Results for 'development countries'

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  1.  8
    Foreign Direct Investment in the Function of Economic Development - Example of Selected Countries in the Western Balkans.Ivana Slavoljub Domazet & Darko Milivoj Marjanović - 2017 - International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences 79:1-15.
    Publication date: 25 October 2017 Source: Author: Ivana Slavoljub Domazet, Darko Milivoj Marjanović The main aim of this work is to determine, on the basis of empirical research, whether and to what extent foreign direct investment has impact on the overall economic development of selected countries in the Western Balkans. Analyses made for the purpose of this paper were performed on the basis of available secondary data possessed by the World Bank for the period of 2000-2012. The research (...)
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  2.  86
    Priority Setting in Low Income Countries: The Roles and Legitimacy of Development Assistance Partners.L. Kapiriri - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (1):67-80.
    Priority setting presents one of the biggest challenges policy makers in low-income countries have to deal with on a daily basis. Extreme lack of resources in these contexts introduces non-state stakeholders whose priorities may not necessarily reflect the national priorities. This raises concerns about the legitimacy of the non-state stakeholders' involvement in priority setting. To date, the meagre literature on priority setting in low-income countries has not focused on the question of the legitimacy of the non-state stakeholders, specifically, (...)
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  3.  99
    Can Export-Oriented Aquaculture in Developing Countries Be Sustainable and Promote Sustainable Development? The Shrimp Case.Marta G. Rivera-Ferre - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):301-321.
    Industrial shrimp farming has been promoted by international development and financial institutions in coastal indebted poor countries as a way to obtain foreign exchange earnings, reimburse external debt, and promote development. The promotion of the shrimp industry is a clear example of a more general trend of support of export-oriented primary products, consisting in monocultures of commodities, as opposed to the promotion of more diverse, traditional production directed to feed the local population. In general, it is assumed (...)
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  4.  10
    Development and Modernization of OIC Member Countries: A Study Based on Selected Indicators.Hazizan Md Noon, A. H. M. Zehadul Karim & Md Sayed Uddin - 2018 - Intellectual Discourse 26 (1):229-253.
    This paper attempts to analyze the performance of 57 memberstates of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation based on selectedindicators of some sectors namely demography, economics, educationand technology and innovation. Specifically, it aims at firstly portraying anoverview of OIC performance based on six selected indicators followed byanalyzing the relationship between selected development variables withliteracy and exploring the state of OIC performance as indicated by theirachievement based on selected indicators. The study was undertaken vis-àvisthe prevailing theories on modernization and development (...)
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  5.  37
    Prospects for the Development of Economic Relations Between COMECON and EEC Countries.Zbigniew Kamecki - 1990 - World Futures 29 (3):165-171.
    (1990). Prospects for the development of economic relations between COMECON and EEC countries. World Futures: Vol. 29, The Future of European Integration, pp. 165-171.
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  6.  33
    Cooperation Between Countries with Planned and Market Economies: Prospects for Development and Future Challenges.Risto Kangas-Ikkala - 1988 - World Futures 25 (1):163-173.
    (1988). Cooperation between countries with planned and market Economies: Prospects for development and future challenges. World Futures: Vol. 25, No. 1-2, pp. 163-173.
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  7.  26
    Public-Private Partnerships in Drug Development for Underdeveloped Countries: An Interview with Craig Wheeler, President of Chiron's Biopharmaceutical Division.Thomasine Kushner - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (4):429-433.
    In an effort to create a mechanism for addressing a critical need of providing medicines for economically developing countries, the Chiron Corporation and the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development have entered into an innovative public-private partnership. In the following interview, Craig Wheeler discusses the origins and nature of this agreement that could set a pattern for how corporations and nonprofit organizations can work together in drug development.
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  8.  14
    National Environmental Policy Development for Sustainable Economic Growth in Developing Countries: A Case Study of Pakistan.Syed Shahbaz Hussain & Pirzada Sami Ullah Sabri - 2014 - International Journal of Social Quality 4 (1):78-94.
    This article analyzes and explores what policies Pakistan adopted to tackle its environmental challenges, effects and outcomes. The research consists of an overview of Pakistan's national environmental policy development and explains the motives and reasons to understand in what context the state formulates these policies. It also makes assessments and evaluations about to what extent policies are successful in achieving their objectives. The study suggests some implications of the Pakistan experience to cope with the global challenges of environmental protection.
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  9.  9
    The Practice of Mining and Inclusive Wealth Development in Developing Countries.Frederick Bird - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):631-643.
    This paper is based upon a review of studies of mining companies, most of them being Canadian, in Chile, northern Canada, Tanzania, Guatemala, Ghana, Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of Congo. In spite of often well-meaning efforts, the wealth produced by most mining firms in developing areas largely benefits those immediately involved, sometimes neighbouring communities, and often those in the governing strata. Typically, mining takes place in enclaves and fosters enclave development rather than the kind of inclusive wealth (...)
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  10.  23
    The Role of MNEs in Community Development Initiatives in Developing Countries Corporate Social Responsibility at Work in Nigeria and South Africa.Gabriel Eweje - 2006 - Business and Society 45 (2):93-129.
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  11.  7
    Values and Prosocial Behaviour in the Global Context: Why Values Predict Public Support for Foreign Development Assistance to Developing Countries.Bayram A. Burcu - 2016 - Journal of Human Values 22 (2):93-106.
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  12.  5
    The Development of Knowledge Societies in 19 OECD Countries Between 1970 and 2002.Daniela Rohrbach - 2007 - Social Science Information 46 (4):655-689.
  13.  29
    Life Expectancy in Less Developed Countries: Socioeconomic Development or Public Health?Richard G. Rogers & Sharon Wofford - 1989 - Journal of Biosocial Science 21 (2):245-252.
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  14.  16
    The Influence of Heidegger’s Thought on the Development of Philosophy in Ex-Yugoslav Countries.Dean Komel - 2018 - Human Studies 41 (4):643-660.
    The purpose of the article is to present the outlines of the reception and the influence of Heidegger’s philosophy on the territory of former Yugoslavia. This reception and influence were in their essence co-conditioned by specific political, social and cultural circumstances in the region, which were throughout accompanied by “the syndrome of dehumanization”. The confrontation with Heidegger’s philosophy is therefore co-defined by the profoundly experienced crisis of European humanity. During both world wars the attempt of an overcoming of this crisis (...)
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  15.  24
    Population Growth and Economic Development in Low-Income Countries: A Case Study of India's Prospects.A. M. Carr-Saunders - 1960 - The Eugenics Review 52 (1):39.
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  16.  22
    Learning From Others Within the Landscape of “Transitional Economies” and the Challenge in ICT Development for African Countries.Thomas Odamtten & Jeremy Millard - 2009 - AI and Society 23 (1):51-60.
  17.  8
    Environmental Quality and Politics : Some Notes on Political Development in "Developed" Countries.L. J. Lundqvist - 1973 - Social Science Information 12 (2):43-65.
  18.  10
    The Development, Implementation and Evaluation of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Gulf Cooperation Council Countries: A Systematic Review of Literature.Erik Koornneef, Paul Robben, Cother Hajat & Azhar Ali - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (6):1006-1013.
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  19.  7
    Rural Development, Technical Knowledge and Shifting Boundaries: The Shaping of “Progress” and “Crisis” in Developing Countries.Kamini Adhikari - 1997 - Social Science Information 36 (1):115-158.
  20.  7
    Development Planning and Environment: The Case of the Countries of the Third World.G. Sachs - 1970 - Social Science Information 9 (5):17-27.
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  21.  9
    Rural Development Programmes and Not Rural Improvement Programmes as the Best Strategy for Rapid and Sustainable Development in Developing Countries.R. Matiki - 2011 - Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 10 (2).
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  22.  6
    International Conference On Comparative Social Research in Developing Countries: Intra-Country Discontinuities in the Process of Economic and Social Development in Latin America Buenos-Aires -- September 8-16, 1964 General Report. [REVIEW]G. Germani - 1965 - Social Science Information 4 (2):156-172.
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  23.  10
    Economic Development and Political Change in Developing Countries.Irma Adelman - 1980 - Social Research 47.
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  24.  9
    Education, Democracy and Development: Does Education Contribute to Democratisation in Developing Countries? By C. Harber and V. Mncube.Edda Sant - 2014 - British Journal of Educational Studies 62 (1):75-77.
  25.  4
    Economic Development and The Influences of Family Socioeconomic Status and Home Civic Learning Environments on Adolescents' Civic Outcomes : A Comparative Study of 31 Countries.Kim Hyung Ryeol - 2015 - Journal of Ethics 1 (101):1-44.
  26.  1
    How Legal Institutions Impact Countries 'Financial Development'.Ion Zăuleţ - 2008 - Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 7.
  27. The part played by different countries in the development of the science of radioactivity.R. W. Lawson - 1921 - Scientia 15 (30):257.
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  28. Economic Development in Underdeveloped Countries.H. W. Singer - 1949 - Social Research 16 (1).
     
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  29.  26
    The Impact of the Multinational in the Development: An Ethical Challenge. [REVIEW]J. Félix Lozano & Alejandra Boni - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):169 - 178.
    Multinational enterprises have continued their increase during the last decades. What these companies do and how they do, determines not only the economic development of countries, but also their social and cultural development. This enormous power implies responsibility and new challenges.If we also take into account the role of multinational enterprises in what has been called sustainable development, we see that their importance is still more decisive.
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  30. The Impact of Nanomedicine Development on North–South Equity and Equal Opportunities in Healthcare.Michael Tyshenko - 2009 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (3).
    Nanomedicine applications are an extension of traditional pharmaceutical drug development that are targeting the most pressing health concerns through improvements to diagnostics, drug delivery systems, therapeutics, equipment, surgery and prosthetics. The benefits and risks to the individual have been extrapolated to include broader societal impacts of nanomedicine with concerns extending to inequitable distribution of benefits accruing to developed, or North countries, rather than developing, or South countries. Analysis reveals a great deal of overlap between the North and (...)
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  31.  46
    Nanotechnology, Development and Buddhist Values.Soraj Hongladarom - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (2):97-107.
    Nanotechnology has been proclaimed as a new technology that could bridge the gap between the rich and the poor countries. Indeed many countries in Asia are fast developing their nanotechnological capabilities. However, one needs to take into consideration the role that culture and values play in adoption of nanotechnological policies, keeping in mind that technology and culture are deeply dependent on each other. I offer a criticism of the dependency theory in economic development, which says that there (...)
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  32.  22
    Academic Evaluation: Universal Instrument? Tool for Development?Mariela Bianco, Natalia Gras & Judith Sutz - 2016 - Minerva 54 (4):399-421.
    Research agendas and academic evaluation are inevitably linked. By means of economic incentives, promotion, research funding, and reputation academic evaluation is a powerful influence on the production of knowledge; moreover, it is often conceived as a universal instrument without consideration of the context in which it is applied. Evaluation systems are social constructions in dispute, being the current focus of international debates regarding criteria, indicators, and their associated methods. A universalist type of productivity indicators is gaining centrality in academic evaluation (...)
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  33.  22
    Southern Roles in Global Nanotechnology Innovation: Perspectives From Thailand and Australia. [REVIEW]Donald C. Maclurcan - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (2):137-156.
    The term ‘nano-divide’ has become a catch-phrase for describing various kinds of global nanotechnology inequities. However, there has been little in-depth exploration as to what the global nano-divide really means, and limited commentary on its early nature. Furthermore, the literature often presents countries from the Global South as ‘passive’ agents in global nanotechnology innovation—without the ability to develop endogenous nanotechnology capabilities. Yet others point to nanotechnology providing opportunities for the South to play new roles in the global research and (...)
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  34.  59
    The Influence of Global Intellectualization on Human Development.Sergii Sardak & A. Samoilenko S. Sardak - 2019 - Bulletin of the Cherkasy Bohdan Khmelnytsky National University. Economic Sciences, 1:176-182.
    In the context of the global intellectualization, human capital is the determining factor in the innovation development and the international competitiveness of countries. In the XXI century. the leading component of human capital are qualitatively new information, communication and network technologies. Particular importance are education and training, professionalism, high level of human resources management, building up, reproduction and human capital development. These factors are the prerequisite for the growth of the competitive advantages of the country in the (...)
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  35.  48
    Factors Related to the Cognitive Moral Development of Business Students and Business Professionals in India and the United States: Nationality, Education, Sex and Gender. [REVIEW]Beverly Kracher, Abha Chatterjee & Arlene R. Lundquist - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (4):255-268.
    This research focuses on the similarities and differences in the cognitive moral development of business professionals and graduate business students in two countries, India and the United States. Factors that potentially influence cognitive moral development, namely, culture, education, sex and gender are analyzed and discussed. Implications for ethics education in graduate business schools and professional associations are considered. Future research on the cognitive moral development of graduate business students and business professionals is recommended.
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  36.  82
    Food Sovereignty or the Human Right to Adequate Food: Which Concept Serves Better as International Development Policy for Global Hunger and Poverty Reduction? [REVIEW]Tina D. Beuchelt & Detlef Virchow - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):259-273.
    The emerging concept of food sovereignty refers to the right of communities, peoples, and states to independently determine their own food and agricultural policies. It raises the question of which type of food production, agriculture and rural development should be pursued to guarantee food security for the world population. Social movements and non-governmental organizations have readily integrated the concept into their terminology. The concept is also beginning to find its way into the debates and policies of UN organizations and (...)
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  37.  72
    Analysis of the “European Charter on General Principles for Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development” The Council of Europe Document CO-DBP 2.Maria A. Martin, Pablo Martínez de Anguita & Miguel Acosta - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):1037-1050.
    For almost 50 years, the Council of Europe through a series of documents has been helping to build up a set of rules, principles, and strategies related to culture, environment, ethics, and sustainable development. At the moment, one of the most important aims of the Council of Europe’s agenda deals with the elaboration of the General Principles for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development, as raised in document CO-DBP (2003)2 related to the environmental subject. The intention (...)
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  38.  58
    How Ethical Behavior of Firms is Influenced by the Legal and Political Environments: A Bayesian Causal Map Analysis Based on Stages of Development[REVIEW]Ahmet Ekici & Sule Onsel - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):271-290.
    Even though potential impacts of political and legal environments of business on ethical behavior of firms (EBOF) have been conceptually recognized, not much evidence (i.e., empirical work) has been produced to clarify their role. In this paper, using Bayesian causal maps (BCMs) methodology, relationships between legal and political environments of business and EBOF are investigated. The unique design of our study allows us to analyze these relationships based on the stages of development in 92 countries around the world. (...)
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  39.  64
    Corporate Governance Reforms in Developing Countries.Darryl Reed - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):223 - 247.
    Corporate governance reforms are occurring in countries around the globe. In developing countries, such reforms occur in a context that is primarily defined by previous attempts at promoting "development" and recent processes of economic globalization. This context has resulted in the adoption of reforms that move developing countries in the direction of an Anglo-American model of governance. The most basic questions that arise with respect to these governance reforms are what prospects they entail for traditional (...) goals and whether alternatives should be considered. This paper offers a framework for addressing these basic questions by providing an account of: 1) previous development strategies and efforts; 2) the nature and causes of the reform processes; 3) the development potential of the reforms and concerns associated with them; 4) the (potential) responsibilities of corporate governance, including the (possible) responsibilities to promote development, and; 5) different approaches to promoting governance reforms with an eye to promoting development. (shrink)
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  40.  17
    Weaning Business Ethics From Strategic Economism: The Development Ethics Perspective. [REVIEW]Prabhir Vishnu Poruthiyil - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):735-749.
    For more than three decades, business ethics has suggested and evaluated strategies for multinationals to address abject deprivations and weak regulatory institutions in developing countries. Critical appraisals, internal and external, have observed these concerns being severely constrained by the overwhelming prioritization of economic values, i.e., economism. Recent contributions to business ethics stress a re-imagination of the field wherein economic goals are downgraded and more attention given to redistribution of wealth and well-being of the weaker individuals and groups. Development (...)
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  41.  58
    Ethical Analysis of the Use of GM Fish: Emerging Issues for Aquaculture Development[REVIEW]Kate Millar & Sandy Tomkins - 2007 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (5):437-453.
    Improvements in production methods over the last two decades have resulted in aquaculture becoming a significant contributor to food production in many countries. Increased efficiency and production levels are off-setting unsustainable capture fishing practices and contributing to food security, particularly in a number of developing countries. The challenge for the rapidly growing aquaculture industry is to develop and apply technologies that ensure sustainable production methods that will reduce environmental damage, increase productivity across the sector, and respect the diverse (...)
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  42.  64
    Health as Freedom: Addressing Social Determinants of Global Health Inequities Through the Human Right to Development.Ashleym Fox - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (2):112-122.
    In spite of vast global improvements in living standards, health, and well-being, the persistence of absolute poverty and its attendant maladies remains an unsettling fact of life for billions around the world and constitutes the primary cause for the failure of developing states to improve the health of their peoples. While economic development in developing countries is necessary to provide for underlying determinants of health – most prominently, poverty reduction and the building of comprehensive primary health systems – (...)
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  43.  71
    Post-Approval Monitoring and Oversight of U.S.-Initiated Human Subjects Research in Resource-Constrained Countries.Brandon Brown, Janni Kinsler, Morenike O. Folayan, Karen Allen & Carlos F. Cáceres - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):119-123.
    The history of human subjects research and controversial procedures in relation to it has helped form the field of bioethics. Ethically questionable elements may be identified during research design, research implementation, management at the study site, or actions by a study’s investigator or other staff. Post-approval monitoring (PAM) may prevent violations from occurring or enable their identification at an early stage. In U.S.-initiated human subjects research taking place in resource-constrained countries with limited development of research regulatory structures, arranging (...)
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  44.  26
    On the Structure of Global Development Goals.Scott Wisor - 2015 - Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):280-287.
    The design of global development goals has been beset by deep flaws, inconsistencies, and manifest unfairness to some developing countries. Momentum has now peaked for the creation of Sustainable Development Goals to replace the Millennium Development Goals. This comment addresses three challenges that arise in setting development goals, and recommends feasible development goals that can meaningfully guide development cooperation, and focus the attention of policy makers on the worst-off.
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  45.  45
    Strategic and Moral Dilemmas of Corporate Philanthropy in Developing Countries: Heineken in Sub-Saharan Africa.Katinka C. Van Cranenburgh & Daniel Arenas - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (3):523-536.
    This case study illustrates the dilemmas facing multinational companies in meeting social challenges in Sub-Saharan Africa. It also discusses the purpose, responsibilities and limitations of business involvement in social development. From a business standpoint, social challenges in developing countries differ greatly from those in nations where governments or markets effectively provide for the population’s health needs. The case illustrates what led a multinational to set up a corporate foundation and focuses on three strategic and operational dilemmas it ran (...)
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  46.  16
    Reinterpreting Responsiveness for Health Systems Research in Low and Middle‐Income Countries.Bridget Pratt & Adnan A. Hyder - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (6):379-388.
    The ethical concept of responsiveness has largely been interpreted in the context of international clinical research. In light of the increasing conduct of externally funded health systems research in low- and middle-income countries, this article examines how responsiveness might be understood for such research and how it can be applied. It contends that four features set HSR in LMICs apart from international clinical research: a focus on systems; being context-driven; being policy-driven; and being closely linked to development objectives. (...)
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  47.  35
    The Potential of Standards and Codes of Conduct in Governing Large-Scale Land Acquisition in Developing Countries Towards Sustainability.Lieske Voget-Kleschin & Setareh Stephan - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1157-1179.
    Commercial interest in land (large-scale land acquisition, LaSLA) in developing countries is a hot topic for debate and its potential consequences are contentious: proponents conceive of it as much needed investment into the formerly neglected agricultural sector while opponents point to severe social and environmental effects. This contribution discusses, if and how sustainability standards and codes of conduct can contribute towards governing LaSLA. Based on the WCED-definition we develop a conception of sustainability that allows framing potential negative effects as (...)
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  48.  39
    Ethical Issues Related to Food Sector Evolution in Developing Countries: About Sustainability and Equity.Raoult-Wack Anne-Lucie & Bricas Nicolas - 2002 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 15 (3):323-334.
    After a century of major technicaladvance, essentially achieved by and for theindustrialized countries, the evolution of thefood sector in southern countries should nolonger be thought of in terms of a ``headlongpursuit.'' In the present context of demographicgrowth, urbanization, poverty and disparities,environmental degradation, and globalization oftrade, new priorities have emerged, and newethical questions have been raised, mainlyrelated to sustainability and equity. Thispaper analyses these ethical concerns in thefollowing terms: can the model of food sectordevelopment initiated by the industrializedcountries be (...)
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  49.  38
    The Contribution of the Energy Industry to the Millennium Development Goals: A Benchmark Study. [REVIEW]Carmen Valor - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):277-287.
    This paper evaluates the contribution of the energy industry (oil, gas and electricity) to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in three countries (Argentina, Colombia and Mexico). To build this international benchmark, a tool was built (the MDG-Scorecard), by drawing on theoretical frameworks and guides on how businesses can contribute to the MDGs. Results show that companies are making efforts to contribute to the environment, human rights, employment creation and labour rights. However, their effort is close to nil for (...)
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  50.  78
    Cultural Values, Economic Growth and Development.Symphorien Ntibagirirwa - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):297 - 311.
    Neo-liberal economics is built upon the claim that the freedom to pursue one's self-interest and rational choice leads to economic growth and development. Against this background neo-liberal economists and policymakers endeavoured to universalise this claim, and insistently argue that appropriate economic policies produce the same results regardless of cultural values. Accordingly, developing countries are often advised to embrace the neo-liberal economic credo for them to escape from the trap of underdevelopment. However, the economic success of South East Asia (...)
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