Results for 'ecosystem services'

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  1.  18
    Ecosystem Services and the Value of Places.Simon P. James - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    In the US Environmental Protection Agency, the World Wide Fund for Nature and many other environmental organisations, it is standard practice to evaluate particular woods, wetlands and other such places on the basis of the ‘ecosystem services’ they are thought to provide. I argue that this practice cannot account for one important way in which places are of value to human beings. When they play integral roles in our lives, particular places have a kind of value which cannot (...)
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  2.  13
    Environmental Subsidiarity as a Guiding Principle for Forestry Governance: Application to Payment for Ecosystem Services and REDD+ Architecture.Pablo Martinez de Anguita, Maria Ángeles Martín & Abbie Clare - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):617-631.
    This article describes and proposes the “environmental subsidiarity principle” as a guiding ethical value in forestry governance. Different trends in environmental management such as local participation, decentralization or global governance have emerged in the last two decades at the global, national and local level. This article suggests that the conscious or unconscious application of subsidiarity has been the ruling principle that has allocated the level at which tasks have been assigned to different agents. Based on this hypothesis this paper describes (...)
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  3.  5
    Option Value, Substitutable Species, and Ecosystem Services.Erik Persson - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):165-181.
    The concept of ecosystem services is a way of visualizing the instrumental value that nature has for human beings. Most ecosystem services can be performed by more than one species. This fact is sometimes used as an argument against the preservation of species. However, even though substitutability does detract from the instrumental value of a species, it also adds option value to it. The option value cannot make a substitutable species as instrumentally valuable as a non-substitutable (...)
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  4.  4
    Rights to Ecosystem Services.Marc D. Davidson - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (4):465-483.
    Ecosystem services are the benefits people obtain from ecosystems. Many of these services are provided outside the borders of the land where they are produced. This article investigates who is entitled to these non-excludable ecosystem services from a libertarian perspective. Taking a right-libertarian perspective, it is concluded that the beneficiaries generally hold the right to use non-excludable ecosystem services and the right to landowners not converting ecosystems. Landowners are only at liberty to convert (...)
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  5. Implementing a Process for Integration Research: Ecosystem Services Project, Australia.Steven J. Cork & Wendy Proctor - 2005 - Journal of Research Practice 1 (2):Article M6.
    This paper reports on the design and implementation of a multi-phase interactive process among a set of scientists, policy makers, land managers, and community representatives, so as to facilitate communication, mutual understanding, and participative decision making. This was part of the Ecosystem Services Project in Australia. The project sought to broaden public understanding about the natural ecosystems in Australia. The study reported here pertains to one of the project sites--the Goulburn Broken catchment, a highly productive agricultural watershed in (...)
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  6.  88
    Biofuels: Efficiency, Ethics, and Limits to Human Appropriation of Ecosystem Services[REVIEW]Tiziano Gomiero, Maurizio G. Paoletti & David Pimentel - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (5):403-434.
    Biofuels have lately been indicated as a promising source of cheap and sustainable energy. In this paper we argue that some important ethical and environmental issues have also to be addressed: (1) the conflict between biofuels production and global food security, particularly in developing countries, and (2) the limits of the Human Appropriation of ecosystem services and Net Primary Productivity. We warn that large scale conversion of crops, grasslands, natural and semi-natural ecosystem, (such as the conversion of (...)
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  7. Understanding Risk in Forest Ecosystem Services: Implications for Effective Risk Management, Communication and Planning.Kristina Blennow, Johannes Persson, Annika Wallin, Niklas Vareman & Erik Persson - 2014 - Forestry 87:219-228.
    Uncertainty, insufficient information or information of poor quality, limited cognitive capacity and time, along with value conflicts and ethical considerations, are all aspects thatmake risk managementand riskcommunication difficult. This paper provides a review of different risk concepts and describes how these influence risk management, communication and planning in relation to forest ecosystem services. Based on the review and results of empirical studies, we suggest that personal assessment of risk is decisive in the management of forest ecosystem (...). The results are used together with a reviewof different principles of the distribution of risk to propose an approach to risk communication that is effective aswell as ethically sound. Knowledge of heuristics and mutual information on both beliefs and desires are important in the proposed risk communication approach. Such knowledge provides an opportunity for relevant information exchange, so that gaps in personal knowledge maps can be filled in and effective risk communication can be promoted. (shrink)
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  8.  10
    Managerial Views of Corporate Impacts and Dependencies on Ecosystem Services: A Case of International and Domestic Forestry Companies in China.D. D’Amato, M. Wan, N. Li, M. Rekola & A. Toppinen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1011-1028.
    A line of research is emerging investigating the private sector impacts and dependencies on critical biodiversity and ecosystem services, and related business risks and opportunities. While the ecosystem services narrative is being forwarded globally as a key paradigm for promoting business sustainability, there is scarce knowledge of how these issues are considered at managerial level. This study thus investigates managerial views of corporate sustainability after the ecosystem services concept. We analyse interviews conducted with 20 (...)
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  9.  36
    Ecosystem Services, Nonhuman Agencies, and Diffuse Dependence.Keith Peterson - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):1-19.
    This paper is a preliminary treatment of the categories of agency and dependence in the context of ecosystem services discourse. These categories are discussed in terms of critical categorial ontology in order to articulate adequately the nature of humankind’s dependence upon the nonhuman natural world, inadequately captured by ecosystem services discourse. Following Val Plumwood, this essay takes ecosystems services discourse as an example of one type of failure to discern various forms of agency as well (...)
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  10.  18
    Reconsidering Resource Rights: The Case for a Basic Right to the Benefits of Life-Sustaining Ecosystem Services.Fabian Schuppert - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):215-225.
    In the presence of anthropogenic climate change, gross environmental degradation, and mass abject poverty, many political theorists currently debate issues such as people's right to water, the right to food, and the distribution of rights to natural resources more generally. However, thus far many theorists either focus (somewhat arbitrarily) only on one particular resource (e.g. water) or they treat all natural resources alike, meaning that many relevant distinctions within the group of natural resources are overlooked. Hence, the paper will start (...)
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  11.  21
    Ecosystem Services and Sacred Natural Sites: Reconciling Material and Non-Material Values in Nature Conservation.Shonil A. Bhagwat - 2009 - Environmental Values 18 (4):417 - 427.
    Ecosystems services are provisions that humans derive from nature. Ecologists trying to value ecosystems have proposed five categories of these services: preserving, supporting, provisioning, regulating and cultural. While this ecosystem services framework attributes 'material' value to nature, sacred natural sites are areas of 'non-material' spiritual significance to people. Can we reconcile the material and non-material values? Ancient classical traditions recognise five elements of nature: earth, water, air, fire and ether. This commentary demonstrates that the perceived properties (...)
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  12.  27
    Identifying Ecosystem Services Using Multiple Methods: Lessons From the Mangrove Wetlands of Yucatan, Mexico. [REVIEW]Michael D. Kaplowitz - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (2):169-179.
    The failure to properly account forthe total value of environmental and natural resourcesresults in socially undesirable overexploitation anddegradation of complex ecosystems such as mangrovewetlands. However, most ecosystem valuation researchtoo often focuses on the question of “what is the value” and not enough on “what peoplevalue.” Nonmarket valuation practitioners have usedqualitative approaches in their work for some time.Yet, the relative strengths and weaknesses ofdifferent qualitative methods have been more thesubject of speculation than systematic research. Thestatistical examination of focus group and (...)
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  13.  12
    Cultural Ecosystem Services: A Critical Assessment.Simon P. James - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):338-350.
    This paper is about the practice of evaluating ecosystems on the basis of the cultural services they provide. My first aim is to assess the various objections that have been made to this practice. My second is to argue that when particular places are integral to people’s lives, their value cannot be adequately conceived in terms of the provision of cultural ecosystem services. It follows, I conclude, that the ecosystem services framework can provide only a (...)
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  14.  13
    Ecosystem Services and Distributive Justice: Considering Access Rights to Ecosystem Services in Theories of Distributive Justice.Stefanie Sievers-Glotzbach - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):162-176.
    As the increasing loss of ecosystem services severely affects life perspectives of today's poor and future populations, governing access to, and use of, ecosystem services in an intragenerational and intergenerational just way is an urgent issue. The author argues that theories of distributive justice should consider the distribution of access rights to ecosystem services. Three specific demands that a theory of distributive justice should fulfill to adequately cope with the distribution of access rights to (...)
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  15.  16
    Social Learning in the Governance of Forest Ecosystem Services.Tom Dedeurwaerdere - 2012 - In Eric Brousseau, Tom Dedeurwaerdere & Bernd Siebenhüner (eds.), Reflexive Governance for Global Public Goods. MIT Press. pp. 205.
    This chapter examines the role of social learning in the governance of the forest ecosystem service through a case study that involves forest groups in Flanders, Belgium, where social learning has generated significant results within a short period. The case study specifically focuses on three social learning mechanisms extensively used in managing social-ecological systems. These mechanisms include a monitoring strategy based on sustainability criteria and indicators as a liberal learning device, experimenting with disruptive action strategies, and involving new stakeholders (...)
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  16.  30
    On the Economic Value of Ecosystem Services.Mark Sagoff - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (2):239-257.
    The productive services of nature, such as the ability of fertile soil to grow crops, receive low market prices not because markets fail but because many natural resources, such as good cropland, are abundant relative to effective demand. Even when one pays nothing for a service such as that the wind provides in pollinating crops, this is its 'correct' market price if the supply is adequate and free. The paper argues that ecological services are either too 'lumpy' to (...)
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  17.  7
    Should Biodiversity Be Useful? Scope and Limits of Ecosystem Services as an Argument for Biodiversity Conservation.Glenn Deliège & Stijn Neuteleers - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (2):165-182.
  18.  6
    Species Are the Building Blocks of Ecosystem Services and Environmental Sustainability.Ashish Sharma, Frank Bouchard, Sean Ryan, Derrick Parker & Jessica J. Hellmann - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):29-32.
  19.  1
    Widening the Evaluative Space for Ecosystem Services: A Taxonomy of Plural Values and Valuation Methods.Paola Arias-Arévalo, Erik Gómez-Baggethun, Berta Martín-López & Mario Pérez-Rincón - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (1):29-53.
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  20. Qiaoyuan Park, Tianjin-An Ecosystem Services-Oriented Regenerative Design.Kongjian Yu - 2010 - Topos: European Landscape Magazine 70:28.
     
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  21.  7
    Acceptance of a Payment for Ecosystem Services Scheme: The Decisive Influence of Collective Action.Jean-Pierre Del Corso, Thi Dieu Phuong Geneviève Nguyen & Charilaos Kephaliacos - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (2):177-202.
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  22.  7
    Payments for Ecosystem Services in Relation to US and UK Agri-Environmental Policy: Disruptive Neoliberal Innovation or Hybrid Policy Adaptation?Clive A. Potter & Steven A. Wolf - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (3):397-408.
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  23.  4
    Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity in Europe.European Academies Science Advisory - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
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  24.  4
    Cherished Places and Ecosystem Services.Simon P. James - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):264-266.
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  25.  2
    Policy Implications of Ecosystem Services Provided by Birds.Christopher Whelan, Daniel Wenny & Robert Marquis - 2010 - Synesis: A Journal of Science, Technology, Ethics, and Policy 1 (1):T11 - T20.
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  26.  1
    Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity in Europe.European Academies Science Advisory Council - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1):239-254.
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  27.  12
    The Argument Web: An Online Ecosystem of Tools, Systems and Services for Argumentation.Reed Chris, Budzynska Katarzyna, Duthie Rory, Janier Mathilde, Konat Barbara, Lawrence John, Pease Alison & Snaith Mark - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (2):137-160.
    The Argument Web is maturing as both a platform built upon a synthesis of many contemporary theories of argumentation in philosophy and also as an ecosystem in which various applications and application components are contributed by different research groups around the world. It already hosts the largest publicly accessible corpora of argumentation and has the largest number of interoperable and cross compatible tools for the analysis, navigation and evaluation of arguments across a broad range of domains, languages and activity (...)
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  28.  12
    To Value Functions or Services? An Analysis of Ecosystem Valuation Approaches.Erik Ansink, Lars Hein & Knut Per Hasund - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (4):489-503.
    Monetary valuation of ecosystem services is a widely used approach to quantify the benefits supplied by the natural environment to society. An alternative approach is the monetary valuation of ecosystem functions, which is defined as the capacity of the ecosystem to supply services. Using two European case-study areas, this paper explores the relative advantages of the two valuation approaches. This is done using a conceptual analysis, a qualitative application, and an overall comparison of both approaches. (...)
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  29.  5
    The IPBES Conceptual Framework: An Unhelpful Start.D. S. Maier & A. Feest - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):327-347.
    The Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services have recently launched themselves as the UN-sanctioned instrument for conserving nature. They seek to establish themselves as the authority in this field alongside the well-known Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in climate science. Quickly following or even before recent publication of their conceptual framework in two biology journals, they were already underway building upon it. This headlong push, we believe, is ill advised. We show how the framework is unsound as (...)
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  30.  24
    Urban Home Food Gardens in the Global North: Research Traditions and Future Directions.John R. Taylor & Sarah Taylor Lovell - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):285-305.
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  31.  22
    From Terra Nullius to Terra Communis.Yogi Hale Hendlin - 2014 - Environmental Philosophy 11 (2):141-174.
    This article argues that understanding “wild” land as terra nullius emerged during historical colonialism, entered international law, and became entrenched in national constitutions and cultural mores around the world. This has perpetuated an unsustainable and unjust human relationship to land no longer tenable in the post-Lockean era of land scarcity and ecological degradation. Environmental conservation, by valuing wild lands, challenges the terra nullius assumption of the vulnerability of unused lands to encroachment, while indigenous groups reasserting their rights to communal territories (...)
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  32.  13
    Food: From Commodity to Commons.Gunnar Rundgren - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (1):103-121.
    Our food and farming system is not socially, economically or ecologically sustainable. Many of the ills are a result of market competition driving specialization and linear production models, externalizing costs for environmental, social and cultural degradation. Some propose that market mechanisms should be used to correct this; improved consumer choice, internalization of costs and compensation to farmers for public goods. What we eat is determined by the path taken by our ancestors, by commercialization and fierce competition, fossil fuels and demographic (...)
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  33.  14
    Improved Fallows: A Case Study of an Adaptive Response in Amazonian Swidden Farming Systems. [REVIEW]Kristina Marquardt, Rebecka Milestad & Lennart Salomonsson - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):417-428.
    Many smallholders in the Amazon employ swidden (slash-and-burn) farming systems in which forest or forest fallows are the primary source of natural soil enrichment. With decreasing opportunities to claim natural forests for agriculture and shrinking landholdings, rotational agriculture on smaller holdings allows insufficient time for fallow to regenerate naturally into secondary forest. This case study examines how Peruvian farmers use “improved fallows” as an adaptive response to a situation of decreasing soil fertility and how the farmers describe the rationale underlying (...)
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  34.  4
    Environmental Duty of Care: From Ethical Principle Towards a Code of Practice for the Grazing Industry in Queensland (Australia). [REVIEW]Romy Greiner - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):527-547.
    Among the options of government for reducing negative environmental externalities from agriculture is the institution of a polluter statutory liability. An environmental duty of care imposes a statutory liability on agents who interact with the environment to avoid causing environmental harm. This paper documents environmental duty of care provisions governing landholders in Queensland, Australia, with specific reference to the 2007 Queensland State Rural Leasehold Land Strategy. The paper reports on a positive response by a group of leaseholders within the Northern (...)
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  35.  4
    Ecosystem Health: More Than a Metaphor?David J. Rapport - 1995 - Environmental Values 4 (4):287-309.
    There is considerable discussion about the nature of the health metaphor as applied to ecosystems. One does not need to accept the analogy of ecosystem as 'organism' to reap insight into the diagnosis of ecosystem ills by applications of approaches pioneered in the health sciences. Ecosystem health can be assessed by the presence or absence of signs ecosystem distress, by direct measures of ecosystem resilience or counteractive capacity, and by evaluation of risks or threats from (...)
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  36.  13
    Ecological Historicity, Functional Goals, and Novelty in the Anthropocene.Justin Donhauser, Eric Desjardins & Gillian Barker - 2018 - Environmental Values.
    While many recognize that rigid historical and compositional goals are inadequate in a world where climate and other global systems are undergoing unprecedented changes, others contend that promoting ecosystem services and functions encourages practices that can ultimately lower the bar of ecological management. These worries are foregrounded in discussions about Novel Ecosystems (NEs); where some researchers and conservationists claim that NEs provide a license to trash nature as long as some ecosystem services are provided. This criticism (...)
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  37.  42
    To What Extent is Business Responding to Climate Change? Evidence From a Global Wine Producer.Jeremy Galbreath - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):421-432.
    Most studies on climate change response have examined reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Yet these studies do not take into account ecosystem services constraints and biophysical disruptions wrought by climate change that may require broader types of response. By studying a firm in the wine industry and using a research approach not constrained by structured methodologies or biased toward GHG emissions, the findings suggest that both “inside out” and “outside in” actions are taken in response to climate (...)
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  38.  11
    A New Way of Valuing Nature.Henry Dicks - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (3):281-299.
    According to the renowned biomimicry specialist, Janine Benyus, biomimicry offers a new way of valuing nature based on the principle of learning from nature. Comparing and contrast­ing this new way of valuing nature with the dominant conception of nature as valuable for the ecosystem services it provides, an articulation of the respective theoretical frameworks of ecosystem services and biomimicry can be proposed. This articulation depends on the insight that each of the four basic categories of (...) service identified in the Millen­nium Ecosystem Assessment correlates with a principle of biomimicry —an insight that makes it possible to add a whole new layer of complexity to ecosystem service theory such that it henceforth covers not just what nature does for us, but also what nature may teach us how to do. This articulation of the theoretical frameworks of ecosystem services and biomimicry implies a significant bifurcation of the general normative orientation of EST such that it is no longer oriented primarily or exclusively toward conserving nature, but also toward imitating and following nature. (shrink)
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  39.  49
    Analysing Biodiversity: The Necessity of Interdisciplinary Trends in the Development of Ecological Theory.Broder Breckling & Hauke Reuter - 2004 - Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):83-105.
    Technological advancement has an ambivalent character concerning the impact on biodiversity. It accounts for major detrimental environmental impacts and aggravates threads to biodiversity. On the other hand, from an application perspective of environmental science, there are technical advancements, which increase the potential of analysis, detection and monitoring of environmental changes and open a wider spectrum of sustainable use strategies.The concept of biodiversity emerged in the last two decades as a political issue to protect the structural and functional basis of earthbound (...)
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  40.  42
    The Emergence of a Sustainable Future: Brainstorming Better Ways to Globalize at the Esalen Institute.Frank Poletti & Jay Oglivy - 2003 - World Futures 59 (8):615 – 623.
    This article provides excerpts and highlights from the insights of twenty global leaders, business executives, and sustainability experts who gathered at the Esalen Institute in California for four days in March 2002 to discuss how to best leverage change toward an environmentally sustainable and socially equitable global economy. The conference topic was sparked by the path-breaking book Natural Capitalism, which outlines an expanded vision of capitalism suitable for the environmental era. The natural capitalism model is qualitatively different from industrial era (...)
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  41.  22
    The Parable of the Bees.John Gowdy, Lisi Krall & Yunzhong Chen - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (1):41-55.
    Many ecological and environmental economists take a microeconomic approach to envi­ronmental valuation and view the macroeconomy as an amalgam of firms whose primary task is to efficiently allocate scarce resources. In this framework, replacing freely provided ecosystem services with costly human-provided substitutes is by definition inefficient. Although destroying and replacing the free gifts of nature can sometimes be an economic benefit, in the case of apple-tree pollination in Maoxian County, China, the positive economic benefits do not justify eliminating (...)
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  42.  12
    Comparing Forests Across Climates and Biomes: Qualitative Assessments, Reference Forests, and Regional Inter-Comparisons.Carl Salk, Ulrich J. Frey & Hannes Rusch - 2014 - PLoS ONE 9 (4):e94800.
    Communities, policy actors and conservationists benefit from understanding what institutions and land management regimes promote ecosystem services like carbon sequestration and biodiversity conservation. However, the definition of success depends on local conditions. Forests’ potential carbon stock, biodiversity, and rate of recovery following disturbance are known to vary with a broad suite of factors including temperature, precipitation, seasonality, species’ traits and land use history. Methods like forest changes over time , and comparison with 'pristine' reference forests have been proposed (...)
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  43.  5
    The Relationship Between Intragenerational and Intergenerational Ecological Justice.Stefanie Glotzbach & Stefan Baumgartner - 2012 - Environmental Values 21 (3):331-355.
    The principle of sustainability contains two objectives of justice regarding the conservation and use of ecosystems and their services : global justice between different people of the present generation ; justice between people of different generations. Three hypotheses about their relationship — independency, facilitation and rivalry — are held in the political and scientific sustainability discourse. Applying the method of qualitative content analysis to important political documents and the scientific literature, we reveal six determinants underlying the different hypotheses: quantity (...)
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  44.  8
    Waiting for the Millennium Bug.Ronnie Hawkins - 1999 - Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):267 – 274.
    With increasing appreciation that the Y2K problem may turn out to have unpredictable and potentially far-reaching effects, we are faced with what in some ways resembles the looming global ecological crisis, only this time what is at stake are not vital ecosystem services but rather the vital structures of our highly complex socially constructed reality—and this time we have a date-certain deadline for the onset of the crisis. Regardless of what actually happens when the calendar turns from 1999 (...)
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  45.  3
    Providing Ethical Guidance for Collaborative Research in Developing Countries.N. Morris - 2015 - Research Ethics 11 (4):211-235.
    Experience has shown that the application of ethical guidelines developed for research in developed countries to research in developing countries can be, and often is, impractical and raises a number of contentious issues. Various attempts have been made to provide guidelines more appropriate to the developing world context; however, to date these efforts have been dominated by the fields of bioscience, medical research and nutrition. There is very little advice available for those seeking to undertake collaborative social science or natural (...)
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  46. Resilience in Social-Ecological Systems: The Role of Learning and Education.Marianne E. Krasny, Cecilia Lundholm & Ryan Plummer (eds.) - 2011 - Routledge.
    Resilience thinking challenges us to reconsider the meaning of sustainability in a world that must constantly adapt in the face of gradual and at times catastrophic change. This volume further asks environmental education and resource management scholars to consider the relationship of environmental learning and behaviours to attributes of resilient social-ecological systems - attributes such as ecosystem services, innovative governance structures, biological and cultural diversity, and social capital. Similar to current approaches to environmental education and education for sustainable (...)
     
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  47.  7
    How Much is That Ecosystem in the Window? The One with the Bio-Diverse Trail.Clive L. Spash - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (2):259-284.
    Ecosystems are increasingly characterised as goods and services to allow their valuation in monetary terms. This follows an orthodox economic approach to environmental values, but is also being undertaken by ecologists and conservation biologists. There then appears a lack of clarity and debate as to the model of human behaviour, specific values and decision process being adopted. Arguments for ecosystems service valuation are critically appraised and the case for a model leading to value pluralism is presented. The outcome is (...)
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  48.  13
    Ethics Reflection Groups in Community Health Services: An Evaluation Study.Lillian Lillemoen & Reidar Pedersen - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):25.
    Systematic ethics support in community health services in Norway is in the initial phase. There are few evaluation studies about the significance of ethics reflection on care. The aim of this study was to evaluate systematic ethics reflection in groups in community health , - from the perspectives of employees participating in the groups, the group facilitators and the service managers. The reflection groups were implemented as part of a research and development project.
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  49.  46
    Influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on Loyalty and Valuation of Services.Ma del Mar García de los Salmones, Angel Herrero Crespo & Ignacio Rodríguez del Bosque - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):369-385.
    The study of corporate social responsibility has been the object of much research in recent decades, although there is a need to continue investigating its benefits as a marketing tool. In the current work we adopt a multidimensional perspective of social responsibility, and we carry out market research to determine the perceptions of users of mobile telephone services about economic, legal, ethical and social aspects of their operating companies. With these data we determine the structure and components of the (...)
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  50. Quantifying Privacy in Terms of Entropy for Context Aware Services.Athanasios S. Voulodimos & Charalampos Z. Patrikakis - 2009 - Identity in the Information Society 2 (2):155-169.
    In this paper, we address the issue of privacy protection in context aware services, through the use of entropy as a means of measuring the capability of locating a user’s whereabouts and identifying personal selections. We present a framework for calculating levels of abstraction in location and personal preferences reporting in queries to a context aware services server. Finally, we propose a methodology for determining the levels of abstraction in location and preferences that should be applied in user (...)
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