Results for 'ectogenesis'

35 found
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  1.  79
    Ectogenesis, Abortion and a Right to the Death of the Fetus.Joona Räsänen - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (9):697-702.
    Many people believe that the abortion debate will end when at some point in the future it will be possible for fetuses to develop outside the womb. Ectogenesis, as this technology is called, would make possible to reconcile pro-life and pro-choice positions. That is because it is commonly believed that there is no right to the death of the fetus if it can be detached alive and gestated in an artificial womb. Recently Eric Mathison and Jeremy Davis defended this (...)
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  2.  21
    Ectogenesis and the Case Against the Right to the Death of the Foetus.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):76-81.
    Ectogenesis, or the use of an artificial womb to allow a foetus to develop, will likely become a reality within a few decades, and could significantly affect the abortion debate. We first examine the implications for Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, which argues for a woman’s right to withdraw life support from the foetus and so terminate her pregnancy, even if the foetus is granted full moral status. We show that on Thomson’s reasoning, there is no right to the (...)
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  3.  52
    Reproductive Ectogenesis: The Third Era of Human Reproduction and Some Moral Consequences.Stellan Welin - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):615-626.
    In a well known story Derek Parfit describes a disconnection between two entities that normally (in real life) travel together through space and time, namely your personal identity consisting of both mind and body. Realising the possibility of separation, even if it might never happen in real life, new questions arise that cast doubt on old solutions. In human reproduction, in real life, at present the fetus spends approximately nine months inside the pregnant woman. But, we might envisage other possibilities. (...)
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  4.  24
    Ectogenesis and a Right to the Death of the Prenatal Human Being: A Reply to Räsänen.Christopher Kaczor - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (9):634-638.
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  5.  2
    Formula Feeding Can Help Illuminate Long‐Term Consequences of Full Ectogenesis.Zeljka Buturovic - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  6.  20
    The Subjects of Ectogenesis: Are “Gestatelings” Fetuses, Newborns, or Neither?Nick Colgrove - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):723-726.
    Subjects of ectogenesis—human beings that are developing in artificial wombs (AWs)—share the same moral status as newborns. To demonstrate this, I defend two claims. First, subjects of partial ectogenesis—those that develop in utero for a time before being transferred to AWs—are newborns (in the full sense of the word). Second, subjects of complete ectogenesis—those who develop in AWs entirely—share the same moral status as newborns. To defend the first claim, I rely on Elizabeth Chloe Romanis’s distinctions between (...)
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  7.  5
    Abortion and Ectogenesis: Moral Compromise.William Simkulet - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105676.
    The contemporary philosophical literature on abortion primarily revolves around three seemingly intractable debates, concerning the moral status of the fetus, scope of women’s rights and moral relevance of the killing/letting die distinction. The possibility of ectogenesis—technology that would allow a fetus to develop outside of a gestational mother’s womb—presents a unique opportunity for moral compromise. Here, I argue those opposed to abortion have a prima facie moral obligation to pursue ectogenesis technology and provide ectogenesis for disconnected fetuses (...)
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  8. In Defense of Ectogenesis.Anna Smajdor - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (1):90-103.
    In his article “Research Priorities and the Future of Pregnancy” in this issue of CQ, Timothy Murphy evaluates some of the arguments I advanced in an earlier publication, “The Moral Imperative for Ectogenesis.
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  9.  2
    Gestation, Equality and Freedom: Ectogenesis as a Political Perspective.Giulia Cavaliere - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105691.
    The benefits of full ectogenesis, that is, the gestation of human fetuses outside the maternal womb, for women ground many contemporary authors’ arguments on the ethical desirability of this practice. In this paper, I present and assess two sets of arguments advanced in favour of ectogenesis: arguments stressing ectogenesis’ equality-promoting potential and arguments stressing its freedom-promoting potential. I argue that although successfully grounding a positive case for ectogenesis, these arguments have limitations in terms of their reach (...)
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  10.  48
    Is Pregnancy Necessary? Feminist Concerns About Ectogenesis.Julien S. Murphy - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (3):66-84.
    To what extent are women obliged to be child-bearers? If reproductive technology could offer some form of ectogenesis, would feminists regard it as a liberating reproductive option? Three lines of reproductive rights arguments currently used by feminists are applied to ectogenesis. Each fails to provide strong grounds for prohibiting it. Yet, there are several ways in which ectogenesis could contribute to women's oppression, in particular, if it were used to undermine abortion rights, reinforce traditional views of fertility, (...)
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  11.  35
    Women, Ectogenesis and Ethical Theory.Leslie Cannold - 1995 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (1):55-64.
    ABSTRACT The nature of two influential theories on the moral status of abortion logically commits them to welcoming the advent of ectogenesis as a solution to the abortion conflict. However, qualitative research into women's response to ectogenesis reveals that both women in favour and women opposed to abortion rights reject the technology on surprisingly similar grounds. The abortion framework which led women to reject ectogenesis as an ethical resolution to unwanted pregnancy is contrasted with the moral framework (...)
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  12.  69
    Is Reproduction Women's Business? How Should We Regulate Regarding Stored Embryos, Posthumous Pregnancy, Ectogenesis and Male Pregnancy?Rebecca Bennett - 2008 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
    Traditionally reproduction, gestation and childbirth have all been regarded as being primarily a woman's domain. As natural reproduction occurs inside a woman's body, respect for autonomy and bodily integrity requires the pregnant woman to have the conclusive say over the fate of the embryo/fetus growing within her. Thus traditionally the ethics and law of reproduction is dominated by the importance of respecting women's reproductive choices. This paper argues that emerging technologies demand a radical rethink of ethics and law in the (...)
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  13.  17
    Ectogenesis: A Reply to Singer and Wells.David N. James - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (1):80-99.
    The possibility of achieving ectogenesis, or the growing of a human fetus to term in an artificial womb, is approaching reality as a result of advances in treatment of premature newborns and in in vitro fertilization techniques. In their 1984 book, The Reproductive Revolution, issued in North America as Making Babies, Peter Singer and Deane Wells offered several arguments for ectogenesis. James examines their arguments and rejects two of them, that ectogenesis offers a less problematic alternative to (...)
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  14.  18
    Ectogenesis: Artificial Womb Technology and the Future of Human Reproduction.Scott Gelfand & John R. Shook - 2006 - Rodopi.
    This book raises many moral, legal, social, and political, questions related to possible development, in the near future, of an artificial womb for human use. Is ectogenesis ever morally permissible? If so, under what circumstances? Will ectogenesis enhance or diminish women's reproductive rights and/or their economic opportunities? These are some of the difficult and crucial questions this anthology addresses and attempts to answer.
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  15. The Moral Imperative for Ectogenesis.Anna Smajdor - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (3):336-345.
    edited by Tuija Takala and Matti Häyry, welcomes contributions on the conceptual and theoretical dimensions of bioethics.
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  16. Regulating the Reproductive Revolution : Ectogenesis- a Regulatory Minefield?Amel Alghrani - 2008 - In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.
  17.  46
    The Embryo Rescue Debate: Impregnating Women, Ectogenesis, and Restoration From Suspended Animation.Nicholas Tonti-Filippini - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (1):111-137.
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  18.  30
    The Artificial Womb: A Pilot Study Considering People's Views on the Artificial Womb and Ectogenesis in Israel.Frida Simonstein & Michal Mashiach–Eizenberg - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (1):87.
    edited by Tuija Takala and Matti Häyry, welcomes contributions on the conceptual and theoretical dimensions of bioethics. The section is dedicated to the idea that words defined by bioethicists and others should not be allowed to imprison people's actual concerns, emotions, and thoughts. Papers that expose the many meanings of a concept, describe the different readings of a moral doctrine, or provide an alternative angle to seemingly self-evident issues are therefore particularly appreciated. The themes covered in the section so far (...)
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  19.  50
    Rethinking Abortion, Ectogenesis, and Fetal Death.Christine Overall - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (1):126-140.
  20.  6
    Ectogenesis, Justice and Utility: A Reply to James.Deane Wells - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (4):372-379.
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  21.  8
    Ectogenesis, Justice and Utility: A Reply to James.M. P. Wells - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (4):372–379.
  22. Scott Gelfand and John R. Shook, Eds., Ectogenesis: Artificial Womb Technology and the Future of Human Reproduction.C. Kaposy - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27 (3):175.
     
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  23.  9
    Ectogenesis and Mother as Machine.Irina Aristarkhova - 2005 - Body and Society 11 (3):43-59.
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  24.  30
    Can Technology Fix the Abortion Problem?: Ectogenesis and the Real Issues of Abortion.Patrick D. Hopkins - 2008 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):311-326.
    The abortion controversy as a cultural phenomenon is itself socially troublesome. However, current biotechnology research programs point to a possible technological fix. If we could harmlessly remove fetuses from women’s bodies and transfer them to other women, cryonic suspension, or ectogenetic devices, this might mitigate the controversy. Pro-lifers’ apparent minimal requirement would be met—fetuses would not be killed. Pro-choicers’ apparent minimal requirement would be met—women could end pregnancies and control their bodies. This option has been optimistically anticipated by some ethicists, (...)
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  25. There is No Right to the Death of the Fetus.Perry Hendricks - 2018 - Bioethics (6):1-3.
    Joona Räsänen, in his article ‘Ectogenesis, abortion and a right to the death of the fetus’, has argued for the view that parents have a right to the death of the fetus. In this article, I will explicate the three arguments Räsänen defends, and show that two of them have false or unmotivated premises and hence fail, and that the support he offers for his third argument is inconsistent with other views he expresses in his article. Therefore, I conclude (...)
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  26. Is There a Right to the Death of the Foetus?Eric Mathison & Jeremy Davis - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):313-320.
    At some point in the future – perhaps within the next few decades – it will be possible for foetuses to develop completely outside the womb. Ectogenesis, as this technology is called, raises substantial issues for the abortion debate. One such issue is that it will become possible for a woman to have an abortion, in the sense of having the foetus removed from her body, but for the foetus to be kept alive. We argue that while there is (...)
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  27.  20
    Artificial Reproduction Technologies (RTs) – All the Way to the Artificial Womb?Frida Simonstein - 2006 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (3):359-365.
    In this paper, I argue that the development of an artificial womb is already well on its way. By putting together pieces of information arising from new scientific advances in different areas, (neo-natal care, gynecology, embryology, the human genome project and computer science), I delineate a distinctive picture, which clearly suggests that the artificial womb may become a reality sooner than we may think. Currently, there is a huge gap between the first stages of gestation (using in vitro fertilization) and (...)
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  28.  3
    Ectogestation Ethics: The Implications of Artificially Extending Gestation for Viability, Newborn Resuscitation and Abortion.Lydia Di Stefano, Catherine Mills, Andrew Watkins & Dominic Wilkinson - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  29. Ethical Issues in Gestational Surrogacy.Rosalie Ber - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (2):153-169.
    The introduction of contraceptive technologies hasresulted in the separation of sex and procreation. Theintroduction of new reproductive technologies (mainlyIVF and embryo transfer) has led not only to theseparation of procreation and sex, but also to there-definition of the terms mother and family.For the purpose of this essay, I will distinguishbetween:1. the genetic mother – the donor of the egg;2. the gestational mother – she who bears and gives birth to the baby;3. the social mother – the woman who raises the (...)
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  30.  65
    The Morality of Embryo Use.Louis M. Guenin - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Is it permissible to use a human embryo in stem cell research, or in general as a means for benefit of others? Acknowledging each embryo as an object of moral concern, Louis M.Guenin argues that it is morally permissible to decline intrauterine transfer of an embryo formed outside the body, and that from this permission and the duty of beneficence, there follows a consensus justification for using donated embryos in service of humanitarian ends. He then proceeds to show how this (...)
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  31.  24
    The Perfect Womb: Promoting Equality of Opportunity.Evie Kendal - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):185-194.
    This paper aims to address how artificial gestation might affect equality of opportunity for the unborn and any resultant generation of “ectogenetic” babies. It will first explore the current legal obstacles preventing the development of ectogenesis, before looking at the benefits of allowing this technology to control fetal growth and development. This will open up a discussion of the treatment/enhancement divide regarding the use of reproductive technologies, a topic featured in various bioethical debates on the subject. Using current maternity (...)
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  32.  63
    Out-of-Body Gestation: In Whose Best Interests?Rosemarie Tong - 2004 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):67-76.
    This article revisits the question of ectogenesis as our neonatal care and biogenetic technologies bring us closer to the possibility. In 1923, J.B.S. Haldane wrote approvingly of ectogenesis as a eugenic technique, using a science fiction format. In the 1970s and 1980s, feminists debated whether ectogenesis, if possible, would be liberating or oppressive for women. Given current legal and bioethical issues, we must now take seriously the possible costs of ectogenesis: the possibility of growing bodies for (...)
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  33.  52
    Research Priorities and the Future of Pregnancy.Timothy F. Murphy - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (1):78-89.
    The term “ectogenesis” has been around for about a century now, and it is generally understood as the development of embryos and fetuses outside a uterus. In this sense, all in vitro fertilization is ectogenesis, but in vitro development can only proceed to a certain point, at which time human embryos are then either implanted in the attempt to achieve a pregnancy, frozen for that use in the future, used in research, or discarded.
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  34.  27
    Reproduction and Rationality.Albert R. Jonsen - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (3):263.
    Many years ago, the esteemed patriarch of bioethics, Joseph Fletcher, spoke loud and clear in favor of rationality in reproduction. By rationality, he meant not merely limiting population growth, which he certainly favored, but bringing to bear human analytic and creative intelligence on the random and instinctive activities of sexual intercourse and procreation that we share with all mammals. In his 1974 book, The Ethics of Genetic Control: Ending Reproductive Roulette, he foresaw most of the issues that we are facing (...)
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  35.  30
    The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008: A Missed Opportunity?A. Alghrani - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):718-719.
    The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008: a missed opportunity?Amel AlghraniCorrespondence to Dr Amel Alghrani, Institute for Science, Ethics and Innovation, Centre for Social Ethics and Policy, School of Law, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL; amel.alghrani@manchester.ac.ukReceived 16 September 2009 Accepted 24 September 2009 Regulating reproduction is no easy feat. In the past three decades we have witnessed a reproductive revolution and great strides have been made to alleviate the effects of infertility. Reproductive advances such as in-vitro fertilisation (...)
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