Results for 'egocentric and allocentric self-localization'

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  1. Ich bin jetzt hier - aber wo ist das?Geert Keil - 2011 - In Siri Granum Carson, Jonathan Knowles & Bjørn K. Myskja (eds.), Kant: Here, Now, and How. Mentis. pp. 15-34.
    Menschen verfügen über ein komplexes Vermögen der Selbstlokalisierung in Raum und Zeit. Seine eigene Position festzustellen kann in verschiedenen Kontexten Verschiedenes bedeuten. Nicht jedes unsere raumzeitliche Lokalisierung und Orientierung betreffende Problem ist philosophischer Natur. Fragen wie »Wo ist Norden?«, »Wie weit ist es nach Hause?« oder »In welcher Richtung liegt das Ziel?« sind lebensweltliche und gegebenenfalls navigatorische Fragen. Die kognitiven Mechanismen und Fähigkeiten zu untersuchen, die unseren Lokalisierungs- und Orientierungsleistungen zugrunde liegen, ist eine Aufgabe für die Kognitionswissenschaften. Die Untersuchung der (...)
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  2.  87
    Phenomenal Consciousness and the Allocentric-Egocentric Interface.Pete Mandik - 2005 - Endophysics.
    I propose and defend the Allocentric-Egocentric Interface Theory of Con- sciousness. Mental processes form a hierarchy of mental representations with maxi- mally egocentric (self-centered) representations at the bottom and maximally allocentric (other-centered) representations at the top. Phenomenally conscious states are states that are relatively intermediate in this hierarchy. More speci.
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  3. Self, World and Space: The Meaning and Mechanisms of Ego- and Allocentric Spatial Representation.Rick Grush - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (1):59-92.
    b>: The problem of how physical systems, such as brains, come to represent themselves as subjects in an objective world is addressed. I develop an account of the requirements for this ability that draws on and refines work in a philosophical tradition that runs from Kant through Peter Strawson to Gareth Evans. The basic idea is that the ability to represent oneself as a subject in a world whose existence is independent of oneself involves the ability to represent space, and (...)
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  4.  22
    Magnitude of Gravitoinertial Force, an Independent Variable in Egocentric Visual Localization of the Horizontal.Earl F. Miller & Ashton Graybiel - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (3):452.
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  5.  22
    Being Present in More Than One Place at a Time? Patterns of Mental Self-Localization.Bartholomäus Wissmath, David Weibel, Jan Schmutz & Fred W. Mast - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1808-1815.
    Research in cognitive neuroscience and spatial presence suggests that human mental self-localization is tied to one place at a given point in time. In this study, we examined whether it is possible to feel localized at two distinct places at the same time. Participants were exposed to a virtual rollercoaster and they continuously judged to what extent they felt present in the immediate environment and in the mediated environment, respectively. The results show that participants distributed their self-localization to (...)
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  6.  36
    The Complex Interplay Between Three-Dimensional Egocentric and Allocentric Spatial Representation.David M. Kaplan - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):553-554.
    Jeffery et al. characterize the egocentric/allocentric distinction as discrete. But paradoxically, much of the neural and behavioral evidence they adduce undermines a discrete distinction. More strikingly, their positive proposal reflects a more complex interplay between egocentric and allocentric coding than they acknowledge. Properly interpreted, their proposal about three-dimensional spatial representation contributes to recent work on embodied cognition.
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  7.  47
    Individual Differences in the Encoding Processes of Egocentric and Allocentric Survey Knowledge.Wen Wen, Toru Ishikawa & Takao Sato - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (1):176-192.
    This study examined how different components of working memory are involved in the acquisition of egocentric and allocentric survey knowledge by people with a good and poor sense of direction (SOD). We employed a dual-task method and asked participants to learn routes from videos with verbal, visual, and spatial interference tasks and without any interference. Results showed that people with a good SOD encoded and integrated knowledge about landmarks and routes into egocentric survey knowledge in verbal and (...)
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  8.  20
    Egocentric Omniscience and Self-Ascriptive Belief.Brian MacPherson - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25:125-140.
    David Lewis’s property-centered account of belief falls prey to the problem of egocentric omniscience: In self-ascribing the property of being an eye doctor, an agent is thereby self-ascribing the property of being an oculist. It is argued that the problem of egocentric omniscience can be made palatable for Lewis’s property-centered account of belief, at least for the case of linguistic beliefs. Roughly, my solution is as follows: An agent can believe that he or she has the property of (...)
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  9.  11
    Distinct Task-Independent Visual Thresholds for Egocentric and Allocentric Information Pick Up.Matthieu M. De Wit, John Van der Kamp & Rich Sw Masters - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1410-1418.
    The dominant view of the ventral and dorsal visual systems is that they subserve perception and action. De Wit, Van der Kamp, and Masters suggested that a more fundamental distinction might exist between the nature of information exploited by the systems. The present study distinguished between these accounts by asking participants to perform delayed matching , pointing and perceptual judgment responses to masked Müller–Lyer stimuli of varying length. Matching and pointing responses of participants who could not perceptually judge stimulus length (...)
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  10.  18
    The Bilocated Mind: New Perspectives on Self-Localization and Self-Identification.Tiziano Furlanetto, Cesare Bertone & Cristina Becchio - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  11. Spatial Memory: How Egocentric and Allocentric Combine.Neil Burgess - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (12):551-557.
  12.  25
    Orientational Manoeuvres in the Dark: Dissociating Allocentric and Egocentric Influences on Spatial Memory.N. Burgess, H. Spiers & E. PalEologou - 2004 - Cognition 94 (2):149-166.
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  13.  19
    Are All Spatial Reference Frames Egocentric? Reinterpreting Evidence for Allocentric, Object-Centered, or World-Centered Reference Frames.Flavia Filimon - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  14.  9
    Metaphors for Embarrassment and Stories of Exposure: The Not‐So‐Egocentric Self in American Culture.Dorothy Holland & Andrew Kipnis - 1994 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 22 (3):316-342.
  15.  3
    Egocentric and Allocentric Spatial Memory in Korsakoff’s Amnesia.Gabriele Janzen, Claudette J. M. van Roij, Joukje M. Oosterman & Roy P. C. Kessels - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  16.  7
    Integration of Egocentric and Allocentric Information During Memory-Guided Reaching to Images of a Natural Environment.Katja Fiehler, Christian Wolf, Mathias Klinghammer & Gunnar Blohm - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  17.  5
    Metaphors for Embarrassment and Stories of Exposure: The Not-So-Egocentric Self in American Culture.Dorothy Holland & Andrew Kipnis - 1994 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 22 (3):316-342.
  18.  42
    Cortical Maps for Hearing and Egocentric Selection for Self-Organization.N. Suga, J. Yan & Y. Zhang - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):13-20.
  19.  9
    Children and Adults Prefer the Egocentric Representation to the Allocentric Representation.Qingfen Hu, Ying Yang, Zhenzhen Huang & Yi Shao - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  20. Space in the Brain: Different Neural Substrates for Allocentric and Egocentric Frames of Reference.Melvyn A. Goodale & K. Murphy - 2000 - In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press.
     
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  21.  4
    Notes Toward a Motor Theory of Visual Egocentric Localization.Jan H. Bruell & George W. Albee - 1955 - Psychological Review 62 (5):391-400.
  22.  9
    Study of Stress Localisation in Polycrystalline Grains Using Self-Consistent Modelling and Neutron Diffraction.A. Baczmański, A. Gaj, L. Le Joncour, S. Wroński, M. François, B. Panicaud, C. Braham & A. M. Paradowska - 2012 - Philosophical Magazine 92 (24):3015-3035.
  23.  3
    Sharing Different Reference Frames: How Stimulus Setup and Task Setup Shape Egocentric and Allocentric Simon Effects.Pamela Baess, Tom Weber & Christina Bermeitinger - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  24.  8
    An Allocentric Exception Confirms an Egocentric Rule: A Comment on Taghizadeh and Gail.Paul Dassonville, Benjamin D. Lester & Scott A. Reed - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  25.  6
    Vestibular-Auditory Interactions: Assessing the Influence of Passive Self-Motion on Auditory Localisation.Grabherr Luzia, Lory Vanda & Mast Fred - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  26. Localization of Function in the Cerebral Cortex and the Unity and Self-Organization of the Brain.Bruno [Y.] Eduardo Césarman Estañol - 1995 - Ludus Vitalis 3 (5):181-191.
     
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  27. Prism-Generated and Real Pitch Influence Egocentric Localization Similarity; Prism-Generated and Real Slant Don't.W. Li & L. Matin - 1993 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31:367.
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  28. Objective Subjectivity: Allocentric and Egocentric Representations in Thought and Experience.Pete Mandik - 2000 - Dissertation, Washington University
    Many philosophical issues concern questions of objectivity and subjectivity. Of these questions, there are two kinds. The first considers whether something is objective or subjective; the second what it _means_ for something to be objective or subjective.
     
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  29. Der Nullpunkt der Orientierung.Geert Keil - 2002 - In Audun Øfsti, Peter Ulrich & Truls Wyller (eds.), Indexicality and Idealism: The Self in Philosophical Perspective. Mentis. pp. 9-29.
    The indexical sentence “I am here now” can be used any time and anywhere by anyone to say something true. Rather than yielding a special kind of infallible knowledge, this fact indicates that every speaker or thinker has a zero of an egocentric coordinate system at his disposal. Many idealist philosophers assume that this egocentric zero can be further reduced. The ability to make a de se-reference with the first person pronoun, they claim, need not involve spatiotemporal (...). The paper challenges this idealistic view. Starting from the observation that even Descartes’ cogito argument, which expresses a tensed truth, involves a dated mental episode, it is argued that nothing can exist in time without being in space. The paper concludes that the egocentric zero of orientation with its three mutually dependent elements (I, here, now) cannot be further minimized. Thinkers of I-thoughts must have a spatiotemporal position. They must be Strawsonian persons rather than Cartesian egos. (shrink)
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  30.  17
    Being Somewhere. Egocentic Spatial Representation as Self-Representation.Ferdinand Pöhlmann - 2017 - Stuttgart: J.B. Metzler.
    Ferdinand Pöhlmann argues that a sense of one’s own basic abilities to move is a constitutive condition on the ability to perceive the world spatially. This constitutive relation explains why egocentric spatial representation is to be regarded as a kind of self-representation. In arguing for these claims, conceptual as well as empirical questions are discussed and an overview of accounts that take action as a constitutive condition on spatial representation is given. The picture that emerges is linked to the (...)
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  31.  35
    Phenomenal Space and the Unity of Conscious Experience.Douglas B. Meehan - 2003 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 9.
    One's contemporaneous conscious mental states seem bound in a single, unified experience. Dainton argues, against what he calls the S-Thesis, that we cannot explain such co-consciousness in terms of states' being located in a single phenomenal space, a functional space posited to explain our ability to locate ourselves relative to perceived stimuli. But Dainton's argument rests on a conflation of egocentric and allocentric self-localizing, and thus fails to undermine the S-Thesis. Nevertheless, experiments on visual neglect suggest one can (...)
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  32. Comment: Minimal Conditions for the Simplest Form of Self-Consciousness.Adrian J. T. Smith - 2010 - In Thomas Fuchs, Heribert Sattel & Peter Henningsen (eds.), The embodied self: Dimensions, coherence, disorders. Schattauer.
    Commentary on: Olaf Blanke, Thomas Metzinger, Full-body illusions and minimal phenomenal selfhood, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Volume 13, Issue 1, January 2009, Pages 7-13, ISSN 1364-6613, DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2008.10.003.
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  33.  81
    Egocentrism, Allocentrism, and Asperger Syndrome.Uta Frith & Frederique de Vignemont - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):719-738.
    In this paper, we attempt to make a distinction between egocentrism and allocentrism in social cognition, based on the distinction that is made in visuo-spatial perception. We propose that it makes a difference to mentalizing whether the other person can be understood using an egocentric (‘‘you'') or an allocentric (‘‘he/ she/they'') stance. Within an egocentric stance, the other person is represented in relation to the self. By contrast, within an allocentric stance, the existence or mental state (...)
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  34. Bodily Action and Distal Attribution in Sensory Substitution.Robert Briscoe - forthcoming - In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Proceedings of the British Academy.
    According to proponents of the sensorimotor contingency theory of perception (Hurley & Noë 2003, Noë 2004, O’Regan 2011), active control of camera movement is necessary for the emergence of distal attribution in tactile-visual sensory substitution (TVSS) because it enables the subject to acquire knowledge of the way stimulation in the substituting modality varies as a function of self-initiated, bodily action. This chapter, by contrast, approaches distal attribution as a solution to a causal inference problem faced by the subject’s perceptual systems. (...)
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  35.  31
    Meditating Selflessly at the Dawn of a New Millennium.James H. Austin - 2012 - Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):61-81.
    Increasingly open to question are the efficacies and timing of some traditional, conventional and current meditative techniques. Recent brain research emphasizes that it is important to distinguish between the Self-centred (egocentric) and other-centred (allocentric) streams of processing. It also proves useful to view as complementary the assets of the concentrative and receptive styles of meditation, especially when one's practices cultivate an appropriate balance between their top-down and bottom-up systems of attentive processing. From this neural perspective, Part I ventures (...)
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  36.  22
    The Representation of Egocentric Space in the Posterior Parietal Cortex.J. F. Stein - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):691-700.
  37.  92
    Where in the Brain is the Self?Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):671-678.
    Localizing the self in the brain has been the goal of consciousness research for centuries. Recently, there has been an increase in attention to the localization of the self. Here we present data from patients suffering from a loss of self in an attempt to understand the neural correlates of consciousness. Focusing on delusional misidentification syndrome , we find that frontal regions, as well as the right hemisphere appear to play a significant role in DMS and DMS related disorders. These (...)
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  38.  77
    The Self as an Embedded Agent.Chris Dobbyn & Susan A. J. Stuart - 2003 - Minds and Machines 13 (2):187-201.
    In this paper we consider the concept of a self-aware agent. In cognitive science agents are seen as embodied and interactively situated in worlds. We analyse the meanings attached to these terms in cognitive science and robotics, proposing a set of conditions for situatedness and embodiment, and examine the claim that internal representational schemas are largely unnecessary for intelligent behaviour in animats. We maintain that current situated and embodied animats cannot be ascribed even minimal self-awareness, and offer a six point (...)
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  39. Consciousness Evolves When the Self Dissolves.James H. Austin - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):209-230.
    We need to clarify at least four aspects of selfhood if we are to reach a better understanding of consciousness in general, and of its alternate states. First, how did we develop our self-centred psychophysiology? Second, can the four familiar lobes of the brain alone serve, if only as preliminary landmarks of convenience, to help understand the functions of our many self-referent networks? Third, what could cause one's former sense of self to vanish from the mental field during an extraordinary (...)
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  40. Space and Self-Awareness.John Louis Schwenkler - 2009 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    How should we think about the role of visual spatial awareness in perception and perceptual knowledge? A common view, which finds a characteristic expression in Kant but has an intellectual heritage reaching back farther than that, is that an account of spatial awareness is fundamental to a theory of experience because spatiality is the defining characteristic of “outer sense”, of our perceptual awareness of how things are in the parts of the world that surround us. A natural counterpart to this (...)
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  41.  63
    Spatial Aspects of Bodily Self-Consciousness.Bigna Lenggenhager, Michael Mouthon & Olaf Blanke - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):110-117.
    Visual, somatosensory, and perspectival cues normally provide congruent information about where the self is experienced. Separating those cues by virtual reality techniques, recent studies found that self-location was systematically biased to where a visual–tactile event was seen. Here we developed a novel, repeatable and implicit measure of self-location to compare and extend previous protocols. We investigated illusory self-location and associated phenomenological aspects in a lying body position that facilitates clinically observed abnormal self-location . The results confirm that the self is (...)
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  42. The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe Since the Seventeenth Century.Jerrold Seigel - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is the self? The question has preoccupied people in many times and places, but nowhere more than in the modern West, where it has spawned debates that still resound today. In this 2005 book, Jerrold Seigel provides an original and penetrating narrative of how major Western European thinkers and writers have confronted the self since the time of Descartes, Leibniz, and Locke. From an approach that is at once theoretical and contextual, he examines the way figures in Britain, France, (...)
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  43. Space, Self, and the Theater of Consciousness.Arnold Trehub - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):310-330.
    Over a decade ago, I introduced a large-scale theory of the cognitive brain which explained for the first time how the human brain is able to create internal models of its intimate world and invent models of a wider universe. An essential part of the theoretical model is an organization of neuronal mechanisms which I have named the Retinoid Model (Trehub, 1977, 1991). This hypothesized brain system has structural and dynamic properties enabling it to register and appropriately integrate disparate foveal (...)
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  44.  60
    Applying Self-Directed Anticipative Learning to Science I: Agency, Error, and the Interactive Exploration of Possibility Space in Early Ape-Langugae Research.Robert P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker - 2007 - Perspectives on Science 15 (1):87-124.
    : The purpose of this paper and its sister paper (Farrell and Hooker, b) is to present, evaluate and elaborate a proposed new model for the process of scientific development: self-directed anticipative learning (SDAL). The vehicle for its evaluation is a new analysis of a well-known historical episode: the development of ape-language research. In this first paper we outline five prominent features of SDAL that will need to be realized in applying SDAL to science: 1) interactive exploration of possibility space; (...)
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  45. A Complete Theory of Everything (Will Be Subjective).Marcus Hutter - 2010 - Algorithms 3 (4):329-350.
    Increasingly encompassing models have been suggested for our world. Theories range from generally accepted to increasingly speculative to apparently bogus. The progression of theories from ego- to geo- to helio-centric models to universe and multiverse theories and beyond was accompanied by a dramatic increase in the sizes of the postulated worlds, with humans being expelled from their center to ever more remote and random locations. Rather than leading to a true theory of everything, this trend faces a turning point after (...)
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  46. Mystical Feelings and the Process of Self-Transformation.Ruth Tietjen - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1623-1634.
    There is a need for inner recollection opposed to our everyday distraction. Our distraction is partly based on anthropological features and partly on social and cultural features. As well as feelings of distraction, we know experiences of being focussed from everyday life. As feelings in which distraction is absent, and as feelings in which we are partly and temporarily released from our own egocentric perspective, they remind us that a different kind of relation to ourselves and the world is (...)
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  47.  34
    Grasping Spatial Relationships: Failure to Demonstrate Allocentric Visual Coding in a Patient with Visual Form Agnosia.H. Chris Dijkerman, A. David Milner & David P. Carey - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):424-437.
    The cortical visual mechanisms involved in processing spatial relationships remain subject to debate. According to one current view, the ''dorsal stream'' of visual areas, emanating from primary visual cortex and culminating in the posterior parietal cortex, mediates this aspect of visual processing. More recently, others have argued that while the dorsal stream provides egocentric coding of visual location for motor control, the separate ''ventral'' stream is needed for allocentric spatial coding. We have assessed the visual form agnosic patient (...)
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  48.  26
    Where Am I? Redux.Arnold Trehub - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (1-2):207 -225.
    Activation of the brainʼs putative retinoid system has been proposed as the neuronal substrate for our basic sense of being centered within a volumetric surround –- our minimal phenomenal consciousness (Trehub 2007). Here, the assumed properties of the self-locus within the retinoid model are shown to explain recent experimental findings relating to the out-of-body-experience. In addition, selective excursion of the heuristic self-locus is able to explain many important functions of consciousness, including the effective internal representation of a 3D space on (...)
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  49.  39
    Proprioceptive Awareness and Practical Unity.Kathleen A. Howe - 2018 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):65-81.
    Deafferented subjects, while lacking proprioceptive awareness of much of their bodies, are nevertheless able to use their bodies in basic action. Sustained visual contact with the body parts of which they are no longer proprioceptively aware enables them to move these parts in a controlled way. This might be taken to straightforwardly show that proprioceptive awareness is inessential to bodily action. I, however, argue that this is not the case. Proprioceptive awareness figures essentially in our self-conscious unity as practical subjects. (...)
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  50.  5
    No Mental Life After Brain Death: The Argument From the Neural Localization of Mental Functions.Gualtiero Piccinini & Sonya Bahar - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 135-170.
    This paper samples the large body of neuroscientific evidence suggesting that each mental function takes place within specific neural structures. For instance, vision appears to occur in the visual cortex, motor control in the motor cortex, spatial memory in the hippocampus, and cognitive control in the prefrontal cortex. Evidence comes from neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, brain stimulation, neuroimaging, lesion studies, and behavioral genetics. If mental functions take place within neural structures, mental functions cannot survive brain death. Therefore, there is no mental (...)
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