Results for 'divine law ethics'

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  1.  20
    Divine Law/Divine Command: The Ground of Ethics in the Western Tradition -- Muslim Perspectives.Azim Nanji - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (1):35-41.
    The article examines the ideas of divine command and divine law in their Quranic and Muslim legal contexts. It suggests a strong connection between western and Muslim values based on linkages developed in medieval times through Latin appropriation of Arabic studies of Classical philosophy. It also traces the need to address common, contemporary concerns such as poverty, through a shared ethical stance.
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  2.  6
    Natural & Divine Law: Reclaiming the Tradition for Christian Ethics.R. Scott Smith - 2001 - Philosophia Christi 3 (2):603-607.
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  3.  11
    Divine Law, Utilitarian Ethics, and Positivist Jurisprudence: A Study of the Legal Philosophy of John Austin.W. E. Rumble - 1979 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 24 (1):139-180.
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  4.  12
    Porter, Jean. Natural and Divine Law: Reclaiming the Tradition for Christian Ethics.Jeremiah J. McCarthy - 2001 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (1):114-116.
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  5.  24
    Natural and Divine Law: Reclaiming the Tradition for Christian Ethics.David C. Williams - 2003 - Faith and Philosophy 20 (2):255-258.
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  6.  19
    Natural and Divine Law: Reclaiming the Tradition for Christian Ethics.Anthony J. Lisska - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):275-277.
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    Natural and Divine Law: Reclaiming the Tradition for Christian Ethics[REVIEW]David C. Williams - 2003 - Faith and Philosophy 20 (2):255-258.
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  8.  5
    Natural and Divine Law: Reclaiming the Tradition for Christian Ethics[REVIEW]Anthony J. Lisska - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):275-277.
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  9.  46
    Divine Law and Human Law in Hobbes's Leviathan.Greg Forster - 2003 - History of Political Thought 24 (2):189-217.
    Scholars generally divide into two camps regarding the role of religion in Hobbes's Leviathan. One side claims that the natural-law doctrine of Leviathan cannot work without sincere belief in God, and Leviathan's theology is sincerely intended to support it. The other side insists that the natural-law doctrine is intended to replace religious ethics and that the theology is insincere. This article first considers two arguments for the 'insincere' reading, the strangeness of Hobbes's theology and his use of certain rhetorical (...)
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  10.  36
    Religion, Morality, and Law in Liberal Democratic Societies: Divine Command Ethics and the Separation of Religion and Politics.Robert Audi - 2001 - Modern Schoolman 78 (2-3):199-217.
  11.  27
    Divine Command/Divine Law: A Biblical Perspective.Patrick D. Miller - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (1):21-34.
    The starting point for thinking about divine command is the reality of God, the initiating and effecting word of God and the character of God, reflected in Scripture especially in regard to goodness and justice.The necessity of social interaction as context for divine command is reflected in several ways; among those mentioned here are the divine council, the covenant, and the incarnation, the word made flesh and living among us. The covenant is central to thinking about (...) commands as they are reflected in Scripture. It presumes a relationship between God and those commanded and is a voluntary association. Obedience to the divine commands results from the goodness of God and is only to the Lord. As such the ethic of command becomes also an ethic of response. Rather than being commands to be obeyed without reason or thought and only because they are commanded by God, the divine commands of Scripture and the law generally involve rationality and persuasion, teaching and interpretation. They chart a way of freedom. (shrink)
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  12. Human and Divine Law in Hegel's Reading of the Antigone.Molly Farneth - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):643-667.
     
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  13.  50
    Equal Before the Law: The Evilness of Human and Divine Lies ‘Abd Al-Gabbar's Rational Ethics.Sophia Vasalou - 2003 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (2):243-268.
    This paper sets out to chart the fortunes of one of the most significant moral propositions in Mu'tazilite moral theory — namely, that it is evil to lie, and it is evil irrespective of the consequences of so doing. The reasons which promote this principle to significance relate to the broader context of Mu'tazilite theological orientation, which aims to vindicate God's justice through demonstrating that moral value does not derive from revelation. Yet this principle suffers the difficulties which commonly afflict (...)
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  14. Divine Hoorays: Some Parallels Between Expressivism and Religious Ethics.Nicholas Unwin - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):659-684.
    Divine law theories of metaethics claim that moral rightness is grounded in God’s commands, wishes and so forth. Expressivist theories, by contrast, claim that to call something morally right is to express our own attitudes, not to report on God’s. Ostensibly, such views are incompatible. However, we shall argue that a rapprochement is possible and beneficial to both sides. Expressivists need to explain the difference between reporting and expressing an attitude, and to address the Frege-Geach problem. Divine law (...)
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  15.  48
    “In Accordance with the Law”: Reconciling Divine and Civil Law in Abelard.Amber L. Griffioen - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):307-321.
    In the "Ethics", Abelard discusses the example of a judge who knowingly convicts an innocent defendant. He claims that this judge does rightly when he punishes the innocent man to the full extent of the law. Yet this claim seems counterintuitive, and, at first glance, contrary to Abelard’s own ethical system. Nevertheless, I argue that Abelard’s ethical system cannot be viewed as completely subjective, since the rightness of an individual act of consent is grounded in objective standards established by (...)
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  16.  18
    Divine Commands, Natural Law, and the Authority of God.Jean Porter - 2014 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 34 (1):3-20.
    Does morality depend ultimately on the rationally compelling force of natural law, or on God's authoritative commands? These are not exclusive alternatives, of course, but they represent two widely influential ways of understanding the moral order seen in relation to divine wisdom, goodness, and power. Each alternative underscores some elements of theistic belief while deemphasizing others. Theories of the natural law emphasize the intrinsic goodness of the natural order to the potential detriment of divine freedom, whereas divine (...)
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  17.  21
    Natural Law and the Thomistic Roots of John Paul II’s Ethics of Human Life.Martin Rhonheimer - 2009 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9 (3):517-539.
    John Paul II broadly dealt with the topic of natural law, particularly in Veritatis splendor: natural law is a law proper of man created as a free and rational being, whose reason, participating in the divine and ordaining reason, is able to develop a normative function of discernment of good and evil. Already as a professor in Lublin, Pope John Paul II had proposed such a genuinely Thomistic, that is, non-naturalistic, concept of natural law which recognizes both human reason (...)
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  18.  8
    Moral Law in Christian Social Ethics.Walter George Muelder - 1966 - Richmond, John Knox Press.
    This work deals with laws of autonomy, values, persons, community, and the metaphysical or divine context of moral choice. The main question is whether a system of moral laws obediently adhered to would bring coherence into ethical reflection.
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  19.  9
    Divine Spirit and Physical Power: Rabbi Shlomo Goren and the Military Ethic of the Israel Defense Forces.Arye Edrei - 2006 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 7 (1):255-297.
    The renewal of Jewish sovereignty in 1948 created a grave challenge to Jewish tradition. As a system that was constructed in exile for a non-sovereign society, Jewish law was lacking "laws of state." The legitimacy of military action and the distinction between just and unjust wars are prime examples of fundamental issues that Jews did not have to confront for a very long period of time. This article examines contemporary Jewish legal responses to the challenges posed by the creation of (...)
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  20.  4
    Consent and the Ethics of International Law Revisiting Grotius’s System of States in a Secular Setting.Christoph Stumpf - 2020 - Grotiana 41 (1):163-176.
    In this article Grotius’s perception of the legal relevance of consent is analysed with respect to its ongoing importance for an ethical fundament of public international law. It is argued that Grotius views the function of consent as an aspect of human law, which is limited, but also supported by what he views as the overarching framework of divine law. This can be particularly illustrated by Grotius’s idea of a duty of granting consent: such duty reflects the ethical quality (...)
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  21. Weird John Brown: Divine Violence and the Limits of Ethics.Ted Smith - 2014 - Stanford University Press.
    Conventional wisdom holds that attempts to combine religion and politics will produce unlimited violence. Concepts such as jihad, crusade, and sacrifice need to be rooted out, the story goes, for the sake of more bounded and secular understandings of violence. Ted Smith upends this dominant view, drawing on Walter Benjamin, Giorgio Agamben, and others to trace the ways that seemingly secular politics produce their own forms of violence without limit. He brings this argument to life—and digs deep into the American (...)
     
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  22.  8
    Bodies of Law: The Divine Architect, Common Law and the Ancient Constitution.Paul Raffield - 2000 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 13 (3):333-356.
    This article addresses the architecture of the four Inns of Court inLondon as repositories for the body of law (corpus iuris). Thebuildings are perceived as visual representations of the unwrittenconstitution; evidence that the sign, not the text, remains thepredominant form through which the constitution manifests its content.It is in this context that the self-governing Inns are interpreted asmicrocosms of the City of God, envisaged by Saint Augustine andprefigured in ancient Greece by the Republic of Plato. The Innssynthesise these classical and (...)
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  23.  17
    Book Review: David VanDrunen, Divine Covenants and Moral Order: A Biblical Theology of Natural LawVanDrunenDavid, Divine Covenants and Moral Order: A Biblical Theology of Natural Law Emory University Studies in Law and Religion. . Xii + 582 Pp. £29.99/US$45.00. ISBN 978-0-8028-7094-0. [REVIEW]Adam Eitel - 2017 - Studies in Christian Ethics 30 (1):121-123.
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  24.  85
    Revaluing Laws of Nature in Secularized Science.Eli I. Lichtenstein - forthcoming - In Yemima Ben-Menahem (ed.), Rethinking the Concept of Laws of Nature. Springer.
    Discovering laws of nature was a way to worship a law-giving God, during the Scientific Revolution. So why should we consider it worthwhile now, in our own more secularized science? For historical perspective, I examine two competing early modern theological traditions that related laws of nature to different divine attributes, and their secular legacy in views ranging from Kant and Nietzsche to Humean and ‘governing’ accounts in recent analytic metaphysics. Tracing these branching offshoots of ethically charged God-concepts sheds light (...)
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  25. The Divine Command Theory and Objective Good.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 1984 - In Rocco Porreco (ed.), Georgetown Symposium on Ethics. Washington DC: University Press of America. pp. 219-233.
    I reply to criticisms of the divine command theory with an eye to noting the relation of ethics to an ontological ground. The criticisms include: the theory makes the standard of right and wrong arbitrary, it traps the defender of the theory in a vicious circle, it violates moral autonomy, it is a relic of our early deontological state of moral development. I then suggest how Henry Veatch's view of good as an ontological feature of the world provides (...)
     
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  26.  11
    Response to Christopher Insole’s Kant and the Divine: From Contemplation to the Moral Law.Nicholas Adams - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (3):293-297.
    This is a response given at the book launch for Christopher Insole’s Kant and the Divine: From Contemplation to the Moral Law, hosted jointly, in November 2020, by the Centre for Catholic Studies, Durham University, and the Australian Catholic University. The response considers the gap between the textual Kant, and the received Kant, and reflects on how theologians have been too quick either to condemn and dismiss Kant, or to rehabilitate Kant for theological projects, which Kant would have been (...)
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  27. Kant and Religion. By Allen W. Wood. Kant and the Divine: From Contemplation to the Moral Law. By Christopher J. Insole. [REVIEW]Jessica Tizzard - forthcoming - Journal of the American Academy of Religion.
    Double Review of Insole, C, "Kant and the Divine: From Contemplation to the Moral Law," Oxford University Press, 2020, 432 pages; and Wood, A, "Kant and Religion," Cambridge University Press, 2020, 249 pages.
     
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  28. Doctor and Student: Or Dialogues Between a Doctor of Divinity, and a Student in the Laws of England Containing the Grounds of Those Laws, Together with Questions and Cases Concerning the Equity and Conscience Thereof; Also Comparing the Civil, Canon, Common and Statute Laws, and Shewing Wherein They Vary From One Another..Christopher Saint German, Samuel Richardson, Catherine Lintot & John Worrall - 1761 - Printed by S. Richardson and C. Lintot, Law-Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty, for J. Worrall, at the Dove in Bell-Yard, Near Lincoln's Inn.
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  29.  5
    Response to Christopher Insole’s Kant and the Divine: From Contemplation to the Moral Law.Clare Carlisle - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (3):290-292.
    This is a response given at the book launch for Christopher Insole’s Kant and the Divine: From Contemplation to the Moral Law, hosted jointly, in November 2020, by the Centre for Catholic Studies, Durham University, and the Australian Catholic University. The response focuses on the continuity and rupture that Insole claims to find between Kant’s early and late philosophy, and draws attention to an aesthetic sensibility across Kant’s thought: a Platonic and rationalist aesthetics which focuses on the qualities of (...)
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  30.  5
    Virtue Ethics: An Introduction.Richard Taylor - 2002 - Prometheus Books.
    In this fresh evaluation of Western ethics, noted philosopher Richard Taylor argues that philosophy must return to the classical notion of virtue as the basis of ethics. To ancient Greek and Roman philosophers, ethics was chiefly the study of how individuals attain personal excellence, or "virtue," defined as intellectual sophistication, wisdom, strength of character, and creativity. With the ascendancy of the Judeo-Christian ethic, says Taylor, this emphasis on pride of personal worth was lost. Instead, philosophy became preoccupied (...)
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  31.  17
    Divine and Human Agency in Second Temple Judaism and Paul: A Comparative Study.Jason Maston - 2010 - Mohr Siebeck.
    Obedience and the law of life in Sirach -- God's gracious acts of deliverance in the Hodayot -- Sin, the Spirit, and human obedience in Romans 7-8.
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  32. The Constitutional Mandate for Judge-Made-Law and Judicial Activism: A Case Study of the Matter of Elizabeth Vaah V. Lister Hospital and Fertility Centre.Ishmael D. Norman, Moses Sk Aikins, Fred N. Binka, Divine Ndonbi Banyubala & Ama K. Edwin - 2012 - Open Ethics Journal 6:1-7.
  33.  99
    Divine Command.John E. Hare - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Divine Command defends the thesis that what makes something morally obligatory is that God commands it, and what makes something morally forbidden is that God forbids it. John E. Hare successfully defends a version of divine command theory, but also shows that there is considerable overlap with some versions of natural law theory. Hare engages with a number of Christian theologians, most especially Karl Barth, and extends into a discussion of divine command within Judaism and Islam. The (...)
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  34. Scientific Law: A Perspectival Account. [REVIEW]John F. Halpin - 2003 - Erkenntnis 58 (2):137-168.
    An acceptable empiricist account of laws of nature would havesignificant implications for a number of philosophical projects. For example, such an account may vitiate argumentsthat the fundamental constants of nature are divinelydesigned so that laws produce a life permittinguniverse. On an empiricist account, laws do not produce the universe but are designed by us to systematize theevents of a universe which does in fact contain life; so any ``fine tuning'' of natural law has a naturalistic explanation.But there are problems for (...)
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  35.  52
    A Jewish Modified Divine Command Theory.Randi Rashkover Martin Kavka - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (2):387 - 414.
    We claim that divine command metaethicists have not thought through the nature of the expression of divine love with sufficient rigor. We argue, against prior divine command theories, that the radical difference between God and the natural world means that grounding divine command in divine love can only ground a formal claim of the divine on the human; recipients of revelation must construct particular commands out of this formal claim. While some metaethicists might respond (...)
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  36.  17
    Divine Command Theory in Early Franciscan Thought: A Response to the Autonomy Objection.Lydia Schumacher - 2016 - Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):461-476.
    In recent years, many scholars have bemoaned the gradual demise of traditional virtue ethics, and its eventual replacement in the later Middle Ages by divine command theory. Where virtue ethics nurtures a capacity for spontaneous moral judgement, this theory turns on adherence to ordained duties and laws. Thus, virtue ethicists among others have tended to object to the theory on the grounds that it undermines the role of the moral agent in moral adjudication. In this article, by (...)
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  37.  2
    Grounded Ethics: The Empirical Bases of Normative Judgements.Max Hocutt - 2000 - New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.
    Scientific naturalism--basing beliefs on empirical evidence--has now triumphed in every field of inquiry except moral philosophy. There it is still thought appropriate to cite otherworldly standards known by divine revelation or moral intuition. In Grounded Ethics Max Hocutt argues that, since there is no transcendent reality on which to base the claims of ethics, normative truth must be sought in the desires of individuals and the conventions of societies. Hocutt begins with an empiricist analysis of normative judgments. (...)
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  38.  5
    Gabrielle M. Applebaum, BA, Is a Graduate in Philosophy From the University of Chicago and is Presently Pursuing a Master's Degree In Divinity at Harvard University Henry Jo Bourguignon, JD, Ph. D., is Professor of Law at the University of Toledo College of Law. [REVIEW]Miriam Plven Cotler - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3:156-158.
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  39.  4
    The Mandate of Heaven: The Divine Command and the Natural Order.Michael Keeling - 1995 - T&t Clark.
    The aim of this book is to re-establish the concept of 'law' in Christian ethics without at the same time sacrificing any of the gains in moral freedom that have come from the concept of situation ethics. Michael Keeling argues that there is a common human search for morality in which the specific contribution of Christians is the idea of freedom as the primary gift of God to human beings. However, within this freedom it should be possible to (...)
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  40.  39
    Divine Justice/Divine Command.David Novak - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (1):6-20.
    In the Jewish tradition there are those who simply identify divine justice with the specific divine commands, which is a theological version of legal positivism. This paper argues for another view in the Jewish tradition, viz., divine justice or divine wisdom is the rationale of the specific divine commands, thus making them more than arbitrary decrees. As the rationale of the specific divine commands, divine justice functions as a criterion of judgment that prevents (...)
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  41.  10
    Plato on Divinization and the Divinity of the Rational Part of the Soul.Justin Keena - 2021 - Plato Journal 21:87-95.
    Three distinct reasons that Plato calls the rational part of the soul “divine” are analyzed: its metaphysical kinship with the Forms, its epistemological ability to know the Forms, and its ethical capacity to live by them. Supposing these three divine aspects of the rational part are unified in the life of each person, they naturally suggest a process of divinization or “becoming like god” according to which a person, by living more virtuously, which requires increasingly better knowledge of (...)
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  42.  29
    Moral Autonomy and Divine Commands.Chan L. Coulter - 1989 - Religious Studies 25 (1):117 - 129.
    This paper outlines a possible state of affairs in which human moral autonomy and a divine command ethical theory coexist. the theory of human moral autonomy agrees with the divine command theory that moral laws are created by an act of legislation. they disagree on who is the legitimate legislator. the paper argues that a rational agent faced with equally acceptable but incompatible solutions to moral problems or faced with disagreement among agents who insist on exercising their moral (...)
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  43.  17
    Gender and the Ethical Given.Molly Farneth - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):643-667.
    G. W. F. Hegel's discussion of the Antigone in the Phenomenology of Spirit has provoked ongoing debate about his views on gender. This essay offers an interpretation of Hegel as condemning social arrangements that take the authoritativeness of identities and obligations to be natural or merely given. Hegel criticizes the ancient Greeks' understanding of both the human law and the divine law; in so doing, he provides resources for a critique of essentialist approaches to sex and gender. On this (...)
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  44.  26
    Democratic Virtue, Comparative Ethics, and Contemporary Islam.John Kelsay - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):697-707.
    This essay illustrates the kind of moral analysis Jeffrey Stout advocates in "Democracy and Tradition" by way of examining a conversation among Muslims that took place between June and December 2002. Their debate centers on al-Qaìda's legitimacy as God's chosen defender of Islam, which is called into question due to the tension between al-Qaìda's military tactics and the concepts of honorable combat held within the Islamic tradition. This giving and taking of reasons in both defense and detraction of al-Qaìda's tactics (...)
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  45.  1
    Ethics and Religion.Harry J. Gensler - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Many people question whether God is the source of morality. Under divine command theory, God's will creates the moral order, and therefore ethical truths are true because of God's will. Under natural law, on the other hand, some ethical truths do not depend on God's will, and yet perhaps they depend on his reason or creation. Ethics and Religion develops strong, defensible, and original versions of both divine command theory and natural law. The book also discusses (...) and atheism: how atheists object on ethical grounds to belief in God and how they view ethics. The book defends belief in God from criticisms and analyzes related concepts, such as practical reason, the golden rule, ethics and evolution, the problem of evil, and the fine-tuning argument. (shrink)
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  46.  35
    Ethics and the Role of Women in Transforming Violent Conflict.Heather D. Macquarrie - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:159-164.
    In October 2000, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1325 on "Women, Peace and Security", calling for women's full and equal participation in all aspects of conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding. The world is at last recognizing that gender issues and peace are inextricably connected, and that women's involvement in peace efforts is essential for the prevention of renewed conflict. Given the need for women's involvement in peace and security issues, we must address the reasons why women's influence is (...)
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  47. Moral Absolutes and Neo-Aristotelian Ethical Naturalism.David McPherson - 2020 - In Michiel Meijer & Herbert De Vriese (eds.), The Philosophy of Reenchantment. Routledge.
    In “Modern Moral Philosophy,” Elizabeth Anscombe makes a “disenchanting” move: she suggests that secular philosophers abandon a special “moral” sense of “ought” since she thinks this no longer makes sense without a divine law framework. Instead, she recommends recovering an ordinary sense of ought that pertains to what a human being needs in order to flourish qua human being, where the virtues are thought to be central to what a human being needs. However, she is also concerned to critique (...)
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  48. James Doyle, No Morality, No Self: Anscombe’s Radical Skepticism. [REVIEW]Katharina Nieswandt - 2019 - Ethics 130 (1):102-106.
    James Doyle’s book is provocative and timely. It is an important contribution to the current wave of Anscombe scholarship, and it offers valuable insights into general metaethical ques­tions, such as: In what senses might morality be “unintelligible”? Or: To what extent does a divine law ethics rest on practical reason? Here, I do not want to summarize the many ad­mirable features of Doyle’s book. I will instead focus on his two main theses, of which I re­main unconvinced.
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  49. Fine Tuning and Divine Design.John Leslie - 2002 - Maritain Studies/Etudes Maritainiennes 18:3 - 13.
    Force strengths, particle masses, etcetera, appear "fine tuned" for intelligent life. There may be many very diverse universes, observational selection explaining why we see a life-permitting one. The alternative is divine selection. The God hypothesis can explain how one and the same force strength or particle mass satisfies life’s many different requirements, and why there are life-encouraging laws of relativity and of quantum theory. It could also answer why any universe exists. God’s existence could be accounted for Platonically, by (...)
     
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  50.  28
    Ethics[REVIEW]A. F. W. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (3):522-523.
    This is a new critical latin edition, with facing English translation, of Peter Abelard’s ethical treatise, sometimes entitled "Know Thyself." The book is one in the series of Oxford Medieval Texts. Accompanying the latin text and simple, easy reading translation is a most helpful introduction by Luscombe which points out the historical importance of this little treatise as among the first finely articulated attempts at bringing the classical concerns with human virtues and character together with the theological concerns of a (...)
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