Results for 'duties to oneself'

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  1.  34
    The Paradox of Duties to Oneself.Daniel Muñoz - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    Philosophers have long argued that duties to oneself are paradoxical, as they seem to entail an incoherent power to release oneself from obligations. I argue that self-release is possible, both as a matter of deontic logic and of metaethics.
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  2. Kant's Ethics and Duties to Oneself.Lara Denis - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4):321–348.
    This paper investigates the nature and foundation of duties to oneself in Kant's moral theory. Duties to oneself embody the requirement of the formula of humanity that agents respect rational nature in them-selves as well as in others. So understood, duties to oneself are not subject to the sorts of conceptual objections often raised against duties to oneself; nor do these duties support objections that Kant's moral theory is overly demanding or (...)
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  3.  39
    On Marcus Singer’s “On Duties to Oneself”.Michael Cholbi - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):851-853,.
    In “On duties to oneself,” Marcus G. Singer argued that, contrary to long established philosophical tradition, there are no duties to oneself. Singer observes that to have a duty is to be accountable to someone for that duty’s fulfillment, and while she to whom a duty is owed may release the person who has the duty from being bound to fulfill it, the latter cannot release herself from the duty. For releasing oneself from a duty (...)
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  4. Duties to Oneself, Duties of Respect to Others.Allen W. Wood - 2009 - In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    One of the principal aims of Kant’s Metaphysics of Morals, especially of the Doctrine of Virtue, is to present a taxonomy of our duties as human beings. The basic division of duties is between juridical duties and ethical duties, which determines the division of the Metaphysics of Morals into the Doctrine of Right and the Doctrine of Virtue. Juridical duties are duties that may be coercively enforced from outside the agent, as by the civil (...)
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  5. Moral Self-Regard: Duties to Oneself in Kant's Moral Theory.Lara Denis - 2001 - Routledge.
    _Moral Self-Regard_ draws on the work of Marcia Baron, Joseph Butler and Allen Wood, among others in this first extensive study of the nature, foundation and significance of duties to oneself in Kant's moral theory.
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  6.  9
    Kant’s Ethics and Duties to Oneself.Lara Denis - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4):321-348.
    : This paper investigates the nature and foundation of duties to oneself in Kant’s moral theory. Duties to oneself embody the requirement of the formula of humanity that agents respect rational nature in them‐selves as well as in others. So understood, duties to oneself are not subject to the sorts of conceptual objections often raised against duties to oneself; nor do these duties support objections that Kant’s moral theory is overly demanding (...)
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  7.  45
    How to Release Oneself From an Obligation: Good News for Duties to Oneself.Tim Oakley - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):70-80.
    In some cases, you may release someone from some obligation they have to you. For instance, you may release them from a promise they made to you, or an obligation to repay money they have borrowed from you. But most take it as clear that, if you have an obligation to someone else, you cannot in any way release yourself from that obligation. I shall argue the contrary. The issue is important because one standard problem for the idea of having (...)
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  8.  60
    Duties to Oneself and the Concept of Morality.Paul D. Eisenberg - 1968 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 11 (1-4):129 – 154.
    Why is it that most among the relatively few moral philosophers since Kant who, like J. S. Mill, have discussed the question whether there can be moral duties to oneself, have answered it negatively? One reason is that those philosophers have supposed that all moral action must be, inter alia, social; and they may have thought so because of their commitment to what is here called a 'corporationist' moral view. But such a conception of morality as social is (...)
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  9.  16
    Duties to Oneself: A New Defense Sketched.Paul D. Eisenberg - 1967 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (4):602 - 634.
    KANT is the foremost philosopher to have argued at length for there being moral duties to oneself, and he puts forward the most extensive list of such duties to be found in philosophical writings. Kant's most detailed statement of his views concerning duties to oneself is to be found in his late work, the Tugendlehre or Doctrine of Virtue, which forms the second part of his Metaphysic of Morals, that work for which the much more (...)
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  10.  85
    The Market for Bodily Parts: Kant and Duties to Oneself.Ruth F. Chadwick - 1989 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):129-140.
    The demand for bodily parts such as organs is increasing, and individuals in certain circumstances are responding by offering parts of their bodies for sale. Is there anything wrong in this? Kant had arguments to suggest that there is, namely that we have duties towards our own bodies, among which is the duty not to sell parts of them. Kant's reasons for holding this view are examined, and found to depend on a notion of what is intrinsically degrading. Rom (...)
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  11. Freedom, Primacy, and Perfect Duties to Oneself.Lara Denis - 2010 - In Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
  12. On Duties to Oneself.Marcus G. Singer - 1958 - Ethics 69 (3):202-205.
  13.  41
    Self-Legislation and Duties to Oneself.Andrews Reath - 1997 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):103-124.
  14. Duties to Oneself, Motivational Internalism, and Self-Deception in Kant's Ethics.Nelson Potter - 2002 - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: Interpretative Essays. Clarendon Press.
  15.  45
    A Reconsideration of Kant's Treatment of Duties to Oneself.Margaret Paton - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (159):222-233.
  16.  32
    Duties to Oneself.George Mavrodes - 1964 - Analysis 24 (5):165-171.
  17.  55
    Duties and Duties to Oneself.Marcus G. Singer - 1963 - Ethics 73 (2):133-142.
  18.  64
    Deriving Duties to Oneself: Comments on Andrews Reath's “Self-Legislation and Duties to Oneself”.Stephen Engstrom - 1997 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):125-130.
  19. Self-Legislation and Duties to Oneself.Andrews Reath - 2002 - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: Interpretative Essays. Clarendon Press.
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  20.  33
    More About Duties to Oneself.Warner Wick - 1959 - Ethics 70 (2):158-163.
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  21.  16
    DUTIES TO ONESELF: An Ethical Basis for Self-Liberation?Joan Straurnanis - 1984 - Journal of Social Philosophy 15 (2):1-13.
  22.  46
    Deriving Duties to Oneself.Stephen Engstrom - 1997 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (Supplement):125-130.
  23.  21
    Are There Really "No Duties to Oneself"?Daniel Kading - 1959 - Ethics 70 (2):155-157.
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  24.  21
    Professor Wick on Duties to Oneself.Mary Mothersill - 1960 - Ethics 71 (3):205-208.
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  25.  27
    Still More About Duties to Oneself.Warner Wick - 1960 - Ethics 71 (3):213-217.
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  26.  6
    Kant’s Argument for the Existence of Duties to Oneself in § 2 of the Tugendlehre.Dieter Schönecker - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 609-622.
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  27. Duties to Oneself I.George I. Mavrodes & Alonso Church - 1964 - Analysis 24 (5):165.
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  28. Duties to Oneself II.Jan Narveson & Alonso Church - 1964 - Analysis 24 (5):167.
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  29. " Duties to Oneself"-A Reflection.Debika Saha - 2000 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 27 (4):439-444.
  30.  57
    Cognitive Self‐Enhancement as a Duty to Oneself: A Kantian Perspective.Katharina Bauer - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):36-58.
    Recently some bioethicists and neuroscientists have argued for an imperative of chemical cognitive enhancement. This imperative is usually based on consequentialist grounds. In this paper, the topic of cognitive self-enhancement is discussed from a Kantian point of view in order to shed new light on the controversial debate. With Kant, it is an imperfect duty to oneself to strive for perfecting one’s own natural and moral capacities beyond one’s natural condition, but there is no duty to enhance others. A (...)
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  31.  54
    On Satisfying Duties to Assist.Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith - 2019 - In Hilary Greaves & Theron Pummer (eds.), Effective Altruism: Philosophical Issues. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, we take up the question of whether there comes a point at which one is no longer morally obliged to do further good, even at very low cost to oneself. More specifically, they ask: under precisely what conditions is it plausible to say that that “point” has been reached? A crude account might focus only on, say, the amount of good the agent has already done, but a moment’s reflection shows that this is indeed too crude. (...)
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  32.  13
    The Perfect Duty to Oneself Merely as a Moral Being (TL 6:428-437).Stefano Bacin - 2013 - In Andreas Trampota, Oliver Sensen & Jens Timmermann (eds.), Kant’s “Tugendlehre”. A Comprehensive Commentary. DeGruyter. pp. 245-268.
  33.  3
    Humanity as a Duty to Oneself.Sunday Adeniyi Fasoro - 2019 - Con-Textos Kantianos 9:220-237.
    This paper analyses the thorny interpretative puzzle surrounding the connection between humanity and the good will. It discusses this puzzle: if the good will is the only good without qualification, why does Kant claim that humanity is something possessing an absolute value? It explores the answers to this question within Kantian scholarship; answers that emanate from a commitment to the human capacity for freedom and morality and to actual obedience to the moral law. In its final analysis, it endorses Richard (...)
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  34. Animality and Agency: A Kantian Approach to Abortion.Lara Denis - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):117-37.
    This paper situates abortion in the context of women’s duties to themselves. I argue that Kant’s fundamental moral requirement to respect oneself as a rational being, combined with Kant’s view of our animal nature, form the basis for a view of pregnancy and abortion that focuses on women’s agency and moral character without diminishing the importance of their bodies and emotions. The Kantian view of abortion that emerges takes abortion to be morally problematic, but sometimes permissible, and sometimes (...)
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  35. Kant's Conception of Duties Regarding Animals: Reconstruction and Reconsideration.Lara Denis - 2000 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (4):405-23.
    In Kant’s moral theory, we do not have duties to animals, though we have duties with regard to them. I reconstruct Kant’s arguments for several types of duties with regard to animals and show that Kant’s theory imposes far more robust requirements on our treatment of animals than one would expect. Kant’s duties regarding animals are perfect and imperfect; they are primarily but not exclusively duties to oneself; and they condemn not merely cruelty to (...)
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  36.  80
    Kant on Duty to Oneself and Resistance to Political Authority.Sven Arntzen - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):409-424.
    Kant on Duty to Oneself and Resistance to Political Authority SVEN ARNTZEN in ms DOCTRI~tE OF Law and related writings? Kant denies the subject's right to resist political authority in the strongest terms. His argumentation to sup- port this denial is conceptual in character. The denial of a right of resistance follows from the relevant legal concepts of civil society, of the people as sub- ject, of the head of state as the supreme power in civil society, as having (...)
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  37. A Contractualist Reading of Kant's Proof of the Formula of Humanity.Adam Cureton - 2013 - Kantian Review 18 (3):363-386.
    Kant offers the following argument for the formula of humanity (FH): Each rational agent necessarily conceives of her own rational nature as an end in itself and does so on the same grounds as every other rational agent, so all rational agents must conceive of one another's rational nature as an end in itself. As it stands, the argument appears to be question-begging and fallacious. Drawing on resources from the formula of universal law (FUL) and Kant's claims about the primacy (...)
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  38. Kant on the Wrongness of 'Unnatural' Sex.Lara Denis - 1999 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (2):225-48.
    I consider Kant’s use of claims about “nature’s ends” in his arguments to establish maxims of homosexual sex, masturbation, and bestiality as constituting “unnatural” sexual vices, which are contrary to one’s duties to oneself as an animal and moral being. I argue, first, that the formula of humanity is the principle best suited for understanding duties to oneself as an animal and moral being; and second, that although natural teleology is relevant to some degree in specifying (...)
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  39.  65
    Throwing Oneself Away: Kant on the Forfeiture of Respect.Aaron Bunch - 2014 - Kantian Review 19 (1):71-91.
    Surprisingly often Kant asserts that it is possible to behave in such a degrading way that one ‘throws oneself away’ and turns oneself ‘into a thing’, as a result of which others may treat one ‘as they please’. Rather than dismiss these claims out of hand, I argue that they force us to reconsider what is meant and required by ‘respect for humanity’. I argue that to ‘throw away’ humanity is not to lose or extinguish it, but rather (...)
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  40. Duties to Companion Animals.Steve Cooke - 2011 - Res Publica 17 (3):261-274.
    This paper outlines the moral contours of human relationships with companion animals. The paper details three sources of duties to and regarding companion animals: (1) from the animal’s status as property, (2) from the animal’s position in relationships of care, love, and dependency, and (3) from the animal’s status as a sentient being with a good of its own. These three sources of duties supplement one another and not only differentiate relationships with companion animals from wild animals and (...)
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  41.  8
    „Wer Sich Aber Zum Wurm Macht …“ – Würde Als Selbstverpflichtung.Katharina Bauer - 2018 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 66 (5):607-625.
    Kant introduces a duty to oneself to respect oneself and to avoid servility – or not to make oneself a worm. I argue for a wider understanding of this duty: Persons ought to respect their own dignity as persons with autonomy, rationality, and morality, but also as personalities, who embody dignity and live a dignified life. A corresponds to Kant’s concept of duty as the necessity of an action done out of respect for the moral law, B (...)
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  42. Oaths, Promises, and Compulsory Duties: Kant’s Response to Mendelssohn’s Jerusalem.J. Colin McQuillan - 2014 - Journal of the History of Ideas 75 (4):581-604.
    This article argues that Kant's essay on enlightenment responds to Moses Mendelssohn's defense of the freedom of conscience in Jerusalem. While Mendelssohn holds that the freedom of conscience as an inalienable right, Kant argues that the use of one's reason may be constrained by oaths. Kant calls such a constrained use of reason the private use of reason. While he also defends the unconditional freedom of the public use of reason, Kant believes that one makes oneself a part of (...)
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  43. What We Owe to Ourselves: Essays on Rights and Supererogation.Daniel Muñoz - 2019 - Dissertation, MIT
    Some sacrifices—like giving a kidney or heroically dashing into a burning building—are supererogatory: they are good deeds beyond the call of duty. But if such deeds are really so good, philosophers ask, why shouldn’t morality just require them? The standard answer is that morality recognizes a special role for the pursuit of self-interest, so that everyone may treat themselves as if they were uniquely important. This idea, however, cannot be reconciled with the compelling picture of morality as impartial—the view that (...)
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  44.  43
    Kant, Ought Implies Can, the Principle of Alternate Possibilities, and Happiness.Samuel Kahn - 2018 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines three issues: the principle of ought implies can ; the principle of alternate possibilities ; and Kant’s views on the duty to promote one’s own happiness. It argues that although Kant was wrong to deny such a duty, the part of his denial that rests on a conception of duty incorporating both OIC and PAP is sound.
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  45. Duties to the Distant: Aid, Assistance, and Intervention in the Developing World.Dale Jamieson - 2005 - Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):151-170.
    In his classic article, Famine, Affluence, and Morality, pp. 229–243), Peter Singer claimed that affluent people in the developed world are morally obligated to transfer large amounts of resources to poor people in the developing world. For present purposes I will not call Singers argument into question. While people can reasonably disagree about exactly how demanding morality is with respect to duties to the desperate, there is little question in my mind that it is much more demanding than common (...)
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  46. All Things Considered Duties to Believe.Anthony Robert Booth - 2012 - Synthese 187 (2):509-517.
    To be a doxastic deontologist is to claim that there is such a thing as an ethics of belief (or of our doxastic attitudes in general). In other words, that we are subject to certain duties with respect to our doxastic attitudes, the non-compliance with which makes us blameworthy and that we should understand doxastic justification in terms of these duties. In this paper, I argue that these duties are our all things considered duties, and not (...)
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  47.  49
    Vulnerability and the Basis of Business Ethics: From Fiduciary Duties to Professionalism. [REVIEW]Eric Brown - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):489-504.
    This paper examines the role of vulnerability in the basis of business ethics by criticizing its role in giving a moral substantial character to fiduciary duties to shareholders. The target is Marcoux’s (Bus Ethics Q 13(1):1–24, 2003) argument for morally substantial fiduciary duties vis-à-vis the multifiduciary stakeholder theory. Rather than proceed to support the stakeholder paradigm, a conception of vulnerability is combined with Heath’s 2004) “market failure” view of the ethical obligations of managers as falling out of their (...)
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  48. Should We Prevent Non-Therapeutic Mutilation and Extreme Body Modification?Thomas Schramme - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (1):8–15.
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  49.  96
    Duties to Make Friends.Stephanie Collins - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):907-921.
    Why, morally speaking, ought we do more for our family and friends than for strangers? In other words, what is the justification of special duties? According to partialists, the answer to this question cannot be reduced to impartial moral principles. According to impartialists, it can. This paper briefly argues in favour of impartialism, before drawing out an implication of the impartialist view: in addition to justifying some currently recognised special duties, impartialism also generates new special duties that (...)
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  50.  18
    Motherhood and Mistakes About Defeasible Duties to Benefit.Fiona Woollard - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 97 (1):126-149.
    Discussion of the behaviour of pregnant women and mothers, in academic literature, medical advice given to mothers, mainstream media and social media, assumes that a mother who fails to do something to benefit her child is liable for moral criticism unless she can provide sufficient countervailing considerations to justify her decision. I reconstruct the normally implicit reasoning that leads to this assumption and show that it is mistaken. First, I show that the discussion assumes that if any action might benefit (...)
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