Results for 'emergency department'

986 found
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  1.  10
    Emergency department patients’ attitudes towards the use of data in their clinical record for research without their consent.Chase Schultz-Swarthfigure, Anne-Maree Kelly & Deborah Zion - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (1):75-78.
    BackgroundHealth research often uses health information, a subcategory of personal information, collected during clinical encounters. Conditions under which such health information can be used for the secondary purpose of research are set out in state, national and international law. In Australia, consent is required or the relevant conditions for a waiver of consent must be met and approved by a human research ethics committee (HREC). Consent for use of health information for research is rarely sought at an emergency (...) (ED) presentation. Research often occurs after the index visit and gaining consent can be difficult. Waiver of consent provisions are frequently used, but acceptability of this approach to patients is unclear.ObjectiveTo identify ED patients’ knowledge and attitudes towards the use of health information for research, consent preferences and acceptability of waiver of consent.MethodsAn online, anonymous survey of adult patients attending two large EDs in Melbourne, Australia.Results103 patients completed the survey. We found that 52% were unaware that health information might be used for research. A majority (77%) felt that HREC approval for use of health information without consent was acceptable. However, 36% would prefer to be contacted regarding consent.ConclusionThese findings suggest a lack of awareness that health information can be used for research and that waiver of consent is acceptable, but not necessarily preferred, in most of the ED patient population. Efforts to increase awareness and provide opportunities to express preferences about health information use for research are needed. (shrink)
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  2.  12
    Emergency Department Visits for Firearm-Related Injuries among Youth in the United States, 2006–2015.Victor Lee, Catherine Camp, Vikram Jairam, Henry S. Park & James B. Yu - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S4):67-73.
    Firearm injuries are a significant public health problem. Prior studies have analyzed firearm death data or adult firearm injury data, but few studies have analyzed firearm injury data specifically among youth. To inform the current debate surrounding gun policy in the United States, this study aims to provide an estimate of the immense burden of youth firearm injury and its associated risk factors. Therefore, we performed a descriptive analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, the largest all-payer (...) department database in the United States, from January 2006 to September 2015. All patients age < 21 who presented with any diagnosis of firearm-related injuries were included. There were an estimated 198,839 incidents of firearm-related emergency department visits for patients age < 21 from 2006 through 2015. After presenting to the ED, an estimated 11,909 cases resulted in death. The population adjusted rate of firearm-related emergency department visits was highest in the South and Midwest. This study demonstrates the significant burden of firearm injury among youth. Having a reliable estimate of the number of children harmed by firearms each year is a critical tool for policymakers — and may make common-sense gun safety measures more politically possible. (shrink)
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  3.  29
    Emergency department mental health triage scales improve outcomes.Marc Broadbent, Heather Jarman & Michael Berk - 2004 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (1):57-62.
  4.  14
    Freestanding Emergency Departments Are Associated With Higher Medicare Costs: A Longitudinal Panel Data Analysis.Patidar Nitish, Weech-Maldonado Robert, J. O’Connor Stephen, Sen Bisakha, M. Trimm Jerry & A. Camargo Carlos - 2017 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 54:004695801772710.
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  5.  17
    Ethics Consultation in the Emergency Department.Lisa Anderson-Shaw, William Ahrens & Marny Fetzer - 2007 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 9 (1):32-35.
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  6.  9
    Autonomy-Based Obligations to Patients in the Emergency Department Following Opioid Overdose.Ben Schwan & Grayson Holt - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (5):56-58.
    Marshall et al. (2024) persuasively argue that some patients with opiate use disorder (OUD), who refuse observation after naloxone resuscitation in the emergency department (ED), “may be making non...
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  7.  23
    Occupational therapy in emergency departments: Australian practice.Anne Cusick, Lucinda Johnson & Michelle Bissett - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):257-265.
  8.  31
    Postmortem procedures in the emergency department: using the recently dead to practise and teach.K. V. Iserson - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (2):92-98.
    In generations past, it was common practice for doctors to learn lifesaving technical skills on patients who had recently died. But this practice has lately been criticised on religious, legal, and ethical grounds, and has fallen into disuse in many hospitals and emergency departments. This paper uses four questions to resolve whether doctors in emergency departments should practise and teach non-invasive and minimally invasive procedures on the newly dead: Is it ethically and legally permissible to practise and teach (...)
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  9.  7
    A study to assess patient satisfaction in emergency department of a tertiary care hospital in karachi.Shamaila Burney & S. M. Aqil Burney - 2021 - Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities 60 (2):25-37.
    The Emergency Department is a crucial medical treatment unit of hospital specializing in emergency medicine. EDs are responsible for providing immediate healthcare facilities to patients arriving without prior appointment. Thus, evaluating patient satisfaction is of immense importance for efficient service delivery. Very few studies are found in Pakistan, related to patients’ satisfaction and utilization of ED services both from demand and supply perspective of ED-Services Supply Chains. Data was collected to assess 200 patient’s satisfaction towards quality of (...)
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  10.  14
    Decision-making in an emergency department: A nursing accountability model.Alfonso Rubio-Navarro, Diego José García-Capilla, Maria José Torralba-Madrid & Jane Rutty - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301985154.
    Introduction: Nurses who work in an emergency department regularly care for acute patients in a fast-paced environment, being at risk of suffering high levels of burnout. This situation makes them especially vulnerable to be accountable for decisions they did not have time to consider or have been pressured into. Research objective: The objective of this study was to find which factors influence ethical, legal and professional accountability in nursing practice in an emergency department. Research design: Data (...)
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  11.  7
    Patient Abandonment in the Emergency Department?Gerardo R. Maradiaga, Nella Hendley & John C. Moskop - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (7):90-92.
    How should the hospital’s ethics consultation service respond to this request from the Emergency Department for advice about “how to proceed” in caring for ED patient Benjamin? In order to off...
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  12.  14
    Attitudes of Singapore Emergency Department staff towards family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Zohar Lederman, Geraldine Baird, Chaoyan Dong, Benjamin S. H. Leong & Rakhee Y. Pal - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):124-134.
    BackgroundFamily presence during adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation is still not widely implemented. Based on empirical evidence, various national and international professional organizations recommend allowing relatives to be present during resuscitation. However, healthcare providers worldwide are still reluctant to make it standard care.PurposeThis paper is a part of an ongoing cross-cultural study that aims to solicit attitudes of healthcare providers working in emergency departments towards family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This paper reports the qualitative data from surveying healthcare providers working in (...)
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  13. Non-Urgent Pediatric Emergency Department Visits: A Qualitative Analysis of Caregiver and Physician Perspectives.Nichole L. Yunk - 2011 - Polis 4:65.
  14.  23
    GP cooperative and emergency department: an exploration of patient flows.Linda Huibers, Wendy Thijssen, Jan Koetsenruijter, Paul Giesen, Richard Grol & Michel Wensing - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (2):243-249.
  15.  65
    Understanding end‐of‐life caring practices in the emergency department: developing Merleau‐Ponty's notions of intentional arc and maximum grip through praxis and phronesis.Garrett K. Chan - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):19-32.
    The emergency department (ED) is a fast-paced, highly stressful environment where clinicians function with little or suboptimal information and where time is measured in minutes and hours. In addition, death and dying are phenomena that are often experienced in the ED. Current end-of-life care models, based on chronic illness trajectories, may be difficult to apply in the ED. A philosophical approach examining end-of-life care may help us understand how core medical and nursing values are embodied as care practices (...)
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  16.  14
    Dr. Douchebag: A Tale of the Emergency Department.Jay M. Baruch - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (1):9-10.
    “I'm not afraid of dying,” he says, despite his plea on arrival. “Listen up, douchebag. Are you calling my cousin or what?” The emergency department might be the only sphere of human exchange where one party—patients (and sometimes family)—are permitted to insult, threaten, and even spit at the very people on whom they depend for help, while the offended parties—physicians, nurses, and other health care providers—must not only tolerate the abuse, but treat their tormentors. Does the ED's collective (...)
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  17.  1
    A proposal for formal fairness requirements in triage emergency departments: publicity, accessibility, relevance, standardisability and accountability.Davide Battisti & Silvia Camporesi - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    This paper puts forward a wish list of requirements for formal fairness in the specific context of triage in emergency departments (EDs) and maps the empirical and conceptual research questions that need to be addressed in this context in the near future. The pandemic has brought to the fore the necessity for public debate about how to allocate resources fairly in a situation of great shortage. However, issues of fairness arise also outside of pandemics: decisions about how to allocate (...)
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  18.  12
    Older patients’ autonomy when cared for at emergency departments.Catharina Frank, Mats Holmberg, Elin Ekestubbe Jernby, Annika Sevandersson Hansen & Anders Bremer - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (5):1266-1279.
    Background Older patients in emergency care often have complex needs and may have limited ability to make their voices heard. Hence, there are ethical challenges for healthcare professionals in establishing a trustful relationship to determine the patient’s preferences and then decide and act based on these preferences. With this comes further challenges regarding how the patient’s autonomy can be protected and promoted. Aim To describe nurses’ experiences of dealing with older patients’ autonomy when cared for in emergency departments (...)
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  19.  12
    Surprise Billing in the Emergency Department: What’s a Clinical Ethics Consultant to Do?Anita Tarzian - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):110-111.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page 110-111.
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  20.  33
    Caring for Patients or Organs: New Therapies Raise New Dilemmas in the Emergency Department.Michael A. DeVita, Lisa S. Parker & Arjun Prabhu - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (5):6-16.
    Two potentially lifesaving protocols, emergency preservation and resuscitation and uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death, currently implemented in some U.S. emergency departments, have similar eligibility criteria and initial technical procedures, but critically different goals. Both follow unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation and induce hypothermia to “buy time”: one in trauma patients suffering cardiac arrest, to enable surgical repair, and the other in patients who unexpectedly die in the ED, to enable organ donation. This article argues that to fulfill patient-focused (...)
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  21.  11
    Why is Pain Still Under‐Treated in the Emergency Department? Two New Hypotheses.Drew Carter, Paul Sendziuk, Jaklin A. Eliott & Annette Braunack-Mayer - 2015 - Bioethics 30 (3):195-202.
    Across the world, pain is under-treated in emergency departments. We canvass the literature testifying to this problem, the reasons why this problem is so important, and then some of the main hypotheses that have been advanced in explanation of the problem. We then argue for the plausibility of two new hypotheses: pain's under-treatment in the ED is due partly to an epistemic preference for signs over symptoms on the part of some practitioners, and some ED practices that themselves worsen (...)
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  22.  17
    Pain Management in the Emergency Department: Current Landscape and Agenda for Research.Sandra H. Johnson - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):739-740.
  23.  10
    Pain Management in the Emergency Department: Current Landscape and Agenda for Research.Sandra H. Johnson - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):739-740.
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  24.  8
    An Ethics-informed, Policy-based Approach to the Management of Challenges Posed by Living-at-Risk, Frequent Users of Emergency Departments.Jeffrey Kirby & Lisbeth Witthoefft Nielsen - 2023 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 6 (1):44-55.
    The complex health and social circumstances of living-at-risk, frequent users of emergency departments (aREDFUs) in the health jurisdictions of high-income countries, and the related, significant challenges posed for emergency departments and the health care providers working within them, are identified and explored in the paper. Ethical analyses of a set of relevant domains are performed, i.e., individual and relational autonomy considerations, relevant social construction and personal responsibility conceptions, patient welfare principles (beneficence, nonmaleficence, continuity of care), harm reduction methodologies (...)
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  25.  26
    Ethics consultation in paediatric and adult emergency departments: an assessment of clinical, ethical, learning and resource needs.Keith A. Colaco, Alanna Courtright, Sandra Andreychuk, Andrea Frolic, Ji Cheng & April Jacqueline Kam - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1):13-20.
    Objective We sought to understand ethics and education needs of emergency nurses and physicians in paediatric and adult emergency departments in order to build ethics capacity and provide a foundation for the development of an ethics education programme. Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional survey of all staff nurses and physicians in three tertiary care EDs. The survey tool, called Clinical Ethics Needs Assessment Survey, was pilot tested on a similar target audience for question content and clarity. Results (...)
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  26.  25
    Ethics consultation in paediatric and adult emergency departments: an assessment of clinical, ethical, learning and resource needs.K. A. Colaco, A. Courtright, S. Andreychuk, A. Frolic, J. Cheng & A. J. Kam - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (1):13-20.
    Objective We sought to understand ethics and education needs of emergency nurses and physicians in paediatric and adult emergency departments in order to build ethics capacity and provide a foundation for the development of an ethics education programme. Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional survey of all staff nurses and physicians in three tertiary care EDs. The survey tool, called Clinical Ethics Needs Assessment Survey, was pilot tested on a similar target audience for question content and clarity. Results (...)
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  27.  34
    Patients' privacy and satisfaction in the emergency department: a descriptive analytical study.N. D. Nayeri & M. Aghajani - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (2):167-177.
    Respecting privacy and patients’ satisfaction are amongst the main indicators of quality of care and one of the basic goals of health services. This study, carried out in 2007, aimed to investigate the extent to which patient privacy is observed and its correlation with patient satisfaction in three emergency departments of Tehran University of Medical Science, Iran. Questionnaire data were collected from a convenience sample of 360 patients admitted to emergency departments and analysed using SPSS software. The results (...)
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  28.  44
    Defining the scope of implied consent in the emergency department.Raul B. Easton, Mark A. Graber, Jay Monnahan & Jason Hughes - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):35 – 38.
    Purpose: To determine the relative value that patients place on consent for procedures in the emergency department (ED) and to define a set of procedures that fall in the realm of implied consent. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample 134 of 174 patients who were seen in the ED of a Midwestern teaching hospital. The questionnaire asked how much time they believed was necessary to give consent for various procedures. Procedures ranged from simple (venipuncture) to (...)
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  29.  46
    Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis?Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and PAs. All (...)
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  30.  15
    A Principlist Justification of Physical Restraint in the Emergency Department.Hugo Hall & David G. Smithard - 2021 - The New Bioethics 27 (2):176-184.
    The ethics of physical restraint in the Emergency Department has always been an emotive and controversial issue. Recently a vanguard of advocacy groups and regulatory agencies have...
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  31.  19
    Beat the clock! Wait times and the production of 'quality' in emergency departments.Karen A. Melon, Deborah White & Janet Rankin - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (3):223-237.
    Emergency care in large urban hospitals across the country is in the midst of major redesign intended to deliver quality care through improved access, decreased wait times, and maximum efficiency. The central argument in this paper is that the conceptualization of quality including the documentary facts and figures produced to substantiate quality emergency care is socially organized within a powerful ruling discourse that inserts the interests of politics and economics into nurses' work. The Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (...)
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  32.  63
    A pilot study to examine research subjects' perception of participating in research in the emergency department.C. Paradis, M. P. Phelan & M. Brinich - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (10):580-587.
    Study objectives The emergency department (ED) provides an arena for patient enrolment into a variety of research studies even for non-critically ill patients. Given the types of illness, time constraints and sense of urgency that exists in the ED environment, concern exists about whether research subjects in the ED can provide full consent for participation. We sought to identify enrolled research subjects' perspectives on the informed consent process for research conducted in the ED. Methods This was a prospective, (...)
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  33.  22
    Classification of patients by severity grades during triage in the emergency department using data mining methods.Dror Zmiri, Yuval Shahar & Meirav Taieb-Maimon - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):378-388.
  34.  13
    Responding to the Refusal of Care in the Emergency Department.Jennifer Nelson, Arvind Venkat & Moira Davenport - 2014 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 4 (1):75-80.
    The emergency department (ED) serves as the primary gateway for acute care and the source of health care of last resort. Emergency physicians are commonly expected to rapidly assess and treat patients with a variety of life–threatening conditions. However, patients do refuse recommended therapy, even when the consequences are significant morbidity and even mortality. This raises the ethical dilemma of how emergency physicians and ED staff can rapidly determine whether patient refusal of treatment recommendations is based (...)
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  35.  27
    Adolescent Decisional Autonomy Regarding Participation in an Emergency Department Youth Violence Interview.Jennifer M. Cohn, Kenneth R. Ginsburg, Nancy Kassam-Adams & Joel A. Fein - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):70-74.
    Much attention has been given to determining whether an adolescent patient has the capacity to consent to research. This study explores the factors that influence adolescents' decisions to participate in a research study about youth violence and to determine positive or negative feelings elicited by being a research subject. The majority of subjects perceived their decision to participate to be free of coercion, and few felt badly about having participated. However, adolescents who were alone in the room during the assent (...)
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  36.  15
    Is the right to information fulfilled in an emergency department? Patients' perceptions of the care provided.Maria D. Perez‐Carceles, Jose L. Gironda, Eduardo Osuna, Maria Falcon & Aurelio Luna - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):456-463.
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  37.  12
    The ‘mindless’ relationship between nursing homes and emergency departments: what do Bourdieu and Freire have to offer?Rose McCloskey - 2011 - Nursing Inquiry 18 (2):154-164.
    McCLOSKEY R. Nursing Inquiry 2011; 18: 154–164The ‘mindless’ relationship between nursing homes and emergency departments: what do Bourdieu and Freire have to offer?This paper explicates the long-standing and largely unquestioned adversarial relationship between nurses working in the nursing home (NH) and the emergency department (ED). Drawing on the author’s own research on resident ED transfers, this paper reports on the conflict and tension that can arise when residents transfer between the two settings. The theoretical concepts of mindlessness, (...)
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  38.  5
    Reducing Psychosocial Risk Factors and Improving Employee Well-Being in Emergency Departments: A Realist Evaluation.Anne Nathal de Wijn & Margot Petra van der Doef - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    This study reports the findings of a 2.5 year intervention project to reduce psychosocial risks and increase employee well-being in 15 emergency departments in the Netherlands. The project uses the psychosocial risk management approach “PRIMA” which includes cycles of risk assessment, designing and implementing changes, evaluating changes and adapting the approach if necessary. In addition, principles of participative action research were used to empower the departments in designing and implementing their own actions during the project. Next to determining overall (...)
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  39.  30
    Emergency communication: the discursive challenges facing emergency clinicians and patients in hospital emergency departments.Jeannette McGregor, Maria Herke, Christian Matthiessen, Jane Stein-Parbury, Roger Dunston, Rick Iedema, Marie Manidis, Hermine Scheeres & Diana Slade - 2008 - Discourse and Communication 2 (3):271-298.
    Effective communication and interpersonal skills have long been recognized as fundamental to the delivery of quality health care. However, there is mounting evidence that the pressures of communication in high stress work areas such as hospital emergency departments present particular challenges to the delivery of quality care. A recent report on incident management in the Australian health care system cites the main cause of critical incidents, as being poor and inadequate communication between clinicians and patients. This article presents research (...)
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  40. Building an ethical environment improves patient privacy and satisfaction in the crowded emergency department: a quasi-experimental study. [REVIEW]Yen-Ko Lin, Wei-Che Lee, Liang-Chi Kuo, Yuan-Chia Cheng, Chia-Ju Lin, Hsing-Lin Lin, Chao-Wen Chen & Tsung-Ying Lin - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):8-.
    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention in improving emergency department (ED) patient privacy and satisfaction in the crowded ED setting. Methods: A pre- and post-intervention study was conducted. A multifaceted intervention was implemented in a university-affiliated hospital ED. The intervention developed strategies to improve ED patient privacy and satisfaction, including redesigning the ED environment, process management, access control, and staff education and training, and encouraging ethics consultation. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using patient (...)
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  41.  9
    Medicare Expenditures Associated With Hospital and Emergency Department Use Among Beneficiaries With Dementia.Daras Laura Coots, Feng Zhanlian, M. Wiener Joshua & Kaganova Yevgeniya - 2017 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 54:004695801769675.
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  42.  13
    The applicability of official professionalism recommendations in the emergency department.Amirhosein Jahanshir, Hojat S. Motahar, Morteza Saeedi & Elnaz Vahidi - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (4):180-188.
    In this cross-sectional observational study, we wanted to assess the viewpoints of residents and medical students about applicability of official professionalism recommendations in the emergency department. We asked 72 participants to fill a questionnaire, which was designed based on “the directory of professional ethics for physicians” written by Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The questionnaire consisted of 74 statements divided into 6 different categories: altruism, honor and integrity, justice, respect, duty and responsibility, and excellence. The mean and median (...)
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  43.  9
    Ethical Decision-Making In An Emergency Department: Findings On Nursing Advocacy.Emma Phillips & Pam McGrath - 2009 - Monash Bioethics Review 28 (2):38-53.
    The purpose of this article is to share with the reader the specific findings on the role of nurse as consumer advocate from a study on ethical decision-making in an emergency department (ED). Qualitative interviews were conducted with 11 health professionals (doctors and nurses) working in the ED of a hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed.In ED, where the decision-making is described as medico-centric, advocacy ipso facto necessitates a challenge to doctor decision-making. The findings (...)
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  44.  13
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Defining the Scope of Implied Consent in the Emergency Department".Mark Graber & Raul Easton - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):3-4.
    Purpose: To determine the relative value that patients place on consent for procedures in the emergency department and to define a set of procedures that fall in the realm of implied consent. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample 134 of 174 patients who were seen in the ED of a Midwestern teaching hospital. The questionnaire asked how much time they believed was necessary to give consent for various procedures. Procedures ranged from simple to complex. Results: (...)
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  45.  3
    Is It Reasonable to Refuse to Be Seen by a Nurse Practitioner in the Emergency Department?Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):15-17.
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  46.  17
    Optimisation nursing employees in a hospital emergency department by using linear programming.Arash Apornak, Sadigh Raissi, Abbas Keramati & Kaveh Khalili Damghani - 2020 - International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 13 (3):184.
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  47.  13
    Refining the model for an emergency department‐based mental health nurse practitioner outpatient service.Timothy Wand, Kathryn White & Joanna Patching - 2008 - Nursing Inquiry 15 (3):231-241.
    Refining the model for an emergency department‐based mental health nurse practitioner outpatient service The mental health nurse practitioner (MHNP) role based in the emergency department (ED) has emerged in response to an increase in mental health‐related presentations and subsequent concerns over waiting times, co‐ordination of care and therapeutic intervention. The MHNP role also provides scope for the delivery of specialised primary care. Nursing authors are reporting on nurse‐led outpatient clinics as a method of healthcare delivery that (...)
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  48.  11
    Chronic Pain and Aberrant Drug-Related Behavior in the Emergency Department.Knox H. Todd - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):761-769.
    Pain is the single most common reason patients seek care in the emergency department. Given the prevalence of pain as a presenting complaint, one might expect emergency physicians to assign its treatment a high priority; however, pain is often seemingly invisible to the emergency physician. Multiple research studies have documented that the undertreatment of pain, or oligoanalgesia, is a frequent occurrence. Pain that is not acknowledged and managed appropriately causes dissatisfaction with medical care, hostility toward the (...)
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  49.  5
    Chronic Pain and Aberrant Drug-Related Behavior in the Emergency Department.Knox H. Todd - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):761-769.
    Pain is the single most common reason patients seek care in the emergency department. Given the prevalence of pain as a presenting complaint, one might expect emergency physicians to assign its treatment a high priority; however, pain is often seemingly invisible to the emergency physician. Multiple research studies have documented that the undertreatment of pain, or oligoanalgesia, is a frequent occurrence. Pain that is not acknowledged and managed appropriately causes dissatisfaction with medical care, hostility toward the (...)
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  50.  23
    Is it appropriate to use Western guidelines for breaking bad news in non-Western emergency departments? A patients’ perspective.Ali Labaf, Amirhosein Jahanshir, Hamid Baradaran & Amir Shahvaraninasab - 2015 - Clinical Ethics 10 (1-2):13-21.
    Objective To find whether Western guidelines on breaking bad news in a nonemergency department are appropriate for an emergency department of a non-Western country; according to patients’ preferences. Method We designed a 19 items questionnaire of Likert-type scale and interviewed 156 patients in the emergency department of a referral hospital in Iran. Results The patients’ preferences in 9 out of 19 statements were similar to the guidelines. “Using the maternal language” received the strongest agreement. The (...)
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