Results for 'corporate social responsibility'

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  1. Measuring Corporate Social Responsibility: A Scale Development Study.Duygu Turker - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):411-427.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is one of the most prominent concepts in the literature and, in short, indicates the positive impacts of businesses on their stakeholders. Despite the growing body of literature on this concept, the measurement of CSR is still problematic. Although the literature provides several methods for measuring corporate social activities, almost all of them have some limitations. The purpose of this study is to provide an original, valid, and reliable measure of CSR (...)
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  2. Corporate Social Responsibility as a Conflict Between Shareholders.Amir Barnea & Amir Rubin - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):71 - 86.
    In recent years, firms have greatly increased the amount of resources allocated to activities classified as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). While an increase in CSR expenditure may be consistent with firm value maximization if it is a response to changes in stakeholders' preferences, we argue that a firm's insiders (managers and large blockholders) may seek to overinvest in CSR for their private benefit to the extent that doing so improves their reputations as good global citizens and has (...)
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  3. Theorising Corporate Social Responsibility as an Essentially Contested Concept: Is a Definition Necessary?Adaeze Okoye - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):613-627.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become indispensable in modern business discourse; yet identifying and defining what CSR means is open to contest. Although such contestation is not uncommon with concepts found in the social sciences, for CSR it presents some difficulty for theoretical and empirical analysis, especially with regards to verifying that diverse application of the concept is consistent or concomitant. On the other hand, it seems unfeasible that the diversity of issues addressed under the CSR (...)
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  4. How Corporate Social Responsibility Influences Organizational Commitment.Duygu Turker - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):189-204.
    A growing number of studies have investigated the various dimensions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the literature. However, relatively few studies have considered its impacts on employees. The purpose of this study is to analyze how CSR affects the organizational commitment of employees based on the social identity theory (SIT). The proposed model was tested on a sample of 269 business professionals working in Turkey. The findings of the study revealed that CSR to social (...)
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  5. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Supply Chain: An Application in the Food Industry.Michael J. Maloni & Michael E. Brown - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):35-52.
    The food industry faces many significant risks from public criticism of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues in the supply chain. This paper draws upon previous research and emerging industry trends to develop a comprehensive framework of supply chain CSR in the industry. The framework details unique CSR applications in the food supply chain including animal welfare, biotechnology, environment, fair trade, health and safety, and labor and human rights. General supply chain CSR issues such as community and procurement (...)
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  6. Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee–Company Identification.Hae-Ryong Kim, Moonkyu Lee, Hyoung-Tark Lee & Na-Min Kim - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):557 - 569.
    This study proposes two identification cuing factors (i. e., CSR associations and CSR participation) to understand how corporate social responsibility (CSR) relates to employees' identification with their firm.The results reveal that a firm's CSR initiatives increase employee-company identification (E-C identification).E-C identification, in turn, influences employees' commitment to their company. However, CSR associations do not directly influence employees' identification with a firm, but rather influence their identification through perceived external prestige (PEP). Compared to CSR associations, CSR participation has (...)
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  7. Corporate Social Responsibility and Resource-Based Perspectives.Manuel Castelo Branco & Lúcia Lima Rodrigues - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):111-132.
    Firms engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR) because they consider that some kind of competitive advantage accrues to them. We contend that resource-based perspectives (RBP) are useful to understand why firms engage in CSR activities and disclosure. From a resource-based perspective CSR is seen as providing internal or external benefits, or both. Investments in socially responsible activities may have internal benefits by helping a firm to develop new resources and capabilities which are related namely to know-how and (...)
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  8.  98
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Size.Krishna Udayasankar - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):167-175.
    Small and medium-sized firms form 90% of the worldwide population of businesses. However, it has been argued that given their smaller scale of operations, resource access constraints and lower visibility, smaller firms are less likely to participate in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives. This article examines the different economic motivations of firms with varying combinations of visibility, resource access and scale of operations. Arguments are presented to propose that in terms of visibility, resource access and operating scale, (...)
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  9.  54
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Credit Ratings.Najah Attig, Sadok El Ghoul, Omrane Guedhami & Jungwon Suh - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):679-694.
    This study provides evidence on the relationship between corporate social responsibility and firms’ credit ratings. We find that credit rating agencies tend to award relatively high ratings to firms with good social performance. This pattern is robust to controlling for key firm characteristics as well as endogeneity between CSR and credit ratings. We also find that CSR strengths and concerns influence credit ratings and that the individual components of CSR that relate to primary stakeholder management matter (...)
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  10. Corporate social responsibility theories: Mapping the territory. [REVIEW]Elisabet Garriga & Domènec Melé - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):51-71.
    The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) field presents not only a landscape of theories but also a proliferation of approaches, which are controversial, complex and unclear. This article tries to clarify the situation, mapping the territory by classifying the main CSR theories and related approaches in four groups: (1) instrumental theories, in which the corporation is seen as only an instrument for wealth creation, and its social activities are only a means to achieve economic results; (2) political (...)
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  11.  78
    Corporate Social Responsibility Practices and Environmentally Responsible Behavior: The Case of The United Nations Global Compact.Dilek Cetindamar - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):163-176.
    The aim of this paper is to shed some light on understanding why companies adopt environmentally responsible behavior and what impact this adoption has on their performance. This is an empirical study that focuses on the United Nations (UN) Global Compact (GC) initiative as a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) mechanism. A survey was conducted among GC participants, of which 29 responded. The survey relies on the anticipated and actual benefits noted by the participants in the GC. The (...)
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  12. Does Corporate Social Responsibility Influence Firm Performance of Indian Companies?Supriti Mishra & Damodar Suar - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):571 - 601.
    This study examines whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) towards primary stakeholders influences the financial and the non-financial performance (NFP) of Indian firms. Perceptual data on CSR and NFP were collected from 150 senior-level Indian managers including CEOs through questionnaire survey.Hard data on financial performance (FP) of the companies were obtained from secondary sources. A questionnaire for assessing CSR was developed with respect to six stakeholder groups - employees, customers, investors, community, natural environment, and suppliers. A composite measure (...)
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  13. Corporate Social Responsibility in Supply Chains of Global Brands: A Boundaryless Responsibility? Clarifications, Exceptions and Implications.Kenneth M. Amaeshi, Onyeka K. Osuji & Paul Nnodim - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):223-234.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is increasingly becoming a popular business concept in developed economies. As typical of other business concepts, it is on its way to globalization through practices and structures of the globalized capitalist world order, typified in Multinational Corporations (MNCs). However, CSR often sits uncomfortably in this capitalist world order, as MNCs are often challenged by the global reach of their supply chains and the possible irresponsible practices inherent along these chains. The possibility of irresponsible (...)
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  14.  62
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Crony Capitalism in Taiwan.Po-Keung Ip - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1-2):167 - 177.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become increasingly popular in advanced economies in the West. In contrast, CSR awareness in Asia is rather low, both on the corporate and state level. However, recent events have shown that the CSR is receiving more attention by corporations in Asia. Recent development in CSR in Taiwan is one example of such a trend. A 2005 survey on the 700 publicly listed companies in Taiwan on␣CSR has highlighted the current CSR situation. (...)
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  15. Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation of U.S. Organizations.Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen & Wesley J. Johnston - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):303 - 323.
    Organizations that believe they should "give something back" to the society have embraced the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Although the theoretical underpinnings of CSR have been frequently debated, empirical studies often involve only limited aspects, implying that theory may not be congruent with actual practices and may impede understanding and further development of CSR. The authors investigate actual CSR practices related to five different stakeholder groups, develop an instrument to measure those CSR practices, and apply (...)
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  16. Corporate Social Responsibility in the International Banking Industry.Bert Scholtens - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):159-175.
    This article aims at providing a framework to assess corporate social responsibility with international banks. Currently, it is mainly rating institutions like EIRIS and KLD that provide information about firms’ social conduct and performance. However, this is costly information and it is not clear how the rating institutions arrive at their conclusion. We develop a framework to assess the social responsibility of internationally operating banks. We apply this framework to more than 30 institutions and (...)
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  17.  71
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Socially Responsible Investing: A Global Perspective.Ronald Paul Hill, Thomas Ainscough, Todd Shank & Daryl Manullang - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):165-174.
    This research examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and company stock valuation across three regions of the world. After a brief introduction, the article gives an overview of the evolving definition of CSR as well as a discussion of the ways in which this construct has been operationalized. Presentation of the potential impact of corporate social performance on firm financial performance follows, including investor characteristics, the rationale behind their choices, and their influence on (...)
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  18. Corporate Social Responsibility and the Social Enterprise.Nelarine Cornelius, Mathew Todres, Shaheena Janjuha-Jivraj, Adrian Woods & James Wallace - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):355-370.
    In this article, we contend that due to their size and emphasis upon addressing external social concerns, the corporate relationship between social enterprises, social awareness and action is more complex than whether or not these organisations engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR). This includes organisations that place less emphasis on CSR as well as other organisations that may be very proficient in CSR initiatives, but are less successful in recording practices. In this context, (...)
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  19.  71
    Corporate Social Responsibility as a Dynamic Internal Organizational Process: A Case Study.Sharon C. Bolton, Rebecca Chung-hee Kim & Kevin D. O’Gorman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):61-74.
    This article tracks Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as an emergent organizational process that places the employee at its center. Predominantly, research on CSR tends to focus on external pressures and outcomes leading to a neglect of CSR as a dynamic and developing process that relies on the involvement of the employee as a major stakeholder in its co-creation and implementation. Utilizing case study data drawn from a study of a large multinational energy company, we explore how management (...)
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  20.  42
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Exploring Stakeholder Relationships and Programme Reporting across Leading FTSE Companies.Simon Knox, Stan Maklan & Paul French - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):7-28.
    Although it is now widely recognised by business leaders that their companies need to accept a broader responsibility than short-term profits, recent research suggests that as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and social reporting become more widespread, there is little empirical evidence of the range of stakeholders addressed through their CSR programmes and how such programmes are reported. Through a CSR framework which was developed in an exploratory study, we explore the nature of stakeholder relationships reported (...)
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  21.  73
    Corporate Social Responsibility: One Size Does Not Fit All. Collecting Evidence from Europe.Argandoña Antonio & von Weltzien Hoivik Heidi - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S3):221-234.
    This article serves as an introduction to the collection of papers in this monographic issue on "What the European tradition can teach about Corporate Social Responsibility" and presents the rationale and the main hypotheses of the project. We maintain that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an ethical concept, that the demands for socially responsible actions have been around since before the Industrial Revolution and that companies have responded to them, especially in Europe, and that (...)
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  22. Corporate Social Responsibility: A Three-Domain Approach.Mark S. Schwartz & Archie B. Carroll - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):503-530.
    Abstract:Extrapolating from Carroll’s four domains of corporate social responsibility (1979) and Pyramid of CSR (1991), an alternative approach to conceptualizing corporate social responsibility (CSR) is proposed. A three-domain approach is presented in which the three core domains of economic, legal, and ethical responsibilities are depicted in a Venn model framework. The Venn framework yields seven CSR categories resulting from the overlap of the three core domains. Corporate examples are suggested and classified according to (...)
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  23.  9
    Voluntary codes of conduct for multinational corporations: Promises and challenges.Socially Responsible Investing & Barbara Krumsiek - 2004 - Business and Society Review 109 (4):583-593.
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  24. Corporate social responsibility education in europe.Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):323 - 337.
    In the context of some criticism about social responsibility education in business schools, the paper reports findings from a survey of CSR education (teaching and research) in Europe. It analyses the extent of CSR education, the different ways in which it is defined and the levels at which it is taught. The paper provides an account of the efforts that are being made to mainstream CSR teaching and of the teaching methods deployed. It considers drivers of CSR courses, (...)
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  25.  66
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Family Business in Spain.María de la Cruz Déniz Déniz & Ma Katiuska Cabrera Suárez - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (1):27 - 41.
    Despite the economic relevance and distinctiveness of family firms, little attention has been devoted to researching their nature and functioning. Traditionally, family firms have been associated both to positive and negative features in their relationships with the stakeholders. This can be linked to different orientations toward corporate social responsibility. Thus, this research aims to identify the approaches that Spanish family firms maintain about social responsibility, based on the model developed by Quazi and O' Brien Journal (...)
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  26.  74
    Corporate Social Responsibility as an Organizational Attractiveness for Prospective Public Relations Practitioners.Soo-Yeon Kim & Hyojung Park - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):639-653.
    This study viewed students majoring in public relations as prospective public relations practitioners and explored their perceptions about corporate social responsibility (CSR) as their job attraction condition. The results showed that the students perceived CSR to be an important ethical fit condition of a company. One of the significant findings is that CSR can be an effective reputation management strategy for prospective employees, particularly when a company’s business is suffering. In examining the effect of CSR efforts on (...)
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  27.  63
    Embedding Corporate Social Responsibility in Corporate Governance: A Stakeholder Systems Approach.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):77-86.
    Current research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) illustrates the growing sense of discord surrounding the ‘business of doing good’ (Dobers and Springett, Corp Soc Responsib Environ Manage 17(2):63–69, 2010). Central to these concerns is that CSR risks becoming an over-simplified and peripheral part of corporate strategy. Rather than transforming the dominant corporate discourse, it is argued that CSR and related concepts are limited to “emancipatory rhetoric…defined by narrow business interests and serve to curtail interests of (...)
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  28.  21
    Corporate Social Responsibility in Colombia: Making Sense of Social Strategies.Adam Lindgreen, José-Rodrigo Córdoba, François Maon & José María Mendoza - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S2):229 - 242.
    As corporate social responsibility (CSR) grows increasingly well known and accepted worldwide, organizations attempt to make sense of their social strategies bridge the gap between their current situation and what their stakeholders expect of them. If social strategies represent a potential stepping stone to more sophisticated forms of CSR, then research must investigate the strategies that organizations have adopted. After defining a framework for classifying and analyzing organizations' social strategies, this article considers empirical evidence (...)
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  29. Corporate social responsibility and employee commitment.Jane Collier & Rafael Esteban - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (1):19–33.
    Effective corporate social responsibility policies are a requirement for today's companies. Policies have not only to be formulated, they also have to be delivered by corporate employees. This paper uses existing research findings to identify two types of factors that may impact on employee motivation and commitment to CSR ‘buy-in’. The first of these is contextual: employee attitudes and behaviours will be affected by organizational culture and climate, by whether CSR policies are couched in terms of (...)
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  30.  26
    Corporate Social Responsibility and the Supposed Moral Agency of Corporations.Matthew Lampert - 2016 - Ephemera 16 (1):79-105.
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been traditionally framed within business ethics as a discourse attempting to identify certain moral responsibilities of corporations (as well as get these corporations to fulfill their responsibilities). This theory has often been normatively grounded in the idea that a corporation is (or ought to be treated as) a moral agent. I argue that it is a mistake to think of (or treat) corporations as moral agents, and that CSR’s impotency is a direct (...)
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  31.  24
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Government: The Role of Discretion for Engagement with Public Policy.Jette Steen Knudsen & Jeremy Moon - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (2):243-271.
    We investigate the relationship of corporate social responsibility (CSR) (often assumed to reflect corporate voluntarism) and government (often assumed to reflect coercion). We distinguish two broad perspectives on the CSR and government relationship: thedichotomous(i.e., government and CSR are / should be independent of one another) and therelated(i.e., government and CSR are / should be interconnected). Using typologies of CSR public policy and of CSR and the law, we present an integrated framework for corporate discretion for (...)
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  32.  76
    Corporate social responsibility: review and roadmap of theoretical perspectives.Jędrzej George Frynas & Camila Yamahaki - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (3):258-285.
    Based on a survey and content analysis of 462 peer-reviewed academic articles over the period 1990–2014, this article reviews theories related to the external drivers of corporate social responsibility and the internal drivers of CSR that have been utilized to explain CSR. The article discusses the main tenets of the principal theoretical perspectives and their application in CSR research. Going beyond previous reviews that have largely failed to investigate theory applications in CSR scholarship, this article stresses the (...)
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  33.  64
    Corporate Social Responsibility in the Blogosphere.Christian Fieseler, Matthes Fleck & Miriam Meckel - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):599-614.
    This paper uses social network analysis to examine the interaction between corporate blogs devoted to sustainability issues and the blogosphere, a clustered online network of collaborative actors. By analyzing the structural embeddedness of a prototypical blog in a virtual community, we show the potential of online platforms to document corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities and to engage with an increasingly socially and ecologically aware stakeholder base. The results of this study show that stakeholder involvement via (...)
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  34.  36
    Roadmapping Corporate Social Responsibility in Finnish Companies.Virgilio M. Panapanaan, Lassi Linnanen, Minna-Maari Karvonen & Vinh Tho Phan - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2/3):133 - 148.
    This paper presents a roadmap of Finnish companies adopting and managing corporate social responsibility (CSR). It discusses the companies' views on CSR and highlights the practices that Finnish companies have adopted or are currently adopting. It also presents a framework that outlines the CSR processes and management prospects. Results showed that Finnish companies are progressively managing CSR. This newly revived thinking about social responsibility is viewed as an issue traced back from Finland's history of industrial (...)
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  35.  29
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Its Impact on Firms' Investment Policy, Organizational Structure, and Performance.Otgontsetseg Erhemjamts, Qian Li & Anand Venkateswaran - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):395-412.
    This study examines the determinants of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its implications on firms’ investment policy, organizational strategy, and performance. First, we find that firms with better performance, higher R&D intensity, better financial health, and firms in new economy industries are more likely to engage in CSR activities, while riskier firms are less likely to do so. We also find U-shaped relation between firm size and CSR, indicating that either very small or very large firms exhibit (...)
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  36.  42
    Corporate social responsibility and employee commitment.Jane Collier & Rafael Esteban - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (1):19-33.
    Effective corporate social responsibility policies are a requirement for today's companies. Policies have not only to be formulated, they also have to be delivered by corporate employees. This paper uses existing research findings to identify two types of factors that may impact on employee motivation and commitment to CSR ‘buy-in’. The first of these is contextual: employee attitudes and behaviours will be affected by organizational culture and climate, by whether CSR policies are couched in terms of (...)
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  37.  36
    Corporate Social Responsibilities: Alternative Perspectives About the Need to Legislate.Craig Deegan & Marita Shelly - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):499-526.
    This research involves a review of the submissions to a 2005/06 Australian Government Inquiry into Corporate Social Responsibility. The Inquiry was established to investigate whether corporate social responsibilities and accountabilities should be regulated, or left to be determined by market forces. Our results show that the business community overwhelming favour an anti-regulation approach whereby corporations should be left with the flexibility to determine their social responsibilities and associated accountabilities and ‘enlightened self-interest’ should be retained (...)
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  38.  91
    A corporate social responsibility audit within a quality management framework.Ton van der Wiele, Peter Kok, Richard McKenna & Alan Brown - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):285 - 297.
    In this paper a corporate social responsibility audit is developed following the underlying methodology of the quality award/excellence models. Firstly the extent to which the quality awards already incorporate the development of social responsibility is examined by looking at the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the European Quality Award. It will be shown that the quality awards do not yet include ethical aspects in relation to social responsibility. Both a clear definition of (...)
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  39. Corporate social responsibility evolution of a definitional construct.Archie B. Carroll - 1999 - Business and Society 38 (3):268-295.
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  40.  52
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Different Stages of Economic Development: Singapore, Turkey, and Ethiopia.Diana C. Robertson - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S4):617 - 633.
    The U.S. and U.K. models of corporate social responsibility (CSR) are relatively well defined. As the phenomenon of CSR establishes itself more globally, the question arises as to the nature of CSR in other countries. Is a universal model of CSR applicable across countries or is CSR specific to country context? This article uses integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) and four institutional factors – firm ownership structure, corporate governance, openness of the economy to international investment, (...)
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  41.  40
    Corporate Social Responsibility in SMEs: A Shift from Philanthropy to Institutional Works?Kenneth Amaeshi, Emmanuel Adegbite, Chris Ogbechie, Uwafiokun Idemudia, Konan Anderson Seny Kan, Mabumba Issa & Obianuju I. J. Anakwue - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):385-400.
    Corporate Social Responsibility amongst Small and Medium Enterprises is often characterised in the literature as unstructured, informal and ad hoc discretionary philanthropic activities. Drawing insights from recent theoretical/analytical frameworks :52–78, 2010), and on empirical data collected from both Nigeria and Tanzania, we found that CSR practices in SMEs are much more nuanced than previously presented. In addition, SMEs undertake their CSR practices to varying degrees in multiple spaces—i.e. the workplace, marketplace, community and the ecological environment. These CSR (...)
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  42.  51
    Corporate Social Responsibility in Challenging and Non-enabling Institutional Contexts: Do Institutional Voids matter?Kenneth Amaeshi, Emmanuel Adegbite & Tazeeb Rajwani - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):135-153.
    The extant literature on comparative Corporate Social Responsibility often assumes functioning and enabling institutional arrangements, such as strong government, market and civil society, as a necessary condition for responsible business practices. Setting aside this dominant assumption and drawing insights from a case study of Fidelity Bank, Nigeria, we explore why and how firms still pursue and enact responsible business practices in what could be described as challenging and non-enabling institutional contexts for CSR. Our findings suggest that responsible (...)
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  43.  67
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Long-term Compensation: Evidence from Canada.L. S. Mahoney & Linda Thorne - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (3):241-253.
    . This paper examines the association between long-term compensation and corporate social responsibility for 90 publicly traded Canadian firms. Social responsibility is considered to include concerns for social factors and the environment, 564-578; Kane, E. J., 341-359). Long-term compensation attempts to focus executives efforts on optimizing the longer term, which should direct their attention to factors traditionally associated with socially responsible executives. As hypothesized, we found a significant relationship between the long-term compensation and total (...)
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  44.  4
    Can Corporate Social Responsibility Promote Employees’ Taking Charge? The Mediating Role of Thriving at Work and the Moderating Role of Task Significance.Aimin Yan, Liping Tang & Yingchun Hao - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    There is growing evidence to suggest that employees’ perceptions of their employer’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) positively influences their attitude and behavior. An increasing number of scholars have called for further explorations of the microfoundations of CSR. To that end, this study takes the conservation of resources perspective to examine relationships and the perception of CSR by employees, considering areas such as thriving at work, task significance, and employees taking charge. By analyzing 444 questionnaires completed by employees (...)
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  45. Corporate Social Responsibility, Utilitarianism, and the Capabilities Approach.Cecile Renouard - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):85 - 97.
    This article explores the possible convergence between the capabilities approach and utilitarianism to specify CSR. It defends the idea that this key issue is related to the anthropological perspective that underpins both theories and demonstrates that a relational conception of individual freedoms and rights present in both traditions gives adequate criteria for CSR toward the company's stakeholders. I therefore defend "relational capability" as a means of providing a common paradigm, a shared vision of a core component of human development. This (...)
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  46.  16
    Researching Corporate Social Responsibility: An Agenda for the 21st Century.Paul C. Godfrey & Nile W. Hatch - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (1):87-98.
    Corporate social responsibility is a tortured concept. We review the current state of the art across a number of academic disciplines, from accounting to management to theology. In a world that is increasingly global and pluralistic, progress in our understanding of CSR must include theorizing around the micro-level processes practicing managers engage in when allocating resources toward social initiatives, as well as refined measurement of the outcomes of those initiatives on stakeholder and shareholder interests. Scholarship must (...)
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  47.  58
    Corporate Social Responsibility Report Narratives and Analyst Forecast Accuracy.Albert Tsang, Suresh Radhakrishnan, Sunay Mutlu & Volkan Muslu - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (4):1119-1142.
    Standalone corporate social responsibility reports vary considerably in the content of information released due to their voluntary nature. In this study, we develop a disclosure score based on the tone, readability, length, and the numerical and horizon content of CSR report narratives, and examine the relationship between the CSR disclosure scores and analyst forecasts. We find that CSR reporters with high disclosure scores are associated with more accurate forecasts, whereas low score CSR reporters are not associated with (...)
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    Corporate Social Responsibility Audit: From Theory to Practice.Risako Morimoto, John Ash & Chris Hope - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (4):315-325.
    This research examines the possibility of developing a new corporate social responsibility (CSR) auditing system based on the analysis of current CSR literature and interviews conducted with a number of interested and knowledgeable stakeholders. This work attempts to create a framework for social responsibility auditing compatible with an existing commercially successful environmental audit system. The project is unusual in that it tackles the complex issue of CSR auditing with a scientific approach using Grounded Theory. On (...)
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    Corporate Social Responsibility: Views from the Frontline.Lisa Whitehouse - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):279-296.
    This paper offers an evaluation of corporate policy and practice in respect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) deriving from an analysis of qualitative data, obtained during semi-structured interviews with the representatives of 16 companies from a variety of UK sectors including retail, mining, financial services and mobile telephony. The findings of the empirical survey are presented in five sections that trace chronologically the process of CSR policy development. The first identifies the meaning attributed to CSR by (...)
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    Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee–Company Identification.Hae-Ryong Kim, Moonkyu Lee, Hyoung-Tark Lee & Na-Min Kim - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):557-569.
    This study proposes two identification cuing factors to understand how corporate social responsibility relates to employees’ identification with their firm. The results reveal that a firm’s CSR initiatives increase employee–company identification. E–C identification, in turn, influences employees’ commitment to their company. However, CSR associations do not directly influence employees’ identification with a firm, but rather influence their identification through perceived external prestige. Compared to CSR associations, CSR participation has a direct influence on E–C identification. On the basis (...)
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