Results for 'ecosystem services'

997 found
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  1.  77
    Ecosystem Services and the Value of Places.Simon P. James - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (1):101-113.
    In the US Environmental Protection Agency, the World Wide Fund for Nature and many other environmental organisations, it is standard practice to evaluate particular woods, wetlands and other such places on the basis of the ‘ecosystem services’ they are thought to provide. I argue that this practice cannot account for one important way in which places are of value to human beings. When they play integral roles in our lives, particular places have a kind of value which cannot (...)
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  2.  39
    Ecosystem Services and Sacred Natural Sites: Reconciling Material and Non-material Values in Nature Conservation.Shonil A. Bhagwat - 2009 - Environmental Values 18 (4):417 - 427.
    Ecosystems services are provisions that humans derive from nature. Ecologists trying to value ecosystems have proposed five categories of these services: preserving, supporting, provisioning, regulating and cultural. While this ecosystem services framework attributes 'material' value to nature, sacred natural sites are areas of 'non-material' spiritual significance to people. Can we reconcile the material and non-material values? Ancient classical traditions recognise five elements of nature: earth, water, air, fire and ether. This commentary demonstrates that the perceived properties (...)
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  3.  34
    Ecosystem Services and Distributive Justice: Considering Access Rights to Ecosystem Services in Theories of Distributive Justice.Stefanie Sievers-Glotzbach - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):162-176.
    As the increasing loss of ecosystem services severely affects life perspectives of today's poor and future populations, governing access to, and use of, ecosystem services in an intragenerational and intergenerational just way is an urgent issue. The author argues that theories of distributive justice should consider the distribution of access rights to ecosystem services. Three specific demands that a theory of distributive justice should fulfill to adequately cope with the distribution of access rights to (...)
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  4.  58
    Ecosystem Services, Nonhuman Agencies, and Diffuse Dependence.Keith Peterson - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):1-19.
    This paper is a preliminary treatment of the categories of agency and dependence in the context of ecosystem services discourse. These categories are discussed in terms of critical categorial ontology in order to articulate adequately the nature of humankind’s dependence upon the nonhuman natural world, inadequately captured by ecosystem services discourse. Following Val Plumwood, this essay takes ecosystems services discourse as an example of one type of failure to discern various forms of agency as well (...)
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  5.  58
    Cultural Ecosystem Services: A Critical Assessment.Simon P. James - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):338-350.
    This paper is about the practice of evaluating ecosystems on the basis of the cultural services they provide. My first aim is to assess the various objections that have been made to this practice. My second is to argue that when particular places are integral to people’s lives, their value cannot be adequately conceived in terms of the provision of cultural ecosystem services. It follows, I conclude, that the ecosystem services framework can provide only a (...)
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  6. Understanding risk in forest ecosystem services: implications for effective risk management, communication and planning.Kristina Blennow, Johannes Persson, Annika Wallin, Niklas Vareman & Erik Persson - 2014 - Forestry 87:219-228.
    Uncertainty, insufficient information or information of poor quality, limited cognitive capacity and time, along with value conflicts and ethical considerations, are all aspects thatmake risk managementand riskcommunication difficult. This paper provides a review of different risk concepts and describes how these influence risk management, communication and planning in relation to forest ecosystem services. Based on the review and results of empirical studies, we suggest that personal assessment of risk is decisive in the management of forest ecosystem (...). The results are used together with a reviewof different principles of the distribution of risk to propose an approach to risk communication that is effective aswell as ethically sound. Knowledge of heuristics and mutual information on both beliefs and desires are important in the proposed risk communication approach. Such knowledge provides an opportunity for relevant information exchange, so that gaps in personal knowledge maps can be filled in and effective risk communication can be promoted. (shrink)
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  7.  21
    Rights to Ecosystem Services.Marc D. Davidson - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (4):465-483.
    Ecosystem services are the benefits people obtain from ecosystems. Many of these services are provided outside the borders of the land where they are produced. This article investigates who is entitled to these non-excludable ecosystem services from a libertarian perspective. Taking a right-libertarian perspective, it is concluded that the beneficiaries generally hold the right to use non-excludable ecosystem services and the right to landowners not converting ecosystems. Landowners are only at liberty to convert (...)
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  8.  20
    Ecotherapy – A Forgotten Ecosystem Service: A Review.James K. Summers & Deborah N. Vivian - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:354310.
    Natural ecosystems perform fundamental life-support services upon which human civilization depends. However, many people believe that nature provides these services for free and therefore, they are of little or no value. One nearly forgotten ecosystem service is ecotherapy – the ability of interaction with nature to enhance healing and growth. While we do not pay for this service, we pay significantly for its loss resulting in slower recovery times, greater distress, reduced well-being and losses in those images (...)
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  9. A Scale Problem with the Ecosystem Services Argument for Protecting Biodiversity.Katie H. Morrow - 2023 - Environmental Values 32 (3):271-290.
    The ecosystem services argument is a highly publicised instrumental argument for protecting biodiversity. I develop a new objection to this argument based on the lack of a causal connection from global species losses to local ecosystem changes. I survey some alternative formulations of services arguments, including ones incorporating option value or a precautionary principle, and show that they do not fare much better than the standard version. I conclude that environmental thinkers should rely less on (...) services as a means to defend biodiversity, and that attention should be focused on additional types of value which might be attributed to global biodiversity. (shrink)
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  10.  54
    Should Biodiversity be Useful? Scope and Limits of Ecosystem Services as an Argument for Biodiversity Conservation.Glenn Deliège & Stijn Neuteleers - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (2):165-182.
    This article examines the argument that biodiversity is crucial for well-functioning ecosystems and that such ecosystems provide important goods and services to our human societies, in short the ecosystem services argument (ESA). While the ESA can be a powerful argument for nature preservation, we argue that its dominant functionalist interpretation is confronted with three significant problems. First, the ESA seems unable to preserve the nature it claims to preserve. Second, the ESA cannot explain why those caring about (...)
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  11. Forest types, ecosystem services, and current distribution of Korea's sacred groves-the Maeulsoop.Gowoon Kim Dowon Lee, Insu Koh Wanmo Kang & Chan-Ryul Park - 2022 - In Chris Coggins & Bixia Chen (eds.), Sacred forests of Asia: spiritual ecology and the politics of nature conservation. New York: Routledge.
     
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  12. Forest types, ecosystem services, and current distribution of Korea's sacred groves-the Maeulsoop.Gowoon Kim Dowon Lee, Insu Koh Wanmo Kang & Chan-Ryul Park - 2022 - In Chris Coggins & Bixia Chen (eds.), Sacred forests of Asia: spiritual ecology and the politics of nature conservation. New York: Routledge.
     
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  13. Option Value, Substitutable Species, and Ecosystem Services.Erik Persson - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):165-181.
    The concept of ecosystem services is a way of visualizing the instrumental value that nature has for human beings. Most ecosystem services can be performed by more than one species. This fact is sometimes used as an argument against the preservation of species. However, even though substitutability does detract from the instrumental value of a species, it also adds option value to it. The option value cannot make a substitutable species as instrumentally valuable as a non-substitutable (...)
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  14.  31
    Acceptance of a Payment for Ecosystem Services Scheme: The Decisive Influence of Collective Action.Jean-Pierre Del Corso, Thi Dieu Phuong Geneviève Nguyen & Charilaos Kephaliacos - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (2):177-202.
    As scholars have shown, acceptance is key to the success of Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) scheme. While many studies adopt a static cost-benefit perspective, few address the social process leading to acceptance. Drawing on Suchman (1995), this article examines the legitimacy process underlying the acceptance of a PES in agriculture. In particular, the role of collective action in the legitimisation process is analysed, using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods of discourse analysis. Data from an agro-environmental (...)
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  15.  46
    Identifying ecosystem services using multiple methods: Lessons from the mangrove wetlands of Yucatan, Mexico. [REVIEW]Michael D. Kaplowitz - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (2):169-179.
    The failure to properly account forthe total value of environmental and natural resourcesresults in socially undesirable overexploitation anddegradation of complex ecosystems such as mangrovewetlands. However, most ecosystem valuation researchtoo often focuses on the question of “what is the value” and not enough on “what peoplevalue.” Nonmarket valuation practitioners have usedqualitative approaches in their work for some time.Yet, the relative strengths and weaknesses ofdifferent qualitative methods have been more thesubject of speculation than systematic research. Thestatistical examination of focus group and (...)
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  16. Qiaoyuan Park, Tianjin-An ecosystem services-oriented regenerative design.Kongjian Yu - 2010 - Topos: European Landscape Magazine 70:28.
     
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  17.  19
    Payments for ecosystem services in relation to US and UK agri-environmental policy: disruptive neoliberal innovation or hybrid policy adaptation?Clive A. Potter & Steven A. Wolf - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (3):397-408.
    This paper draws on ideas about policy innovation and adaptation to assess the extent to which ‘payments for ecosystem services’ (PES) can be seen as a challenge to traditionally more bureaucratic, state-centered ways of paying for the provisioning of environmental goods from agricultural landscapes through agri environmental policy (AEP). Focussing on recent experience in the United States and the UK, the paper documents the extent to which PES is now an established term of reference in AEP research and (...)
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  18.  8
    Policy implications of ecosystem services provided by birds.Christopher Whelan, Daniel Wenny & Robert Marquis - 2010 - Synesis: A Journal of Science, Technology, Ethics, and Policy 1 (1):T11 - T20.
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  19.  40
    Widening the Evaluative Space for Ecosystem Services: A Taxonomy of Plural Values and Valuation Methods.Paola Arias-Arévalo, Erik Gómez-Baggethun, Berta Martín-López & Mario Pérez-Rincón - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (1):29-53.
    Researchers working in the field of ecosystem services (ES) have long acknowledged the importance of recognising multiple values in ecosystems and biodiversity. Yet the operationalisation of value pluralism in ES assessments remains largely elusive. The aim of this research is to present a taxonomy of values and valuation methods to widen the evaluative space for ES. First, we present our preanalytic positions in regards to the values and valuation of ES. Second, we review different value definitions that we (...)
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  20. Serving Nature: Completing the Ecosystem Services Circle.Nancy J. Turner & Darcy Mathews - 2020 - In Heesoon Bai, David Chang & Charles Scott (eds.), A book of ecological virtues: living well in the anthropocene. Regina, Saskatchewan: University of Regina Press.
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  21.  11
    Implementing a process for integration research: Ecosystem Services Project, Australia.Steven J. Cork & Wendy Proctor - 2005 - Journal of Research Practice 1 (2):Article M6.
    This paper reports on the design and implementation of a multi-phase interactive process among a set of scientists, policy makers, land managers, and community representatives, so as to facilitate communication, mutual understanding, and participative decision making. This was part of the Ecosystem Services Project in Australia. The project sought to broaden public understanding about the natural ecosystems in Australia. The study reported here pertains to one of the project sites--the Goulburn Broken catchment, a highly productive agricultural watershed in (...)
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  22.  25
    Cherished Places and Ecosystem Services.Simon P. James - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):264-266.
    Mark Sagoff claims that if we are to explain what moves people to protect the natural world, we will need to refer to their ‘cultural, aesthetic, and moral ties’ to the ‘places they cherish or love...
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  23.  53
    Why animal welfare is not biodiversity, ecosystem services, or human welfare: Toward a more complete assessment of climate impacts.Katie Mcshane - 2018 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 13 (1):43-64.
    KATIE McSHANE | : Taking the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as representative, I argue that animal ethics has been neglected in the assessment of climate policy. While effects on ecosystem services, biodiversity, and human welfare are all catalogued quite carefully, there is no consideration at all of the effects of climate change on the welfare of animals. This omission, I argue, should bother us, for animal welfare is not adequately captured by assessments (...)
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  24.  42
    Environmental Subsidiarity as a Guiding Principle for Forestry Governance: Application to Payment for Ecosystem Services and REDD+ Architecture.Pablo Martinez de Anguita, Maria Ángeles Martín & Abbie Clare - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):617-631.
    This article describes and proposes the “environmental subsidiarity principle” as a guiding ethical value in forestry governance. Different trends in environmental management such as local participation, decentralization or global governance have emerged in the last two decades at the global, national and local level. This article suggests that the conscious or unconscious application of subsidiarity has been the ruling principle that has allocated the level at which tasks have been assigned to different agents. Based on this hypothesis this paper describes (...)
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  25. Muslim graveyard groves: plant diversity, ecosystem services, and species conservation in Northwest Pakistan.Shujaul Mulk Khan Abdullah, Zahoor Ul Haq & Zeeshan Ahmad - 2022 - In Chris Coggins & Bixia Chen (eds.), Sacred forests of Asia: spiritual ecology and the politics of nature conservation. New York: Routledge.
     
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  26. Muslim graveyard groves: plant diversity, ecosystem services, and species conservation in Northwest Pakistan.Shujaul Mulk Khan Abdullah, Zahoor Ul Haq & Zeeshan Ahmad - 2022 - In Chris Coggins & Bixia Chen (eds.), Sacred forests of Asia: spiritual ecology and the politics of nature conservation. New York: Routledge.
     
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  27.  13
    Civil society’s perception of forest ecosystem services. A case study in the Western Alps.Stefano Bruzzese, Simone Blanc, Valentina Maria Melino, Stefano Massaglia & Filippo Brun - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Forest Ecosystem Services are widely recognised by the society nowadays. However, no study in the literature has analysed a ranking of FES after the pandemic. This paper investigated civil society’s perception and knowledge toward these services; in addition, the presence of attitudinal or behavioural patterns regarding individual’s preference, was assessed. A choice experiment was conducted using the Best-Worst Scaling method on a sample of 479 individuals intercepted in the Argentera Valley, in the Western Italian Alps. Results, showed (...)
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  28.  51
    Reconsidering resource rights: the case for a basic right to the benefits of life-sustaining ecosystem services.Fabian Schuppert - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):215-225.
    In the presence of anthropogenic climate change, gross environmental degradation, and mass abject poverty, many political theorists currently debate issues such as people's right to water, the right to food, and the distribution of rights to natural resources more generally. However, thus far many theorists either focus (somewhat arbitrarily) only on one particular resource (e.g. water) or they treat all natural resources alike, meaning that many relevant distinctions within the group of natural resources are overlooked. Hence, the paper will start (...)
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  29.  77
    On the Economic Value of Ecosystem Services.Mark Sagoff - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (2):239-257.
    The productive services of nature, such as the ability of fertile soil to grow crops, receive low market prices not because markets fail but because many natural resources, such as good cropland, are abundant relative to effective demand. Even when one pays nothing for a service such as that the wind provides in pollinating crops, this is its 'correct' market price if the supply is adequate and free. The paper argues that ecological services are either too 'lumpy' to (...)
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  30.  59
    Improving Land Use Planning through the Evaluation of Ecosystem Services: One Case Study of Quyang County.Lin Liu, Yapeng Zhou, Haikui Yin, Ruiqiang Zhang, Ying Ma, Guijun Zhang, Pengfei Zhao & Jinxiong Feng - 2021 - Complexity 2021:1-13.
    Competition for land is increasing as demand for multiple land uses and ecosystem services rises. Land regulation of the principles of landscape ecology is necessary to develop more sustainable approaches to land use planning. The research evaluated the present land patterns and determined best practices for its regulation of Dongwang Township in Quyang County, located in the Taihang Mountain area of Hebei Province, China. The research used the landscape ecology theory to construct an index system for landscape pattern (...)
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  31. Biofuels: Efficiency, Ethics, and Limits to Human Appropriation of Ecosystem Services[REVIEW]Tiziano Gomiero, Maurizio G. Paoletti & David Pimentel - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (5):403-434.
    Biofuels have lately been indicated as a promising source of cheap and sustainable energy. In this paper we argue that some important ethical and environmental issues have also to be addressed: (1) the conflict between biofuels production and global food security, particularly in developing countries, and (2) the limits of the Human Appropriation of ecosystem services and Net Primary Productivity. We warn that large scale conversion of crops, grasslands, natural and semi-natural ecosystem, (such as the conversion of (...)
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  32.  14
    Effects of Land Use/Cover Change on the Ecosystem Service Values in the Greater Bay Area of China Accounting for Spatiotemporal Complexity.Yingying Liu, Yalan Shi & Chunyu Liu - 2022 - Complexity 2022:1-17.
    With the rapid development of the economy, the land use/cover change in the Greater Bay Area has undergone tremendous changes, which have had directly negative effects on ecosystem functions and services. The development of sustainable land use strategies to quantitatively evaluate ecosystem services is required. Based on multitemporal land use data, the equivalent coefficients table method was used to assess the ecosystem service values, and the impact of LUCC on ecosystem services was analyzed. (...)
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  33.  15
    An Exploration of the Contribution of Embodied, Situated Research Strategies to Cultural Ecosystem Services and Landscape Assessment Frameworks: An Environmental Empathy Case Study.Klara Łucznik, Joane V. Serrano & John Martin - 2022 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 13 (1).
    Since the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment in 2005, interest has increased in cultural ecosystem services (CESs) research to understand the complexity of the non-material benefits that people obtain from ecosystems. The intangible and interactive characteristics of CESs present many challenges regarding how to approach, quantify and even define CESs. In this paper, we suggest looking at CESs through the lens of embodied and situated cognition theories. We advocate that such an approach should be applied to the development stage (...)
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  34.  33
    Managerial Views of Corporate Impacts and Dependencies on Ecosystem Services: A Case of International and Domestic Forestry Companies in China.D. D’Amato, M. Wan, N. Li, M. Rekola & A. Toppinen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1011-1028.
    A line of research is emerging investigating the private sector impacts and dependencies on critical biodiversity and ecosystem services, and related business risks and opportunities. While the ecosystem services narrative is being forwarded globally as a key paradigm for promoting business sustainability, there is scarce knowledge of how these issues are considered at managerial level. This study thus investigates managerial views of corporate sustainability after the ecosystem services concept. We analyse interviews conducted with 20 (...)
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  35.  39
    Social Learning in the Governance of Forest Ecosystem Services.Tom Dedeurwaerdere - 2012 - In Eric Brousseau, Tom Dedeurwaerdere & Bernd Siebenhüner (eds.), Reflexive Governance for Global Public Goods. MIT Press. pp. 205.
    This chapter examines the role of social learning in the governance of the forest ecosystem service through a case study that involves forest groups in Flanders, Belgium, where social learning has generated significant results within a short period. The case study specifically focuses on three social learning mechanisms extensively used in managing social-ecological systems. These mechanisms include a monitoring strategy based on sustainability criteria and indicators as a liberal learning device, experimenting with disruptive action strategies, and involving new stakeholders (...)
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  36.  25
    Species are the Building Blocks of Ecosystem Services and Environmental Sustainability.Ashish Sharma, Frank Bouchard, Sean Ryan, Derrick Parker & Jessica J. Hellmann - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):29-32.
    Rather than advance novel strategies for achieving the objectives of conservation, Sandler suggests that we change the goals of conservation itself, emphasizing ecological processes through...
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  37. Part II: Ethics in Environmental Studies. Introduction / Marie-Geneviève Pinsart. Electronic Waste Dumped in the Global South: Ethical Issues in Practices and Research / Florence Rodhain. Ethics of Biotechnology Research / Frédéric Thomas. Ethical Questions Associated with Research on Soil-Based Ecosystem Services / Oumarou Malam Issa, Damien Hauswirth, Damien Jourdain, Didier Orange, Guillaume Duteurtre, Christian Valentin. Ethical Issues Arising from the Social and Environmental Impacts of Rapid Economic Expansion: The Experience of a Brazilian City. [REVIEW]Tereza Maciel-Lyra - 2018 - In Anne Marie Moulin, Bansa Oupathana, Manivanh Souphanthong & Bernard Taverne (eds.), The paths of ethics in research in Laos and the Mekong countries: health, environment, societies. Marseille: Institut de recherche pour le développement.
     
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  38. Experiential Value in Multi-Actor Service Ecosystems: Scale Development and Its Relation to Inter-Customer Helping Behavior.Patrick Weretecki, Goetz Greve & Jörg Henseler - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Interactions in service ecosystems, as opposed to the service dyad, have recently gained much attention from research. However, it is still unclear how they influence a customer’s experiential value and trigger desired prosocial behavior. The purpose of this study is to identify which elements of the multi-actor service ecosystem contribute to a customer’s experiential value and to investigate its relation to a customer’s interaction attitude and inter-customer helping behavior. The authors adopted a scale development procedure from the existing literature. (...)
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  39.  52
    The Argument Web: an Online Ecosystem of Tools, Systems and Services for Argumentation.Mark Snaith, Alison Pease, John Lawrence, Barbara Konat, Mathilde Janier, Rory Duthie, Katarzyna Budzynska & Chris Reed - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (2):137-160.
    The Argument Web is maturing as both a platform built upon a synthesis of many contemporary theories of argumentation in philosophy and also as an ecosystem in which various applications and application components are contributed by different research groups around the world. It already hosts the largest publicly accessible corpora of argumentation and has the largest number of interoperable and cross compatible tools for the analysis, navigation and evaluation of arguments across a broad range of domains, languages and activity (...)
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  40.  31
    Biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and the environmentalist agenda.Jay Odenbaugh - 2020 - Biology and Philosophy 35 (1):1-11.
    Jonathan Newman, Gary Varner, and Stefan Linquist’s Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics is a critical examination of a panoply of arguments for conserving biodiversity. Their discussion is extremely impressive though I think one can push back on some of their criticisms. In this essay, I consider their criticisms of the argument for conserving biodiversity based on ecosystem services; specifically, ecosystem functioning. In the end, I try to clarify and defend this argument against their criticisms.
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  41.  83
    Wax Moth Larvae: From Nuisome Parasites to Hope for Ecosystem Rescue.Quan-Hoang Vuong - manuscript
    This short article provides information about a lesson on the value of biodiversity in an ecosystem currently suffering severe damage due to human socio-economic activities.
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  42.  22
    How Much is that Ecosystem in the Window? The One with the Bio-diverse Trail.Clive L. Spash - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (2):259-284.
    Ecosystems are increasingly characterised as goods and services to allow their valuation in monetary terms. This follows an orthodox economic approach to environmental values, but is also being undertaken by ecologists and conservation biologists. There then appears a lack of clarity and debate as to the model of human behaviour, specific values and decision process being adopted. Arguments for ecosystems service valuation are critically appraised and the case for a model leading to value pluralism is presented. The outcome is (...)
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  43. Invasive species increase biodiversity and, therefore, services: An argument of equivocations.Christopher Lean - 2021 - Conservation Science and Practice 553.
    Some critics of invasion biology have argued the invasion of ecosystems by nonindigenous species can create more valuable ecosystems. They consider invaded communities as more valuable because they potentially produce more ecosystem services. To establish that the introduction of nonindigenous species creates more valuable ecosystems, they defend that value is provisioned by ecosystem services. These services are derived from ecosystem productivity, the production and cycling of resources. Ecosystem productivity is a result of biodiversity, (...)
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  44.  12
    Ecosystem Management in the Northeast: A Forestry Paradigm Shift?Andrew F. Egan, Kathy Waldron, Jason Raschka & John Bender - 1999 - Journal of Forestry 97 (10):24-30.
    A survey of professional foresters in the northeastern United States was conducted to determine whether professional forest resource managers viewed forest ecosystem management and other "new" forestry language as representing practical constructs, and whether there is a difference between USDA Forest Service foresters and private-sector foresters in the degree to which they have applied "new" forestry. Results suggested that the forest management behaviors of most foresters in the region may be influenced more by traditional forestry concepts and language than (...)
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  45.  1
    The Ethics of Ecosystem Management.Marion Hourdequin - 2017 - In Stephen M. Gardiner & Allen Thompson (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Ecosystem management is an integrative, systems-based approach developed in response to the inadequacy of land management strategies centered on single species or resources such as timber. Contemporary ecosystem management acknowledges the dynamism of natural systems, need for ongoing adaptive learning, and importance of citizen engagement, especially in managing public lands. However, ecosystem management faces both conceptual and ethical challenges. Core concepts—such as ecosystem, stability, health, and resilience—remain difficult to define and operationalize. In addition, rapid directional changes (...)
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  46.  4
    Public Service Media and Diversity in the Digital Media Landscape: Opportunities and Limitations for Social Justice.Aya Yadlin & Oranit Klein-Shagrir - 2024 - Studies in Social Justice 18 (1):165-179.
    This essay reviews the place and role of Public Service Media (PSM) in promoting social justice in the changing digital media landscape through the ethos of diversity. Media diversity – the value and practice of including varied viewpoints, social groups, voices, and channels or outlets in media – has long been a declared pillar of PSM organizations worldwide. However, current changes in the digital media landscape and the growing extension of PSM organizations to digital platforms require re-reading the premise of (...)
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  47.  4
    Political ecology des services écosystémiques.Xavier Arnauld de Sartre (ed.) - 2014 - New York: P.I.E. Peter Lang.
  48. How to design a governable digital health ecosystem.Jessica Morley & Luciano Floridi - manuscript
    It has been suggested that to overcome the challenges facing the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) of an ageing population and reduced available funding, the NHS should be transformed into a more informationally mature and heterogeneous organisation, reliant on data-based and algorithmically-driven interactions between human, artificial, and hybrid (semi-artificial) agents. This transformation process would offer significant benefit to patients, clinicians, and the overall system, but it would also rely on a fundamental transformation of the healthcare system in a way that (...)
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  49. The limits of empowerment: how to reframe the role of mHealth tools in the healthcare ecosystem.Jessica Morley & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (3):1159-1183.
    This article highlights the limitations of the tendency to frame health- and wellbeing-related digital tools (mHealth technologies) as empowering devices, especially as they play an increasingly important role in the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK. It argues that mHealth technologies should instead be framed as digital companions. This shift from empowerment to companionship is advocated by showing the conceptual, ethical, and methodological issues challenging the narrative of empowerment, and by arguing that such challenges, as well as the risk (...)
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    Nuclear Energy in the Service of Biomedicine: The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission’s Radioisotope Program, 1946–1950.Angela N. H. Creager - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):649-684.
    The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the "physicists' war" for postwar life science. Scientists in the Manhattan Project, as part of their efforts to advocate for civilian uses of atomic energy after the war, proposed using infrastructure from the wartime bomb project to develop a government-run radioisotope distribution program. After the Atomic Energy Bill was passed and before the Atomic Energy Commission was formally established, the Manhattan Project (...)
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