Results for 'didacticism'

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  1.  86
    What's Wrong with Didacticism?C. Repp - 2012 - British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):271-285.
    Works of literature that are too overtly instructive are commonly faulted for being didactic. For so-called literary cognitivists, who believe that instruction is an important literary value, this seems to pose a problem: if we value literature for the instruction it affords, why would we ever object to overt instruction? In this paper I propose the following answer: overt instruction can arouse suspicion of intellectual vices in the author, such as intellectual arrogance, dogmatism, and prejudice, which can make the lessons (...)
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  2. Entertainment and Didacticism: Eliza Haywood's The Unequal Conflict and Fatal Fondness.H. R. Luhning - 2010 - Lumen 29:161-174.
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  3. Teaching Without Existence: Didacticism as Monological Discourse.D. McKnight - 2002 - Journal of Thought 37 (2):45-62.
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  4.  5
    Entertainment and Didacticism: Eliza Haywood's The Unequal Conflict and Fatal Fondness.Holly Luhning - 2010 - Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 29:161.
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  5.  6
    'I, Polybius': self-conscious didacticism?Georgina Longley - 2013 - In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity. Oxford University Press. pp. 175.
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  6.  13
    Literature and Didacticism: Examining Some Popularly Held Ideas.William Casement - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 21 (1):101-11.
  7.  21
    Late Greek Literature - Johnson Greek Literature in Late Antiquity. Dynamism, Didacticism, Classicism. Pp. Xii + 215. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006. Cased, £50, US$99.95. ISBN: 978-0-7546-5683-8. [REVIEW]Claudia Rapp - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (1):93-95.
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  8.  9
    Literature (S.F.) Johnson Ed. Greek Literature in Late Antiquity. Dynamism, Didacticism, Classicism. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006, Pp. Xii + 215. £50. 9780754656838. [REVIEW]Fiona Haarer - 2008 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:203-.
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  9.  12
    Contrary Things: Exegesis, Dialectic, and the Poetics of Didacticism. Catherine Brown.Mark D. Johnston - 2000 - Speculum 75 (4):896-898.
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  10. Contrary Things: Exegesis, Dialectic, and the Poetics of Didacticism.Catherine Brown - 1998 - Stanford University Press.
    This work of intellectual and cultural history seeks to understand the recurring connection of teaching with contradiction in some major texts of the European Middle Ages. It moves comfortably between patristic and monastic exegesis, the Paris schools of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and late medieval Spain; between Latin and vernacular, between religious and secular. It assimilates the methodologies of religious and erotic texts, thereby displaying the investment of each in the sensuality and analytical power of language. The book begins (...)
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  11.  3
    Conor Whately, Battles and Generals: Combat, Culture, and Didacticism in Procopius’ “Wars”. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2016. Pp. Xiii, 276. $149. ISBN: 978-90-04-31036-0. [REVIEW]Alexander Sarantis - 2019 - Speculum 94 (4):1243-1244.
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  12.  24
    Handbook of Inaesthetics.Alain Badiou - 2005 - Stanford University Press.
    Didacticism, romanticism, and classicism are the possible schemata for the knotting of art and philosophy, the third term in this knot being the education of subjects, youth in particular. What characterizes the century that has just come to a close is that, while it underwent the saturation of these three schemata, it failed to introduce a new one. Today, this predicament tends to produce a kind of unknotting of terms, a desperate dis-relation between art and philosophy, together with the (...)
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  13. Handbook of Inaesthetics.Alberto Toscano (ed.) - 2004 - Stanford University Press.
    Didacticism, romanticism, and classicism are the possible schemata for the knotting of art and philosophy, the third term in this knot being the education of subjects, youth in particular. What characterizes the century that has just come to a close is that, while it underwent the saturation of these three schemata, it failed to introduce a new one. Today, this predicament tends to produce a kind of unknotting of terms, a desperate dis-relation between art and philosophy, together with the (...)
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  14. Hans-Georg Gadamer's Dialectic of Dialogue and the Epistemology of the Community of Inquiry.David Kennedy - 1990 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 11 (1).
    The idea of the classroom as a community of inquiry, and of the community of inquiry as a model for optimal classroom practice, is perhaps one of the great unrealized ideas in Western educational history. We first find it represented in the Socratic dialogues, but it is not realized there, whether becasue of the dominating power of Socrates' intellect, or the scribal distortions which resulted from PLatos's didacticism, or both. More recently, the concept finds powerful theoretical articulation in the (...)
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  15.  1
    Goodbye Gauley Mountain, Hello Eco-Camp: Queer Environmentalism in the Anthropocene.Lauran Whitworth - 2019 - Feminist Theory 20 (1):73-92.
    This article considers the effectiveness of queer environmental ethics in the Anthropocene, a word increasingly used to describe the anthropogenic destruction of ecosystems that marks our current geological era. Taking as my subject the contemporary ecosexuality movement popularised by performance artists Annie Sprinkle and her co-collaborator and partner Elizabeth Stephens, I explore the ethics behind ecosexuals’ encounters with the natural environment. Stephens and Sprinkle's performances, captured in their documentary Goodbye Gauley Mountain: An Ecosexual Love Story, make clear ecosexuality's concurrent urgency (...)
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  16.  16
    “Art for Humanity's Sake” the Social Novel as a Mode of Moral Discourse.D. M. Yeager - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):445-485.
    The social novel ought not to be confused with didacticism in literature and ought not to be expected to provide prescriptions for the cure of social ills. Neither should it necessarily be viewed as ephemeral. After examining justifications of the social novel offered by William Dean Howells (in the 1880s) and Jonathan Franzen (in the 1990s), the author explores the way in which social novels alter perceptions and responses at levels of sensibility that are not usually susceptible to rational (...)
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  17.  23
    Two Didactic Strategies at the End of Herodotus 'Histories(9.108–122)'.Christopher Welser - 2009 - Classical Antiquity 28 (2):359-385.
    Although most scholars now seem to agree that Herodotus was to some extent a didactic historian writing for the instruction of his readers, the systematic nature of his didacticism has perhaps not been fully appreciated. The Histories' concluding episodes reveal at least two didactic programs or strategies: first, the reader is to be trained in the application of Herodotean thinking to events subsequent to the period covered by the narrative; second, the reader is to be warned of the moral (...)
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  18.  13
    Didática e suas forças vertiginosas.Sônia Regina da Luz de Matos - 2009 - Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 14 (1).
    Resumo: Vivendo os momentos contemporâneos da sociedade, da ciência,da tecnologia, da virtualidade e do quadro de giz; me ponho como uma sintomatologista desses tempos. Para isso, eventualmente, me desnudo do ser professora, para, assim, poder olhar o que não vejo quando estou nas vestes dessa identidade. Os sintomas fazem com que escreva e trace muitas linhas para transitar nesse cosmo da “didática no currículo”. Algumas dessas linhas são lisas, sinuosas, umas ainda não ditas, outras ainda têm que ser esfaceladas, porém (...)
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  19.  16
    Discipline and Pleasure: The Pedagogical Work of Disneyland.Susan L. Aronstein & Laurie A. Finke - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (6):610-624.
    Disneyland is work disguised as play; school disguised as vacation. While Walt Disney’s curriculum deploys across all of its products, it literally engulfs the approximately 50 million ‘guests’ who visit the Disney Parks each year. Drawing on Sarah Ahmed’s phenomenological reading of orientation in Queer phenomenology, this article investigates the ways in which Disney’s didacticism is made material through practices and procedures designed to orient the park’s visitors, to ensure that those visitors always know where they are and who (...)
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  20.  7
    The Ethical Turn in Aesthetic Education: Early Chinese Thinkers on Music and Arts. Gu - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (1):95-111.
    In memory of Anthony C. Yu who read and commented on an early version of this article.In the comparative philosophy of art, there is a widely accepted view that, while classical Western aesthetic theory emphasizes the unity of beauty and truth, classical Chinese aesthetic theory focuses on the unity of beauty and goodness. Indeed, one striking feature of Chinese aesthetics is its emphasis on moral education and didacticism. Although Western tradition also emphasizes the importance of moral education in art (...)
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  21.  46
    Charm and Strangeness: The Aesthetic and Epistemic Dimensions of Derek Jarman's Wittgenstein.Kieran Anthony Cashell - 2012 - Film-Philosophy 16 (1):101-126.
    Wittgenstein (1993), Derek Jarman’s biopic of the Austrian-born Cambridge philosopher is a fascinating – if perplexing – film. In equal measure aesthetic and didactic, its status is ambiguous, and not only because didacticism in the philosophy of art is often assumed to diminish aesthetic value. Nothing, however, of the film’s aesthetic is depreciated by the intention to instruct. Even if the objective was to teach, the film is also highly aestheticised. Composed of a series of richly theatrical set-pieces, Jarman’s (...)
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  22. Nietzsche's Subversion of the Aesthetic Socratic Dialectic.Thomas Jovanovski - 1991 - Dissertation, Duquesne University
    The object of my dissertation is to demonstrate that the conceptual thrust of Nietzsche's philosophical activity is a sustained endeavor to negate the Socratic basis of Western ontology through the re-implementation of the Aeschylean tragic paideia. Nietzsche's most consequential objection against Socrates is the latter's neutralizing of Hellenic mythos with the "cold edge" of reason and the "naive optimism" of science. Accordingly, we may most properly understand Nietzsche's effort as a movement against aesthetic Socratism, since it is with its "supreme (...)
     
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  23.  24
    Political Theory and International Relations. [REVIEW]L. P. T. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (1):126-128.
    This is a revised dissertation and exhibits some of the infelicities of that genre: verbosity, didacticism, and repetitiveness. The first two parts criticize the two "prevailing conceptions of international relations". The third section points the way to a "more cosmopolitan" perspective vaguely inspired by Kant and grounded in Rawls. Beitz mentions in passing that prior to the mid-seventeenth century "a different conception of international order had been ascendant", but he is otherwise ignorant of both the classical and the medieval (...)
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  24.  12
    Screwtape’s Remedy for Love: C. S. Lewis and Ovid.Michael Boler - 2019 - Renascence 71 (1):21-38.
    In the Ars Amatoria Ovid claims to make his audience experts in love; in the Remedia Amoris he teaches them how to fall out of love. These two poems are masterpieces of satirical comedy. At first glance Ovidian satire seems worlds apart from The Screwtape Letters of C.S. Lewis. While written for entirely different aims and differing in many obvious aspects, both works describe the surest means by which to suffocate love. For Ovid, it is romantic love that must be (...)
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  25.  15
    "Stalingrad" and My Lai: A Literary-Political Speculation.Strother Purdy - 1979 - Critical Inquiry 5 (4):651-661.
    In serious art, where the best talents of each generation work, we have seen the elimination of didacticism, moral lessons, and the sentimentality so characteristic of the preceding century; in their place we find the celebration of dryness, acerbity, irony, withdrawal from emotion, balance in tension, the reduction of the authorial and, finally, the human presence: "empty words, corresponding to the void in things."1 Literature as practiced and as taught in the schools has tended toward the allusive and the (...)
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  26.  24
    The Extra Strand of the Māori Science Curriculum.Georgina Stewart - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1175-1182.
    This paper comments on the process of re-development of the Maori-medium Science (Pūtaiao) curriculum, as part of overall curriculum development in Aotearoa New Zealand. A significant difference from the English Science curriculum was the addition of an ‘extra strand’ covering the history and philosophy of science. It is recommended that this strand be taught by means of narratives (i.e. using ‘narrative pedagogy’) in order to avoid a superficial didacticism that succumbs to the traditional notion of science curriculum content as (...)
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  27.  16
    Avoir besoin que les gens pensent.Philippe Pignarre - 2005 - Multitudes 4 (4):127-134.
    New issues have invaded the political field over the past years , while the traditional issues of the labour movement seem to be increasingly excluded, abandoned to the discourse of experts. With the Altermondialist movement and the NO campaign to the French referendum on the European Constitution, traditional political issues have made a comeback, but « the political » itself has experienced a deep transformation in the meantime. Against experts and their didacticism, politics now consists in experimenting with collective (...)
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  28.  4
    Zhu Xi’s Study of the Chuci and the Tradition of Confucian Aesthetics.Chen Chao-Ying - 2018 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 49 (3-4):207-218.
    Zhu Xi regarded the Chuci as highly as the Shijing. The author argues that Zhu’s positive reading of Chuci turned on the author Qu Yuan’s patriotic intent but neglected the cultural background of Chu and alchemical Daoism. Zhu’s didacticism led him to take the non-Confucian cultural imagery as metaphor.
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  29.  65
    The Artist on Process and Ethics.Ada Medina & Chris J. Cuomo - 2003 - Ethics and the Environment 8 (1):3-21.
    : Standing before one of Ada Medina's works in a museum recently, I knew myself to be in the company of a distinct presence. The exquisite form was so novel, yet its layers of organicity were deeply familiar. The piece effectively conveyed complex relationality, and pointed toward innovative forms of being, without resorting to didacticism, melodrama, or cliché. I had a strong urge to hug it. I needed to step back and figure it out.
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  30.  8
    Fernán Pérez de Guzmán: Poet in Exile.Julian Weiss - 1991 - Speculum 66 (1):96-108.
    We look on Fernán Pérez de Guzmán as an exile not only because he lived out the last thirty years of his life in the relative seclusion of his estate in Batres; he is an exile, too, because as a poet he has long been banished from critical acclaim. For an enthusiastic view, one has to go back to the 1860s and the eulogy of the literary historian José Amador de los Ríos, according to whom Fernán Pérez's graceful didacticism (...)
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  31.  8
    Education as Resistance in Literary Criticism and Journalism: Between Professionalization and Democratization of Literature.Nathalia Jabur - 2010 - Cosmos and History 6 (2):148-161.
    Professionalization and political engagement are usually placed as incompatible in the case of journalism and the mainstream press, resulting in an identification of cultural resistance exclusively with alternative/amateur vehicles. I will use the concept of journalistic field as introduced by Pierre Bourdieu to review these assumptions and to discuss a form of political resistance that acts in one’s own area of knowledge, is not overtly political and whose effects are not immediately accountable for.Drawing examples from my research on two literary (...)
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  32.  23
    Sartre's Theater of Resistance: Les Mouches and the Deadlock of Collective Responsibility.Andrew Ryder - 2009 - Sartre Studies International 15 (2):78-95.
    Sartre's play Les Mouches ( The Flies ), first performed in 1943 under German occupation, has long been controversial. While intended to encourage resistance against the Nazis, its approval by the censor indicates that the regime did not recognize the play as a threat. Further, its apparently violent and solitary themes have been read as irresponsible or apolitical. For these reasons, the play has been characterized as ambiguous or worse. Sartre himself later saw it as overemphasizing individual autonomy, and in (...)
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  33.  7
    The Epistemology of Genre.Jonathan Sadow - 2008 - In Alexander John Dick & Christina Lupton (eds.), Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century: Writing Between Philosophy and Literature. Pickering & Chatto.
    In “The Epistemology of Metaphor,” Paul De Man analyzes the problem of figural language in Locke, Condillac, and Kant, and suggests that the proliferation of figuration in language is a central difficulty for eighteenth-century philosophy. De Man, curiously enough, provides examples from philosophy while (aside from an oblique reference to the gothic novel) largely ignoring the "depository of the problem": Literature. And yet, readers of Sterne will find De Man's subject—the fear of metaphoric proliferation in eighteenth-century philosophy in general, and (...)
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  34. Can Literary Fiction Be Suppositional Reasoning?Gilbert Plumer - 2020 - In Catarina Dutilh Novaes, Henrike Jansen, Jan Albert Van Laar & Bart Verheij (eds.), Reason to Dissent: Proceedings of the 3rd European Conference on Argumentation, Vol. III. London, UK: College Publications. pp. 279-289.
    Suppositional reasoning can seem spooky. Suppositional reasoners allegedly (e.g.) “extract knowledge from the sheer workings of their own minds” (Rosa), even where the knowledge is synthetic a posteriori. Can literary fiction pull such a rabbit out of its hat? Where P is a work’s fictional ‘premise’, some hold that some works reason declaratively (supposing P, Q), imperatively (supposing P, do Q), or interrogatively (supposing P, Q?), and that this can be a source of knowledge if the reasoning is good. True, (...)
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