Results for 'depersonalization'

138 found
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  1.  65
    Depersonalization Disorder, Affective Processing and Predictive Coding.Philip Gerrans - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (2):401-418.
    A flood of new multidisciplinary work on the causes of depersonalization disorder provides a new way to think about the feeling that experiences “belong” to the self. In this paper I argue that this feeling, baptized “mineness” or “subjective presence” : 565–573, 2013) emerges from a multilevel interaction between emotional, affective and cognitive processing. The “self” to which experience is attributed is a predictive model made by the mind to explain the modulation of affect as the organism progresses through (...)
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  2.  33
    Depersonalization: A Selective Impairment of Self-Awareness.Mauricio Sierra & Anthony S. David - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):99-108.
    Depersonalization is characterised by a profound disruption of self-awareness mainly characterised by feelings of disembodiment and subjective emotional numbing.It has been proposed that depersonalization is caused by a fronto-limbic suppressive mechanism – presumably mediated via attention – which manifests subjectively as emotional numbing, and disables the process by which perception and cognition normally become emotionally coloured, giving rise to a subjective feeling of ‘unreality’.Our functional neuroimaging and psychophysiological studies support the above model and indicate that, compared with normal (...)
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  3.  71
    Depersonalization and the Sense of Realness.Somogy Varga - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):103-113.
    From Minkowski and Jaspers to Blankenburg, phenomenological psychopathology has assumed that lost or diminished experience of ‘realness’ is related to an impairment of tacit level intersubjectivity. This paper develops a theoretical framework for this hypothesis by drawing mainly on the phenomenological tradition and the works of Wittgenstein. The argument, in return, contributes to recent discussions regarding depersonalization and intersubjectivity. In addition, the approach suggests some interesting implications for psychopathology.
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  4.  11
    The Depersonalized Brain: New Evidence Supporting a Distinction Between Depersonalization and Derealization From Discrete Patterns of Autonomic Suppression Observed in a Non-Clinical Sample.Hayley Dewe, Derrick G. Watson, Klaus Kessler & Jason J. Braithwaite - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 63:29-46.
  5.  93
    Bodily Feeling in Depersonalization: A Phenomenological Account.Giovanna Colombetti & Matthew Ratcliffe - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (2):145-150.
    This paper addresses the phenomenology of bodily feeling in depersonalization disorder. We argue that not all bodily feelings are intentional states that have the body or part of it as their object. We distinguish three broad categories of bodily feeling: noematic feeling, noetic feeling, and existential feeling. Then we show how an appreciation of the differences between them can contribute to an understanding of the depersonalization experience.
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  6. Anomalous Self-Experience in Depersonalization and Schizophrenia: A Comparative Investigation.Louis Sass, Elizabeth Pienkos, Barnaby Nelson & Nick Medford - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):430-441.
    Various forms of anomalous self-experience can be seen as central to schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. We examined similarities and differences between anomalous self-experiences common in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, as listed in the EASE , and those described in published accounts of severe depersonalization. Our aims were to consider anomalous self-experience in schizophrenia in a comparative context, to refine and enlarge upon existing descriptions of experiential disturbances in depersonalization, and to explore hypotheses concerning a possible core process in schizophrenia (...)
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  7.  50
    On the Role of Depersonalization in Merleau-Ponty.Dylan Trigg - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):275-289.
    This essay considers the role of depersonalization in the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty. While there has been a modest amount of interest in depersonalization from a phenomenological perspective, a critical exploration of the theme of depersonalization in Merleau-Ponty’s thinking itself remains overlooked ; Colombetti and Ratcliffe. This is an oddity, given that the theme of depersonalization proves instructive in Merleau-Ponty’s account of the constitution of the subject, and appears within Phenomenology of Perception at key points in his (...)
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  8.  20
    Depersonalization of Business in Ancient Rome.Barbara Abatino, Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci & Enrico C. Perotti - 2011 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 31 (2):365-389.
    A crucial step in economic development is the depersonalization of business, which enables an enterprise to operate as a separate entity from its owners and managers. Until the emergence of a de iure depersonalization of business in the 19th century, business activities were eminently personal, with managing partners bearing unlimited liability. Roman law even restricted agency. Yet, the Roman legal system developed a form of de facto depersonalized business entity, where depersonalization was achieved by making the fulcrum (...)
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  9.  32
    Fair Trade and the Depersonalization of Ethics.Jérôme Ballet & Aurélie Carimentrand - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (S2):317-330.
    Fair Trade has changed considerably since its early days. In this article, we argue that these changes have led to a depersonalization of ethics, thus raising serious questions about the future of Fair Trade. In particular, the depersonalization of ethics which is seen to accompany the current changes has led to greater variety in the interpretations of Fair Trade. Hiding these divergences behind the labels is increasing the risk that the movement will lose its credibility.
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  10.  27
    The Depersonalized‐Self: Rousseau's Emile.Jan H. Blits - 1991 - Educational Theory 41 (4):397-405.
  11.  46
    Developmental Depersonalization: The Prefrontal Cortex and Self-Functions in Autism.Dorit Ben Shalom - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):457-460.
    The human self model suggests that the construct of self involves functions such as agency, body-centered spatial perspectivity, and long-term unity. Vogeley, Kurthen, Falkai, and Maieret (1999) suggest that agency is subserved by the prefrontal cortex and other association areas of the cortex, spatial perspectivity by the prefrontal cortex and the parietal lobes, and long-term unity by the prefrontal cortex and the temporal lobes and that all of these functions are impaired in schizophrenia. Exploring the connections between the prefrontal cortex (...)
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  12.  39
    Emotion and the Unreal Self: Depersonalization Disorder and De-Affectualization.Nick Medford - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (2):139-144.
    Depersonalization disorder (DPD) is a psychiatric condition in which there is a pervasive change in the quality of subjective experience, in the absence of psychosis. The core complaint is a persistent and disturbing feeling that experience of oneself and the world has become empty, lifeless, and not fully real. A greatly reduced emotional responsivity, or “de-affectualization,” is frequently described. This article examines the phenomenology and neurobiology of DPD with a particular emphasis on the emotional aspects. It is argued that (...)
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  13. Apostasy as Objective and Depersonalized Fact: Two Recent Egyptian Court Judgments.Baber Johansen - 2003 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (3):687-710.
    The jurists of classical Islamic Law defined the interior forum as a limit to the religious validity of the sentences of Muslim judges , because these have neither access to God's knowledge nor to the individual believer’s conscience and motivations. They can base their decisions solely on exterior appearances and can, therefore, neither be sure that their judgments correspond to the facts nor to the intentions and memories of the individuals concerned. This holds especially true for questions of belief and (...)
     
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  14.  55
    Depersonalization, the Experience of Prosthesis, and Our Cosmic Insignificance: The Experimental Phenomenology of an Altered State.Andrew Apter - 1992 - Philosophical Psychology 5 (3):257-285.
    Psychogenic depersonalization is an altered mental state consisting of an unusual discontinuity in the phenomenological perception of personal being; the individual is engulfed by feelings of unreality, self-detachment and unfamiliarity in which the self is felt to lack subjective perspective and the intuitive feeling of personal embodiment. A new sub-feature of depersonalization is delineated. 'Prosthesis' consists in the thought that the thinker is a 'mere thing'. It is a subjectively realized sense of the specific and objective 'thingness' of (...)
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  15.  32
    When the Body Stands in the Way: Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Depersonalization, and Schizophrenia.Yochai Ataria - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (1):19-31.
    Although not identical, this article suggests that complex posttraumatic stress disorder, depersonalization and schizophrenia share at least one feature: in all these cases, the body becomes a defective tool, an IT. In turn, those suffering from them can no longer be-in-the-world through the living body but rather experience their body as an object; they manage their lives on the level of body image.The next section outlines some cognitive and phenomenological concepts such as body schema, body image, body-as-subject and body-as-object. (...)
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  16. Feelings of Unreality: A Conceptual and Phenomenological Analysis of the Language of Depersonalization.Filip Radovic & Susanna Radovic - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):271-279.
    The paper offers a conceptual and phenomenological analysis of the language of depersonalization. The depersonalization syndrome or disorder has no known common pathogenesis and shows no characteristic behavioral manifestations. A conceptual analysis of the key terms in the subjective complaints would therefore have consequences for clinical research into the phenomenon of depersonalization.
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  17.  93
    The Depersonalization of Violence: Reflections on the Future of Personal Responsibility.Edmund F. Byrne - 1973 - Journal of Value Inquiry 7 (3):161-172.
    The intent of this article is to discredit the much used concept (often unstated) of virtuous violence. To begin with, it is a paradox hence in need of not easily achieved justification. Here author's critique focuses on the political myth of prophetic righteousness, the ethical myth of a common good, and the myth of the infinite, which is utilized all too often to bypass finite systems. (Article sharply criticized when first presented to a faculty group.).
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  18.  33
    Investigating Depersonalization.Filip Radovic & Susanna Radovic - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):287-288.
  19. Depersonalization in the Modern Drama.Charles I. Glicksberg - 1958 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 39 (2):158.
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  20. Derealization, Depersonalization and the Question of ´Realness´.Somogy Varga - 2008 - Archives of Philosophy and Mental Health 1 (1):42-51.
  21. Emotional Depersonalization in Persons with Feeding and Eating Disorders.Milena Mancini & Giovanni Stanghellini - forthcoming - Phenomenology and Mind:154.
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  22.  37
    Depersonalization and Feelings of Unreality: Significant Symptoms With a Variety of Meanings.Kjell Modigh - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):285-286.
  23.  9
    Of Depersonalization: A Disorder of Self-Awareness.Hedy Kober, R. A. Y. Alysa & Sukhvinder Obhi - 2005 - In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press. pp. 193.
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  24. The Depersonalization of Creativity.Paul Muscari - 1994 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 15 (4):311-322.
    Since much of modern discourse, extending from cognitivism to connectionism, has been greatly inclined to look at human behavior in relation to processes where the subjective factor plays little if any causal role, it would not be inaccurate to say that the person has been left with but a trivial part to play in the overall script. The intent of this paper is to address this theoretical disproportionality by offering a more symmetrical account of creativity C one that reconsiders the (...)
     
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  25. The Depersonalization of Creativity.Carl Ratner - 1994 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 15 (4):311-322.
     
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  26. A Depersonalized World.H. Osborne Ryder - 1924 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 5 (4):264.
     
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  27.  14
    Emotional Experience and Awareness of Self: Functional MRI Studies of Depersonalization Disorder.Nick Medford, Mauricio Sierra, Argyris Stringaris, Vincent Giampietro, Michael J. Brammer & Anthony S. David - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  28. The Neural Correlates of Depersonalization: A Disorder of Self-Awareness.Hedy Kober, Alysa Ray, Sukhvinder Obhi, Kevin Guise & Julian Paul Keenan - 2005 - In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press. pp. 193-205.
     
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  29.  11
    Constitutional Problems of Depersonalizing Judicial Procedural Decisions.Algimantas Šindeikis - 2009 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 117 (3):41-58.
    This publication analyzes the issue of depersonalization in the field of constitutional substantiation of judicial resolutions, judgements, verdicts and rulings (hereinafter, judicial procedural decisions). Electronic databases are the primary source of information about judicial procedural resolutions for judges, reporters, as well as for the public-at-large. As for judicial practice, the data regarding parties of a case is depersonalised in these databases. Personal names are either replaced with initials, or a message “depersonalized data” is included. The constitutional substantiation for such (...)
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  30.  39
    Descartes, Consciousness and Depersonalization: Viewing the History of Philosophy From a Strausian Perspective.Avner Cohen - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):7-28.
    This paper develops particular Strausian-like themes on the formation and structure of the Cartesian problematic. Particularly, my interest is to link the Cartesian ‘invention’ of consciousness (or ‘the mental’) in the philosophy of mind with the issues of representation and ‘the problem of the external world’ in epistemology. The Cartesian novelty becomes clear by comparing Cartesian scepticism with Greek classical scepticism. I end with some speculative clinical (i.e., psychiatric) suggestions on possible roots of the Cartesian invention. Keywords: Consciousness, Externalization, Dualism, (...)
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  31. Hypnagogia, Anxiety, Depersonalization: A Phenomenological Perspective.Dylan Trigg - 2017 - In Dylan Trigg & Dorothée Legrand (eds.), Unconsciousness Between Phenomenology and Psychoanalysis. Springer Verlag.
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  32.  10
    Pain Asymbolia as Depersonalization for Pain Experience. An Interoceptive Active Inference Account.Philip Gerrans - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  33.  44
    A Sociological View of Depersonalization.Friedrich Baerwald - 1956 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 31 (1):55-78.
  34.  11
    Losing Ourselves: Active Inference, Depersonalization, and Meditation.George Deane, Mark Miller & Sam Wilkinson - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  35.  1
    Whatever Next and Close to My Self—The Transparent Senses and the “Second Skin”: Implications for the Case of Depersonalization.Anna Ciaunica, Andreas Roepstorff, Aikaterini Katerina Fotopoulou & Bruna Petreca - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    In his paper “Whatever next? Predictive brains, situated agents, and the future of cognitive science,” Andy Clark seminally proposed that the brain's job is to predict whatever information is coming “next” on the basis of prior inputs and experiences. Perception fundamentally subserves survival and self-preservation in biological agents, such as humans. Survival however crucially depends on rapid and accurate information processing of what is happening in the here and now. Hence, the term “next” in Clark's seminal formulation must include not (...)
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  36. The New Social Disease: From High Tech Depersonalization to Survival of the Soul.Ronald S. Laura, Tim Marchant & Susen R. Smith - 2008 - Upa.
    The New Social Disease is about how we personalize our computers and associated technologies while depersonalizing others and ourselves.
     
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  37.  4
    Place Matters: (Dis)embeddedness and Child Labourers’ Experiences of Depersonalized Bullying in Indian Bt Cottonseed Global Production Networks.Premilla D’Cruz, Ernesto Noronha, Muneeb Ul Lateef Banday & Saikat Chakraborty - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.
    Engaging Polanyi’s embeddedness–disembeddedness framework, this study explored the work experiences of Bhil children employed in Indian Bt cottonseed GPNs. The innovative visual technique of drawings followed by interviews was used. Migrant children, working under debt bondage, underwent greater exploitation and perennial and severe depersonalized bullying, indicative of commodification of labour and disembeddedness. In contrast, children working in their home villages were not under debt bondage and underwent less exploitation and occasional and mild depersonalized bullying, indicative of how civil society organizations, (...)
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  38.  28
    Phenomenal Depth A Common Phenomenological Dimension in Depression and Depersonalization.Michael Gaebler & Jan-Peter Lamke - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    Describing, understanding, and explaining subjective experience in depression is a great challenge for psychopathology. Attempts to uncover neurobiological mechanisms of those experiences are in need of theoretical concepts that are able to bridge phenomenological descriptions and neurocognitive approaches, which allow us to measure indicators of those experiences in quantitative terms. Based on our own on going work with patients who suffer from depersonalization disorder and describe their experience as flat and detached from self, body, and world, we introduce the (...)
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  39. “You're Not Just in There to Do the Work”: Depersonalizing Policies and the Exploitation of Home Care Workers' Labor.Sheila M. Neysmith & Jane Aronson - 1996 - Gender and Society 10 (1):59-77.
    Community care for frail elderly people rests heavily on the work of low-status, paraprofessional home care workers. Home care workers describe their work as highly personalized caring labor that often seeps out of its formal boundaries into informal, unpaid activities. Although these activities are valued by workers, their supervisors, elderly clients, and family members, they represent uncompensated and exploited labor. Cost-cutting trends in home care management that seek to depersonalize home care labor are likely to increase its exploitative potential for (...)
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  40. A Hole in the Mirror: The Experimental and Phenomenological Psychopathology of Psychogenic Depersonalization.Andrew Apter - 1992 - Dissertation, Duke University
    This project comprises a two-part synthesis and exploration of everything that is presently known of psychogenic depersonalization experience , and advances a psychometric and experimental analysis in an attempt to construct an Empirical Phenomenology of Depersonalization . EPD consists of a descriptive phenomenology of the experiential features of PDE, a self-report scale open to psychometric analysis, and an experimental venture. EPD is thus an instance of the experimental psychopathology of altered states of consciousness. ; Descriptive phenomenology. The history (...)
     
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  41.  7
    Implicit Self-Esteem in Borderline Personality and Depersonalization Disorder.Alexis N. Hedrick & Heather A. Berlin - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  42.  9
    On the Significance of 'World 3' for the Depersonalization of Inquiry and the Democratization of Education.Darrell Patrick Rowbottom - unknown
    This article explores the practical significance of the notion of ‘World 3’ – a domain of abstract entities – for inquiry and education. First, it explains how ‘objectifying’ our thoughts and statements, viz. treating them as if they are objective, can help in inquiry to: promote impartiality towards ideas on the basis of their source and the manner in which they are presented; enable more effective communication; and encourage wider participation in debates. Second, the article examines how ‘objectification’ can be (...)
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  43. Why Are We Certain That We Exist?Alexandre Billon - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (3):723-759.
    Descartes was certain that he was thinking and he was accordingly certain that he existed. Like Descartes, we seem to be more certain of our thoughts and our existence than of anything else. What is less clear is the reason why we are thus certain. Philosophers throughout history have provided different interpretations of the cogito, disagreeing both on the kind of thoughts it characterizes and on the reasons for its cogency. According to what we may call the empiricist interpretation of (...)
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  44.  74
    Basic Self‐Awareness.Alexandre Billon - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):732-763.
    Basic self-awareness is the kind of self-awareness reflected in our standard use of the first-person. Patients suffering from severe forms of depersonalization often feel reluctant to use the first-person and can even, in delusional cases, avoid it altogether, systematically referring to themselves in the third-person. Even though it has been neglected since then, depersonalization has been extensively studied, more than a century ago, and used as probe for understanding the nature and the causal mechanisms of basic self-awareness. In (...)
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  45.  35
    Basic Self‐Awareness.Alexandre Billon - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (4).
    Basic self-awareness is the kind of self-awareness reflected in our standard use of the first-person. Patients suffering from severe forms of depersonalization often feel reluctant to use the first-person and can even, in delusional cases, avoid it altogether, systematically referring to themselves in the third-person. Even though it has been neglected since then, depersonalization has been extensively studied, more than a century ago, and used as probe for understanding the nature and the causal mechanisms of basic self-awareness. In (...)
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  46.  98
    Somatoparaphrenia, Anosognosia, and Higher-Order Thoughts.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2015 - In Disturbed Consciousness: New Essays on Psychopathology and Theories of Consciousness. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. pp. 55-74.
    Somatoparaphrenia is a pathology of self characterized by the sense of alienaton from parts of one’s body. It is usually construed as a kind of delusional disorder caused by extensive right hemisphere lesions. Lesions in the temporoparietal junction are common in somatoparaphrenia but deep cortical regions (for example, the posterior insula) and subcortical regions (for example, the basal ganglia) are also sometimes implicated (Valler and Ronschi 2009). Patients are often described as feeling that a limb belongs to another person and (...)
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  47.  75
    Mineness First: Three Challenges to Contemporary Theories of Bodily Self-Awareness.Alexandre Billon - 2017 - In Adrian J. T. Alsmith & Frédérique de Vignemont (eds.), The Subject's Matter: Self-Consciousness and the Body. Boston, USA: MIT Press. pp. 189-216.
    Depersonalization is a pathological condition consisting in a deep modification of the way things appear to a subject, leading him to feel estranged from his body, his actions, his thoughts, his mind and even from himself. In this article, I argue that the study of depersonalization raises three challenges for recent theories of the sense of bodily ownership. These challenges—which I call the centrality challenge, the dissociation challenge and the grounding challenge— thwart most of these theories and suggest (...)
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  48.  13
    Feelings of Being: Phenomenology, Psychiatry and the Sense of Reality.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Emotions and bodily feelings -- Existential feelings -- The phenomenology of touch -- Body and world -- Feeling and belief in the Capgras delusion -- Feelings of deadness and depersonalization -- Existential feeling in schizophrenia -- What William James really said -- Stance, feeling, and belief -- Pathologies of existential feeling.
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  49. Self, Belonging, and Conscious Experience: A Critique of Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness.Timothy Lane - 2015 - In Rocco Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed consciousness: New essays on psychopathology and theories of consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 103-140.
    Subjectivity theories of consciousness take self-reference, somehow construed, as essential to having conscious experience. These theories differ with respect to how many levels they posit and to whether self-reference is conscious or not. But all treat self-referencing as a process that transpires at the personal level, rather than at the subpersonal level, the level of mechanism. -/- Working with conceptual resources afforded by pre-existing theories of consciousness that take self-reference to be essential, several attempts have been made to explain seemingly (...)
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  50. What Pain Asymbolia Really Shows.Colin Klein - 2015 - Mind 124 (494):493-516.
    Pain asymbolics feel pain, but act as if they are indifferent to it. Nikola Grahek argues that such patients present a clear counterexample to motivationalism about pain. I argue that Grahek has mischaracterized pain asymbolia. Properly understood, asymbolics have lost a general capacity to care about their bodily integrity. Asymbolics’ indifference to pain thus does not show something about the intrinsic nature of pain ; it shows something about the relationship between pains and subjects, and how that relationship might break (...)
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