Results for 'dysfunction'

823 found
Order:
  1. Evolution, Dysfunction, and Disease: A Reappraisal.Paul E. Griffiths & John Matthewson - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (2):301-327.
    Some ‘naturalist’ accounts of disease employ a biostatistical account of dysfunction, whilst others use a ‘selected effect’ account. Several recent authors have argued that the biostatistical account offers the best hope for a naturalist account of disease. We show that the selected effect account survives the criticisms levelled by these authors relatively unscathed, and has significant advantages over the BST. Moreover, unlike the BST, it has a strong theoretical rationale and can provide substantive reasons to decide difficult cases. This (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  2. Defining Dysfunction: Natural Selection, Design, and Drawing a Line.Peter H. Schwartz - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (3):364-385.
    Accounts of the concepts of function and dysfunction have not adequately explained what factors determine the line between low‐normal function and dysfunction. I call the challenge of doing so the line‐drawing problem. Previous approaches emphasize facts involving the action of natural selection (Wakefield 1992a, 1999a, 1999b) or the statistical distribution of levels of functioning in the current population (Boorse 1977, 1997). I point out limitations of these two approaches and present a solution to the line‐drawing problem that builds (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  3. Dysfunction in the Neural Circuitry of Emotion Regulation—A Possible Prelude to Violence.Richard J. Davidson - unknown
    Emotion is normally regulated in the human brain by a complex circuit consisting of the orbital frontal cortex, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, and several other interconnected regions. There are both genetic and environmental contributions to the structure and function of this circuitry. We posit that impulsive aggression and violence arise as a consequence of faulty emotion regulation. Indeed, the prefrontal cortex receives a major serotonergic projection, which is dysfunctional in individuals who show impulsive violence. Individuals vulnerable to faulty regulation of (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  4.  41
    Disease, Dysfunction, and Synthetic Biology.Sune Holm - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (4):329-345.
    Theorists analyzing the concept of disease on the basis of the notion of dysfunction consider disease to be dysfunction requiring. More specifically, dysfunction-requiring theories of disease claim that for an individual to be diseased certain biological facts about it must be the case. Disease is not wholly a matter of evaluative attitudes. In this paper, I consider the dysfunction-requiring component of Wakefield’s hybrid account of disease in light of the artifactual organisms envisioned by current research in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5.  31
    Dysfunction, Disease, and the Limits of Selection.Zachary Ardern - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (1):4-9.
    Paul Griffiths and John Matthewson argue that selected effects play the key role in determining whether a state is pathological. In response, it is argued that a selected effects account faces a number of difficulties in light of modern genomic research. Firstly, a modern history approach to selection is problematic as a basis for assigning function to human traits in light of the small population sizes in the hominin lineage, which imply that selection has played a limited role in shaping (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. Executive Dysfunction in Autism.Elisabeth L. Hill - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):26-32.
  7.  79
    Is Psychopathy a Harmful Dysfunction?Marko Jurjako - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (5):1-23.
    In their paper “Is psychopathy a mental disease?”, Thomas Nadelhoffer and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong argue that according to any plausible account of mental disorder, neural and psychological abnormalities correlated with psychopathy should be regarded as signs of a mental disorder. I oppose this conclusion by arguing that at least on a naturalistically grounded account, such as Wakefield’s ‘Harmful Dysfunction’ view, currently available empirical data and evolutionary considerations indicate that psychopathy is not a mental disorder.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8. The Dysfunction of Ritual in Early Confucianism.Michael David Kaulana Ing - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    Michael Ing's The Dysfunction of Ritual in Early Confucianism is the first monograph in English about the Liji--a text that purports to be the writings of Confucius' immediate disciples, and part of the earliest canon of Confucian texts called ''The Five Classics,'' included in the canon several centuries before the Analects. Ing uses his analysis of the Liji to show how early Confucians coped with situations where their rituals failed to achieve their intended aims. In contrast to most contemporary (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  38
    Function, Dysfunction, and Normality in Biological Sciences.Etienne Roux - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (1):17-28.
    A biological function is supposed to be performed adequately, and hence may fail to do so: this is dysfunction. This raises two questions. One is how to make explicit the way in which function can be discriminated from dysfunction without confusing dysfunction with non-function. The second question is how what is “right” and “wrong” can be legitimated by natural regulatory norms. A function can be viewed as a quality to which at least one variable with a definite (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  84
    Responsibility, Dysfunction and Capacity.Nicole A. Vincent - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (3):199-204.
    The way in which we characterize the structural and functional differences between psychopath and normal brains – either as biological disorders or as mere biological differences – can influence our judgments about psychopaths’ responsibility for criminal misconduct. However, Marga Reimer (Neuroethics 1(2):14, 2008) points out that whether our characterization of these differences should be allowed to affect our judgments in this manner “is a difficult and important question that really needs to be addressed before policies regarding responsibility... can be implemented (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  11.  29
    Function, Dysfunction, and Adaptation?Kelly Roe & Dominic Murphy - 2011 - In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press. pp. 216--237.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  12.  29
    Insular Dysfunction Reflects Altered Between-Network Connectivity and Severity of Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia During Psychotic Remission.Andrei Manoliu, Valentin Riedl, Anselm Doll, Josef Georg Bäuml, Mark Mühlau, Dirk Schwerthöffer, Martin Scherr, Claus Zimmer, Hans Förstl, Josef Bäuml, Afra M. Wohlschläger, Kathrin Koch & Christian Sorg - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  13.  34
    Dysfunctional Counterfactual Thinking: When Simulating Alternatives to Reality Impedes Experiential Learning.John V. Petrocelli, Catherine E. Seta & John J. Seta - 2013 - Thinking and Reasoning 19 (2):205 - 230.
    Using a multiple-trial stock market decision paradigm, the possibility that counterfactual thinking can be dysfunctional for learning and performance by distorting the processing of outcome information was examined. Correlational (Study 1) and experimental (Study 2) evidence suggested that counterfactuals are associated with a decrease in experiential learning. When counterfactuals were made salient, participants displayed significantly poorer performance compared to their counterparts for whom counterfactuals were relatively less salient. A counterfactual salience ? need for cognition (NFC) interaction qualified these findings. High (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  38
    Delusions, Harmful Dysfunctions, and Treatable Conditions.Peter Clutton & Stephen Gadsby - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (2):167-181.
    It has recently been suggested that delusions be conceived of as symptoms on the harmful dysfunction account of disorder: delusions sometimes arise from dysfunction, but can also arise through normal cognition. Much attention has thus been payed to the question of how we can determine whether a delusion arises from dysfunction as opposed to normal cognition. In this paper, we consider another question, one that remains under-explored: which delusions warrant treatment? On the harmful dysfunction account, this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  40
    Dysfunction as a Value-Free Concept: A Reply to Sadler and Agich.Jerome C. Wakefield - 1995 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (3):233-246.
  16.  12
    Dysfunction of Attentional Networks for Non-Emotional Processing in Negative Affect.Jun Moriya & Yoshihiko Tanno - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (6):1090-1105.
  17. The Harmful Dysfunction Analysis of Mental Disorder.Dominic Murphy & Robert L. Woolfolk - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (4):241-252.
    This paper is a critical analysis of the concept of mental disorder recently advanced by Jerome Wakefield. Wakefield suggests that mental disorders are most aptly conceived as "harmful dysfunctions" involving two distinct and separable components: the failure of the mechanism in the person to perform a natural function for which the mechanism was designed by natural selection, and a value judgment that the dysfunction is undesirable.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  18. Schizophrenia and the Dysfunctional Brain.Justin Garson - 2010 - Journal of Cognitive Science 11:215-246.
    Scientists, philosophers, and even the lay public commonly accept that schizophrenia stems from a biological or internal ‘dysfunction.’ However, this assessment is typically accompanied neither by well-defined criteria for determining that something is dysfunctional nor empirical evidence that schizophrenia satisfies those criteria. In the following, a concept of biological function is developed and applied to a neurobiological model of schizophrenia. It concludes that current evidence does not warrant the claim that schizophrenia stems from a biological dysfunction, and, in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  89
    Disorder as Harmful Dysfunction: A Conceptual Critique of DSM-III-R's Definition of Mental Disorder.Jerome C. Wakefield - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (2):232-247.
  20.  11
    Proprioceptive Dysfunction in Focal Dystonia: From Experimental Evidence to Rehabilitation Strategies.Laura Avanzino & Mirta Fiorio - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  21.  13
    Temporal Dysfunction in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: Primary or Secondary Impairment?Giovanna Mioni, Simon Grondin & Franca Stablum - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  22.  7
    Working Memory Dysfunction in Schizophrenia.Patricia S. Goldman-Rakic, S. P. Salloway, P. F. Malloy & J. D. Duffy - 2001 - In S. Salloway, P. Malloy & J. Duffy (eds.), The Frontal Lobes and Neuropsychiatric Illness. American Psychiatric Press.
  23.  44
    Can the Harmful Dysfunction Analysis Explain Why Addiction is a Medical Disorder?: Reply to Marc Lewis.Jerome Wakefield - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (2):313-317.
  24. Is Pathology Dysfunctional?G. Loek J. Schönbeck - 2012 - Philosophy of Management 11 (3):47-65.
    An enterprising odyssey might be one way to investigate whether a unique role is afforded to ‘a’ philosophy of management. The question is, first, which philosophy is at stake and what finery such a philosophy might bear. Second, three cardinal questions arise: (1) “What can we say about it?“; (2) “How do we know we can or cannot say something about it?“; and (3) “What is its relation to rationality?” Third, by an old scepticist tradition one may choose tantalising innersubjects (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Function, Dysfunction, and the Concept of Mental Disorder.Jonathan Y. Tsou - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology.
  26. Can We Define Mental Disorder by Using the Criterion of Mental Dysfunction?Thomas Schramme - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):35-47.
    The concept of mental disorder is often defined by reference to the notion of mental dysfunction, which is in line with how the concept of disease in somatic medicine is often defined. However, the notions of mental function and dysfunction seem to suffer from some problems that do not affect models of physiological function. Functions in general have a teleological structure; they are effects of traits that are supposed to have a particular purpose, such that, for example, the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27. Thomson's Lamp is Dysfunctional.William I. McLaughlin - 1998 - Synthese 116 (3):281-301.
    James Thomson envisaged a lamp which would be turned on for 1 minute, off for 1/2 minute, on for 1/4 minute, etc. ad infinitum. He asked whether the lamp would be on or off at the end of 2 minutes. Use of “internal set theory” (a version of nonstandard analysis), developed by Edward Nelson, shows Thomson's lamp is chimerical; its copy within set theory yields a contradiction. The demonstration extends to placing restrictions on other “infinite tasks” such as Zeno's paradoxes (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  66
    The Biostatistical Theory Versus the Harmful Dysfunction Analysis, Part 1: Is Part-Dysfunction a Sufficient Condition for Medical Disorder?Jerome Wakefield - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (6):648-682.
    Christopher Boorse’s biostatistical theory of medical disorder claims that biological part-dysfunction (i.e., failure of an internal mechanism to perform its biological function), a factual criterion, is both necessary and sufficient for disorder. Jerome Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder agrees that part-dysfunction is necessary but rejects the sufficiency claim, maintaining that disorder also requires that the part-dysfunction causes harm to the individual, a value criterion. In this paper, I present two considerations against the sufficiency claim. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  29.  53
    Philosophical Education as Dysfunction of Society.Predrag Krstić - 2008 - Theoria: Beograd 51 (1):103-116.
    This paper tries to extricate philosophical education from the restrictions of social and school systems and to commend some independent and subversive views. This is to be accomplished through a conceptual dissection of the term ‘education’. On the one hand, there is education seen as transmitter of the tradition, where to be educated is seen as being able to fit into an established community. There is also another education to which the authority of tradition is a permanent target of resistance, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  19
    Modulating Functional and Dysfunctional Mentalizing by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.Tobias Schuwerk, Berthold Langguth & Monika Sommer - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  16
    Power of Cognition: How Dysfunctional Cognitions and Schemas Influence Eating Behavior in Daily Life Among Individuals With Eating Disorders.Tanja Legenbauer, Anne Kathrin Radix, Nick Augustat & Sabine Schütt-Strömel - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  40
    Fusiform Gyrus Dysfunction is Associated with Perceptual Processing Efficiency to Emotional Faces in Adolescent Depression: A Model-Based Approach.Tiffany C. Ho, Shunan Zhang, Matthew D. Sacchet, Helen Weng, Colm G. Connolly, Eva Henje Blom, Laura K. M. Han, Nisreen O. Mobayed & Tony T. Yang - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  3
    Decoupling Internalized Dysfunctional Attachments: A Combined ACT and Schema Therapy Approach.Alessandro Grecucci, Irene Messina & Harold Dadomo - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  13
    Definitions: Does Disjunction Mean Dysfunction?Justine Kingsbury & Jonathan McKeown-Green - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy 106 (10):568-585.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35.  29
    Diseases Are Not Adaptations and Neither Are Their Causes: A Response to Ardern’s "Dysfunction, Disease, and the Limits of Selection".Paul E. Griffiths & John Matthewson - 2020 - Biological Theory 15 (3):136-142.
    In a recent article in this journal, Zachary Ardern criticizes our view that the most promising candidate for a naturalized criterion of disease is the "selected effects" account of biological function and dysfunction. Here we reply to Ardern’s criticisms and, more generally, clarify the relationship between adaptation and dysfunction in the evolution of health and disease.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  12
    The Search for Dysfunctions. A Commentary on ‘What is a Mental/Psychiatric Disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V’ by Stein Et Al.B. Verhoeff & G. Glas - unknown
  37.  49
    How Does Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility Matter in a Dysfunctional Institutional Environment? Evidence From China.Zelong Wei, Hao Shen, Kevin Zheng Zhou & Julie Juan Li - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (2):209-223.
    Drawing on institutional and signaling theories, this study examines how environmental corporate social responsibility affects firm performance in a dysfunctional institutional environment. We extend the ECSR literature by suggesting that ECSR indirectly influences firm performance through the mediating effects of business and political legitimacy. Based on a dataset of 238 firms in China, we find that ECSR affects business and political legitimacy followed by firm performance. Moreover, legal incompleteness weakens and legal inefficiency strengthens the effects of ECSR on business and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  38.  3
    Dysfunctional Culture: The Inadequacy of Cultural Liberalism as a Guide to Major Challenges of the 21st Century.Sigurd N. Skirbekk - 2005 - Upa.
    Written for both theoretical and practical purposes, Dysfunctional Culture discusses how to understand and identify political ideologies as cultural systems. Using examples related to family morality and reproduction, this book argues that belief in individual rights as the main basis for morality is not an adequate response to the moral challenges of the future.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  9
    Circumcision, Sexual Dysfunction and the Child's Best Interests: Why the Anatomical Details Matter.David P. Lang - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):429-431.
    In his contribution to the Journal of Medical Ethics, Joseph Mazor1 makes a logical case, based on the premises underlying his reasoning, for his article's primary thesis: he concludes that parents have the prerogative to determine the ‘best interests’ of their infant son in a circumcision decision. If the facts of the matter were ultimately no different from what he adduces, one could admit the soundness of his argument. But the paper is flawed by some questionable assumptions and grievous incompleteness.First, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  15
    Visuospatial and Mathematical Dysfunction in Major Depressive Disorder and/or Panic Disorder: A Study of Parietal Functioning.Brady D. Nelson & Stewart A. Shankman - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (3):417-429.
  41.  5
    Face Recognition Dysfunction and Delusional Misidentification Syndromes (DMS).A. Tzavaras, J. P. Luauté & E. Bidault - 1986 - In H. Ellis, M. Jeeves, F. Newcombe & Andrew W. Young (eds.), Aspects of Face Processing. Martinus Nijhoff. pp. 310--316.
  42.  28
    Peeling the Onion: NMDA Dysfunction as a Unifying Model in Schizophrenia.Daniel C. Javitt - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):93-94.
    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction plays a crucial role in schizophrenia, leading to impairments in cognitive coordination. NMDAR agonists (e.g., glycine) ameliorate negative and cognitive symptoms, consistent with NMDAR models. However, not all types of cognitive coordination use NMDAR. Further, not all aspects of cognitive coordination are impaired in schizophrenia, suggesting the need for specificity in applying the cognitive coordination construct.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  24
    Parsing Neurobiological Dysfunctions in Obesity: Nosologic and Ethical Consequences.Paul S. Appelbaum, Michael J. Devlin & Carl E. Fisher - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):14-16.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  53
    fMRI and Cognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia.Rachel L. C. Mitchell, Rebecca Elliott & Peter W. R. Woodruff - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (2):71-81.
  45.  11
    Dysfunction of the Ubiquitin–Proteasome System in Multiple Disease Conditions: Therapeutic Approaches.Subhankar Paul - 2008 - Bioessays 30 (11-12):1172-1184.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  5
    Frontal Lobe Dysfunction in Secondary Depression.H. Mayberg - 2001 - In S. Salloway, P. Malloy & J. Duffy (eds.), The Frontal Lobes and Neuropsychiatric Illness. American Psychiatric Press. pp. 167--186.
  47.  6
    Anxiety: Dysfunction of Transmission or Modulation?Béla Bohus - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):484-484.
  48.  74
    Dysfunctions, Disabilities, and Disordered Minds.Bengt Brülde & Filip Radovic - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (2):133-141.
  49.  4
    Corticostriatal Dysfunction in Huntington’s Disease: The Basics.Kendra D. Bunner & George V. Rebec - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  50.  16
    The Validation of a Clinical Algorithm for the Prevention and Management of Pulmonary Dysfunction in Intubated Adults: A Synthesis of Evidence and Expert Opinion.Susan Hanekom, Sue Berney, Brenda Morrow, George Ntoumenopoulos, Jennifer Paratz, Shane Patman & Quinette Louw - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (4):801-810.
1 — 50 / 823