Results for 'corporate governance'

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  1. Corporate Governance and Firm Value: The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Hoje Jo & Maretno A. Harjoto - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):351-383.
    This study investigates the effects of internal and external corporate governance and monitoring mechanisms on the choice of corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement and the value of firms engaging in CSR activities. The study finds the CSR choice is positively associated with the internal and external corporate governance and monitoring mechanisms, including board leadership, board independence, institutional ownership, analyst following, and anti- takeover provisions, after controlling for various firm characteristics. After correcting for endogeneity and simultaneity (...)
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  2. The Causal Effect of Corporate Governance on Corporate Social Responsibility.Hoje Jo & Maretno A. Harjoto - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):53-72.
    In this article, we examine the empirical association between corporate governance (CG) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement by investigating their causal effects. Employing a large and extensive US sample, we first find that while the lag of CSR does not affect CG variables, the lag of CG variables positively affects firms’ CSR engagement, after controlling for various firm characteristics. In addition, to examine the relative importance of stakeholder theory and agency theory regarding the associations among CSR, (...)
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  3.  19
    Corporate Governance and CSR Nexus.Maretno A. Harjoto & Hoje Jo - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):45 - 67.
    Some argue that managers over-invest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities to build their personal reputations as good global citizens. Others claim that CEOs strategically choose CSR activities to reduce the probability of CEO turnover in a future period through indirect support from activists. Still others assert that firms use CSR activities to signal their product quality. We find that firms use governance mechanisms, along with CSR engagement, to reduce conflicts of interest between managers and non-investing stakeholders. Employing (...)
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  4.  32
    Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures: Evidence From an Emerging Economy. [REVIEW]Arifur Khan, Mohammad Badrul Muttakin & Javed Siddiqui - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):207-223.
    We examine the relationship between corporate governance and the extent of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosures in the annual reports of Bangladeshi companies. A legitimacy theory framework is adopted to understand the extent to which corporate governance characteristics, such as managerial ownership, public ownership, foreign ownership, board independence, CEO duality and presence of audit committee influence organisational response to various stakeholder groups. Our results suggest that although CSR disclosures generally have a negative association with managerial (...)
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  5.  29
    Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure: Evidence From the US Banking Sector. [REVIEW]Mohammad Issam Jizi, Aly Salama, Robert Dixon & Rebecca Stratling - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (4):1-15.
    There is a distinct lack of research into the relationship between corporate governance and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the banking sector. This paper fills the gap in the literature by examining the impact of corporate governance, with particular reference to the role of board of directors, on the quality of CSR disclosure in US listed banks’ annual reports after the US sub-prime mortgage crisis. Using a sample of large US commercial banks for the period (...)
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  6.  80
    Corporate Governance Reform and CEO Compensation: Intended and Unintended Consequences.Ella Mae Matsumura & Jae Yong Shin - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):101-113.
    Recent scandals allegedly linked to CEO compensation have brought executive compensation and perquisites to the forefront of debate about constraining executive compensation and reforming the associated corporate governance structure. We briefly describe the structure of executive compensation, and the agency theory framework that has commonly been used to conceptualize executives acting on behalf of shareholders. We detail some criticisms of executive compensation and associated ethical issues, and then discuss what previous research suggests are likely intended and unintended consequences (...)
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  7.  16
    Does the Voluntary Adoption of Corporate Governance Mechanisms Improve Environmental Risk Disclosures? Evidence From Greenhouse Gas Emission Accounting.Gary F. Peters & Andrea M. Romi - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (4):1-30.
    Prior research suggests that voluntary environmental governance mechanisms operate to enhance a firm’s environmental legitimacy as opposed to being a driver of proactive environmental performance activities. To understand how these mechanisms contribute to the firm’s environmental legitimacy, we investigate whether environmental corporate governance characteristics are associated with voluntary environmental disclosure. We examine an increasingly important attribute of a firm’s disclosure setting, namely the disclosure of greenhouse gas (GHG) information. GHG information represents proprietary non-financial information about the firm’s (...)
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  8.  21
    Embedding Corporate Social Responsibility in Corporate Governance: A Stakeholder Systems Approach.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):77-86.
    Current research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) illustrates the growing sense of discord surrounding the ‘business of doing good’ (Dobers and Springett, Corp Soc Responsib Environ Manage 17(2):63–69, 2010). Central to these concerns is that CSR risks becoming an over-simplified and peripheral part of corporate strategy. Rather than transforming the dominant corporate discourse, it is argued that CSR and related concepts are limited to “emancipatory rhetoric…defined by narrow business interests and serve to curtail interests of external stakeholders.” (...)
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  9.  83
    Corporate Governance: An Ethical Perspective.Surendra Arjoon - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):343-352.
    This paper discusses corporate governance issues from a compliance viewpoint. It makes a distinction between legal and ethical compliance mechanisms and shows that the former has clearly proven to be inadequate as it lacks the moral firepower to restore confidence and the ability to build trust. The concepts of freedom of indifference and freedom for excellence provide a theoretical basis for explaining why legal compliance mechanisms are insufficient in dealing with fraudulent practices and may not be addressing the (...)
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  10.  74
    Galvanising Shareholder Activism: A Prerequisite for Effective Corporate Governance and Accountability in Nigeria.Olufemi Amao & Kenneth Amaeshi - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):119-130.
    Shareholder activism has been largely neglected in the few available studies on corporate governance in sub Saharan Africa. Following the recent challenges posed by the Cadbury Nigeria Plc, this paper examines shareholder activism in an evolving corporate governance institutional context and identifies strategic opportunities associated with shareholders’ empowerment through changes in code of corporate governance and recent developments in information and communications technologies in Nigeria; especially in relation to corporate social responsibility in Nigeria. (...)
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  11.  76
    Corporate Governance and Ethics: A Feminist Perspective.Silke Machold, Pervaiz K. Ahmed & Stuart S. Farquhar - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):665-678.
    The mainstream literature on corporate governance is based on the premise of conflicts of interest in a competitive game played by variously defined stakeholders and thus builds explicitly and/or implicitly on masculinist ethical theories. This article argues that insights from feminist ethics, and in particular ethics of care, can provide a different, yet relevant, lens through which to study corporate governance. Based on feminist ethical theories, the article conceptualises a governance model that is different from (...)
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  12.  47
    Corporate Governance Quality and CSR Disclosures.MuiChing Carina Chan, John Watson & David Woodliff - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):1-15.
    Given the increasing importance attached to both corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance, this study investigates the association between these two complimentary mechanisms used by companies to enhance relations with stakeholders. Consistent with both legitimacy and stakeholder theory and controlling for industry profile, firm size, stockholder power/dispersion, creditor power/leverage, and economic performance, our analysis of the annual reports for a sample of 222 listed companies suggests that firms providing more CSR information: have better corporate (...) ratings; are larger; belong to higher profile industries; and are more highly leveraged. Our findings support the limited prior research suggesting a link between corporate governance quality and CSR disclosure in company annual reports and suggest that, rather than mandating specific disclosures, regulators might be better served focussing on corporate governance quality as a way of increasing CSR disclosures. (shrink)
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  13. Development of Corporate Governance Regulations: The Case of an Emerging Economy.Javed Siddiqui - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):253-274.
    This paper investigates the development of corporate governance regulations in emerging economies, using the case of Bangladesh. In particular, the paper considers three issues: What type of corporate governance model may be suitable for an emerging economy such as Bangladesh? What type of model has Bangladesh adopted in reality? and What has prompted such adoption? By analysing the corporate environment and corporate governance regulations, the paper finds that, like many other developing nations, Bangladesh (...)
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  14.  33
    Corporate Governance and Corruption: Ethical Dilemmas of Asian Business Groups. [REVIEW]Marie Rama - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):501-519.
    This study looks at how the corporate governance of family-owned business groups, the most dominant form of private sector organising in Asia, deals with different forms of corruption during the course of common business transactions. As a part of an ethnographic study conducted in 2007 to look at the impact of corporate governance reforms in the Philippines, one of the emergent themes from the study was the presence of significant corruption in the business environment of the (...)
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  15.  43
    Ethics Programs, Board Involvement, and Potential Conflicts of Interest in Corporate Governance.Andrew J. Felo - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):205 - 218.
    Board composition, insider participation on compensation committees, and director compensation practices can potentially cause conflicts of interest between directors and shareholders. If these corporate governance structures result in situations where actions beneficial to directors do not also benefit shareholders, then shareholders may suffer.Corporate ethics programs usually address conflicts of interest that may arise in the firm''s activities. Some boards of directors take active roles in their firms'' ethics programs by actively overseeing the programs. This paper empirically examines (...)
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  16. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act: The Failure of the Self-Regulatory Model of Corporate Governance in the Global Business Environment.Miriam F. Weismann - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):615-661.
    The American regulatory model of corporate governance rests on the theory of self-regulation as␣the most effective and efficient means to achieve corporate self-restraint in the marketplace. However, that model fails to achieve regular compliance with baseline ethical and legal behaviors as evidenced by a century of repeated corporate debacles, the most recent being Enron, WorldCom, and Refco. Seemingly impervious to its domestic failure, Congress imprinted the same self-regulation paradigm on legislation restraining global business behavior, the Foreign (...)
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  17.  24
    Unenlightened Economism: The Antecedents of Bad Corporate Governance and Ethical Decline.Matthias Philip Huehn - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):823-835.
    The paper expands on Goshal’s criticism of what management as a scientific discipline teaches and the effects on managerial and societal ethics. The main argument put forward is that the economisation of management has a detrimental effect on the practice of management and on society in large. The ideology of economism is described and analysed from an epistemological perspective. The paper argues that the economisation of management not only introduces the problems of economics (three are identified and discussed) but destroys (...)
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  18.  23
    Proximity and Rationalisation: The Limits of a Levinasian Ethics in the Context of Corporate Governance and Regulation.Samuel Mansell - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):565-577.
    In this article, I explore how the ideas of French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas offer insights into a debate often held today in the field of corporate governance, concerning the relative merits of statutory and voluntary approaches to the regulation of business. The philosophical position outlined by Levinas questions whether any rule-based systematisation of ethical responsibility, either statutory or voluntary, can ever equate to a genuine responsibility for the other person. I reflect on how various authors have adapted Levinas’s (...)
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  19.  25
    Edging Toward ‘Reasonably’ Good Corporate Governance.Donald Nordberg - 2018 - Philosophy of Management 17 (3):353-371.
    Over four decades, research and policy have created layers of understandings in the quest for "good" corporate governance. The corporate excesses of the 1970s sparked a search for market mechanisms and disclosure to empower shareholders. The UK-focused problems of the 1990s prompted board-centric, structural approaches, while the fall of Enron and many other companies in the early 2000s heightened emphasis on director independence and professionalism. With the financial crisis of 2007–09, however, came a turn in some policy (...)
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  20.  12
    Corporate Governance in a Risk Society.Anselm Schneider & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-15.
    Under conditions of growing interconnectedness of the global economy, more and more stakeholders are exposed to risks and costs resulting from business activities that are neither regulated nor compensated for by means of national governance. The changing distribution of risks poses a threat to the legitimacy of business firms that normally derive their legitimacy from operating in compliance with the legal rules of democratic nation states. However, during the process of globalization, the regulatory power of nation states has been (...)
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  21.  51
    Theorising South Africa’s Corporate Governance.Andrew West - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):433 - 448.
    South Africa’s principal corporate governance report aspires to an ‘inclusive’ approach to corporate governance, in which companies are clearly advised to consider the interests of a variety of stakeholders. Yet, in common with many other countries, there is little discussion of the theoretical foundations and assumptions implicit in the recommended approach to corporate governance. The purpose of this article is to provide an analysis of corporate governance and the corporate environment in (...)
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  22.  30
    Corporate Governance Reforms: Redefined Expectations of Audit Committee Responsibilities and Effectiveness.Sandra C. Vera-Muñoz - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):115-127.
    Comprehensive regulatory changes brought on by recent corporate governance reforms have broadly redefined and re-emphasized the roles and responsibilities of all the participants in a public company’s financial reporting process. Most notably, these reforms have intensified scrutiny of corporate audit committees, whose role as protectors of investors’ interests now attracts substantially higher visibility and expectations. As a result, audit committees face the formidable challenge of effectively overseeing the company’s financial reporting process in a dramatically changed – and (...)
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  23.  63
    Corporate Governance Reforms in Developing Countries.Darryl Reed - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):223 - 247.
    Corporate governance reforms are occurring in countries around the globe. In developing countries, such reforms occur in a context that is primarily defined by previous attempts at promoting "development" and recent processes of economic globalization. This context has resulted in the adoption of reforms that move developing countries in the direction of an Anglo-American model of governance. The most basic questions that arise with respect to these governance reforms are what prospects they entail for traditional development (...)
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  24.  51
    Corporate Governance and Institutional Transparency in Emerging Markets.Carla Cjm Millar, Tarek I. EldomIaty, Chong Ju Choi & Brian Hilton - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):163-174.
    This paper posits that differences in corporate governance structure partly result from differences in institutional arrangements linked to business systems. We developed a new international triad of business systems: the Anglo-American, the Communitarian and the Emerging system, building on the frameworks of Choi et al. (British Academy of Management (Kynoch Birmingham) 1996, Management International Review 39, 257–279, 1999). A common factor determining the success of a corporate governance structure is the extent to which it is transparent (...)
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  25.  32
    The Study of the Relations Among Ethical Considerations, Family Management and Organizational Performance in Corporate Governance.C. -F. Wu - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):165-179.
    Corporate governance is increasingly becoming an issue of global concern, not least because we are more and more living in a corporate world that transcends international boundaries. The main purpose and motivation of this study is to determine how the international community should motivate businesses in fostering exemplary corporate governance, therefore eliminating obstacles to ethically exemplary behavior. The empirical approach utilized here has been applied to 161 businesses, both listed and over-the-counter (OTC) companies, with the (...)
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  26.  22
    Corporate Governance, Commitment to Business Ethics, and Firm Valuation: Evidence From the Korean Stock Market. [REVIEW]Jinhan Pae & Tae Hee Choi - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (2):323 - 348.
    A variety of stakeholders have long been interested in the factors that are related to firm valuation. This article investigates why companies with more comprehensive corporate governance (CG) have a value premium over companies with less comprehensive CG. We posit and find that the cost of equity capital (COC) decreases with the strength of CG, suggesting that the value premium stems from the lower COC for more comprehensive CG. We also find that the COC is lower for companies (...)
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  27.  54
    Reconciling Rules and Principles: An Ethics-Based Approach to Corporate Governance.Linda M. Sama & Victoria Shoaf - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):177-185.
    . In this paper, we consider the nature of recent corporate abuses both in the U.S. and in Europe, and how globalization has had an impact on amplifying their consequences. We discuss the rules-based and principles-based remedies that have been proposed in each region, respectively. With a focus on the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOA), we examine the principles forwarded by this act, and how it addresses those principles with specific rules and governance mechanisms. Invoking Integrative Social Contracts Theory (...)
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  28.  56
    Cultural Dimensions, Ethical Sensitivity, and Corporate Governance.Alex W. H. Chan & Hoi Yan Cheung - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):45-59.
    The economic globalization process has integrated different competitive markets and pushes firms in different countries to improve their managerial and operational efficiencies. Given the recent empirical evidence for the benefits to firms and stakeholders of good corporate governance (CG) practice, it is expected that good CG practice would be a common strategy for firms in different countries to meet the increasingly intense competition; however, this is not the case. This study examines the differences in CG practices in firms (...)
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  29.  48
    Does Good Governance Matter to Institutional Investors? Evidence From the Enactment of Corporate Governance Guidelines.Armand Picou & Michael J. Rubach - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 65 (1):55-67.
    Corporate governance guidelines are a mechanism that a firm can enact which should reduce agency costs and better align the interests of boards and the suppliers of capital. This study examines stock price reactions primarily attributable to institutional investors occurring when corporations announce the enactment of corporate governance guidelines. A final sample of 77 firms was derived from the first announcement of corporate governance guidelines exclusive to the SEC-EDGAR database. The results indicate that good (...)
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  30.  86
    Corporate Governance in Nigeria.Boniface Ahunwan - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):269 - 287.
    In recent years, international economic pressures have induced Nigeria to adopt a program of economic liberalization and deregulation. Advocates of the reforms tout their potential not only for generating greater economic growth, but also for contributing to more responsible corporate governance. Sceptics abound. This paper provides an account of the nature of corporate governance in Nigeria and investigates the prospects for recent reforms contributing to more responsible governance and development.
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  31.  21
    Convergence of Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Governance in Weak Economies: The Case of Bangladesh.Mia Mahmudur Rahim & Shawkat Alam - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):1-14.
    The convergence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance (CG) has changed the corporate accountability mechanism. This has developed a socially responsible ‘corporate self-regulation’, a synthesis of governance and responsibility in the companies of strong economies. However, unlike in the strong economies, this convergence has not been visible in the companies of weak economies, where the civil society groups are unorganised, regulatory agencies are either ineffective or corrupt and the media and non-governmental organisations (...)
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  32.  11
    Monitoring Costs, Managerial Ethics and Corporate Governance: A Modeling Approach. [REVIEW]Lerong He & Shih-Jen Kathy Ho - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):623 - 635.
    This article evaluates effectiveness and costs of external regulation, in particular the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) in restricting managerial malfeasance and safeguarding shareholder interests. It discusses the role of managerial ethics as an alternative corporate governance mechanism to protect shareholder value. This article builds a mathematical model to illustrate shareholders' choices of best corporate governance mechanisms, taking into account the influence of managerial ethics, effectiveness and costs of monitoring. We suggest that the best corporate (...)
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  33.  4
    Corporate Governance Research Opportunities in Nigeria: A National Development Issue.Rosemary O. Obasi - 2019 - International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences 87:13-22.
    Publication date: 2 May 2019 Source: Author: Rosemary O. Obasi This paper presents a number of research opportunities in corporate governance in Nigeria. Corporate governance has come along with changes in Nigeria regulatory framework for financial reporting and corporate governance code during the recent years. The researcher identified some important areas where research can help advance our knowledge and provide relevant information for policy makers. These research areas include audit firm governance, corporate (...)
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  34.  50
    Enlightened Corporate Governance: Specific Investments by Employees as Legitimation for Residual Claims.Alexander Brink - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):641-651.
    While much has been written on specificity (e.g., in texts on new institutional economics, agency theory, and team production theory), there are still some insights to be learnt by business ethicists. This article approaches the issue from the perspective of team production, and will propose a new form of corporate governance: enlightened corporate governance, which takes into consideration the specific investments of employees. The article argues that, in addition to shareholders, employees also bear a residual risk (...)
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  35.  38
    Corporate Governance and the Responsibility of the Board of Directors for Strategic Financial Reporting.James C. Gaa - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S2):179 - 197.
    One of the fundamental principles of good corporate governance is transparency, i.e., the disclosure of private information to external stakeholders, so that they may make judgments and decisions relating to the corporation. Equally important, but less discussed, is the competing value that corporations need to protect legitimate secrets. Corporations thus need a communication strategy for dealing with external stakeholders which addresses the conflict between disclosure and secrecy. This article focuses on an important element of that communication strategy in (...)
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  36.  23
    Corporate Governance and Intellectual Capital Disclosure.Ruth L. Hidalgo, Emma García-Meca & Isabel Martínez - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (3):483 - 495.
    The aim of this article is to analyse the internal mechanisms of corporate governance (board of directors and ownership structure), which influence voluntary disclosure of intangibles. The results appear to corroborate the view that an increase in institutional investor shareholding has a negative effect on voluntary disclosure, supporting the hypothesis of entrenchment, whereas an excessive ownership by institutional investors may have adverse effects on strategic disclosure decisions. The results also indicate that an increase in the number of members (...)
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  37.  22
    Putting Creditors in Their Rightful Place: Corporate Governance and Business Ethics in the Light of Limited Liability. [REVIEW]Christopher J. Cowton - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):21-32.
    Contemporary academic and policy discussions of corporate governance tend to accord primacy to the interests of shareholders. While the primacy (descriptive or prescriptive) of shareholders is argued for in various ways, others seek to promote a wider stakeholder model of the firm and its governance. In both cases, the interests of creditors tend to be neglected. In this paper, the fundamental position of creditors in a system of corporate law that offers limited liability is reasserted and (...)
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  38.  19
    Corporate Governance as Part of the Strategic Process: Rethinking the Role of the Board. [REVIEW]David Weitzner & Theo Peridis - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):33-42.
    Managers are most likely to turn to the board of directors for guidance during a period of crisis. But can good corporate governance prevent an organization from reaching that critical point in the first place? In light of the recent global financial crisis, this question has become all the more pressing, and so to prevent future crises, we argue that corporate boards of directors need to be keenly aware of the potential social harms that might arise from (...)
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  39.  18
    The Cultural Dimension of Codes of Corporate Governance: A Focus on the Olivencia Report. [REVIEW]Alejo José G. Sison - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):181 - 192.
    The article deals with the sociocultural and historical background of the Olivencia Report and relates this to the document's content, particularly, to its recommendations for Spanish Boards. A discussion of the distinctively Spanish understandings of loyalty, due diligence and transparency is included. The work ends with insights into parallelisms between corporate governance and political government, specifically on the role of culture, democratic representation and accountability, the distribution of power, the protection of property rights and equality.
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  40.  56
    The Soft Underbelly of Corporate Governance : The Software of Board Dynamics.Theo H. Veldsman - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):56.
    In spite of the abundance of corporate governance codes, legislation to ensure compliance and stock exchange reporting requirements, corporate failures still persist because of poor governance. It can be argued that though the 'rules of the road' - codes, legislation, and requirements - are in place, the chances of governance failure will remain high if explicit attention is not given to 'soft' governance: The black box of what happens behind the boardroom door in terms (...)
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  41.  21
    Concepts and Working Instruments for Corporate Governance.Herman Siebens - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):109 - 116.
    Enterprises seem to entirely operate on their management. But behind the scenes directors play a very important role. On a strategic level (in the long term) they will determine the direction of the company.Even though on the level of daily management a great deal of quality instruments and control systems exist, this is not the case on the highest level, the board. It is in this specific area that the idea of corporate governance must be situated.
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  42.  76
    Corporate Governance, Ethics, and the Backdating of Stock Options.Avshalom M. Adam & Mark S. Schwartz - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):225 - 237.
    Backdating of stock options is an example of an agency problem. It has emerged despite all the measures (i.e., new regulations and additional corporate governance mechanisms) aimed at addressing such problems? Beyond such negative controlling measures, a more positive empowering approach based on ethics may also be necessary. What ethical measures need to be taken to address the agency problem? What values and norms should guide the board of directors in protecting the shareholders' interests? To examine these issues, (...)
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  43.  49
    Corporate Governance in Mexico.Bryan W. Husted & Carlos Serrano - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):337 - 348.
    This paper looks broadly at the theme of corporate governance in Mexico. It begins with a brief analysis of the historical corporate governance model in Mexico, including the governance structures, the banking and financial systems, ownership and control patterns, industrial policy, and industrial relations. The paper then examines how and why these various aspects of corporate governance have been changing with processes of economic liberalization currently under way. Finally, it analyzes the consequences of (...)
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  44.  23
    Corporate Governance Reforms in India.Ananya Mukherjee Reed - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):249 - 268.
    In recent years India has been moving further in the direction of adopting an Anglo-American model of corporate governance. This decision, the result more of international economic and political pressures than public debate, in effect represents a new development strategy for the world's most populous democracy. In light of this situation, it is important to ask two basic questions: 1) why has the Anglo-American model of corporate governance been adopted? and; 2) can it be justified? This (...)
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  45.  70
    Corporate Governance in Brazil.Flávio M. Rabelo & Flávio C. Vasconcelos - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):321 - 335.
    Corporate governance is an issue of growing importance in developing economies, as many firms pass through significant transformations due to the combined forces of sociopolitical changes, technological progress and economic trends toward globalization. These elements, along with the structural characteristics of developing economies such as less developed capital markets and governmental interventionism, draw a picture for corporate governance practices that may, in some aspects, be fundamentally different from the practices found in European or North American contexts. (...)
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  46.  26
    The Spanish Code for Good Corporate Governance (Olivencia Report): An Ethical Analysis. [REVIEW]J. Félix Lozano - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):175 - 180.
    The aim of this article is to analyse the Report on good corporate governance (Olivencia Report) from an ethical point of view. This report was drawn up by a group of experts at the request of the National Commission of the Spanish Stock Exchange Commission (Comisión Nacional del Mercado de Valores), in winter 1998, and began to be implemented over late 1998.This paper is the result of several sessions of discussions with businessmen and managers about the role that (...)
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  47.  29
    Do Variations in the Strength of Corporate Governance Still Matter? A Comparison of the Pre- and Post-Regulation Environment.Nancy Harp, Mark Myring & Rebecca Toppe Shortridge - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (3):1-13.
    Corporate scandals brought the issue of corporate governance to the forefront of the agendas of lawmakers and regulators in the early 2000s. As a result, Congress, the New York Stock Exchange, and the NASDAQ enacted standards to improve the quality of corporate governance, thereby enhancing the quantity and quality of disclosures by listed companies. We investigate the relationship between corporate governance strength and the quality of disclosures in pre- and post-regulation time periods. If (...)
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  48.  13
    Corporate Governance Systems as Dynamic Institutions: Towards a Dynamic Model of Corporate Governance Systems.Chukwunonye O. Emenalo - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):39.
    Taking note of the evidence in extant literature that corporate governance systems are designed to incentivise, monitor, and guide agents to achieve firm mission, this paper develops a dynamic model of corporate governance systems that views these systems as artificial realities (Simon 1996) in general, and institutions in particular. The paper suggests that viewing these systems as institutions has theoretical and practical implications for the study and design of these systems, and illuminates how the process of (...)
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  49. Corporate Governance and Trust in Business: A Matter of Balance.G. J. Rossouw - 2005 - African Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):1.
    The recent prominence of corporate governance was sparked by a decline in trust in business that followed on some spectacular corporate scandals. There is an expectation that adherence to the standards of good corporate governance can restore trust in business. This article examines the link between corporate governance and trust and finds that at least theoretically there is a positive correlation between corporate governance and trust in business. It is however argued (...)
     
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  50.  7
    Internal Corporate Governance and Personal Trust.Deon Rossouw - 2009 - African Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):37.
    There are various indications that corporations and their leaders are currently not perceived as trustworthy. This decline in trust is one of the factors that has contributed to the rise of interest in corporate governance. There is an explicit expectation that an adherence to the principles and practice of good corporate governance will bolster the trust of stakeholders in business. It is exactly this expectation that provides the focus for this article. The expectation that good (...) governance will result in higher levels of trust will be critically examined. This will be done by first making some crucial distinctions regarding corporate governance in order to clarify what kind of corporate governance is at stake in the examination that is to follow. Also, with regard to the concept of 'trust', a number of important distinctions will be made to clarify what is meant by trust within the context of this paper. Against the backdrop of these distinctions regarding corporate governance and trust, the question will then be refined as to whether, specifically, internal corporate governance can bolster the perceptions of trustworthiness that stakeholders have of business. Principles and practices of internal corporate governance will then be critically examined to determine their potential for enhancing stakeholders' perceptions of the trustworthiness of corporations and their leaders. (shrink)
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