Results for 'embryonic stem cell research'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  62
    Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Ethical Views of Buddhist, Hindu and Catholic Leaders in Malaysia.Mathana Amaris Fiona Sivaraman & Siti Nurani Mohd Noor - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):467-485.
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research raises ethical issues. In the process of research, embryos may be destroyed and, to some, such an act entails the ‘killing of human life’. Past studies have sought the views of scientists and the general public on the ethics of ESCR. This study, however, explores multi-faith ethical viewpoints, in particular, those of Buddhists, Hindus and Catholics in Malaysia, on ESCR. Responses were gathered via semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Three main ethical quandaries emerged (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  52
    Human embryonic stem cell research: Why the discarded-created-distinction cannot be based on the potentiality argument.Katrien Devolder - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (2):167-186.
    Discussions about the use and derivation of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells are a stumbling block in developing public policy on stem cell research. On the one hand there is a broad consensus on the benefits of these cells for science and biomedicine; on the other hand there is the controversial issue of killing human embryos. I will focus on the compromise position that accepts research on spare embryos, but not on research embryos (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  3. Human embryonic stem cell research: An intercultural perspective.LeRoy Walters - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):3-38.
    : In 1998, researchers discovered that embryonic stem cells could be derived from early human embryos. This discovery has raised a series of ethical and public-policy questions that are now being confronted by multiple international organizations, nations, cultures, and religious traditions. This essay surveys policies for human embryonic stem cell research in four regions of the world, reports on the recent debate at the United Nations about one type of such research, and reviews (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  4.  47
    Human embryonic stem cell research: Why the discarded‐created‐distinction cannot be based on the potentiality argument.Katrien Devolder - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (2):167-186.
    Discussions about the use and derivation of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells are a stumbling block in developing public policy on stem cell research. On the one hand there is a broad consensus on the benefits of these cells for science and biomedicine; on the other hand there is the controversial issue of killing human embryos. I will focus on the compromise position that accepts research on spare embryos, but not on research embryos (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  5.  79
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research: A Pragmatic Roman Catholic's Defense.R. Whittington - 2012 - Christian Bioethics 18 (3):235-251.
    The potential benefits of embryonic stem cell research have been clarified by the last ten years of research so that it is necessary to re-examine the foundations for the restrictions imposed on this research. Those who believe that life begins at the moment of fertilization and is imbued with a full complement of human rights have opposed all embryonic research. As one who accepts this premise, I will demonstrate that there are certain (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  28
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research and Therapy: The Need for a Common European Legal Framework.Carlos M. Romeo–Casabona - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (6):557-567.
    The possibility of obtaining stem cells from human embryos has given rise to an intensive legal and ethical debate. In this paper, attention is paid to the normative disparity and ambiguity in Europe. An argument for the need for a minimal legal harmonization is made; and a prudent and flexible way to reach this successfully is suggested. Establishing a common legal framework seems to be the only way to guarantee true competitiveness for the European scientific community.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7.  49
    Human embryonic stem cell research debates: a Confucian argument.D. F.-C. Tsai - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (11):635-640.
    Human embryonic stem cell research can bring about major biomedical breakthroughs and thus contribute enormously to human welfare, yet it raises serious moral problems because it involves using human embryos for experiment. The “moral status of the human embryo” remains the core of such debates. Three different positions regarding the moral status of the human embryo can be categorised: the “all” position, the “none” position, and the “gradualist” position.The author proposes that the “gradualist” position is more (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  46
    Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Its Importance in the Culture Wars.Bishop Thomas - 2013 - Christian Bioethics 19 (1):60-71.
    The debate surrounding human embryonic stem cell research plays a crucial role in the culture wars. Those who embrace post-traditional morality not only see no ethical problem with the destruction of human embryos for research and therapies, but press for their use despite the greater potential for risk from the totipotent cells that are harvested from the destruction of human embryos as opposed to other kinds of stem cells. Indeed, there have been foreseeable negative (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Abortion, embryonic stem cell research, and waste.David A. Jensen - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (1):27-41.
    Can one consistently deny the permissibility of abortion while endorsing the killing of human embryos for the sake of stem cell research? The question is not trivial; for even if one accepts that abortion is prima facie wrong in all cases, there are significant differences with many of the embryos used for stem cell research from those involved in abortion—most prominently, many have been abandoned in vitro, and appear to have no reasonably likely meaningful (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  46
    Democracy, embryonic stem cell research, and the Roman Catholic church.J. Oakley - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (4):228-228.
    The Roman Catholic Church in Australia has lobbied politicians to prohibit embryonic stem cell research, on the grounds that such research violates the sanctity and inherent dignity of human life. I suggest, however, that reasoned reflection does not uniquely support such conclusions about the morality of stem cell research. A recent parliamentary standing committee report recommended that embryonic stem cell research be allowed to proceed in certain circumstances, and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  8
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research and Therapy: The Need for a Common European Legal Framework.Carlos M. Romeo&Ndashcasabona - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (6):557-567.
    The possibility of obtaining stem cells from human embryos has given rise to an intensive legal and ethical debate. In this paper, attention is paid to the normative disparity and ambiguity in Europe. An argument for the need for a minimal legal harmonization is made; and a prudent and flexible way to reach this successfully is suggested. Establishing a common legal framework seems to be the only way to guarantee true competitiveness for the European scientific community.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. Human embryonic stem cell research and the discarded embryo argument.Mark Moller - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):131-145.
    Many who believe that human embryos have moral status are convinced that their use in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research can be morally justified as long as they are discarded embryos left over from fertility treatments. This is one reason why this view about discarded embryos has played such a prominent role in the debate over publicly funding hESC research in the United States and other countries. Many believe that this view offers the best (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Ethics and Policy in Embryonic Stem Cell Research.John Ancona Robertson - 1999 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):109-136.
    : Embryonic stem cells, which have the potential to save many lives, must be recovered from aborted fetuses or live embryos. Although tissue from aborted fetuses can be used without moral complicity in the underlying abortion, obtaining stem cells from embryos necessarily kills them, thus raising difficult questions about the use of embryonic human material to save others. This article draws on previous controversies over embryo research and distinctions between intrinsic and symbolic moral status to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  14.  45
    Human embryonic stem cell research: Middle-ground positions and moral compromise.Angeliki Kerasidou - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 57:167-169.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Embryonic stem cell research and human therapeutic cloning : Maintaining the ethical tension between respect and research.Gerard Magill - 2006 - In Ana Smith Iltis (ed.), Research Ethics. Routledge.
  16.  65
    Human embryonic stem cell research, justice, and the problem of unequal biological access.Mark S. Moller - 2008 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:22.
    In 2003, Ruth Faden and eighteen other colleagues argued that a.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  32
    Introduction: Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Abortion, Euthanasia, and the Plurality of Moralities in Bioethics.A. E. Hinkley - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (3):217-220.
  18.  87
    The Ethical Dilemma of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Nabeel Manzar, Bushra Manzar, Nuzhat Hussain, M. Fawwad Ahmed Hussain & Sajjad Raza - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):97-106.
    To determine the knowledge, attitude, and ethical concerns of medical students and graduates with regard to Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC) research. This questionnaire based descriptive study was conducted at the Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK), Pakistan from February to July 2008. A well structured questionnaire was administered to medical students and graduate doctors, which included their demographic profile as well as questions in line with the study objective. Informed consent was taken and full confidentiality was assured to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  21
    The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Katrien Devolder - 2015 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for biomedical research, but involves the destruction of human embryos. Katrien Devolder explores the tension between the view that embryos should never be deliberately harmed, and the view that such research must go forward. She provides an in-depth analysis of major attempts to resolve the problem.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20.  60
    Embryonic stem cell research: Ethical challenges for developing world bioethics.Debora Diniz - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (3).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. The ethics of funding embryonic stem cell research: A catholic viewpoint.Richard M. Doerflinger - 1999 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):137-150.
    : Stem cell research that requires the destruction of human embryos is incompatible with Catholic moral principles, and with any ethic that gives serious weight to the moral status of the human embryo. Moreover, because there are promising and morally acceptable alternative approaches to the repair and regeneration of human tissues, and because treatments that rely on destruction of human embryos would be morally offensive to many patients, embryonic stem cell research may play (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  22. The ethics of embryonic stem cell research.Howard J. Curzer - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (5):533 – 562.
    In this article I rebut conservative objections to five phases of embryonic stem cell research. I argue that researchers using existing embryonic stem cell lines are not complicit in the past destruction of embryos because beneficiaries of immoral acts are not necessary morally tainted. Second, such researchers do not encourage the destruction of additional embryos because fertility clinics presently destroy more spare embryos than researchers need. Third, actually harvesting stem cells from slated-to-be-discarded (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23. Rescuing human embryonic stem cell research: The blastocyst transfer method.S. Matthew Liao - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):8 – 16.
    Despite the therapeutic potential of human embryonic stem (HES) cells, many people believe that HES cell research should be banned. The reason is that the present method of extracting HES cells involves the destruction of the embryo, which for many is the beginning of a person. This paper examines a number of compromise solutions such as parthenogenesis, the use of defective embryos, genetically creating a "pseudo embryo" that can never form a placenta, and determining embryo death, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  24.  33
    Religion, public reason, and embryonic stem cell research.Cynthia B. Cohen - 2006 - In David E. Guinn (ed.), Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter argues that although there are certain limits on how religious bodies and their members should attempt to insert their beliefs into public policy matters, religiously based arguments should, as a matter of principle, be allowed to enter into public debate. This is the case even when many participants in these debates do not accept the premises on which the arguments of religious believers are constructed. The first part of the chapter considers the stances that various religious bodies and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25.  58
    Rescuing human embryonic stem cell research: The possibility of embryo reconstitution after stem cell derivation.Katrien Devolder & Christopher M. Ward - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):245–263.
    We discuss in this essay the alternative techniques proposed for the isolation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) that attempt to satisfy moral issues surrounding killing embryos but show that these techniques are either redundant or do not achieve their intended aim. We discuss the difficulties associated with defining a human embryo and how the lack of clarity on this issue antagonises the ethical debate and impedes hESC research. We present scientific evidence showing that isolation of hESCs (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  49
    Ethical Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research (A Recommended Manuscript).Chinese National Human Genome Center at Shanghai Ethics Committee - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):47-54.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14.1 (2004) 47-54 [Access article in PDF] Ethical Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research*(A Recommended Manuscript) Adopted on 16 October 2001Revised on 20 August 2002 Ethics Committee of the Chinese National Human Genome Center at Shanghai, Shanghai 201203 Human embryonic stem cell (ES) research is a great project in the frontier of biomedical science for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Monotheistic Religions' Perspectives on Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Mansooreh Saniei & Raymond de Vries - 2008 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 18 (2):45-50.
    The controversy about research on human embryonic stem cells raises many fundamental ethical and religious questions, especially about the sanctity of lifeand the Divine mandate of human dominion over nature. This paper reviews the different perspectives of three monotheistic religions on the use of embryo for stem cell research. Looking at the religious perspectives, it shows us that Islam and Judaism support most forms of stem cell research. Both of them express (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  14
    Can Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Escape Its Troubled History?Lisa C. Ikemoto - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (6):7-8.
    Combining human embryonic stem cells with SCNT has been a gold standard of stem cell research. Adding a particular individual's genes to pluripotent stem cells might lead to the development of personalized tissue repair or replacement. Enthusiasm for human embryonic stem cell research had flagged in recent years due to controversy over the moral status of in vitro embryos, scientific misconduct by researcher Woo Suk Hwang, and the discovery that induced (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  26
    A Kantian Analysis of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Bethanne Smith - 2007 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (2):257-262.
    Stem cell research is undeniably valuable and has generated excitement in the scientific community because of its potential use in developing new therapeutic treatments for chronic and debilitating diseases. Many researchers believe that the development of new human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines is necessary for success in this research forum. A review of hESC research based on the four principles of biomedical ethics—autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice—reveals areas of ethical conflict. Specifically, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  24
    A qualified endorsement of embryonic stem cell research, based on two widely shared beliefs about the brain-diseased patients such research might benefit.R. DiSilvestro - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):563-567.
    Are there persuasive approaches to embryonic stem cell (ESC) research that appeal, not just to those fellow-citizens in one’s own ideological camp, nor just to those undecided citizens in the middle, but to those citizens on the other side of the issue? I believe that there are such arguments and in this short paper I try to develop one of them. In particular, I argue that certain beliefs shared by some proponents and some opponents of ESC (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Ethical issues in human embryonic stem cell research.Philip J. Nickel - 2008 - In Kristen Renwick Monroe, Ronald B. Miller & Jerome Tobis (eds.), Fundamentals of the Stem Cell Debate: The Scientific, Religious, Ethical & Political Issues. University of California Press.
    As a moral philosopher, the perspective I will take in this chapter is one of argumentation and informed judgment about two main questions: whether individuals should ever choose to conduct human embryonic stem cell research, and whether the law should permit this type of research. I will also touch upon a secondary question, that of whether the government ought to pay for this type of research. I will discuss some of the main arguments at (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. The moral-principle objection to human embryonic stem cell research.Don Marquis - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):190–206.
    Opponents of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research claim that such research is incompatible with the moral principle that it is always wrong intentionally to end a human life. In this essay, I discuss how that principle might be revised so that it is subject to as few difficulties as possible. I then argue that even the most defensible version of the principle is compatible with the moral permissibility of hESC research.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  33. Stem Cell Research on Embryonic Persons Is Just.Aaron Rizzieri - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):195-203.
    I argue that embryonic stem cell research is fair to the embryo, even on the assumption that the embryo has attained full personhood and an attendant right to life at conception. This is because the only feasible alternatives open to the embryo are to exist briefly in an unconscious state and be killed or to not exist at all. Hence, one is neither depriving the embryo of an enduring life it would otherwise have had nor is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Stem Cell Research and the Problem of Embryonic Identity.Phillip Montague - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (4):307-319.
    A basic component of moral objections to embryonic stem cell research is the claim that human embryos have the same moral status as typical adult human beings. There is no reason to accept this claim, however, unless adult humans once existed as embryos—that is, unless the developmental history of adult humans contains embryos to which the adults are numerically identical. The purpose of this paper is to argue that there are no such identities, and hence that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  15
    Overview of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Marina Petrisor Ticmeanu - 2016 - Postmodern Openings 7 (2):59-77.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  32
    Human Embryonic Stem Cell (HESC) Research in Malaysia: Multi-faith Perspectives.Patrick Foong - 2011 - Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):182-206.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  37.  42
    Federal policy toward human embryonic stem cell research.James F. Childress - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):34 – 35.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  44
    A Cooperation Analysis of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Peter J. Cataldo - 2002 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (1):35-41.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  24
    Human Cloning and Embryonic Stem Cell Research after Seoul.Richard M. Doerflinger - 2006 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 6 (2):339-350.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  23
    Assessing the Risk of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome in Egg Donation: Implications for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Brooke Ellison & Jaymie Meliker - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (9):22-30.
    Stem cell research has important implications for medicine. The source of stem cells influences their therapeutic potential, with stem cells derived from early-stage embryos remaining the most versatile. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), a source of embryonic stem cells, allows for understandings about disease development and, more importantly, the ability to yield embryonic stem cell lines that are genetically matched to the somatic cell donor. However, SCNT requires women (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  41. For love or money? The saga of korean women who provided eggs for embryonic stem cell research.Françoise Baylis - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):385-396.
    In 2004 and 2005, Woo-Suk Hwang achieved international stardom with publications in Science reporting on successful research involving the creation of stem cells from cloned human embryos. The wonder and success all began to unravel, however, when serious ethical concerns were raised about the source of the eggs for this research. When the egg scandal had completely unfolded, it turned out that many of the women who provided eggs for stem cell research had not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. Target Populations for First-In-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Spinal Cord Injury.Frederic Bretzner, Frederic Gilbert, Françoise Baylis & Robert M. Brownstone - 2011 - Cell Stem Cell 8 (5):468-475.
    Geron recently announced that it had begun enrolling patients in the world's first-in-human clinical trial involving cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This trial raises important questions regarding the future of hESC-based therapies, especially in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We address some safety and efficacy concerns with this research, as well as the ethics of fair subject selection. We consider other populations that might be better for this research: chronic complete SCI patients for (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43.  82
    Oversight framework over oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer: Comparative analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk case under south korean bioethics law and U.s. Guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research.Mi-Kyung Kim - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):367-384.
    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang’s potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  27
    Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part I - Jordan's Banks, A View from the First Years of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Laurie Zoloth - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):3-11.
    This essay will address the ethical issues that have emerged in the first considerations of the newly emerging stem cell technology. Many of us in the field of bioethics were deliberating related issues as we first learned of the new science and confronted the ethical issues it raised. In this essay, I will draw on the work of colleagues who were asked to reflect on early stages of the research as the field debated the issues of consent, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  45.  56
    The "future like ours" argument and human embryonic stem cell research.A. Kuflik - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):417-421.
    The most closely argued and widely discussed case against abortion in the philosophical literature today is Don Marquis’s “future like ours” argument. The argument moves from an analysis of why there is a serious presumption against killing someone “like us” to the conclusion that most abortions are seriously wrong for the same reason: they deprive “an individual” of a future of valuable experiences and activities, a “future like ours”. Julian Savulescu has objected that “preventing” such a future could not be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  40
    Making regulations and drawing up legislation in Islamic countries under conditions of uncertainty, with special reference to embryonic stem cell research.S. Aksoy - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):399-403.
    Stem cell research is a newly emerging technology that promises a wide variety of benefits for humanity. It has, however, also caused much ethical, legal, and theological debate. While some forms of its application were prohibited in the beginning, they have now started to be used in many countries. This fact obliges us to discuss the regulation of stem cell research at national and international level. It is obvious that in order to make regulations (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  47.  39
    How to depolarise the ethical debate over human embryonic stem cell research (and other ethical debates too!).Nicolas Espinoza & Martin Peterson - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):496-500.
    The contention of this paper is that the current ethical debate over embryonic stem cell research is polarised to an extent that is not warranted by the underlying ethical conflict. It is argued that the ethical debate can be rendered more nuanced, and less polarised, by introducing non-binary notions of moral rightness and wrongness. According to the view proposed, embryonic stem cell research—and possibly other controversial activities too—can be considered ‘a little bit (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  50
    The contributions of empirical evidence to socio-ethical debates on fresh embryo donation for human embryonic stem cell research.Erica Haimes & Ken Taylor - 2009 - Bioethics 25 (6):334-341.
    This article is a response to McLeod and Baylis (2007) who speculate on the dangers of requesting fresh ‘spare’ embryos from IVF patients for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, particularly when those embryos are good enough to be transferred back to the woman. They argue that these embryos should be frozen instead. We explore what is meant by ‘spare’ embryos. We then provide empirical evidence, from a study of embryo donation and of embryo donors' views, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  93
    Are human embryos Kantian persons?: Kantian considerations in favor of embryonic stem cell research.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2008 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:4.
    One argument used by detractors of human embryonic stem cell research (hESCR) invokes Kant's formula of humanity, which proscribes treating persons solely as a means to an end, rather than as ends in themselves. According to Fuat S. Oduncu, for example, adhering to this imperative entails that human embryos should not be disaggregated to obtain pluripotent stem cells for hESCR. Given that human embryos are Kantian persons from the time of their conception, killing them to (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  59
    Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity.David B. Resnik - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (3):211-222.
    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000