Results for 'drugs'

999 found
Order:
See also
  1. Cognitive Enhancement, Lifestyle Choice or Misuse of Prescription Drugs?Eric Racine & Cynthia Forlini - 2010 - Neuroethics 3 (1):1-4.
    The prospects of enhancing cognitive or motor functions using neuroscience in otherwise healthy individuals has attracted considerable attention and interest in neuroethics (Farah et al., Nature Reviews Neuroscience 5:421–425, 2004; Glannon Journal of Medical Ethics 32:74–78, 2006). The use of stimulants is one of the areas which has propelled the discussion on the potential for neuroscience to yield cognition-enhancing products. However, we have found in our review of the literature that the paradigms used to discuss the non-medical use of stimulant (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  2. Mandatory Minimums and the War on Drugs.Daniel Wodak - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Palgrave.
    Mandatory minimum sentencing provisions have been a feature of the U.S. justice system since 1790. But they have expanded considerably under the war on drugs, and their use has expanded considerably under the Trump Administration; some states are also poised to expand drug-related mandatory minimums further in efforts to fight the current opioid epidemic. In this paper I outline and evaluate three prominent arguments for and against the use of mandatory minimums in the war on drugs—they appeal, respectively, (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  62
    Sports and Drugs: Are the Current Bans Justified?Michael Lavin - 1987 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 14 (1):34-43.
    Current bans on sports and drugs rest on inadequate grounds. Prohibitions on drugs in sports should rely more on what it is permissible to ban, not on what "must" be banned. Further permissible prohibitions should enjoy democratic support at levels.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  4.  48
    [Book Review] Drugs and Rights. [REVIEW]Douglas N. Husak - 1995 - Criminal Justice Ethics 14 (1):63-72.
    This important book was the first serious work of philosophy to address the question: Do adults have a moral right to use drugs for recreational purposes? Many critics of the 'war on drugs' denounce law enforcement as counterproductive and ineffective. Douglas Husak argues that the 'war on drugs' violates the moral rights of adults who want to use drugs for pleasure, and that criminal laws against such use are incompatible with moral rights. This is not a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  5. Libertarianism, Legitimation, and the Problems of Regulating Cognition-Enhancing Drugs.Benjamin Capps - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):119-128.
    Some libertarians tend to advocate the wide availability of cognition-enhancing drugs beyond their current prescription-only status. They suggest that certain kinds of drugs can be a component of a prudential conception of the ‘good life’—they enhance our opportunities and preferences; and therefore, if a person freely chooses to use them, then there is no justification for the kind of prejudicial, authoritative restrictions that are currently deployed in public policy. In particular, this libertarian idea signifies that if enhancements are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6. Psychedelic, Psychoactive, and Addictive Drugs and States of Consciousness.Ralph Metzner - 2005 - In Mitch Earleywine (ed.), Mind-Altering Drugs: The Science of Subjective Experience. Oxford University Press. pp. 25-48.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  43
    Memory Enhancing Drugs and Alzheimer’s Disease: Enhancing the Self or Preventing the Loss of It? [REVIEW]Wim Dekkers & Marcel Olde Rikkert - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):141-151.
    In this paper we analyse some ethical and philosophical questions related to the development of memory enhancing drugs (MEDs) and anti-dementia drugs. The world of memory enhancement is coloured by utopian thinking and by the desire for quicker, sharper, and more reliable memories. Dementia is characterized by decline, fragility, vulnerability, a loss of the most important cognitive functions and even a loss of self. While MEDs are being developed for self-improvement, in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) the self is being (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  73
    Extraordinary Pricing of Orphan Drugs: Is It a Socially Responsible Strategy for the U.S. Pharmaceutical Industry? [REVIEW]Thomas A. Hemphill - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):225 - 242.
    The PRIME Institute of the College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, recently released preliminary research findings indicating a trend of extraordinary pharmaceutical industry pricing of drug products in the United States (U.S.). According to researchers at the PRIME Institute, such extraordinary price increases are defined as any price increase that is equal to, or greater than, 100% at a single point in time. In some instances, PRIME Institute researchers found that drugs exhibiting extraordinary price increases are categorized as "orphan (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  32
    Paying a High Price for Low Costs: Why There Should Be No Legal Constraints on the Profits That Can Be Made on Drugs for Tropical Diseases.J. Sonderholm - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (5):315-319.
    This paper deals with the question of how to price drugs for tropical diseases. The thesis defended in the paper is: (i) there should be no legal constraints on the profits pharmaceutical companies can make on their products for tropical diseases. In essence, (i) expresses the idea that drugs for tropical diseases should be treated as any other product on the free market and that the producers of these drugs should be allowed to sell their products at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure.Robin Mackenzie - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health strategies should (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  31
    The Ethics of Neuroenhancement: Smart Drugs, Competition and Society.Nils-Frederic Wagner, Jeffrey Robinson & Christine Wiebking - 2015 - International Journal of Technoethics 6 (1):1-20.
    According to several recent studies, a big chunk of college students in North America and Europe uses so called ‘smart drugs' to enhance their cognitive capacities aiming at improving their academic performance. With these practices, there comes a certain moral unease. This unease is shared by many, yet it is difficult to pinpoint and in need of justification. Other than simply pointing to the medical risks coming along with using non-prescribed medication, the salient moral question is whether these practices (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  14
    Cognitive-Enhancing Drugs, Behavioral Training and the Mechanism of Cognitive Enhancement.Emma Peng Chien - 2013 - In Elisabeth Hildt & Andreas G. Franke (eds.), Cognitive Enhancement: An Interdisciplinary Perspective. New York, NY: Springer. pp. 139-144.
    In this chapter, I propose the mechanism of cognitive enhancement based on studies of cognitive-enhancing drugs and behavioral training. I argue that there are mechanistic differences between cognitive-enhancing drugs and behavioral training due to their different enhancing effects. I also suggest possible mechanisms for cognitive-enhancing drugs and behavioral training and for the synergistic effects of their simultaneous application.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  14
    Problematic Aspects of Subject Matter in Criminal Deeds, Related to Illegal Disposition of Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (text only in Lithuanian).Edita Gruodytė - 2010 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 122 (4):153-167.
    Lithuania’s legislation, establishing criminal liability for illegal disposition of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances, uses two different terms while identifying the subject matter for criminal deeds: “narcotic and psychotropic substances” and “plants, incorporated into the lists of controlled substances.” The legislation in article 269 of the Lithuanian criminal code explains that narcotic and psychotropic substances, indicated in the respective chapter of the Lithuanian criminal code, shall be those substances that are included in the lists of narcotic and psychotropic substances (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Antichrist Psychonaut: Nietzsche's Psychoactive Drugs.Peter Sjöstedt-H. - 2015 - Psychedelic Press Journal 12:19-41.
    An exploration into the reciprocity between Nietzsche's drug use and his philosophy.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  86
    Why We Should Not Use Some Drugs for Pleasure.Rem Edwards - 1994 - In S. Luper-Foy C. Brown (ed.), Drugs, Morality, and the Law. Garland. pp. 183.
    The article explains why we should not use dangerous drugs for pleasure.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  99
    Drugs, Morality and the Law.Paul Smith - 2002 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):233–244.
    A critical survey of arguments for and against the morality and the legality of recreational drug use, deploying Feinberg's analysis of liberty-limiting principles.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  54
    Consumer Believability of Information in Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) Advertising of Prescription Drugs.Richard F. Beltramini - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):333 - 343.
    Direct to consumer (DTC) advertising has attracted significant research attention, yet none has focused on empirical assessments of its overall impact on U.S. consumers nationally, and tying assessment to relevant behavioral outcomes. This paper addresses the ethical issue of DTC advertising providing a balance of product and risk information that is both understandable and believable, and contributes direction to those exploring this phenomenon.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18. Addicted to Food, Hungry for Drugs.Bennett Foddy - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):79-89.
    There is a growing consensus among neuroscientists that people can become addicted to food, and that at least some cases of obesity have addiction as their cause. By contrast, the rest of the world continues to see obesity as either a disease of the metabolism, or as a reckless case of self-harm. Among obesity researchers, there has been a lively debate on the issue of whether obesity ought to be considered a disease. Few researchers, however, have suggested that obesity is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  54
    Prescribing Pattern of Antihypertensive Drugs by Family Physicians and General Practitioners in the Primary Care Setting in Bahrain.Reginald P. Sequeira, Khalid A. Jassim, Awatif H. H. Damanhori & Vijay S. Mathur - 2002 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (4):407-414.
  20.  20
    Drugs, Money, and Power: The Canadian Drug Shortage.Chris Kaposy - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (1):85-89.
    This article describes the shortage of generic injectable medications in Canada that affected hospitals in 2012. It traces the events leading up to the drug shortage, the causes of the shortage, and the responses by health administrators, pharmacists, and ethicists. The article argues that generic drug shortages are an ethical problem because health care organizations and governments have an obligation to avoid exposing patients to resource scarcity. The article also discusses some options governments could pursue in order to secure the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  20
    Ethical Issues in Drug Testing, Approval and Pricing: The Clot-Dissolving Drugs.Baruch A. Brody & Udo Schuklenk - 1998 - Bioethics 12 (1):79-81.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  30
    Quality Circles for Pharmacotherapy to Modify General Practitioners' Prescribing Behaviour for Generic Drugs.Wolfgang Spiegel, Marie‐Theres Mlczoch‐Czerny, Rolf Jens & Christopher Dowrick - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (4):828-834.
  23.  17
    FabAct®: A Decision‐Making Tool for the Anticipation of the Preparation of Anticancer Drugs.Brigitte Bonan, Nicolas Martelli, Malik Berhoune, Ludovic-Alexandre Vidal, Evren Sahin & Patrice Prognon - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1129-1135.
  24.  17
    The Effects of Certain Drugs and Hormones Upon Conditioning.E. A. Wentink - 1938 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (2):150.
  25.  14
    Neurophysiological and Psychological Changes Induced by Certain Drugs: I. Responses to Electrical Stimulation.O. D. Fowler - 1940 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):657.
  26.  15
    Neurophysiological and Psychological Changes Induced by Certain Drugs: II. Electrocortical Changes.O. D. Fowler - 1941 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (1):37.
  27.  13
    An Extension of Hullian Theory to Response Decrements Resulting From Drugs.R. B. Payne - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (4):342.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  13
    Drug‐Adherence Questionnaires Not Valid for Patients Taking Blood‐Pressure‐Lowering Drugs in a Primary Health Care Setting.Nina van de Steeg, Martin Sielk, Michael Pentzek, Carel Bakx & Attila Altiner - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (3):468-472.
  29.  21
    Placebo in the Investigation of Psychotropic Drugs, Especially Antidepressants.Stanisław Pużyński - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):135-142.
    The paper presents major ethical, legal and methodological problems related to the use of placebo in mental disorders, especially in depression. It is pointed out that although authoritative groups of experts and numerous publications in the field of psychopharmacology indicate advisability of the double blind design with placebo in clinical trials of antidepressants, in recent years there have been more and more voices questioning legitimacy of this method. Objections of an ethical nature are raised, and reliability of this approach is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  37
    Performance-Enhancing Drugs, Sport, and the Ideal of Natural Athletic Performance.Sigmund Loland - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (6):8-15.
    The use of certain performance-enhancing drugs is banned in sport. I discuss critically standard justifications of the ban based on arguments from two widely used criteria: fairness and harms to health. I argue that these arguments on their own are inadequate, and only make sense within a normative understanding of athletic performance and the value of sport. In the discourse over PED, the distinction between “natural” and “artificial” performance has exerted significant impact. I examine whether the distinction makes sense (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  31. Disagreement, Drugs, Etc.: From Accuracy to Akrasia.David Christensen - 2016 - Episteme 13 (4):397-422.
    We often get evidence concerning the reliability of our own thinking about some particular matter. This “higher-order evidence” can come from the disagreement of others, or from information about our being subject to the effects of drugs, fatigue, emotional ties, implicit biases, etc. This paper examines some pros and cons of two fairly general models for accommodating higher-order evidence. The one that currently seems most promising also turns out to have the consequence that epistemic akrasia should occur more frequently (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  32. The Myth of Cognitive Enhancement Drugs.Hazem Zohny - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):257-269.
    There are a number of premises underlying much of the vigorous debate on pharmacological cognitive enhancement. Among these are claims in the enhancement literature that such drugs exist and are effective among the cognitively normal. These drugs are deemed to enhance cognition specifically, as opposed to other non-cognitive facets of our psychology, such as mood and motivation. The focus on these drugs as cognitive enhancers also suggests that they raise particular ethical questions, or perhaps more pressing ones, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  33.  9
    Not Just “Study Drugs” for the Rich: Stimulants as Moral Tools for Creating Opportunities for Socially Disadvantaged Students.Keisha Shantel Ray - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):29-38.
    An argument in the cognitive enhancement literature is that using stimulants in populations of healthy but socially disadvantaged individuals mistakenly attributes pathology to nonpathological individuals who experience social inequalities. As the argument goes, using stimulants as cognitive-enhancing drugs to solve the social problem of poorly educated students in inadequate schools misattributes the problem as an individual medical problem, when it is really a collective sociopolitical problem. I challenge this argument on the grounds that not all types of enhancement have (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  34. Intervention, Causal Reasoning, and the Neurobiology of Mental Disorders: Pharmacological Drugs as Experimental Instruments.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (2):542-551.
    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  35.  71
    Smart Drugs for Cognitive Enhancement: Ethical and Pragmatic Considerations in the Era of Cosmetic Neurology.V. Cakic - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):611-615.
    Reports in the popular press suggest that smart drugs or “nootropics” such as methylphenidate, modafinil and piracetam are increasingly being used by the healthy to augment cognitive ability. Although current nootropics offer only modest improvements in cognitive performance, it appears likely that more effective compounds will be developed in the future and that their off-label use will increase. One sphere in which the use of these drugs may be commonplace is by healthy students within academia. This article reviews (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  36. Drugs as Instruments: A New Framework for Non-Addictive Psychoactive Drug Use.Christian P. Müller & Gunter Schumann - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):293-310.
    Most people who are regular consumers of psychoactive drugs are not drug addicts, nor will they ever become addicts. In neurobiological theories, non-addictive drug consumption is acknowledged only as a prerequisite for addiction, but not as a stable and widespread behavior in its own right. This target article proposes a new neurobiological framework theory for non-addictive psychoactive drug consumption, introducing the concept of Psychoactive drugs are consumed for their effects on mental states. Humans are able to learn that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  37.  1
    The Practice of Pharmaceutics and the Obligation to Expand Access to Investigational Drugs.Michael Buckley & Collin O’Neil - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (2):193-211.
    Do pharmaceutical companies have a moral obligation to expand access to investigational drugs to patients outside the clinical trial? One reason for thinking they do not is that expanded access programs might negatively affect the clinical trial process. This potential impact creates dilemmas for practitioners who nevertheless acknowledge some moral reason for expanding access. Bioethicists have explained these reasons in terms of beneficence, compassion, or a principle of rescue, but their arguments have been limited to questions of moral permissibility, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  37
    Institutional Corruption of Pharmaceuticals and the Myth of Safe and Effective Drugs.Donald W. Light, Joel Lexchin & Jonathan J. Darrow - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):590-600.
    Over the past 35 years, patients have suffered from a largely hidden epidemic of side effects from drugs that usually have few offsetting benefits. The pharmaceutical industry has corrupted the practice of medicine through its influence over what drugs are developed, how they are tested, and how medical knowledge is created. Since 1906, heavy commercial influence has compromised congressional legislation to protect the public from unsafe drugs. The authorization of user fees in 1992 has turned drug companies (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  39.  21
    Addressing ethical challenges in HIV prevention research with people who inject drugs.Liza Dawson, Steffanie A. Strathdee, Alex John London, Kathryn E. Lancaster, Robert Klitzman, Irving Hoffman, Scott Rose & Jeremy Sugarman - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (3):149-158.
    Despite recent advances in HIV prevention and treatment, high HIV incidence persists among people who inject drugs. Difficult legal and political environments and lack of services for PWID likely contribute to high HIV incidence. Some advocates question whether any HIV prevention research is ethically justified in settings where healthcare system fails to provide basic services to PWID and where implementation of research findings is fraught with political barriers. Ethical challenges in research with PWID include concern about whether research evidence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40.  16
    Addressing Ethical Challenges in HIV Prevention Research with People Who Inject Drugs.Liza Dawson, Steffanie A. Strathdee, Alex John London, Kathryn E. Lancaster, Robert Klitzman, Irving Hoffman, Scott Rose & Jeremy Sugarman - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (3):149-158.
    Despite recent advances in HIV prevention and treatment, high HIV incidence persists among people who inject drugs. Difficult legal and political environments and lack of services for PWID likely contribute to high HIV incidence. Some advocates question whether any HIV prevention research is ethically justified in settings where healthcare system fails to provide basic services to PWID and where implementation of research findings is fraught with political barriers. Ethical challenges in research with PWID include concern about whether research evidence (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41. Priceless Goods: How Should Life-Saving Drugs Be Priced?Ian Maitland - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):451-480.
    Abstract: This article examines the ethical issues raised by the pricing of priceless goods. Priceless goods are defined as ones that are widely held to have some special non-market value that makes them unsuited for buying and selling. One subset of priceless goods is prescription drugs—particularly life-saving and life-enhancing ones. Drug makers are under pressure to price their medicines responsibly, which means to restrain their prices (and profits). However, this article argues that it is precisely because life-saving and life-enhancing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  42. Should We Use Commitment Contracts to Regulate Student Use of Cognitive Enhancing Drugs?John Danaher - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (7):568-578.
    Are universities justified in trying to regulate student use of cognitive enhancing drugs? In this article I argue that they can be, but that the most appropriate kind of regulatory intervention is likely to be voluntary in nature. To be precise, I argue that universities could justifiably adopt a commitment contract system of regulation wherein students are encouraged to voluntarily commit to not using cognitive enhancing drugs. If they are found to breach that commitment, they should be penalized (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  40
    Intellectual Property and Pharmaceutical Drugs: An Ethical Analysis.Richard T. De George - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):549-575.
    The pharmaceutical industry has in recent years come under attack from an ethical point of view concerning its patents and thenon-accessibility of life-saving drugs for many of the poor both in less developed countries and in the United States. The industry has replied with economic and legal justifications for its actions. The result has been a communication gap between the industry on the one hand and poor nations and American critics on the other. This paper attempts to present and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  44.  50
    Developing Drugs for the Developing World: An Economic, Legal, Moral, and Political Dilemma.David B. Resnik - 2001 - Developing World Bioethics 1 (1):11-32.
    This paper discusses the economic, legal, moral, and political difficulties in developing drugs for the developing world. It argues that large, global pharmaceutical companies have social responsibilities to the developing world, and that they may exercise these responsibilities by investing in research and development related to diseases that affect developing nations, offering discounts on drug prices, and initiating drug giveaways. However, these social responsibilities are not absolute requirements and may be balanced against other obligations and commitments in light of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  45.  67
    Intellectual Property and Pharmaceutical Drugs: An Ethical Analysis.Richard T. De George - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):549-575.
    The pharmaceutical industry has in recent years come under attack from an ethical point of view concerning its patents and thenon-accessibility of life-saving drugs for many of the poor both in less developed countries and in the United States. The industry has replied with economic and legal justifications for its actions. The result has been a communication gap between the industry on the one hand and poor nations and American critics on the other. This paper attempts to present and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  46.  58
    Priceless Goods: How Should Life-Saving Drugs Be Priced?Ian Maitland - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):451-480.
    This article examines the ethical issues raised by the pricing of priceless goods. Priceless goods are defined as ones that are widely held to have some special non-market value that makes them unsuited for buying and selling. One subset of priceless goods isprescription drugs—particularly life-saving and life-enhancing ones. Drug makers are under pressure to price their medicines responsibly, which means to restrain their prices (and profits). However, this article argues that it is precisely because life-saving and life-enhancing medicines are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  47.  6
    Moral Ambivalence Towards the Cancer Drugs Fund.Ilias Ektor Epanomeritakis - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (9):623-626.
    The UK’s Cancer Drugs Fund was introduced in 2010 following the Conservative Party’s promise to address the fact that numerous efficacious cancer drugs were not available because of their cost ineffectiveness, as deduced by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence. While, at face value, this policy appears only to promote the UK’s public welfare, a deeper analysis reveals the ethically unjustifiable inconsistencies that the CDF introduces; where is the analogous fund for other equally severe diseases? Have (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  20
    An analysis of common ethical justifications for compassionate use programs for experimental drugs.Kasper Raus - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):60.
    When a new intervention or drug is developed, this has to pass through various phases of clinical testing before it achieves market approval, which can take many years. This raises an issue for drugs which could benefit terminally ill patients. These patients might set their hopes on the experimental drug but are unable to wait since they are likely to pass away before the drug is available. As a means of nevertheless getting access to experimental drug, many seriously ill (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  83
    Judgments of the Fairness of Using Performance Enhancing Drugs.John Sabini & John Monterosso - 2005 - Ethics and Behavior 15 (1):81 – 94.
    Undergraduates (total N = 185) were asked about performance-affecting drugs. Some drugs supposedly affected athletic performance, others memory, and others attention. Some improved performance for anyone who took them, others for the top 10% of performers, others for the bottom 10%, and finally, yet other drugs worked only on the bottom 10% who also showed physical abnormalities. Participants were asked about the fairness of allowing the drug to be used, about banning it, and about whether predictions of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  50.  15
    Evaluating Oversight of Human Drugs and Medical Devices: A Case Study of the FDA and Implications for Nanobiotechnology.Jordan Paradise, Alison W. Tisdale, Ralph F. Hall & Efrosini Kokkoli - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):598-624.
    This article evaluates the oversight of drugs and medical devices by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration using an integration of public policy, law, and bioethics approaches and employing multiple assessment criteria, including economic, social, safety, and technological. Criteria assessment and expert elicitation are combined with existing literature, case law, and regulations in an integrative historical case studies approach. We then use our findings as a tool to explore possibilities for effective oversight and regulatory mechanisms for nanobiotechnology. Section I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
1 — 50 / 999