Results for 'educational neuroscience'

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  1.  16
    The Somatic Appraisal Model of Affect: Paradigm for Educational Neuroscience and Neuropedagogy.Kathryn E. Patten - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):87-97.
    This chapter presents emotion as a function of brain-body interaction, as a vital part of a multi-tiered phylogenetic set of neural mechanisms, evoked by both instinctive processes and learned appraisal systems, and argues to establish the primacy of emotion in relation to cognition. Primarily based on Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, but also incorporating elements of Lazarus' appraisal theory, this paper presents a neuropedagogical model of emotion, the somatic appraisal model of affect (SAMA). SAMA identifies quintessential components, facets, and functions of (...)
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  2.  50
    Position Statement on Motivations, Methodologies, and Practical Implications of Educational Neuroscience Research: fMRI Studies of the Neural Correlates of Creative Intelligence.John Geake - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):43-47.
    In this position statement it is argued that educational neuroscience must necessarily be relevant to, and therefore have implications for, both educational theory and practice. Consequently, educational neuroscientific research necessarily must embrace educational research questions in its remit.
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  3.  31
    Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, Methodology, and Implications.Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):7-16.
    ‘What does the brain have to do with learning?’Prima facie, this may seem like a strange thing for anyone to say, especially educational scholars, researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. There are, however, valid objections to injecting various and sundry neuroscientific considerations piecemeal into the vast field of education. These objections exist in a variety of dimensions. After providing a working definition for educational neuroscience, identifying the ‘mindbrain’ as the proper object of study thereof, I discuss, dispel or (...)
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  4.  33
    Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, Methodology, and Implications.Stephen R. Campbell - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):7-16.
    ‘What does the brain have to do with learning?’Prima facie, this may seem like a strange thing for anyone to say, especially educational scholars, researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. There are, however, valid objections to injecting various and sundry neuroscientific considerations piecemeal into the vast field of education. These objections exist in a variety of dimensions. After providing a working definition for educational neuroscience, identifying the ‘mindbrain’ as the proper object of study thereof, I discuss, dispel or (...)
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  5. Educational Neuroscience: Initiatives and Emerging Issues.Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell (eds.) - 2011 - Wiley.
    _Educational Neuroscience_ provides an overview of the wide range of recent initiatives in educational neuroscience, examining a variety of methodological concerns, issues, and directions. Encourages interdisciplinary perspectives in educational neuroscience Contributions from leading researchers examine key issues relating to educational neuroscience and mind, brain, and education more generally Promotes a theoretical and empirical base for the subject area Explores a range of methods available to researchers Identifies agencies, organizations, and associations facilitating development in the (...)
     
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  6.  17
    Educational Neuroscience: A Plea for Radical Scepticism.Ivan Snook - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):445-449.
  7.  18
    Introduction: Educational Neuroscience.Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):1-6.
  8.  3
    Educational Neuroscience: Its Position, Aims and Expectations.Anna van der Meulen, Lydia Krabbendam & Doret de Ruyter - 2015 - British Journal of Educational Studies 63 (2):229-243.
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  9.  41
    Implications of Affective and Social Neuroscience for Educational Theory.Mary Helen Immordino‐Yang - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):98-103.
    The past decade has seen major advances in cognitive, affective and social neuroscience that have the potential to revolutionize educational theories about learning. The importance of emotion and social learning has long been recognized in education, but due to technological limitations in neuroscience research techniques, treatment of these topics in educational theory has largely not had the benefit of biological evidence to date. In this article, I lay out two general, complementary findings that have emerged from (...)
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  10.  3
    The Practical and Principled Problems With Educational Neuroscience.Jeffrey S. Bowers - forthcoming - Psychological Review.
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  11. Ethical Issues in Educational Neuroscience: Raising Children in a Brave New World.Zachary Stein, Bruno Della Chiesa, Christina Hinton & Kurt W. Fischer - 2011 - In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  12.  1
    From the Laboratory to the Classroom: The Potential of Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Educational Neuroscience.Guilherme Brockington, Joana Bisol Balardin, Guilherme Augusto Zimeo Morais, Amanda Malheiros, Roberto Lent, Luciana Monteiro Moura & Joao R. Sato - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  13. Educational Neuroscience, Constructivism, and the Mediation of Learning and Creativity in the 21st Century.M. Layne Kalbfleisch - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  14.  30
    Lessons From Neuroscience Research for Understanding Causal Links Between Family and Neighborhood Characteristics and Educational Outcomes.Charles A. Nelson & Margaret A. Sheridan - 2011 - In Greg J. Duncan & Richard J. Murnane (eds.), Whither Opportunity. Russell Sage. pp. 27--46.
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  15.  5
    Emotions, Learning, and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience, by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang.Jennifer McCrickerd - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):547-552.
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  16.  1
    On Theory of Learning and Knowledge: Educational Implications of Advances in Neuroscience.Graham D. Hendry & Ronald C. King - 1994 - Science Education 78 (3):223-253.
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  17. Once More with Feeling : Integrating Emotion in Teaching Business Ethics' Educational Implications From Cognitive Neuroscience and Social Psychology.Christopher P. Adkins - 2011 - In Ronald R. Sims & William I. Sauser (eds.), Experiences in Teaching Business Ethics. Information Age.
  18. Neuroscience for Educators: What Are They Seeking, and What Are They Finding?Cayce Hook & Martha Farah - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (2):331-341.
    What can neuroscience offer to educators? Much of the debate has focused on whether basic research on the brain can translate into direct applications within the classroom. Accompanying ethical concern has centered on whether neuroeducation has made empty promises to educators. Relatively little investigation has been made into educators’ expectations regarding neuroscience research and how they might find it professionally useful. In order to address this question, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 13 educators who were repeat attendees of (...)
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  19.  53
    Neuroeducation–a Critical Overview of an Emerging Field.Daniel Ansari, Bert de Smedt & Roland Grabner - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (2):105-117.
    Abstract In the present article, we provide a critical overview of the emerging field of ‘neuroeducation’ also frequently referred to as ‘mind, brain and education’ or ‘educational neuroscience’. We describe the growing energy behind linking education and neuroscience in an effort to improve learning and instruction. We explore reasons behind such drives for interdisciplinary research. Reviewing some of the key advances in neuroscientific studies that have come to bear on neuroeducation, we discuss recent evidence on the brain (...)
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  20.  39
    The Need for Interdisciplinary Dialogue in Developing Ethical Approaches to Neuroeducational Research.Paul Howard-Jones & Kate Fenton - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (2):119-134.
    This paper argues that many ethical issues in neuroeducational research cannot be appropriately addressed using the principles and guidance available in one of these areas alone, or by applying these in simple combination. Instead, interdisciplinary and public dialogue will be required to develop appropriate normative principles. In developing this argument, it examines neuroscientific and educational perspectives within three broad categories of ethical issue arising at the interface of cognitive neuroscience and education: issues regarding the carrying out of interdisciplinary (...)
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  21.  76
    Connecting Education and Cognitive Neuroscience: Where Will the Journey Take Us?Daniel Ansari, Donna Coch & Bert De Smedt - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):37-42.
    In recent years there have been growing calls for forging greater connections between education and cognitive neuroscience. As a consequence great hopes for the application of empirical research on the human brain to educational problems have been raised. In this article we contend that the expectation that results from cognitive neuroscience research will have a direct and immediate impact on educational practice are shortsighted and unrealistic. Instead, we argue that an infrastructure needs to be created, principally (...)
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  22.  59
    What Can Neuroscience Bring to Education?Michel Ferrari - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):31-36.
    Educational neuroscience promises to incorporate emerging insights from neuroscience into education, and is an exiting renovation of cognitive science in education. But unlike cognitive neuroscience—which aims to explain how the mind is embodied—educational neuroscience necessarily incorporates values that reflect the kind of citizen and the kind of society we aspire to create. Neuroscience can help fulfill the mandate of public education, but only as a tool that is part of a broader conversation about (...)
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  23.  18
    The Eudaimonian Question: Virtue, Ethics, Neuroscience and Higher Education.Raymond Aaron Younis - 2014 - Education and Philosophies of Engagement.
    Many philosophies of engagement build upon pedagogical, metaphysical, epistemological and ethical frameworks, particularly Virtue Ethics frameworks. However, a glance at the literature suggests that there are many debates about the nature, meaning, value and application of such things. In this paper, I will look at some recent empirical work (particularly in neuroscience) on virtues. I will argue that not only do such (empirical) studies enrich and deepen our understanding of virtues and indeed of virtue ethics; when combined with a (...)
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  24.  23
    Directions for Mind, Brain, and Education: Methods, Models, and Morality.Zachary Stein & Kurt W. Fischer - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):56-66.
    In this article we frame a set of important issues in the emerging field of Mind, Brain, and Education in terms of three broad headings: methods, models, and morality. Under the heading of methods we suggest that the need for synthesis across scientific and practical disciplines entails the pursuit of usable knowledge via a catalytic symbiosis between theory, research, and practice. Under the heading of models the goal of producing usable knowledge should shape the construction of theories that provide comprehensive (...)
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  25.  6
    Neurophilia: Guiding Educational Research and the Educational Field?Paul Smeyers - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (1):62-75.
    For a decade or so there has been a new ‘hype’ in educational research: it is called educational neuroscience or even neuroeducation —there are numerous publications, special journals, and an abundance of research projects together with the advertisement of many positions at renowned research centres worldwide. After a brief introduction of what is going on in the ‘emerging sub-discipline’, a number of characterisations are offered of what is envisaged by authors working in this field. In the discussion (...)
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  26.  49
    Philosophical Challenges for Researchers at the Interface Between Neuroscience and Education.Paul Howard-jones - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):361-380.
    This article examines how discussions around the new interdisciplinary research area combining neuroscience and education have brought into sharp relief differences in the philosophies of learning in these two areas. It considers the difficulties faced by those working at the interface between these two areas and, in particular, it focuses on the challenge of avoiding 'non-sense' when attempting to include the brain in educational argument. The paper relates common transgressions in sense-making with dualist and monist notions of the (...)
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  27. Principles of Learning, Implications for Teaching: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective.Usha Goswami - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):381-399.
    Cognitive neuroscience aims to improve our understanding of aspects of human learning and performance by combining data acquired with the new brain imaging technologies with data acquired in cognitive psychology paradigms. Both neuroscience and psychology use the philosophical assumptions underpinning the natural sciences, namely the scientific method, whereby hypotheses are proposed and tested using quantitative approaches. The relevance of 'brain science' for the classroom has proved controversial with some educators, perhaps because of distrust of the applicability of so-called (...)
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  28.  7
    Neuroscience and Education: Blind Spots in a Strange Relationship.Volker Kraft - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):386-396.
    This article—mainly referring to the situation in Germany—consists of three parts. In a first section the current presence of neurosciences in the public discourse will be described in order to illuminate the background which is relevant for contemporary educational thinking. The prefix ‘neuro-’ is ubiquitous today and therefore concepts like ‘neuropedagogy’ or ‘neurodidactics’ seem to be in the mainstream of modern thinking. In the second part of the article the perspective changes from the public discourse to the disciplinary discourse; (...)
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  29.  60
    Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning?Anthony E. Kelly - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):17-23.
    In this article, I review recent findings in cognitive neuroscience in learning, particularly in the learning of mathematics and of reading. I argue that while cognitive neuroscience is in its infancy as a field, theories of learning will need to incorporate and account for this growing body of empirical data.
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  30. Neuroscience and Education: A Philosophical Appraisal.Clarence W. Joldersma (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    This volume makes a philosophical contribution to the application of neuroscience in education. It frames neuroscience research in novel ways around educational conceptualizing and practices, while also taking a critical look at conceptual problems in neuroeducation and at the economic reasons driving the mind-brain education movement. It offers alternative approaches for situating neuroscience in educational research and practice, including non-reductionist models drawing from Dewey and phenomenological philosophers such as Martin Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. The volume gathers (...)
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  31.  29
    A Temporally Sustained Implicit Theory of Mind Deficit in Autism Spectrum Disorders.Dana Schneider, Virginia P. Slaughter, Andrew P. Bayliss & Paul E. Dux - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):410-417.
    Eye movements during false-belief tasks can reveal an individual's capacity to implicitly monitor others' mental states (theory of mind - ToM). It has been suggested, based on the results of a single-trial-experiment, that this ability is impaired in those with a high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), despite neurotypical-like performance on explicit ToM measures. However, given there are known attention differences and visual hypersensitivities in ASD it is important to establish whether such impairments are evident over time. In addition, investigating implicit (...)
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  32.  38
    Neuroscience and the Teaching of Mathematics.Kerry Lee & Swee Fong Ng - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):81-86.
    Much of the neuroimaging research has focused on how mathematical operations are performed. Although this body of research has provided insight for the refinement of pedagogy, there are very few neuroimaging studies on how mathematical operations should be taught. In this article, we describe the teaching of algebra in Singapore schools and the imperatives that led us to develop two neuroimaging studies that examined questions of curricular concerns. One of the challenges was to condense issues from classrooms into tasks suitable (...)
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  33.  22
    Philosophy, Neuroscience and Pre-Service Teachers’ Beliefs in Neuromyths: A Call for Remedial Action.Minkang Kim & Derek Sankey - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1214-1227.
    Hitherto, the contribution of philosophers to Neuroscience and Education has tended to be less than enthusiastic, though there are some notable exceptions. Meanwhile, the pervasive influence of neuromyths on education policy, curriculum design and pedagogy in schools is well documented. Indeed, philosophers have sometimes used the prevalence of neuromyths in education to bolster their opposition to neuroscience in teacher education courses. By contrast, this article views the presence of neuromyths in education as a call for remedial action, including (...)
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  34.  23
    Does Neuroscience Matter for Education?Francis Schrag - 2011 - Educational Theory 61 (2):221-237.
    In this review essay, Francis Schrag focuses on two recent anthologies dealing completely or in part with the role of neuroscience in learning and education: The Jossey-Bass Reader on the Brain and Learning, edited by Jossey-Bass Publishers, and New Philosophies of Learning, edited by Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis. Schrag argues that philosophers of education do have a distinctive role in the conversation about neuroscience. He contends that the impact of neuroscience is likely to be substantial, though (...)
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  35.  41
    A Multiperspective Approach to Neuroeducational Research.Paul A. Howard‐Jones - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):24-30.
    There is increasing interest in research that combines neuroscientific and educational perspectives on learning, but significant philosophical issues divide these perspectives. This article examines the value of such neuroeducational research and how concepts from different perspectives may be interrelated through a ‘level of actions’ model. This model, which encourages a multiperspective approach, may be helpful in avoiding some of the worst transgressions of sense-making in constructing concepts that span neuroscience and education. Application of the model is explored in (...)
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  36.  1
    Where Neuroscience and Education Meet: Can Emergentism Successfully Occupy the Middle Ground Between Mind and Body?John Clark - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):404-416.
    Increasingly, connections are being made between neuroscience and education. At their interface is the attempt to ‘bridge the gap between conscious minds and living brains’. All too often, the two sides pursue a reductionist strategy of excluding the other. A middle way, promoted by Sankey in the context of values education, is emergentism: our conscious mental states are the product of brain processes but are not reducible to them. This paper outlines Sankey’s emergentist position and raises two objections: What (...)
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  37.  42
    Neuroethics, Neuroeducation, and Classroom Teaching: Where the Brain Sciences Meet Pedagogy. [REVIEW]Mariale Hardiman, Luke Rinne, Emma Gregory & Julia Yarmolinskaya - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (2):135-143.
    The popularization of neuroscientific ideas about learning—sometimes legitimate, sometimes merely commercial—poses a real challenge for classroom teachers who want to understand how children learn. Until teacher preparation programs are reconceived to incorporate relevant research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences, teachers need translation and guidance to effectively use information about the brain and cognition. Absent such guidance, teachers, schools, and school districts may waste time and money pursuing so called brain-based interventions that lack a firm basis in research. Meanwhile, the (...)
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  38.  20
    Philosophy, Neuroscience and Education.John Clark - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (1):36-46.
  39.  4
    Neuroscience and Education: A Philosophical Approach.Andrew Davis - 2018 - Educational Theory 68 (2):235-242.
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  40.  5
    From Brain to Mind: Using Neuroscience to Guide Change in Education. James E. Zull. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, LLC, 2011. 294 Pp. $75.00; $14.99. [REVIEW]Meredith E. Michaud - 2015 - Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association 51 (3):259-262.
  41.  3
    A Rview Of “Real Learning: A Bridge to Cognitive Neuroscience”.Douglas Kolodny - 2007 - Educational Studies 42 (1):64-67.
  42. A Fool’s Paradise? The Subtle Assault of the Hard Sciences of Consciousness Upon Experiential Education.Gregory Nixon - 1997 - Educational Change (1997):11-28.
    Advances in artificial intelligence and neuroscience claim to have begun to undermine the assumptions of the arts and educational theory community by explaining consciousness through either a reduction to mathematical functionalism or an excrescence of brain biology. I suggest that the worldview behind such reductionism is opposed to the worldview assumed by many educational practitioners and theorists. I then go on to outline a few common positions taken in the burgeoning field of consciousness studies that suggest that—though (...)
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  43.  5
    On Being Musical: Education Towards Inclusion.Eve Ruddock - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
    This article questions educational practices that undermine ‘being’ musical. Where Western misconceptions about the nature of human musicality distance many individuals from meaningful engagement with an intrinsic part of their humanity, I challenge the status quo to argue for an inclusive educational practice which gives everyone an opportunity to ‘be’ musical. Despite evidence from neuroscience now supporting the understanding that humans are a musical species, the widespread neo-liberal oriented focus on vocational training fails to recognise music as (...)
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  44. And Morality.Zachary Stein & Kurt W. Fischer - 2011 - In Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell (eds.), Educational Neuroscience. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 23--55.
     
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  45. Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education.Glenn Whitman & Ian Kelleher - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Teachers are brain changers. Thus it would seem obvious that an understanding of the brain – the organ of learning – would be critical to a teacher’s readiness to work with students. Unfortunately, in traditional public, public-charter, private, parochial, and home schools across the country, most teachers lack an understanding of how the brain receives, filters, consolidates, and applies learning for both the short and long term. Neuroteach was therefore written to help solve the problem teachers and school leaders have (...)
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  46.  33
    Toward a Second-Person Neuroscience.Leonhard Schilbach, Bert Timmermans, Vasudevi Reddy, Alan Costall, Gary Bente, Tobias Schlicht & Kai Vogeley - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):393-414.
    In spite of the remarkable progress made in the burgeoning field of social neuroscience, the neural mechanisms that underlie social encounters are only beginning to be studied and could —paradoxically— be seen as representing the ‘dark matter’ of social neuroscience. Recent conceptual and empirical developments consistently indicate the need for investigations, which allow the study of real-time social encounters in a truly interactive manner. This suggestion is based on the premise that social cognition is fundamentally different when we (...)
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  47. Hard-Incompatibilist Existentialism: Neuroscience, Punishment, and Meaning in Life.Derk Pereboom & Gregg D. Caruso - 2018 - In Gregg D. Caruso & Owen Flanagan (eds.), Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
    As philosophical and scientific arguments for free will skepticism continue to gain traction, we are likely to see a fundamental shift in the way people think about free will and moral responsibility. Such shifts raise important practical and existential concerns: What if we came to disbelieve in free will? What would this mean for our interpersonal relationships, society, morality, meaning, and the law? What would it do to our standing as human beings? Would it cause nihilism and despair as some (...)
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  48. Your Brain as the Source of Free Will Worth Wanting: Understanding Free Will in the Age of Neuroscience.Eddy Nahmias - forthcoming - In Gregg Caruso & Owen Flanagan (eds.), Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical debates about free will have focused on determinism—a potential ‘threat from behind’ because determinism entails that there are conditions in the distant past that, in accord with the laws of nature, are sufficient for all of our decisions. Neuroscience is consistent with indeterminism, so it is better understood as posing a ‘threat from below’: If our decision-making processes are carried out by neural processes, then it might seem that our decisions are not based on our prior conscious deliberations (...)
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  49.  82
    Neuroscience, Choice, and the Free Will Debate.Jason Shepard & Shane Reuter - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics - Neuroscience 3 (3):7-11.
    A number of scientists have recently argued that neuroscience provides strong evidence against the requirements of the folk notion of free will. In one such line of argumentation, it is claimed that choice is required for free will, and neuroscience is showing that people do not make choices. In this article, we argue that this no-choice line of argumentation relies on a specific conception of choice. We then provide evidence that people do not share the conception of choice (...)
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  50. The Cognitive Neuroscience Revolution.Worth Boone & Gualtiero Piccinini - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5):1509-1534.
    We outline a framework of multilevel neurocognitive mechanisms that incorporates representation and computation. We argue that paradigmatic explanations in cognitive neuroscience fit this framework and thus that cognitive neuroscience constitutes a revolutionary break from traditional cognitive science. Whereas traditional cognitive scientific explanations were supposed to be distinct and autonomous from mechanistic explanations, neurocognitive explanations aim to be mechanistic through and through. Neurocognitive explanations aim to integrate computational and representational functions and structures across multiple levels of organization in order (...)
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