Results for 'divine concurrence'

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  1. Peter of Palude on Divine Concurrence: An Edition of his In II Sent., D. 1, Q. 4.Zita Toth - 2016 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 83 (1):49-92.
    The present text contains a critical edition of Peter of Palude’s question of divine concurrence, found in his Sentences commentary, book II, d. 1, q. 4. The question concerns whether God is immediately active in every action of a creature, and if yes, how we should understand this divine concurrence. Peter, just as elsewhere in his commentary, considers at length the opinions of other thinkers — especially those of Giles of Rome, Durand of St.-Pourçain, and Thomas (...)
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  2. Ockham on Divine Concurrence.Zita Toth - 2019 - Saint Anselm Journal 15:81-105.
    The focus of this paper is Ockham's stance on the question of divine concurrence---the question whether God is causally active in the causal happenings of the created world, and if so, what God's causal activity amounts to and what place that leaves for created causes. After discussing some preliminaries, I turn to presenting what I take to be Ockham's account. As I show, Ockham, at least in this issue, is rather conservative: he agrees with the majority of medieval (...)
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  3. Leibniz on divine concurrence.Sukjae Lee - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (2):203-248.
    Leibniz was a divine concurrentist. That is to say, when it came to the question of how God’s causal power relates to the natural causal activity of creatures, Leibniz held that both God and the creature are directly involved in the occurrence of these effects.
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  4. Moral evil and divine concurrence in the Theodicy.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2014 - In Larry M. Jorgensen & Samuel Newlands (eds.), New Essays on Leibniz’s Theodicy. Oxford University Press.
  5.  15
    Leibniz on Divine Concurrence.Sukjae Lee - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (2):203-248.
    Leibniz was a divine concurrentist. That is to say, when it came to the question of how God’s causal power relates to the natural causal activity of creatures, Leibniz held that both God and the creature are directly involved in the occurrence of these effects.
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  6.  55
    Leibniz on Divine Concurrence.John Whipple - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (10):865-879.
  7.  32
    Leibniz on divine concurrence with secondary causes.Ezio Vailati - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):209 – 230.
  8.  15
    Cartesian Causality, Explanation, and Divine Concurrence.Kenneth Clatterbaugh - 1995 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (2):195 - 207.
  9.  2
    One True Cause: Causal Powers, Divine Concurrence, and the Seventeenth-Century Revival of Occasionalism.Andrew R. Platt - 2020 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    "The French philosopher Nicolas Malebranche popularized the doctrine of occasionalism in the late seventeenth century. Occasionalism is the thesis that God alone is the true cause of everything that happens in the world, and created substances are merely "occasional causes." This doctrine was originally developed in medieval Islamic theology, and was widely rejected in the works of Christian authors in medieval Europe. Yet despite its heterodoxy, occasionalism was revived starting in the 1660s by French and Dutch followers of the philosophy (...)
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  10. Exaltation and atrocity: why kenotic humility can’t justify divine concurrence of evil.Jill Hernandez - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 79 (5):493-506.
    ABSTRACT‘Exaltation views’ of humility are grounded on a kenotic view of humility, such that divine blessing comes proportionate to the extent to which an agent humbles herself. This article rejects exaltation views of humility which define humility kenotically, justify their arguments from a divine hiddenness perspective, and which conclude that divine concurrence with evil is justified as long as all humble believers eventually are exalted and blessed. Rather, I will contend that exaltation views misunderstand the meaning (...)
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  11.  72
    One True Cause: Causal Powers, Divine Concurrence, and the Seventeenth-Century Revival of Occasionalism by Andrew R. Platt. [REVIEW]Nabeel Hamid - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (2):345-347.
    On an old narrative, dating back to Leibniz and developed in nineteenth-century historiography, occasionalism was revived in the early modern period as an ad hoc response to the problems of mind-body union and interaction arising from Descartes's metaphysics. According to Leibniz, Descartes gave up the struggle, leaving his disciples to iron out this most scandalous of wrinkles in his system. A line of followers—Clauberg, Geulincx, La Forge, Le Grand, Arnauld, Cordemoy, and above all, Malebranche—dusted off the discredited doctrine of occasionalism (...)
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  12. Leibniz on Individual Substances and Causation: An Account of Divine Concurrence.Sukjae Lee - 2001 - Dissertation, Yale University
    Leibniz's views on divine concurrence have presented interpreters with great difficulty. On the one hand, Leibniz thought that creatures have genuine causal powers, causing their own states. But he also believed that God is immediately involved in every aspect of the world by endorsing the 'conservation is but continuous creation' thesis . Accordingly, when faced with the question of how divine and creaturely causality relate, Leibniz held that God and creatures concur. It is not obvious, however, how (...)
     
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  13.  22
    What Do God and Creatures Really Do in an Evolutionary Change? Divine Concurrence and Transformism from the Thomistic Perspective.Mariusz Tabaczek - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (3):445-482.
    Many enthusiasts of theistic evolution willingly accept Aquinas’s distinction between primary and secondary causes, to describe theologically “the mechanics” of evolutionary transformism. However, their description of the character of secondary causes in relation to God’s creative action oftentimes lacks precision. To some extent, the situation within the Thomistic camp is similar when it comes to specifying the exact nature of secondary and instrumental causes at work in evolution. Is it right to ascribe all causation in evolution to creatures—acting as secondary (...)
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  14. What Do God and Creatures Really Do in an Evolutionary Change? Divine Concurrence and Transformism from the Thomistic Perspective in advance.Mariusz Tabaczek - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (3):445-482.
    Many enthusiasts of theistic evolution willingly accept Aquinas’s distinction between primary and secondary causes, to describe theologically “the mechanics” of evolutionary transformism. However, their description of the character of secondary causes in relation to God’s creative action oftentimes lacks precision. To some extent, the situation within the Thomistic camp is similar when it comes to specifying the exact nature of secondary and instrumental causes at work in evolution. Is it right to ascribe all causation in evolution to creatures—acting as secondary (...)
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  15.  67
    Descartes's Nomic Concurrentism: Finite Causation and Divine Concurrence.Andrew Pessin - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):25-49.
  16.  93
    Divine Conservation, Concurrence, and Occasionalism.Edward Ryan Moad - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (2):209-225.
    Occasionalism is the doctrine that relegates all real causal efficacy exclusively to God. This paper will aim to elucidate in some detail the metaphysical considerations that, together with certain common medieval theological axioms, constitute the philosophical steps leading to this doctrine. First, I will explain how the doctrine of divine conservation implies that we should attribute to divine power causal immediacy in every natural event and that it rules out mere conservationism as a model of the causal relation (...)
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  17. Leibniz on Divine Causation: Continuous Creation and Concurrence without Occasionalism.Julia Jorati - 2021 - In Gregory E. Ganssle (ed.), Philosophical Essays on Divine Causation. New York: Routledge. pp. 122-140.
  18.  93
    Concurrence or divergence? Reconciling Descartes's physics with his metaphysics.Helen Hattab - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):49-78.
    : This paper interprets Descartes's use of the Scholastic doctrine of divine concurrence in light of contemporaneous sources, and argues against two prevailing occasionalist interpretations. On the first occasionalist reading God's concurrence or cooperation with natural causes is always mediate (i.e., concurrence reduces to God's continual recreation of substances). The second reading restricts God's immediate concurrence to his co-action with minds. This paper shows that Descartes's metaphysical commitments do not necessitate either form of occasionalism, and (...)
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  19.  33
    Leibniz on Concurrence, Spontaneity, and Authorship.Julia von Bodelschwingh - 2011 - Modern Schoolman 88 (3/4):267-297.
    Leibniz holds that creatures require divine concurrence for all their actions, and that this concurrence is 'special,' that is, directed at the particular qualities of each action. This gives rise to two potential problems. The first is the problem of explaining why special concurrence does not make God a co-author of creaturely actions. Second, divine concurrence may seem incompatible with the central Leibnizian doctrine that substances must act spontaneously, or independently of other substances. (...), in other words, may appear to jeopardize creaturely substancehood. I argue that Leibniz can solve both of these problems by invoking final and formal causation. The creature is the sole author of its actions because it alone contributes the formal and final cause to these actions. Similarly, because it contributes the formal and final cause, the creature possesses what I call explanatory spontaneity. Leibniz, I contend, considers this type of spontaneity sufficient for substancehood. (shrink)
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  20. Divine Activity and Motive Power in Descartes's Physics.Andrew R. Platt - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):623 - 646.
    This paper is the first of a two-part reexamination of causation in Descartes's physics. Some scholars ? including Gary Hatfield and Daniel Garber ? take Descartes to be a `partial' Occasionalist, who thinks that God alone is the cause of all natural motion. Contra this interpretation, I agree with literature that links Descartes to the Thomistic theory of divine concurrence. This paper surveys this literature, and argues that it has failed to provide an interpretation of Descartes's view that (...)
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  21. Leibniz: Creation and Conservation and Concurrence.Jeffrey K. McDonough - 2007 - The Leibniz Review 17:31-60.
    In this paper I argue that the hoary theological doctrine of divine concurrence poses no deep threat to Leibniz’s views on theodicy and creaturely activity even as those views have been traditionally understood. The first three sections examine respectively Leibniz’s views on creation, conservation and concurrence, with an eye towards showing their sys­tematic compatibility with Leibniz’s theodicy and metaphysics. The fourth section takes up remaining worries arising from the bridging principle that conservation is a continued or continuous (...)
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  22. God's general concurrence with secondary causes: Why conservation is not enough.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1991 - Philosophical Perspectives 5:553-585.
    After an exposition of some key concepts in scholastic ontology, this paper examines four arguments presented by Francisco Suarez for the thesis, commonly held by Christian Aristotelians, that God's causal contribution to effects occurring in the ordinary course of nature goes beyond His merely conserving created substances along with their active and passive causal powers. The postulation of a further causal contribution, known as God's general concurrence (or general concourse), can be viewed as an attempt to accommodate an element (...)
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  23.  5
    On Creation, Conservation, and Concurrence: Metaphysical Disputations 20, 21, and 22.Francisco Suárez - 2002 - St. Augustine's Press.
    This is the first time that the Disputations 20-22 have been translated into English. They deal with the divine action of creation, conservation and concurrence.
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  24. Moral Evil and Leibniz’s Form/Matter Defense of Divine Omnipotence.Jill Graper Hernandez - 2010 - Sophia 49 (1):1-13.
    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that Leibniz’s form/matter defense of omnipotence is paradoxical, but not irretrievably so. Leibniz maintains that God necessarily must concur only in the possibility for evil’s existence in the world (the form of evil), but there are individual instances of moral evil that are not necessary (the matter of evil) with which God need not concur. For Leibniz, that there is moral evil in the world is contingent on God’s will (a dimension of (...)
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  25.  10
    Leibniz: Creation and Conservation and Concurrence.Jeffrey K. McDonough - 2007 - The Leibniz Review 17:31-60.
    In this paper I argue that the hoary theological doctrine of divine concurrence poses no deep threat to Leibniz’s views on theodicy and creaturely activity even as those views have been traditionally understood. The first three sections examine respectively Leibniz’s views on creation, conservation and concurrence, with an eye towards showing their sys­tematic compatibility with Leibniz’s theodicy and metaphysics. The fourth section takes up remaining worries arising from the bridging principle that conservation is a continued or continuous (...)
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  26.  13
    Divinity, humanity, and death: THOMAS V. MORRIS.Thomas V. Morris - 1983 - Religious Studies 19 (4):451-458.
    In an article which appeared a few years ago, entitled ‘God's Death’ , A.D. Smith launched one of the most interesting of recent attacks on the traditional doctrine of the Incarnation. Focusing on the death of Christ, he claimed to demonstrate the logical impossibility of Jesus having been both human and divine. Each of the premises of his argument was said to be a commitment of orthodox theology. He thus presented his reasoning as displaying an internal incoherence in that (...)
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  27. Durand and Suárez on Divine Causation.Jacob Tuttle - 2022 - In Philosophical Essays on Divine Causation (Routledge Studies in the Philosophy of Religion). Routledge. pp. 82-101.
  28. The Incompatibility of Universal, Determinate Divine Action with Human Free Will.Simon Kittle - forthcoming - In Peter Furlong & Leigh C. Vicens (eds.), Theological Determinism: New Perspectives. Cambridge. pp. 100-118.
    Is it consistent to maintain that human free will is incompatible with determinism in the natural world while also maintaining that it is compatible with divine universal causation? On the face of it, divine universal causation looks like a form of determinism. And the intuitions which lead to incompatibilism about free will and natural determinism also lead to incompatibilism about free will and divine determinism. Several thinkers have attempted to resist this conclusion. This essay critiques that view, (...)
     
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  29.  50
    Peter Olivi's Rejection of God's Concurrence with Created Causes.Gloria Frost - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (4):655-679.
    The relationship between divine and created causality was widely discussed in medieval and early modern philosophy. Contemporary scholars of these discussions typically stake out three possible positions: occasionalism, concurrentism, and mere-conservationism. It is regularly claimed that virtually no medieval thinker adopted the final view which denies that God is an immediate active cause of creaturely actions. The main aim of this paper is to further understanding of the medieval causality debate, and particularly the mere-conservationist position, by analysing Peter John (...)
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  30. Création continuelle, concours divin et théodicée dans le débat Bayle-Jaquelot-Leibniz.Jean-Luc Solere - 2015 - In Chr. Leduc, P. Rateau and J.-L. Solère, eds., Leibniz et Bayle: Confrontation et Dialogue. Hanover, Germany: pp. 395-424.
  31.  10
    Self-ownership and despotism: Locke on property in the person, divine dominium of human life, and rights-forfeiture.Johan Olsthoorn - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (2):242-263.
    :This essay explores the meaning and normative significance of Locke’s depiction of individuals as proprietors of their own person. I begin by reconsidering the long-standing puzzle concerning Locke’s simultaneous endorsement of divine proprietorship and self-ownership. Befuddlement vanishes, I contend, once we reject concurrent ownership in the same object: while God fully owns our lives, humans are initially sole proprietors of their own person. Locke employs two conceptions of “personhood”: as expressing legal independence vis-à-vis humans and moral accountability vis-à-vis God. (...)
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  32.  14
    W. Matthews Grant, Free Will and God’s Universal Causality: The Dual Sources Account. [REVIEW]Simon Kittle - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):374-379.
    I review W. Matthews Grant's book Free Will and God's Universal Causality. While I note that Grant's book is a systematic and wide-ranging defence of a strong doctrine of divine concurrence, I suggest that in the end the core of Grant's view fails to overcome the metaphysical objection to divine concurrence, roughly, that there cannot be two causes both of which (but not together) cause the entirety of an event.
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  33.  18
    Peter of Palude and the Fiery Furnace.Zita V. Toth - 2020 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 37 (2):121-142.
    According to most medieval thinkers, whenever something causally acts on another thing, God also acts with it. Durand of St.-Pourçain, an early fourteenth-century Dominican philosopher, disagrees. This paper is about a fourteenth-century objection to Durand’s view, which I will call the Fiery Furnace Objection, as formulated by Durand’s contemporary, Peter of Palude. Although Peter of Palude is not usu- ally regarded as a particularly original thinker, this paper calls attention to one of his more interesting controversies with his fellow friar, (...)
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  34.  88
    God is (probably) a cause among causes.Simon Kittle - 2022 - Theology and Science 20 (2):247-262.
    Several recent authors have suggested that much of the discussion on divine action is flawed since it presupposes that divine and human agency compete. Such authors advocate a reappropriation of the Scholastic distinction between primary and secondary causation which, it is suggested, solves many problems in the theology of divine action. This article (i) critiques defences of the primary/secondary cause distinction based on appeals to analogical predication, and (ii) argues that, even assuming an adequate account of the (...)
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  35. Dieu fainéant? Bog in telesa pri Descartesu, Malebranchu in Leibnizu.Gregor Kroupa - 2005 - Filozofski Vestnik 26 (1):67-82.
    "Dieu fainéant? God and Bodies in Descartes, Malebranche, and Leibniz" Conservation, concurrence with secondary causes, and occasionalism are the three attitudes that God can have towards the created universe in early modern philosophy. The aim of this article is to show how and in what forms these three originally mediaeval theories had survived the seventeenth century in Descartes, Malebranche, and Leibniz. I argue that although it cannot always be unequivocally determined which of the three doctrines each of the thinkers (...)
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  36.  32
    Leibniz on Causation and Agency.Julia Jorati - 2017 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a comprehensive examination of Gottfried Leibniz's views on the nature of agents and their actions. Julia Jorati offers a fresh look at controversial topics including Leibniz's doctrines of teleology, the causation of spontaneous changes within substances, divine concurrence, freedom, and contingency, and also discusses widely neglected issues such as his theories of moral responsibility, control, attributability, and compulsion. Rather than focusing exclusively on human agency, she explores the activities of non-rational substances and the differences between (...)
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  37.  52
    Imagination, Intellect and Premotion A Psychological Theory of Domingo Báñez: A Journal of Analytic Scholasticism.David Peroutka Ocd - 2010 - Studia Neoaristotelica 7 (2):107-115.
    The notion of physical premotion is usually associated with the theological topic of divine concurrence. In the present paper I argue that the Thomist Domingo Báñez applied the concept of premotion also in his psychology. According to Báñez, the active intellect communicates a kind of “actual motion” to the phantasma in order to render it a collaborator of intellectual cognition. Such an actual motion is, in other words, a premotion to the effect, as the phantasma is, in Báñez’s (...)
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  38.  27
    Acquainted with Grief: the Atonement and Early Feminist Conceptions of Theodicy.Jill Graper Hernandez - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (1):97-111.
    This paper explores the relationship between the problem of evil and a kenotic view of the Atonement evidenced not just by feminist theologians, but by analytic philosophers of religion. I will argue that, although kenosis provides an interesting story about the ability of Christ to partake in human suffering, it faces debilitating problems for understanding divine concurrence with evil in the world. Most significantly, I will argue that the potential tensions between divine justice and divine love (...)
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  39. Human Freedom in the Philosophy of Pierre Gassendi.Veronica Gventsadze - 2001 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    This dissertation is the first comprehensive study of human freedom in the philosophy of Pierre Gassendi, a 17th century natural scientist, Catholic priest, and one of the founders of Early Modern philosophy. The key postulate of this dissertation is that the epistemology of probabilism, which represents Gassendi's skeptical stance toward the possibility of certain knowledge, is also the foundation of human freedom: the uncertain and merely probable nature of all our knowledge serves as a guarantee of the multiplicity of options (...)
     
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  40. The Actual World.Donald Rutherford - 2018 - In Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. Oxford University Press. pp. 65-85.
    This chapter discusses Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz’s theory of the actual world as the best of all possible worlds. The chapter opens with Leibniz’s response to the two most basic questions of metaphysics: Why is there something rather than nothing? And, why do certain things exist while other equally possible things do not? It examines Leibniz’s critique of Baruch Spinoza’s metaphysics, with particular reference to the argument that God must make a choice among possible worlds because not all possibles are “compossible.” (...)
     
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  41.  1
    A Bigger God and the Pre-Creation Situation: Some Remarks Inspired by William Hasker.Jacek Wojtysiak - 2022 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 70 (1):121-136.
    In the present essay, while entering into discussion with William Hasker, I addressed two divine dilemmas in “the pre-creation situation.” My considerations focused on the reasons for creating a world—the love reason and the manifestation reason—which in some way prevailed over the reasons against creating a world and whose concurrence prompted the image of an optimal creatable world. It turns out that the latter resembles both our world and the world suggested by Hasker’s theism. In that world, God (...)
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  42. Religions, Reasons and Gods: Essays in Cross-Cultural Philosophy of Religion.John Clayton - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Traditional theistic proofs are often understood as evidence intended to compel belief in a divinity. John Clayton explores the surprisingly varied applications of such proofs in the work of philosophers and theologians from several periods and traditions, thinkers as varied as Ramanuja, al-Ghazali, Anselm, and Jefferson. He shows how the gradual disembedding of theistic proofs from their diverse and local religious contexts is concurrent with the development of natural theologies and atheism as social and intellectual options in early modern Europe (...)
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  43.  30
    Making sense of emergence: A critical engagement with leidenhag, leidenhag, and Yong.David Bradnick & Bradford McCall - 2018 - Zygon 53 (1):240-257.
    A number of theologians engaged in the theology and science dialogue—particularly Pentecostal theologian Amos Yong—employ emergence as a framework to discuss special divine action as well as causation initiated by other spiritual realities, such as angels and demons. Mikael and Joanna Leidenhag, however, have issued concerns about its application. They argue that Yong employs supernaturalistic themes with implications that render the concept of emergence obsolete. Further, they claim that Yong's use of emergence theory is inconsistent because he highlights the (...)
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  44.  27
    On the Ecstatic Sources of the Concept of "Alienation".Nathan Rotenstreich - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (3):550 - 555.
    The term ἀλλοίωσις appears in Plato's Republic, 381, as a verb, when Socrates speaks about the fact that the brave and wise soul is the least disturbed and changed by external influences. This term as a noun, in its Latin rendering, alienatio, occurs in St. Augustine, as we shall see presently. Plotinus' description of the relationship between contemplation and the soul's loss of knowledge of herself, is of decisive importance in this context. When the soul is immersed in pure contemplation (...)
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  45.  2
    Культурно-символічна картина світу латинського християнського середньовіччя: Онтологічний вимір.Yurii Svatko - 2020 - Наукові Записки Наукма. Філософія Та Релігієзнавство 5:26-59.
    The present paper is a continuation of the previous appearances by the author addressing the phenomenon of the cultural-symbolic world pictures as typologically founded in the “epoch-making” ontologies and culturally expressed versions of history. In their construction, philosophy is responsible for the love of wisdom, history – for the given in making the consciousness of being, culture – for the personal expression of human history. This article re-constructs the world picture of the Latin Christian Medieval Ages, adequate to the author’s (...)
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    The Ungovernable.Nicholas Heron - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (2):159 - 174.
    This article seeks to deepen Giorgio Agamben?s brief investigation of the Foucauldian technical term dispositif, by locating it (and the triple structure which articulates it) in the larger context of his own contribution to the genealogy of ?governmentality.? Following Agamben?s reconstruction of the Christian paradigm for the divine government of the world, it explores the singular relation between governmental dispositifs and concurrent modes of subjectivation. It argues that the contingency of human action must first be secured for the governmental (...)
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  47. Kant, Wordsworth, and the Aesthetic Experience.Yu Liu - 1994 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo
    In my dissertation "Kant, Wordsworth, and the Aesthetic Experience," I explore the poetic and political implications of the Kantian aesthetic experience, and use them implicitly for a new reading of Wordsworth's poetry. The dissertation begins by considering Kant's view that beauty and sublimity are what may potentially occur inside each and every one of us in our interaction with any given object rather than what exists outside us in the external world. Emphasizing the reading activity of the spectator rather than (...)
     
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  48.  18
    Religions, Reasons and Gods: Essays in Cross-Cultural Philosophy of Religion.Anne M. Blackburn & Thomas D. Carroll - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Traditional theistic proofs are often understood as evidence intended to compel belief in a divinity. John Clayton explores the surprisingly varied applications of such proofs in the work of philosophers and theologians from several periods and traditions, thinkers as varied as Ramanuja, al-Ghazali, Anselm, and Jefferson. He shows how the gradual disembedding of theistic proofs from their diverse and local religious contexts is concurrent with the development of natural theologies and atheism as social and intellectual options in early modern Europe (...)
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  49. Visione e conoscenza : lineamenti di una psicologia mistico‑ascensionale nei Sermones di Garnerio di Rochefort (1140 ca.‑1225 ca.). [REVIEW]Maria Borriello - 2022 - Chôra 20:319-346.
    In the work of the Cistercian Garnerio de Rochefort, active in the second half of the 12th century, we find the formulation of a psychological doctrine based on the interweaving of the Augustinian model of videre and the Neoplatonic principle of a scalar order of the faculties of the soul. The idea of a visual‑cognitive ascent of the soul is used in the direction of an overtly mystical approach, typical of monastic spiritual theology. For Garnerio, the process of man’s inner (...)
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  50. Efficient Causality in the Actual Intellectual Knowledge According to John Duns Scotus.Enrique Santiago Mayocchi - 2017 - Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval 24:139.
    The subject of causality appears in many of the solutions proposed by Duns Scotus on various philosophical problems, such as voluntary act, and theological problems, as the divine dispensation of grace in the sacraments. This paper shows the kinds of causes and causality which are involved in the actual act of intellection. It focuses on the concept of essential order as the source of the different kinds of causal concurrence, and applies this concept to the act of actual (...)
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