Results for 'doctors'

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  1. Toward an Emancipatory Psychoanalysis: Brandchaft's Intersubjective Vision.Bernard Brandchaft, Shelley Doctors & Dorienne Sorter - 2010 - Routledge.
    Best known for his contributions to the development of contemporary intersubjectivity theory, Bernard Brandchaft has dedicated a career to the advancement of psychoanalytic theory and practice. Continually searching for a theoretical viewpoint that would satisfactorily explain the clinical phenomena he was encountering, his curiosity eventually led him to the work of Heinz Kohut and the then-emerging school of self psychology. However, seemingly always one step ahead of the crowd, Brandchaft constantly reformulated his ideas about and investigations into the intersubjective nature (...)
     
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  2.  32
    Understanding Doctors' Ethical Challenges as Role Virtue Conflicts.Rosalind Mcdougall - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (1):20-27.
    This paper argues that doctors' ethical challenges can be usefully conceptualised as role virtue conflicts. The hospital environment requires doctors to be simultaneously good doctors, good team members, good learners and good employees. I articulate a possible set of role virtues for each of these four roles, as a basis for a virtue ethics approach to analysing doctors' ethical challenges. Using one junior doctor's story, I argue that understanding doctors' ethical challenges as role virtue conflicts (...)
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  3.  30
    The Implications of Methylphenidate Use by Healthy Medical Students and Doctors in South Africa.Chad Beyer, Ciara Staunton & Keymanthri Moodley - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):20.
    The use of medical stimulants to sustain attention, augment memory and enhance intellectual capacity is increasing in society. The use of Methylphenidate for cognitive enhancement is a subject that has received much attention in the literature and academic circles in recent times globally. Medical doctors and medical students appear to be equally involved in the off-label use of Methylphenidate. This presents a potential harm to society and the individual as the long-term side effect profile of this medication is unknown.
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  4.  19
    Langues de Bois D’Hier Et Parler Vrai D’Aujourd’Hui : De la « Novlangue » aux « Spin Doctors ».Michaël Oustinoff - 2010 - Hermès: La Revue Cognition, communication, politique 58 (3):, [ p.].
    Le terme « langue de bois » est d’une extrême polysémie en français. Il n’en a pas toujours été ainsi : apparu dans les années 1980, le mot est un emprunt au russe, par l’intermédiaire, semble-t-il, du polonais, au moment des événements de Gdansk et du mouvement lancé par le syndicat Solidarność. Comment un terme servant à qualifier la langue d’un régime totalitaire, synonyme de novlangue orwellienne, en est-il venu à couvrir une si grande variété d’emplois, le rendant intraduisible ? (...)
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  5.  32
    Courts as Communicators: Can Doctors Learn From Judges' Decisions? [REVIEW]Loane Skene - 2004 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):49-56.
    The role of the courts in ‘communicating’ with those affected by their decisions is contentious. Some legal commentators maintain that courts and legislators are able to communicate decisions effectively and that attempts to ‘dumb down’ the law will not make such decisions more accessible to doctors and other professionals. Justice Michael Kirby, on the other hand, seems to share the present author's view that judges could improve their communication of their decisions to a wider audience: ‘In future, it seems (...)
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  6.  11
    Ontario Doctors' Attitudes Toward and Use of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.Ian D. Graham, Melissa Brouwers, Christine Davies & Jacqueline Tetroe - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):607-615.
  7.  12
    How Do Prescribing Doctors Anticipate the Effect of Statins?Per Lytsy, Gunilla Burell & Ragnar Westerling - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (3):420-428.
  8.  5
    Changes in Perceived Effect of Practice Guidelines Among Primary Care Doctors.Lee Cheng, Linda Z. Nieman & James L. Becton - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):621-626.
  9.  22
    Communication Between Residents and Attending Doctors on Call After Hours.Michal A. Novoselsky Persky, Amos M. Yinnon, Yossi Freier‐Dror & Ruth Henshke‐Bar‐Meir - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (6):1107-1112.
  10.  20
    How Do Patients Choose Their Doctors for Primary Care in a Free Market?Yuk Tsan Wun, Tai Pong Lam, Kwok Fai Lam, David Goldberg, Donald K. T. Li & Ka Chee Yip - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1215-1220.
  11.  17
    The Role of Clinical Support Workers in Reducing Junior Doctors? Hours and Improving Quality of Patient Care.Rebecca Herbertson, Adrian Blundell & Christine Bowman - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (2):272-275.
  12.  17
    Identifying Poor Performance Among Doctors in NHS Organizations.Rachel Locke, Samantha Scallan, Camilla Leach & Mark Rickenbach - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):882-888.
  13.  12
    Secondary Care Doctors' Perception of Appropriate Prescribing.Christina Ljungberg, Åsa Kettis Lindblad & Mary Tully - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):110-115.
  14.  14
    Diurnal Variation of Prescribing Pattern of Primary Care Doctors in Bahrain.Awatif H. H. Damanhori, Khalid A. J. Al Khaja, Reginald P. Sequeira & Thuraya M. Al-Ansari - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):25-30.
  15.  14
    Conflict of Interest in Croatia: Doctors with Dual Obligations. [REVIEW]Professor Bozidar Vrhovac - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):309-316.
    There is an emerging awareness of the possibility of conflicts of interest in the practice of medicine in Croatia. The paper examines areas within the medical profession where conflicts of interest can and have occurred, probably not only in Croatia. Particularly addressed are situations when a doctor may have dual obligations and how independent ethics committees can help in decreasing the influence of a conflict of interest. The paper also presents extracts from the Croatian Code of Ethics for the medical (...)
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  16.  7
    Diabetes and Oral Health: Doctors' Knowledge, Perception and Practices.Rola Al-Habashneh, Nicola Barghout, Lewis Humbert, Yousef Khader & Hayder Alwaeli - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (5):976-980.
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  17.  60
    How Doctors Think: Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine.Kathryn Montgomery - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    How Doctors Think defines the nature and importance of clinical judgment. Although physicians make use of science, this book argues that medicine is not itself a science but rather an interpretive practice that relies on clinical reasoning. A physician looks at the patient's history along with the presenting physical signs and symptoms and juxtaposes these with clinical experience and empirical studies to construct a tentative account of the illness. How Doctors Think is divided into four parts. Part one (...)
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  18.  28
    Doctors Have No Right to Refuse Medical Assistance in Dying, Abortion or Contraception.Julian Savulescu & Udo Schuklenk - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (3):162-170.
    In an article in this journal, Christopher Cowley argues that we have ‘misunderstood the special nature of medicine, and have misunderstood the motivations of the conscientious objectors’. We have not. It is Cowley who has misunderstood the role of personal values in the profession of medicine. We argue that there should be better protections for patients from doctors' personal values and there should be more severe restrictions on the right to conscientious objection, particularly in relation to assisted dying. We (...)
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  19.  47
    Doctors Have No Right to Refuse Medical Assistance in Dying, Abortion or Contraception.Julian Savulescu & Udo Schuklenk - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (9).
    In an article in this journal, Christopher Cowley argues that we have ‘misunderstood the special nature of medicine, and have misunderstood the motivations of the conscientious objectors’. We have not. It is Cowley who has misunderstood the role of personal values in the profession of medicine. We argue that there should be better protections for patients from doctors' personal values and there should be more severe restrictions on the right to conscientious objection, particularly in relation to assisted dying. We (...)
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  20.  31
    Ethical Difficulties in Clinical Practice: Experiences of European Doctors.S. A. Hurst, A. Perrier, R. Pegoraro, S. Reiter-Theil, R. Forde, A.-M. Slowther, E. Garrett-Mayer & M. Danis - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (1):51-57.
    Background: Ethics support services are growing in Europe to help doctors in dealing with ethical difficulties. Currently, insufficient attention has been focused on the experiences of doctors who have faced ethical difficulties in these countries to provide an evidence base for the development of these services.Methods: A survey instrument was adapted to explore the types of ethical dilemma faced by European doctors, how they ranked the difficulty of these dilemmas, their satisfaction with the resolution of a recent (...)
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  21.  41
    Learning a Way Through Ethical Problems: Swedish Nurses' and Doctors' Experiences From One Model of Ethics Rounds.M. Svantesson, R. Lofmark, H. Thorsen, K. Kallenberg & G. Ahlstrom - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):399-406.
    Objective: To evaluate one ethics rounds model by describing nurses’ and doctors’ experiences of the rounds. Methods: Philosopher-ethicist-led interprofessional team ethics rounds concerning dialysis patient care problems were applied at three Swedish hospitals. The philosophers were instructed to promote mutual understanding and stimulate ethical reflection, without giving any recommendations or solutions. Interviews with seven doctors and 11 nurses were conducted regarding their experiences from the rounds, which were then analysed using content analysis. Findings: The goal of the rounds (...)
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  22.  19
    Gross Negligence Manslaughter and Doctors: Ethical Concerns Following the Case of Dr Bawa-Garba.Ash Samanta & Jo Samanta - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):10-14.
    Dr Bawa-Garba, a senior paediatric trainee who had been involved in the care of a child who died shortly after admission to hospital, was convicted of gross negligence manslaughter and subsequently erased from the medical register. We argue that criminalisation of doctors in this way is fraught with ethical tensions at levels of individual blameworthiness, systemic failures, professionalism, patient safety and at the interface of the regulator and doctor. The current response to alleged manslaughter during clinical care is not (...)
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  23.  19
    Making Space for Empathy: Supporting Doctors in the Emotional Labour of Clinical Care.Angeliki Kerasidou & Ruth Horn - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-5.
    BackgroundThe academic and medical literature highlights the positive effects of empathy for patient care. Yet, very little attention has been given to the impact of the requirement for empathy on the physicians themselves and on their emotional wellbeing.DiscussionThe medical profession requires doctors to be both clinically competent and empathetic towards the patients. In practice, accommodating both requirements can be difficult for physicians. The image of the technically skilful, rational, and emotionally detached doctor dominates the profession, and inhibits physicians from (...)
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  24.  7
    Professionalism Eliminates Religion as a Proper Tool for Doctors Rendering Advice to Patients.Udo Schuklenk - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):713-713.
    Religious considerations and language do not typically belong in the professional advice rendered by a doctor to a patient. Among the rationales mounted by Greenblum and Hubbard in support of that conclusion is that religious considerations and language are incompatible with the role of doctors as public officials.1 Much as I agree with their conclusion, I take issue with this particular aspect of their analysis. It seems based on a mischaracterisation of what societal role doctors fulfil, qua (...). What obliges doctors to communicate by means of content that is expressed in public reason-based language is not that they are public officials. Doctors as doctors are not necessarily public officials. Rather, doctors have such obligations, because they are professionals. Unlike public officials doctors are part of a profession that is to a significant extent self-governing. This holds true for all professions. The …. (shrink)
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  25.  19
    Moral Distress Among Norwegian Doctors.R. Forde & O. G. Aasland - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):521-525.
    Background: Medicine is full of value conflicts. Limited resources and legal regulations may place doctors in difficult ethical dilemmas and cause moral distress. Research on moral distress has so far been mainly studied in nurses. Objective: To describe whether Norwegian doctors experience stress related to ethical dilemmas and lack of resources, and to explore whether the doctors feel that they have good strategies for the resolution of ethical dilemmas. Design: Postal survey of a representative sample of 1497 (...)
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  26.  6
    Bawa-Garba Ruling is Not Good News for Doctors.Nathan Hodson - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):15-16.
    Although some doctors celebrated when the Court of Appeal overturned Hadiza Bawa-Garba’s erasure from the medical register, it is argued here that in many ways the ruling is by no means good news for the medical profession. Doctors’ interests are served by transparent professional tribunals but the Court of Appeal’s approach to the GMC Sanctions Guidance risks increasing opacity in decision-making. Close attention to systemic factors in the criminal trial protects doctors yet the Court of Appeal states (...)
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  27.  33
    Rational Non-Interventional Paternalism: Why Doctors Ought to Make Judgments of What is Best for Their Patients.J. Savulescu - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (6):327-331.
    This paper argues that doctors ought to make all things considered value judgments about what is best for their patients. It illustrates some of the shortcomings of the model of doctor as 'fact-provider'. The 'fact-provider' model fails to take account of the fact that practising medicine necessarily involves making value judgments; that medical practice is a moral practice and requires that doctors reflect on what ought to be done, and that patients can make choices which fail to express (...)
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  28.  14
    Doctors’ Perceptions of How Resource Limitations Relate to Futility in End-of-Life Decision Making: A Qualitative Analysis.Eliana Close, Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves & Sarah Winch - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):373-379.
    ObjectiveTo increase knowledge of how doctors perceive futile treatments and scarcity of resources at the end of life. In particular, their perceptions about whether and how resource limitations influence end-of-life decision making. This study builds on previous work that found some doctors include resource limitations in their understanding of the concept of futility.SettingThree tertiary hospitals in metropolitan Brisbane, Australia.DesignQualitative study using in-depth, semistructured, face-to-face interviews. Ninety-six doctors were interviewed in 11 medical specialties. Transcripts of the interviews were (...)
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  29.  5
    Junior Doctors and Moral Exploitation.Joshua Parker - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (9):571-574.
    In this paper I argue that junior doctors are morally exploited. Moral exploitation occurs where an individual’s vulnerability is used to compel them to take on additional moral burdens. These might include additional moral responsibility, making weighty moral decisions and shouldering the consequent emotions. Key to the concept of exploitation is vulnerability and here I build on Rosalind McDougall’s work on the key roles of junior doctors to show how these leave them open to moral exploitation by restricting (...)
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  30.  22
    Settling for Second Best: When Should Doctors Agree to Parental Demands for Suboptimal Medical Treatment?Tara Nair, Julian Savulescu, Jim Everett, Ryan Tonkens & Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (12):831-840.
    Background Doctors sometimes encounter parents who object to prescribed treatment for their children, and request suboptimal substitutes be administered instead. Previous studies have focused on parental refusal of treatment and when this should be permitted, but the ethics of requests for suboptimal treatment has not been explored. Methods The paper consists of two parts: an empirical analysis and an ethical analysis. We performed an online survey with a sample of the general public to assess respondents’ thresholds for acceptable harm (...)
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  31.  50
    When Doctors Say No: The Battleground of Medical Futility.Susan B. Rubin - 1998 - Indiana University Press.
    Who should decide? In When Doctors Say No, philosopher and bioethicist Rubin examines this controversial issue.
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  32.  21
    Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Healthcare Ethics and Law Among Doctors and Nurses in Barbados.Seetharaman Hariharan, Ramesh Jonnalagadda, Errol Walrond & Harley Moseley - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-9.
    Background The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among healthcare professionals in Barbados in relation to healthcare ethics and law in an attempt to assist in guiding their professional conduct and aid in curriculum development. Methods A self-administered structured questionnaire about knowledge of healthcare ethics, law and the role of an Ethics Committee in the healthcare system was devised, tested and distributed to all levels of staff at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Barbados (a (...)
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  33.  99
    The Role of Doctors' Religious Faith and Ethnicity in Taking Ethically Controversial Decisions During End-of-Life Care.C. Seale - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):677-682.
    Background and Aims The prevalence of religious faith among doctors and its relationship with decision-making in end-of-life care is not well documented. The impact of ethnic differences on this is also poorly understood. This study compares ethnicity and religious faith in the medical and general UK populations, and reports on their associations with ethically controversial decisions taken when providing care to dying patients. Method A postal survey of 3733 UK medical practitioners, of whom 2923 reported on the care of (...)
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  34.  62
    Ethical Theory, Ethnography, and Differences Between Doctors and Nurses in Approaches to Patient Care.D. W. Robertson - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):292-299.
    OBJECTIVES: To study empirically whether ethical theory (from the mainstream principles-based, virtue-based, and feminist schools) usefully describes the approaches doctors and nurses take in everyday patient care. DESIGN: Ethnographic methods: participant observation and interviews, the transcripts of which were analysed to identify themes in ethical approaches. SETTING: A British old-age psychiatry ward. PARTICIPANTS: The more than 20 doctors and nurses on the ward. RESULTS: Doctors and nurses on the ward differed in their conceptions of the principles of (...)
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  35.  15
    Why Doctors Use or Do Not Use Ethics Consultation.J. P. Orlowski - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (9):499-503.
    Background: Ethics consultation is used regularly by some doctors, whereas others are reluctant to use these services.Aim: To determine factors that may influence doctors to request or not request ethics consultation.Methods: A survey questionnaire was distributed to doctors on staff at the University Community Hospital in Tampa, Florida, USA. The responses to the questions on the survey were arranged in a Likert Scale, from strongly disagree, somewhat disagree, neither agree nor disagree, somewhat agree to strongly agree. Data (...)
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  36.  60
    Strengths and Limitations of Considering Patients as Ethics 'Actors' Equal to Doctors: Reflections on the Patients' Position in a French Clinical Ethics Consultation Setting.E. Rari & V. Fournier - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (3):152-155.
    The Clinical ethics centre in Paris offers its services equally to doctors and patients/proxies. Its primary goal is to re-equilibrate doctor–patient roles through giving greater voice to patients individually in medical decisions. Patients are present at virtually all levels, initiating consults, providing their point of view and receiving feedback. The implications of patients' involvement are threefold. At an operational level, decision-making is facilitated by repositioning the debate on ethical grounds and introducing a dynamic of decisional partnership, although contact with (...)
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  37.  12
    Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Healthcare Ethics Among Resident Doctors and Ward Nurses From a Resource Poor Setting, Nepal.Samaj Adhikari, Kumar Paudel, Arja R. Aro, Tara Ballav Adhikari, Bipin Adhikari & Shiva Raj Mishra - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):68.
    BackgroundHealthcare ethics is neglected in clinical practice in LMICs such as Nepal. The main objective of this study was to assess the current status of knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare ethics among resident doctors and ward nurses in a tertiary teaching hospital in Nepal.MethodsThis was a cross sectional study conducted among resident doctors and ward nurses in the largest tertiary care teaching hospital of Nepal during January- February 2016 with a self-administered questionnaire. A Cramer’s V value was (...)
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  38.  44
    Doctors' and Nurses' Attitudes Towards and Experiences of Voluntary Euthanasia: Survey of Members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Shizuko K. Nagata, Noritoshi Tanida & Yasuji Yamazaki - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):324-330.
    Objective—To demonstrate Japanese doctors' and nurses' attitudes towards and practices of voluntary euthanasia (VE) and to compare their attitudes and practices in this regard. Design—Postal survey, conducted between October and December 1999, using a self-administered questionnaire.Participants—All doctor members and nurse members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Main outcome measure—Doctors' and nurses' attitude towards and practices of VE.Results—We received 366 completed questionnaires from 642 doctors surveyed (response rate, 58%) and 145 from 217 nurses surveyed (68%). A total (...)
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  39. Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease (Review).Philippa Lang - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):151-152.
    Philippa Lang - Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.1 151-152 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Philippa Lang Emory University Philip van der Eijk. Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. xiv + 404. Cloth, $95.00. This immaculately (...)
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  40.  28
    Courteous but Not Curious: How Doctors' Politeness Masks Their Existential Neglect. A Qualitative Study of Video-Recorded Patient Consultations.K. M. Agledahl, P. Gulbrandsen, R. Forde & A. Wifstad - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):650-654.
    Objective To study how doctors care for their patients, both medically and as fellow humans, through observing their conduct in patient–doctor encounters. Design Qualitative study in which 101 videotaped consultations were observed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach, generating explanatory categories through a hermeneutical analysis of the taped consultations. Setting A 500-bed general teaching hospital in Norway. Participants 71 doctors working in clinical non-psychiatric departments and their patients. Results The doctors were concerned about their patients' health (...)
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  41.  49
    The Practice of Defensive Medicine Among Hospital Doctors in the United Kingdom.Osman Ortashi, Jaspal Virdee, Rudaina Hassan, Tomasz Mutrynowski & Fikri Abu-Zidan - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):42.
    Defensive medicine is defined as a doctor’s deviation from standard practice to reduce or prevent complaints or criticism. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of the practice of defensive medicine in the UK among hospital doctors and the factors affecting it.
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  42.  36
    A Role for Doctors in Assisted Dying? An Analysis of Legal Regulations and Medical Professional Positions in Six European Countries.G. Bosshard, B. Broeckaert, D. Clark, L. J. Materstvedt, B. Gordijn & H. C. Muller-Busch - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):28-32.
    Objectives: To analyse legislation and medical professional positions concerning the doctor’s role in assisted dying in western Europe, and to discuss their implications for doctors.Method: This paper is based on country-specific reports by experts from European countries where assisted dying is legalised , or openly practiced , or where it is illegal .Results: Laws on assisted dying in The Netherlands and Belgium are restricted to doctors. In principle, assisted suicide is not illegal in either Germany or Switzerland, but (...)
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  43.  28
    Clinical Essentialising: A Qualitative Study of Doctors' Medical and Moral Practice. [REVIEW]Kari Milch Agledahl, Reidun Førde & Åge Wifstad - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):107-113.
    While certain substantial moral dilemmas in health care have been given much attention, like abortion, euthanasia or gene testing, doctors rarely reflect on the moral implications of their daily clinical work. Yet, with its aim to help patients and relieve suffering, medicine is replete with moral decisions. In this qualitative study we analyse how doctors handle the moral aspects of everyday clinical practice. About one hundred consultations were observed, and interviews conducted with fifteen clinical doctors from different (...)
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  44.  32
    Making Research a Requirement of Treatment: Why We Should Sometimes Let Doctors Pressure Patients to Participate in Research.David Orentlicher - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (5):20-28.
    : When a patient could be offered one of multiple established treatments, doctors should be able to offer treatment only if the patient agrees to participate in research aimed at determining which of the treatments is most effective. Making treatment conditional on research participation will help researchers complete badly needed studies.
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  45.  36
    How Should Doctors Approach Patients? A Confucian Reflection on Personhood.Daniel Fu-Chang Tsai - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):44-50.
    The modern doctor-patient relationship displays a patient-centred, mutual-participation characteristic rather than the former active-passive or guidance-cooperation models in terms of medical decision making. Respecting the wishes of patients, amounting to more than mere concern for their welfare, has become the feature central to certain modern bioethics theories. A group of ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice has been proposed by bioethicists and widely adopted by many medical societies as an ethical guide to how doctors, (...)
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  46.  33
    Is There a Moral Duty for Doctors to Trust Patients?W. A. Rogers - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):77-80.
    In this paper I argue that it is morally important for doctors to trust patients. Doctors' trust of patients lays the foundation for medical relationships which support the exercise of patient autonomy, and which lead to an enriched understanding of patients' interests. Despite the moral and practical desirability of trust, distrust may occur for reasons relating to the nature of medicine, and the social and cultural context within which medical care is provided. Whilst it may not be possible (...)
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  47.  57
    Conscientious Refusal and a Doctors's Right to Quit.John K. Davis - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):75 – 91.
    Patients sometimes request procedures their doctors find morally objectionable. Do doctors have a right of conscientious refusal? I argue that conscientious refusal is justified only if the doctor's refusal does not make the patient worse off than she would have been had she gone to another doctor in the first place. From this approach I derive conclusions about the duty to refer and facilitate transfer, whether doctors may provide 'moral counseling,' whether doctors are obligated to provide (...)
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  48.  1
    Trusting Doctors: The Decline of Moral Authority in American Medicine.Jonathan B. Imber - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    "--Daniel Callahan, cofounder of the Hastings Center "Doctors and people who have no choice but to trust doctors--which means all of us--need to read this book.
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  49.  37
    A Long Shadow: Nazi Doctors, Moral Vulnerability and Contemporary Medical Culture.A. Colaianni - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (7):435-438.
    More than 7% of all German physicians became members of the Nazi SS during World War II, compared with less than 1% of the general population. In so doing, these doctors willingly participated in genocide, something that should have been antithetical to the values of their chosen profession. The participation of physicians in torture and murder both before and after World War II is a disturbing legacy seldom discussed in medical school, and underrecognised in contemporary medicine. Is there something (...)
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  50.  47
    Nudging in the Clinic: The Ethical Implications of Differences in Doctors’ and Patients’ Point of View.David Avitzour & Ittay Nissan-Rozen - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (3):183-189.
    There is an extensive ethical debate regarding the justifiability of doctors nudging towards healthy behaviour and better health-related choices. One line of argument in favour of nudging is based on empirical findings, according to which a healthy majority among the public support nudges. In this paper, we show, based on an experiment we conducted, that, in health-related choices, people’s ethical attitudes to nudging are strongly affected by the point of view from which the nudge is considered. Significant differences have (...)
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