Results for 'domestic animals'

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  1.  31
    Reasonable Partiality to Domestic Animals.Robert Heeger - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):123-139.
    The paper deals with partiality flowing from special relationships. Two main problems are discussed. The first concerns the relationship between partiality and genuine moral obligations. If partiality can bring about such obligations only if it is reasonable, what requirements should it meet in order to be reasonable? The second problem is one of animal ethics. Can the concept of reasonable partiality help us articulate what is morally at stake in a current discussion about the treatment of domestic animals, (...)
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  2.  1
    Introducing the Oxford Vocal Sounds Database: A Validated Set of Non-Acted Affective Sounds From Human Infants, Adults, and Domestic Animals.Christine E. Parsons, Katherine S. Young, Michelle G. Craske, Alan L. Stein & Morten L. Kringelbach - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  3.  84
    "What a Thing, Then, is This Cow...": Positioning Domestic Livestock Animals in the Texts and Practices of Small-Scale "Self-Sufficiency".Lewis Holloway - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (2):145-165.
    This paper focuses on the positioning of animals other than human in the texts and practices of two versions of small-scale food "self-sufficiency" in Britain. The paper discusses the writings of Cobbett and Seymour on self-sufficiency, suggesting that livestock animals are central, in a number of ways, to the constitution of these modes of self-sufficiency. First, animals are situated in both the texts and in the practicing of self-sufficiency regarded as essential parts of the economies and ecologies (...)
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  4.  35
    “Pets or Meat”? Ethics and Domestic Animals.Grace Clement - 2011 - Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):46-57.
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  5.  21
    The Abuse of Animals and Domestic Violence: A National Survey of Shelters for Women Who Are Battered.Frank R. Ascione, David S. Wood & Claudia V. Weber - 1997 - Society and Animals 5 (3):205-218.
    The maltreatment of animals, usually companion animals, may occur in homes where there is domestic violence, yet we have limited information about the prevalence of such maltreatment. We surveyed the largest shelters for women who are battered in 49 states and the District of Columbia. Shelters were selected if they provided overnight facilities and programs or services for children. Ninety-six percent of the shelters responded. Analysis revealed that it is common for shelters to serve women and children (...)
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  6.  7
    ""New Places for" Old Spots": The Changing Geographies of Domestic Livestock Animals.Richard Yarwood & Nick Evans - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (2):137-165.
    This paper considers the real and imagined geographies of livestock animals. In doing so, it reconsiders the spatial relationship between people and domesticated farm animals. Some consideration is given to the origins of domestication and comparisons are drawn between the natural and domesticated geographies of animals. The paper mainly focuses on the contemporary geographies of livestock animals and, in particular, "rare breeds" of British livestock animals. Attention is given to the spatial relationship these animals (...)
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  7.  5
    New Places for "Old Spots": The Changing Geographies of Domestic Livestock Animals.Richard Yarwood & Nick Evans - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (2):137-165.
    This paper considers the real and imagined geographies of livestock animals. In doing so, it reconsiders the spatial relationship between people and domesticated farm animals. Some consideration is given to the origins of domestication and comparisons are drawn between the natural and domesticated geographies of animals. The paper mainly focuses on the contemporary geographies of livestock animals and, in particular, "rare breeds" of British livestock animals. Attention is given to the spatial relationship these animals (...)
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  8.  3
    Bulletin on Sumerian Agriculture, Vol. 7: Domestic Animals of Mesopotamia, Part I.Benjamin R. Foster & Sumerian Agriculture Group - 1995 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 115 (4):729.
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  9. A Semantic Field: The Names of the Domestic Animals in French.G. Mounin - 1969 - Social Science Information 8 (3):173-190.
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  10. Feminist Reflections on Humans and Other Domestic Animals.Dianne Romain - 1990 - Between the Species 6 (4):15.
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  11. Historical Background and Analysis of Scientific Content of Ancient Indian Litterature on Practices for the Treatment of Diseases of Domestic Animals.R. D. Sharma & R. Kumar - 1987 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 22 (1):158-163.
     
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  12.  11
    The Ethics of Assisting Domestic and Wild Animals.Paul Veatch Moriarty - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (3):315-317.
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  13.  3
    Provincial Life with Animals.Josephine Donovan - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (1):17-33.
    The relationship of peasants and villagers with their animals in the premodern era is a missing chapter in the history of human-animal relations. Works on peasant culture ignore animals, and works on animals neglect their place in rural lives. This article, based on the depiction of premodern peasant and village life in hundreds of local-color novels and stories of the early nineteenth century, begins to fill in this gap in animal studies scholarship. It reveals that many of (...)
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  14.  3
    The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication.Charles Darwin - 1883 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859 ignited a public storm he neither wanted nor enjoyed. Having offered his book as a contribution to science, Darwin discovered to his dismay that it was received as an affront by many scientists and as a sacrilege by clergy and Christian citizens. To answer the criticism that his theory was a theory only, and a wild one at that, he published two volumes in 1868 to demonstrate that evolution was (...)
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  15. Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication.Charles Darwin - 1988 - New York University Press.
    Are they needed? To be sure. The Darwinian industry, industrious though it is, has failed to provide texts of more than a handful of Darwin's books. If you want to know what Darwin said about barnacles (still an essential reference to cirripedists, apart from any historical importance) you are forced to search shelves, or wait while someone does it for you; some have been in print for a century; various reprints have appeared and since vanished." -Eric Korn,Times Literary Supplement Charles (...)
     
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  16.  16
    Live Free or Die. [REVIEW]Joel Marks - 2010 - Animal Law 17 (1):243-250.
    In On Their Own Terms (Darien, CT: Nectar Bat Press, 2010), Lee Hall articulates a theory that wild animals, due to their autonomous nature, are endowed with rights, but domesticated animals lack rights because they are not autonomous. Hall then argues that the rights of wild animals require that humans let them alone, and that, despite the fact that domestic animals lack rights, humans are required to take care of them because it is humans who (...)
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  17.  65
    Duties to Companion Animals.Steve Cooke - 2011 - Res Publica 17 (3):261-274.
    This paper outlines the moral contours of human relationships with companion animals. The paper details three sources of duties to and regarding companion animals: (1) from the animal’s status as property, (2) from the animal’s position in relationships of care, love, and dependency, and (3) from the animal’s status as a sentient being with a good of its own. These three sources of duties supplement one another and not only differentiate relationships with companion animals from wild (...) and other categories of domestic animals such as livestock, but they also overlap to provide moral agents with additional reasons for preventing and avoiding harm to companion animals. The paper concludes that not only do owners and bystanders have direct and indirect duties to protect companion animals from harm, but also that these duties have the potential, in some circumstances, to clash with duties owed to the state and fellow citizens. (shrink)
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  18.  10
    Visibility and Invisibility of Animals in Traditional Chinese Philosophy and Law.Deborah Cao - 2011 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):351-367.
    There is yet to be any animal welfare or protection law for domestic animals in China, one of the few countries in the world today that do not have such laws. However, in Chinese imperial law, there were legal provisions adopted more than a 1,000 years ago for the care and treatment of domestic working animals. Furthermore, in traditional Chinese philosophy, animals were regarded as constituent part of the organic whole of the cosmos by ancient (...)
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  19. Zoos and Animal Rights: The Ethics of Keeping Animals.Stephen St C. Bostock - 1993 - Routledge.
    Zoos and animal rights seem utterly opposed to each other. In this controversial and timely book, Stephen Bostock argues that they can develop a more harmonious relationship. He examines the diverse ethical and technical issues involved, including human cruelty, human domination over animals, the well-being of wild animals outside their natural habitat, and the nature of wild and domestic animals. In his analysis, Bostock draws attention to the areas which give rise to misconceptions. This book explores (...)
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  20. Physical Cruelty Toward Animals in Massachusetts, 1975-1996.Arnold Arluke & Carter Luke - 1997 - Society and Animals 5 (3):195-204.
    This article describes the nature of animal abuse and the response of the criminal justice system to all cruelty cases prosecuted by the Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals between 1975 and 1996. Dogs were the most common target; when combined with cats, these domestic animals composed the vast majority of incidents. Almost all of these animals were owned, and females were the majority of complainants. Suspects were almost always young males, and most of (...)
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  21.  47
    Killing Animals in Animal Shelters.Clare Palmer - 2006 - In The Animal Studies Group (ed.), Killing Animals. Illinois University Press. pp. 170-187.
    In this article, Palmer provides a clear survey of positions on killing domestic animals in animal shelters. She argues that there are three ways of understanding the killing that occurs in animal shelters: consequentialism, rights based, and relation based. She considers the relationship of humans and domesticated animals that leads to their killing in animal shelters as well as providing an ethical assessment of the practice.
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  22. Childhood Socialization and Companion Animals: United States, 1820-1870.Katherine C. Grier - 1999 - Society and Animals 7 (2):95-120.
    Between 1820 and 1870, middle-class Americans became convinced of the role nonhuman animals could play in socializing children. Companion animals in and around the household were the medium for training children into self-consciousness about, and abhorrence of, causing pain to other creatures including, ultimately, other people. In an age where the formation of character was perceived as an act of conscious choice and self-control, middle-class Americans understood cruelty to animals as a problem both of individual or familial (...)
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  23. Wild Animals and Other Pets Kept in Costa Rican Households: Incidence, Species and Numbers.Carlos Drews - 2001 - Society and Animals 9 (2):107-126.
    A nationwide survey that included personal interviews in 1,021 households studied the incidence, species, and numbers of nonhuman animals kept in Costa Rican households. A total of 71% of households keep animals.The proportion of households keeping dogs is 3.6 higher than the proportion of households keeping cats . In addition to the usual domestic or companion animals kept in 66% of the households, 24% of households keep wild species as pets. Although parrots are the bulk of (...)
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  24.  19
    Battered Women and Their Animal Companions: Symbolic Interaction Between Human and Nonhuman Animals.Clifton P. Flynn - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (2):99-127.
    Only recently have sociologists considered the role of nonhuman animals in human society. The few studies undertaken of battered women and their animal companions have revealed high rates of animal abuse co-existing with domestic violence. This study examines several aspects of the relationship between humans and animals in violent homes. The study explored the role of companion animals in the abusive relationship through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with clients at a battered women's shelter. In particular, the study (...)
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  25.  14
    Animals and Soil Sustainability.E. G. Beauchamp - 1990 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 3 (1):89-98.
    Domestic livestock animals and soils must be considered together as part of an agroecosystem which includes plants. Soil sustainability may be simply defined as the maintenance of soil productivity for future generations. There are both positive and negative aspects concerning the role of animals in soil sustainability. In a positive sense, agroecosystems which include ruminant animals often also include hay forage-or pasture-based crops in the humid regions. Such crops stabilize the soil by decreasing erosion, improving soil (...)
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  26.  2
    Battered Women and Their Animal Companions: Symbolic Interaction Between Human and Nonhuman Animals.Clifton P. Flynnl - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (1):99-127.
    Only recently have sociologists considered the role of nonhuman animals in human society. The few studies undertaken of battered women and their animal companions have revealed high rates of animal abuse co-existing with domestic violence. This study examines several aspects of the relationship between humans and animals in violent homes. The study explored the role of companion animals in the abusive relationship through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with clients at a battered women's shelter. In particular, the study (...)
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  27.  1
    Animals of the City.Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):79-91.
    Although long treated as the human space par excellence, the city is in fact a vibrant ecosystem that is home to many more nonhuman animals than human ones. Nonetheless, the longstanding emphasis on the city as human built environment and human center of culture has occluded extensive study of it as a thriving ecosystem in its own right. Ethology offers valuable tools for conducting a serious study of the zoological dimensions of urban areas. Companion and domestic animals (...)
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  28. Farm Animal Welfare and World Food.J. R. Bellerby - 1965 - London: One World Publications.
     
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  29.  32
    The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy.Justin E. H. Smith (ed.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume Smith examines the early modern science of generation, which included the study of animal conception, heredity, and fetal development. Analyzing how it influenced the contemporary treatment of traditional philosophical questions, it also demonstrates how philosophical pre-suppositions about mechanism, substance, and cause informed the interpretations offered by those conducting empirical research on animal reproduction. Composed of essays written by an international team of leading scholars, the book offers a fresh perspective on some of the basic problems in early (...)
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  30. Animals That Act for Moral Reasons.Mark Rowlands - unknown
    Non-human animals (henceforth, “animals”) are typically regarded as moral patients rather than moral agents. Let us define these terms as follows: 1) X is a moral patient if and only if X is a legitimate object of moral concern: that is, roughly, X is something whose interests should be taken into account when decisions are made concerning it or which otherwise impact on it. 2) X is a moral agent if and only if X can be morally evaluated–praised (...)
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  31.  37
    Dis/Integrating Animals: Ethical Dimensions of the Genetic Engineering of Animals for Human Consumption. [REVIEW]Traci Warkentin - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (1):82-102.
    Research at the intersections of feminism, biology and philosophy provides dynamic starting grounds for this discussion of genetic technologies and animals. With a focus on animal bodies, I will examine moral implications of the genetic engineering of “domesticated” animals—primarily pigs and chickens—for the purposes of human consumption. Concepts of natural and artificial, contamination and purity, integrity and fragmentation and mind and body will feature in the discussion. In this respect, Margaret Atwood’s novel, Oryx and Crake, serves as a (...)
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  32.  2
    Animal Welfare Impact Assessments: A Good Way of Giving the Affected Animals a Voice When Trying to Tackle Wild Animal Controversies?Peter Sandøe & Christian Gamborg - forthcoming - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-8.
    Control of wild animals may give rise to controversy, as is seen in the case of badger control to manage TB in cattle in the UK. However, it is striking that concerns about the potential suffering of the affected animals themselves are often given little attention or completely ignored in policies aimed at dealing with wild animals. McCulloch and Reiss argue that this could be remedied by means of a “mandatory application of formal and systematic Animal Welfare (...)
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  33.  26
    Competing Conceptions of Animal Welfare and Their Ethical Implications for the Treatment of Non-Human Animals.Richard Haynes - 2011 - Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):105-120.
    Animal welfare has been conceptualized in such a way that the use of animals in science and for food seems justified. I argue that those who have done this have appropriated the concept of animal welfare, claiming to give a scientific account that is more objective than the sentimental account given by animal liberationists. This strategy seems to play a major role in supporting merely limited reform in the use of animals and seems to support the assumption that (...)
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  34.  11
    Not All Animals Are Equal Differences in Moral Foundations for the Dutch Veterinary Policy on Livestock and Animals in Nature Reservations.Katinka Waelbers, Frans Stafleu & Frans W. A. Brom - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (6):497-515.
    The Netherlands is a small country with many people and much livestock. As a result, animals in nature reservations are often living near cattle farms. Therefore, people from the agricultural practices are afraid that wild animals will infect domestic livestock with diseases like Swine Fever and Foot and Mouth Disease. To protect agriculture (considered as an important economic practice), very strict regulations have been made for minimizing this risk. In this way, the practice of animal farming has (...)
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  35.  6
    Animals with Rich Histories: The Case of the Lions of Gir Forest, Gujarat, India.Mahesh Rangarajan - 2013 - History and Theory 52 (4):109-127.
    This article explores how far animals are or are not endowed with a sense of history. The century-long history of lion–human interaction in the lions' last habitat in Asia—in India's Gir Forest, Gujarat State—is the focal point of analysis. In turn, there have been longer-term shifts since ancient and medieval times. Aside from two specific phases of breakdown, Gir's lions rarely attack people. To comprehend why this is so, both the lions and humans need to be seen as products (...)
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  36.  1
    Domestic Violence and Dog Care in New Providence, The Bahamas.William J. Fielding - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (2):183-203.
    Although there has been much research on the connection between nonhuman animal cruelty/ abuse and domestic violence, the link between nonhuman animal care and domestic violence has received less attention. This study, based on responses from 477 college students in New Provi-dence, The Bahamas, indicates that the presence of domestic violence in homes is linked with the level of care and the prevalence of negative interactions with dogs. Dogs received 10 or more of 11 components of essential (...)
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  37.  2
    Care for the Wild: An Integrative View on Wild and Domesticated Animals.Jac A. A. Swart - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (2):251-263.
    Environmental ethics has to deal with the challenge of reconciling contrasting ecocentric and animal-centric perspectives. Two classic attempts at this reconciliation, which both adopted the metaphor of concentric circles, are discussed. It is concluded that the relationship between the animal and its environment, whether the latter is human or natural, should be a pivotal element of such reconciliation. An alternative approach is presented, inspired by care ethics, which proposes that caring for wild animals implies caring for their relationship to (...)
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  38.  4
    [Animal electricity, animal magnetism, universal galvanism: in search of universal harmony between humanity and nature].M. Segala - 2000 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 54 (1):71-84.
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  39. The Wild Side of Animal Domestication.Nerissa Russell - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (3):285-302.
    This paper examines not the process but the concept of nonhuman animal domestication. Domestication involves both biological and cultural components. Creating a category of domestic animals means constructing and crossing the boundaries between human and animal, culture and nature. The concept of domestication thus structures the thinking both of researchers in the present and of domesticators and herders in the past. Some have argued for abandoning the notion of domestication in favor of a continuum of human-nonhuman animal relationships. (...)
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  40.  19
    Beyond Dominance and Affection: Living with Rabbits in Post-Humanist Households.Julie Ann Smith - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (2):181-197.
    Nearly 20 years age, Yi-Fu Tuan wrote his influential Dominance and Affection:The Making of Pets , which argued that human affection for domestic animals is inseparable from dominance. Today, cultural critics persist in the view that companion animals are compromised, even degraded, because they are controlled by humans. The essay attempts to rethink the relationship between humans and companion animals beyond the freedom-dominance binary. It argues for a conceptual approach that defers confidant interpretation of animals (...)
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  41.  30
    The Reintroduction and Reinterpretation of the Wild.Eileen O'Rourke - 2000 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1):144-165.
    This paper is concerned with changing social representations of the ``wild,'' in particular wild animals. We argue that within a contemporary Western context the old agricultural perception of wild animals as adversarial and as a threat to domestication, is being replaced by an essentially urban fascination with certain emblematic wild animals, who are seen to embody symbols of naturalness and freedom. On closer examination that carefully mediatized ``naturalness'' may be but another form of domestication. After an historical (...)
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  42.  9
    Animal Vocalization and Human Polyglossia in Walter of Bibbesworth's Thirteenth-Century Domestic Treatise in Anglo-Norman French and Middle English.William Sayers - 2009 - Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):525-541.
    Walter of Bibbesworth’s late thirteenth-century versified treatise on French vocabulary relevant to the management of estates in Britain has the first extensive list of animal vocalizations in a European vernacular. Many of the Anglo-Norman French names for animals and their sounds are glossed in Middle English, inviting both diachronic and synchronic views of the capacity of these languages for onomatopoetic formation and reflection on the interest of these social and linguistic communities in zoosemiotics.
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  43.  3
    Human-Animal Meeting Points: Use of Space in the Household Arena in Past Societies.Kristin Armstrong Oma - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (2):162-177.
    The construction and use of space is highly structuring in the lives of household members of both human and non-human animals. The choice of social practice is embedded in the ways in which both human and non-human animals physically organize the world around them. The architectural vestiges of houses—both in terms of the distribution of material culture within and surrounding them, and architectural choices—provide frameworks for a social practice that was shared between humans and living, domestic (...), or animal materiality. The notion of meeting points is explored via both its tangible and metaphorical aspects to approach the meetings—the physical performances and their significance—of humans and animals in the past. To gauge the potential likenesses and differences, two case studies are compared from the Late Bronze Age in Scandinavia and Early Iron Age in Sicily. Both case studies represent societies where domestic animals were present and formed part of the household subsistence. A framework is presented that takes into consideration the spatial potential of allowing human-animal relationships to unfold within the framework of the everyday social practice of the household. (shrink)
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  44.  8
    The Origin of Species.Thomas H. Huxley - unknown
    h e Darwinian hypothesis has the merit of being eminently simple and comprehensible in principle, and its essential positions may be stated in a very few words: all species have been produced by the development of varieties from common stocks; by the conversion of these, first into permanent races and then into new species, by the process of natural selection , which process is essentially identical with that artificial selection by which man has originated the races of domestic (...)—the struggle for existence taking the place of man, and exerting, in the case of natural selection, that selective action which he performs in artificial selection. (shrink)
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  45.  19
    Animal Rearing as a Contract?Catherine Larrère & Raphaël Larrère - 2000 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (1):51-58.
    Can animals, and especially cattle, be the subject ofmoral concern? Should we care about their well-being?Two competing ethical theories have addressed suchissues so far. A utilitarian theory which, inBentham's wake, extends moral consideration to everysentient being, and a theory of the rights orinterests of animals which follows Feinberg'sconceptions. This includes various positions rangingfrom the most radical (about animal liberation) tomore moderate ones (concerned with the well-being ofanimals). Notwithstanding their diversity, theseconceptions share some common flaws. First, as anextension of (...)
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  46.  20
    Can Natural Behavior Be Cultivated? The Farm as Local Human/Animal Culture.Pär Segerdahl - 2007 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (2):167-193.
    Although the notion of natural behavior occurs in many policy-making and legal documents on animal welfare, no consensus has been reached concerning its definition. This paper argues that one reason why the notion resists unanimously accepted definition is that natural behavior is not properly a biological concept, although it aspires to be one, but rather a philosophical tendency to perceive animal behavior in accordance with certain dichotomies between nature and culture, animal and human, original orders and invented artifacts. The paper (...)
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  47.  15
    Sacrificing Sacrifice to Self-Sacrifice.D. Meyer Eric - 2017 - Existenz 11 (1):40-50.
    Abstract: Karl Jaspers describes The Axial Period (800-200 BCE) as a world-historical turning point in the spiritual evolution of the human species, characterized by the rise of Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Pythagoreanism, and the Hebrew prophets, without precisely identifying what defines this world-historical period. What defines The Axial Period, I argue with Jaspers, is the sublimation of sacrifice, through which the sacrificial killing of domestic animals, characteristic of primitive religions, is sublimated into the self-sacrificial disciplines of prayer, meditation, and asceticism. (...)
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  48.  51
    Animal Agriculture: Symbiosis, Culture, or Ethical Conflict? [REVIEW]Vonne Lund & I. Anna S. Olsson - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):47-56.
    Several writers on animal ethics defend the abolition of most or all animal agriculture, which they consider an unethical exploitation of sentient non-human animals. However, animal agriculture can also be seen as a co-evolution over thousands of years, that has affected biology and behavior on the one hand, and quality of life of humans and domestic animals on the other. Furthermore, animals are important in sustainable agriculture. They can increase efficiency by their ability to transform materials (...)
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  49. When Species Meet.Donna J. Haraway - 2007 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    “When Species Meet is a breathtaking meditation on the intersection between humankind and dog, philosophy and science, and macro and micro cultures.” —Cameron Woo, Publisher of Bark magazine In 2006, about 69 million U.S. households had pets, giving homes to around 73.9 million dogs, 90.5 million cats, and 16.6 million birds, and spending over $38 billion dollars on companion animals. As never before in history, our pets are truly members of the family. But the notion of “companion species”—knotted from (...)
     
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  50. Pets.Erica Fudge - 2008 - Routledge.
    'When I play with my cat, who knows if I am not a pastime to her more than she is to me?' - Michel de Montaigne. Why do we live with pets? Is there something more to our relationship with them than simply companionship? What is it we look for in our pets and what does this say about us as human beings? In this fascinating book, Erica Fudge explores the nature of this most complex of relationships and the difficulties (...)
     
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