Results for 'cryonics'

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Bibliography: Cryonics in Applied Ethics
  1.  24
    Malchronia: Cryonics and Bionics as Primitive Weapons in the War on Time.Christopher C. Yorke & Lois Rowe - 2006 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 15 (1):73-85.
    The feeling that one was ‘born in the wrong time’ we call malchronia. This is distinct from mere nostalgia, in that it may generate the longing to transcend the temporal present in favor of a time of which one has had no experience, or even a timeless state of being. Implicit in malchronetic longing is the rejection of one’s experience of one’s own time, making it a revolutionary and utopian inclination. In this article we examine two dominant strategies—primitive weapons in (...)
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  2. The Future of Death: Cryonics and the Telos of Liberal Individualism.James Hughes - 2001 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 6 (1).
    This paper addresses five questions: First, what is trajectory of Western liberal ethics and politics in defining life, rights and citizenship? Second, how will neuro-remediation and other technologies change the definition of death for the brain injured and the cryonically suspended? Third, will people always have to be dead to be cryonically suspended? Fourth, how will changing technologies and definitions of identity affect the status of people revived from brain injury and cryonic suspension? I propose that Western liberal thought is (...)
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  3.  48
    The Case for Cryonics.Ole Martin Moen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):677-681.
  4.  41
    Youniverse: Toward a Self-Centered Philosophy of Immortalism and Cryonics.R. C. W. Ettinger - 2009 - Universal Publishers.
    Youniverse is about you and the way things really are--how to improve your chances of a much longer and more satisfying life.
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  5. Many Are Cold But Few Are Frozen: A Humanist Looks at Cryonics.S. B. Harris - 1989 - Free Inquiry 9 (2):19-24.
     
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  6.  17
    Caring Cryonics?Rita C. Manning - 2002 - In Charles Tandy & Scott R. Stroud (eds.), The Philosophy of Robert Ettinger. Universal Publishers. pp. 97.
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  7.  7
    Time Shock And The Problem Of Anachronistic Being: An Anthropological Approach To Cryonics.James C. Lindahl - 2002 - In Charles Tandy & Scott R. Stroud (eds.), The Philosophy of Robert Ettinger. Universal Publishers. pp. 65.
  8. Cryoethics: Seeking Life After Death.David Shaw - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (9):515-521.
    Cryonic suspension is a relatively new technology that offers those who can afford it the chance to be 'frozen' for future revival when they reach the ends of their lives. This paper will examine the ethical status of this technology and whether its use can be justified. Among the arguments against using this technology are: it is 'against nature', and would change the very concept of death; no friends or family of the 'freezee' will be left alive when he is (...)
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  9.  51
    Euthanasia and Cryothanasia.Francesca Minerva & Anders Sandberg - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (7):526-533.
    In this article we discuss the moral and legal aspects of causing the death of a terminal patient in the hope of extending their life in the future. We call this theoretical procedure cryothanasia. We argue that administering cryothanasia is ethically different from administering euthanasia. Consequently, objections to euthanasia should not apply to cryothanasia, and cryothanasia could also be considered a legal option where euthanasia is illegal.
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  10. Man Into Superman.R. C. W. Ettinger - 1972 - New York: St. Martin's Press.
     
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  11.  10
    The Philosophy of Robert Ettinger.Charles Tandy & Scott R. Stroud (eds.) - 2002 - Universal Publishers.
    The ideas presented by Ettinger in these two books are examined in the present volume by living philosophers.
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  12. Annihilation: The Sense and Significance of Death.Christopher Belshaw - 2009 - Routledge.
    The ever-present possibility of death forces upon us the question of life's meaning and for this reason death has been a central concern of philosophers throughout history. From Socrates to Heidegger, philosophers have grappled with the nature and significance of death. In "Annihilation", Christopher Belshaw explores two central questions at the heart of philosophy's engagement with death: what is death; and is it bad that we die? Belshaw begins by distinguishing between literal and metaphorical uses of the term and offers (...)
     
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  13.  29
    Annihilation: The Sense and Significance of Death.Christopher Belshaw - 2008 - Routledge.
    The ever-present possibility of death forces upon us the question of life's meaning and for this reason death has been a central concern of philosophers throughout history. From Socrates to Heidegger, philosophers have grappled with the nature and significance of death. In "Annihilation", Christopher Belshaw explores two central questions at the heart of philosophy's engagement with death: what is death; and is it bad that we die? Belshaw begins by distinguishing between literal and metaphorical uses of the term and offers (...)
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  14.  40
    Technologies of Immortality: The Brain on Ice.Bronwyn Parry - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (2):391-413.
    One of the first envatted brains, the most cyborgian element of J. D. Bernal’s 1929 futuristic manifesto, The world, the flesh and the the devil, proposed a technological solution to the dreary certainty of mortality. In Bernal’s scenario the brain is maintained in an ‘out of body’ but ‘like-body’ environment—in a bath of cerebral–spinal fluid held at constant body temperature. In reality, acquiring prospective immortality requires access to very different technologies—those that allow human organs and tissues to be preserved in (...)
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  15. Cryoethics.David Shaw - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopaedia of Ethics. Blackwell.
    Cryoethics is a new theme within bioethics (see bioethics) concerned with the ethics of cryonic storage. Cryonics, which is also erroneously referred to as “cryogenic” technology, offers people the option of having their bodies or brain-stems preserved at very low temperatures after death in order to be revived at some point in the future when technology is sufficiently advanced to enable reanimation, and possibly immortality. The main issues in cryoethics center around whether it is ethical to use this technology, (...)
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  16.  96
    Katherine’s Questionable Quest for Love and Happiness.Bo C. Klintberg - 2008 - Philosophical Plays 1 (1):1-98.
    CATEGORY: Philosophy play; historical fiction; comedy; social criticism. STORYLINE: Katherine, a slightly neurotic American lawyer, has tried very hard to find personal happiness in the form of friends and lovers. But she has not succeeded, and is therefore very unhappy. So she travels to London, hoping that Christianus — a well-known satisfactionist — may be able to help her. TOPICS: In the course of the play, Katherine and Christianus converse about many philosophical issues: the modern American military presence in Iraq; (...)
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  17.  4
    Cryopreservation of Embryos and Fetuses as a Future Option for Family Planning Purposes.Francesca Minerva & Anders Sandberg - 2015 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 25 (1):17-30.
    This paper explores the ethical implications of a possible future technology; namely cryonics of embryos/fetuses extracted from the uterus. We argue that more research should be conducted in order to explore the feasibility of such technology. We highlight the advantages that this option would offer; including the foreseeable prevention of a considerable number of abortions.
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  18.  28
    Encouraging an Honest Consensus.Robin Hanson - unknown
    Are you fascinated by some basic questions about science, technology, and our future? Questions like: Is cryonics technically feasible? When will nanoassemblers be feasible and how quickly will resulting changes come? Does a larger population help or hinder the world environment and economy? Will uploading be possible, and if so when? When can I live in space? Where will I be able to live free from tyranny? When will A.I.s be bucking for my job? Is there intelligent life beyond (...)
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  19. God Versus the Multiverse: An Ontological Argument Against the Existence of a Supreme Being: With a Hopeful Alternative.R. Michael Perry - 2009 - In Death and Anti-Death, Volume 7: Nine Hundred Years After St. Anselm (1033-1109). Ria University Press.
    Anselm’s ontological argument for the existence of God is examined. It is concluded that Anselm errs in assuming the greatest "thing" must be a sentient being. The existence of God, then, is not established by Anselm’s argument, and is concluded to be unlikely for other reasons as well, one being that a perfected sentient being would be a logical impossibility. An afterlife and personal immortality are not precluded however; these goals could be reached by future scientific means. For now (...) is advocated as a means to reach a more advanced future when death may be physically overcome. (shrink)
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