Results for 'epiblast stem cell'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  24
    Would the Real Human Embryonic Stem Cell Please Stand Up?Ben Zhang, Roman Krawetz & Derrick E. Rancourt - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (7):632-638.
  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Legal and Ethical Issues in the UK.David Shaw - forthcoming - In Jörg P. Halter Peter Bürkli (ed.), The Legal and Ethical Challenges of Present and Future Stem-Cell Transplantation. Schwabe Verlag.
    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a widely accepted practice in the United Kingdom (UK). The relatively liberal UK law permits donation both within families and from strangers, and even allows the creation of “saviour siblings” who are brought into being with the specific intent of having them donate stem cells to save other members of their family. This chapter describes the regulation of HSCT in the UK and highlights some ethical issues related to discrimination against some categories (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Stem Cell Research on Embryonic Persons Is Just.Aaron Rizzieri - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):195-203.
    Abstract I argue that embryonic stem cell research is fair to the embryo, even on the assumption that the embryo has attained full personhood and an attendant right to life at conception. This is because the only feasible alternatives open to the embryo are to exist briefly in an unconscious state and be killed or to not exist at all. Hence, one is neither depriving the embryo of an enduring life it would otherwise have had nor is one (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  64
    Donating Fresh Versus Frozen Embryos to Stem Cell Research: In Whose Interests?Carolyn Mcleod & Françoise Baylis - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):465–477.
    Some stem cell researchers believe that it is easier to derive human embryonic stem cells from fresh rather than frozen embryos and they have had in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinicians invite their infertility patients to donate their fresh embryos for research use. These embryos include those that are deemed 'suitable for transfer' (i.e. to the woman's uterus) and those deemed unsuitable in this regard. This paper focuses on fresh embryos deemed suitable for transfer - hereafter 'fresh embryos'- (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  5. Biopower, Styles of Reasoning, and What's Still Missing From the Stem Cell Debates.Shelley Tremain - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):577 - 609.
    Until now, philosophical debate about human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has largely been limited to its ethical dimensions and implications. Although the importance and urgency of these ethical debates should not be underestimated, the almost undivided attention that mainstream and feminist philosophers have paid to the ethical dimensions of hESC research suggests that the only philosophically interesting questions and concerns about it are by and large ethical in nature. My argument goes some distance to challenge the assumption (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6.  36
    On Moral Incoherence and Hidden Battles: Stem Cell Research in Argentina.Florencia Luna & Arleen Salles - 2010 - Developing World Bioethics 10 (3):120-128.
    In this article, the authors focus on Argentina's activity in the developing field of regenerative medicine, specifically stem cell research. They take as a starting point a recent article by Shawn Harmon (published in this journal) who argues that attempts to regulate the practice in Argentina are morally incoherent. The authors try to show first, that there is no such ‘attempt to legislate’ on stem cell research in Argentina and this is due to a number of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  7.  10
    The Lady Vanishes: What's Missing From the Stem Cell Debate.Donna Dickenson - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1):43-54.
    Most opponents of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cell technologies base their arguments on the twin assertions that the embryo is either a human being or a potential human being, and that it is wrong to destroy a human being or potential human being in order to produce stem cell lines. Proponents’ justifications of stem cell research are more varied, but not enough to escape the charge of obsession with the status (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  51
    Public Stem Cell Banks: Considerations of Justice in Stem Cell Research and Therapy.Ruth R. Faden, Liza Dawson, Alison S. Bateman-House, Dawn Mueller Agnew, Hilary Bok, Dan W. Brock, Aravinda Chakravarti, Xiao-Jiang Gao, Mark Greene, John A. Hansen, Patricia A. King, Stephen J. O'Brien, David H. Sachs, Kathryn E. Schill, Andrew Siegel, Davor Solter, Sonia M. Suter, Catherine M. Verfaillie, LeRoy B. Walters & John D. Gearhart - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (6):13-27.
    If stem cell-based therapies are developed, we will likely confront a difficult problem of justice: for biological reasons alone, the new therapies might benefit only a limited range of patients. In fact, they might benefit primarily white Americans, thereby exacerbating long-standing differences in health and health care.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  9. The Moral-Principle Objection to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Don Marquis - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):190–206.
    Opponents of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research claim that such research is incompatible with the moral principle that it is always wrong intentionally to end a human life. In this essay, I discuss how that principle might be revised so that it is subject to as few difficulties as possible. I then argue that even the most defensible version of the principle is compatible with the moral permissibility of hESC research.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  10.  52
    Stem Cell Research in Germany: Ethics of Healing Vs. Human Dignity. [REVIEW]Fuat S. Oduncu - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):5-16.
    On 25 April 2002, the German Parliament has passed a strict new law referring to stem cell research. This law took effect on July 1, 2002. The so-called embryonic Stem Cell Act ( Stammzellgesetz — StZG ) permits the import of embryonic stem (ES) cells isolated from surplus IvF-embryos for research reasons. The production itself of ES cells from human blastocysts has been prohibited by the German Embryo Protection Act of 1990, with the exception of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  11.  83
    Developments in Stem Cell Research and Therapeutic Cloning: Islamic Ethical Positions, a Review.Hossam E. Fadel - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (3):128-135.
    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not – in the opinion of scientists – reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues.Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12.  54
    Informed Consent and Fresh Egg Donation for Stem Cell Research.Katherine Carroll & Catherine Waldby - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):29-39.
    This article develops a model of informed consent for fresh oöcyte donation for stem cell research, during in vitro fertilisation (IVF), by building on the importance of patients’ embodied experience. Informed consent typically focuses on the disclosure of material information. Yet this approach does not incorporate the embodied knowledge that patients acquire through lived experience. Drawing on interview data from 35 patients and health professionals in an IVF clinic in Australia, our study demonstrates the uncertainty of IVF treatment, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13. How is the Ethics of Stem Cell Research Different From the Ethics of Abortion?Elizabeth Harman - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):207–225.
    It seems that if abortion is permissible, then stem cell research must be as well: it involves the death of a less significant thing (an embryo rather than a fetus) for a greater good (lives saved rather than nine months of physical imposition avoided). However, I argue in this essay that this natural thought is mistaken. In particular, on the assumption that embryos and fetuses have the full moral status of persons, abortion is permissible but one form of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  26
    Canada’s Stem Cell Corporation: Aggregate Concerns and the Question of Public Trust. [REVIEW]Matthew Herder & Jennifer Dyck Brian - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (1):73 - 84.
    This paper examines one nascent entrepreneurial endeavour intended by Canada's Stem Cell Network to catalyze the commercialization of stem cell research: the creation of a company called "Aggregate Therapeutics". We argue that this initiative, in its current configuration, is likely to result in a breach of public trust owing to three inter-related concerns: conflicts of interest; corporate influence on the university research agenda; and the failure to provide some form of direct return for the public's substantial (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  26
    Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Ethical Views of Buddhist, Hindu and Catholic Leaders in Malaysia.Mathana Amaris Fiona Sivaraman & Siti Nurani Mohd Noor - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):467-485.
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research raises ethical issues. In the process of research, embryos may be destroyed and, to some, such an act entails the ‘killing of human life’. Past studies have sought the views of scientists and the general public on the ethics of ESCR. This study, however, explores multi-faith ethical viewpoints, in particular, those of Buddhists, Hindus and Catholics in Malaysia, on ESCR. Responses were gathered via semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Three main ethical quandaries emerged from the data: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  22
    Stem Cell Tourism and Future Stem Cell Tourists: Policy and Ethical Implications.Edna F. Einsiedel & Hannah Adamson - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (1):35-44.
    Stem cell tourism is a small but growing part of the thriving global medical tourism marketplace. Much stem cell research remains at the experimental stage, with clinical trials still uncommon. However, there are over 700 clinics estimated to be operating in mostly developing countries – from Costa Rica and Argentina to China, India and Russia – that have lured many patients, mostly from industrialized countries, driven by desperation and hope, which in turn continue to fuel the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  47
    Benefiting From Past Wrongdoing, Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines, and the Fragility of the German Legal Position.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):150–159.
    This paper examines the logic and morality of the German Stem Cell Act of 2002. After a brief description of the law’s scope and intent, its ethical dimensions are analysed in terms of symbolic threats, indirect consequences, and the encouragement of immorality. The conclusions are twofold. For those who want to accept the law, the arguments for its rationality and morality can be sound. For others, the emphasis on the uniqueness of the German experience, the combination of absolute (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18.  14
    Unproven Stem Cell–Based Interventions and Achieving a Compromise Policy Among the Multiple Stakeholders.Kirstin R. W. Matthews & Ana S. Iltis - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundIn 2004, patient advocate groups were major players in helping pass and implement significant public policy and funding initiatives in stem cells and regenerative medicine. In the following years, advocates were also actively engaged in Washington DC, encouraging policy makers to broaden embryonic stem cell research funding, which was ultimately passed after President Barack Obama came into office. Many advocates did this because they were told stem cell research would lead to cures. After waiting more (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  64
    The Ethical Dilemma of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Nabeel Manzar, Bushra Manzar, Nuzhat Hussain, M. Fawwad Ahmed Hussain & Sajjad Raza - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):97-106.
    To determine the knowledge, attitude, and ethical concerns of medical students and graduates with regard to Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC) research. This questionnaire based descriptive study was conducted at the Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK), Pakistan from February to July 2008. A well structured questionnaire was administered to medical students and graduate doctors, which included their demographic profile as well as questions in line with the study objective. Informed consent was taken and full confidentiality was assured to the participants. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  80
    Stem Cell Research and the Problem of Embryonic Identity.Phillip Montague - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (4):307-319.
    A basic component of moral objections to embryonic stem cell research is the claim that human embryos have the same moral status as typical adult human beings. There is no reason to accept this claim, however, unless adult humans once existed as embryos—that is, unless the developmental history of adult humans contains embryos to which the adults are numerically identical. The purpose of this paper is to argue that there are no such identities, and hence that no adult (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  64
    Direct Reprogramming and Ethics in Stem Cell Research.W. Malcolm Byrnes - 2008 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (2):277-290.
    The recent successful conversion of adult cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through direct reprogramming opens a new chapter in the study of disease and the development of regenerative medicine. It also provides a historic opportunity to turn away from the ethically problematic use of embryonic stem cells isolated through the destruction of human embryos. Moreover, because iPS cells are patient specific, they render therapeutic cloning unnecessary. To maximize therapeutic benefit, adult stem cell research will (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Broadening the Scope of Debates Around Stem Cell Research.Tamra Lysaght & Alastair V. Campbell - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (5):251-256.
    Over the last decade, stem cell research has generated an enormous amount of public, political and bioethical debate. These debates have overwhelmingly tended to focus on two moral issues: the moral status of human embryos and the duty to care for the sick and vulnerable. This preoccupation, especially on the question of moral status, has not only dichotomized the debate around two fundamentally incommensurable positions, it has come at the cost of other important issues largely being ignored. In (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  48
    The Ethics of Moral Compromise for Stem Cell Research Policy.Zubin Master & G. K. D. Crozier - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (1):50-65.
    In the US, stem cell research is at a moral impasse—many see this research as ethically mandated due to its potential for ameliorating major diseases, while others see this research as ethically impermissible because it typically involves the destruction of embryos and use of ova from women. Because their creation does not require embryos or ova, induced pluripotent stem cells offer the most promising path for addressing the main ethical objections to stem cell research; however, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  61
    Oversight Framework Over Oocyte Procurement for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Comparative Analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk Case Under South Korean Bioethics Law and U.S. Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Mi-Kyung Kim - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):367-384.
    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang’s potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Abortion, Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and Waste.David A. Jensen - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (1):27-41.
    Can one consistently deny the permissibility of abortion while endorsing the killing of human embryos for the sake of stem cell research? The question is not trivial; for even if one accepts that abortion is prima facie wrong in all cases, there are significant differences with many of the embryos used for stem cell research from those involved in abortion—most prominently, many have been abandoned in vitro, and appear to have no reasonably likely meaningful future. On (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  12
    Rationality and Religion in the Public Debate on Embryo Stem Cell Research and Prenatal Diagnostics.Bjørn K. Myskja - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (2):213-224.
    Jürgen Habermas has argued that religious views form a legitimate background for contributions to an open public debate, and that religion plays a particular role in formulating moral intuitions. Translating religious arguments into “generally accessible language” (Habermas, Eur J Philos 14(1):1–25, 2006) to enable them to play a role in political decisions is a common task for religious and non-religious citizens. The article discusses Habermas’ view, questioning the particular role of religion, but accepting the significance of including such counter-voices to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  8
    Exploring the Boundaries of Autonomy and the 'Right' to Access Innovative Stem Cell Therapies.Tamra Lysaght, Bernadette Richards & Anantharaman Muralidharan - 2017 - Asian Bioethics Review 9 (1-2):45-60.
    Demands for improved access to innovative therapies have prompted a discourse that claims patients have rights to access treatments that may be of benefit, even if evidence that demonstrates safety and efficacy is lacking. This rights-based discourse is grounded in accounts of autonomy and assertions claiming that the state ought to not interfere with the free choices of patients and clinical decision-making. In this essay, we scrutinise these arguments to defend the ethical and legal permissibility of interference in contexts where (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  26
    The Italian Way to Stem Cell Research: Rethinking the Role of Catholic Religion in Shaping Italian Stem Cell Research Regulations.Lorenzo Beltrame - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):157-166.
    Stem cell research regulations are highly variable across nations, notwithstanding shared and common ethical concerns. Dominant in political debates has been the so-called embryo question. However, the permissibility of human embryonic stem cell research varies among national regulatory frameworks. Scholars have explained differences by resorting to notions of political culture, traditions of ethical reasoning, discursive strategies and political manoeuvring of involved actors. Explanations based on the role of religion or other cultural structural variables are also employed. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  95
    An Inclusive Ethics for the Twenty-First Century: Implications for Stem Cell Research.John F. Kilner - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):683-722.
    An important contribution of Christian ethics in the pluralistic world of the twenty-first century is to emphasize inclusivity. Rather than promoting the interests of certain groups at the expense of the most vulnerable, society does well to prioritize ways forward that benefit all. For stem cell research, inclusivity entails benefiting or at least protecting the beneficiaries of treatment, the sources of materials, and the subjects of research. Adult stem cells are already benefiting many ill patients without causing (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  20
    Cell Churches and Stem Cell Marketing in South Korea and the United States.Douglas Sipp - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):167-172.
    The commercial provision of putative stem cell-based medical interventions in the absence of conclusive evidence of safety and efficacy has formed the basis of an unregulated industry for more than a decade. Many clinics offering such supposed stem cell treatments include statements about the ‘ethical’ nature of somatic stem cells, in specific contrast to human embryonic stem cells, which have been the subject of intensive political, legal, and religious controversy since their first derivation in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  58
    “Just One Animal Among Many?” Existential Phenomenology, Ethics, and Stem Cell Research.Norman K. Swazo - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):197-224.
    Stem cell research and associated or derivative biotechnologies are proceeding at a pace that has left bioethics behind as a discipline that is more or less reactionary to their developments. Further, much of the available ethical deliberation remains determined by the conceptual framework of late modern metaphysics and the correlative ethical theories of utilitarianism and deontology. Lacking, to any meaningful extent, is a sustained engagement with ontological and epistemological critiques, such as with “postmodern” thinking like that of Heidegger’s (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  57
    No Ethical Bypass of Moral Status in Stem Cell Research.Mark Brown - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (1):12-19.
    Recent advances in reprogramming technology do not bypass the ethical challenge of embryo sacrifice. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) research has been and almost certainly will continue to be conducted within the context of embryo sacrifice. If human embryos have moral status as human beings, then participation in iPS research renders one morally complicit in their destruction; if human embryos have moral status as mere precursors of human beings, then advocacy of iPS research policy that is inhibited by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  44
    Stem Cell-Based Therapies: Promises, Obstacles, Discordance, and the Agora.Kathleen K. Eggleson - 2012 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (1):1-25.
    The communicative relationship between science and society has metamorphosed with the dawn of the 21st century, as articulated by Michael Gibbons in 1999. In this new social contract, "socially robust" production is expected—the "reliable" knowledge produced under the previous social contract no longer suffices. Barriers between sectors have become more permeable than before, and "the sites at which problems are formulated and negotiated have moved from their previous institutional locations in government, industry, and universities into the 'agora'—the public space in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  34
    Stem Cell Treatments in China: Rethinking the Patient Role in the Global Bio‐Economy.Haidan Chen & Herbert Gottweis - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (4):194-207.
    The paper looks in detail at patients that were treated at one of the most discussed companies operating in the field of untried stem cell treatments, Beike Biotech of Shenzhen, China. Our data show that patients who had been treated at Beike Biotech view themselves as proactively pursuing treatment choices that are not available in their home countries. These patients typically come from a broad variety of countries: China, the United Kingdom, the United States, South Africa and Australia. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  20
    The Policy Statement of the American Academy of Pediatrics – Children as Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donors – a Proposal of Modifications for Application in the UK.Tak K. Chan & George L. Tipoe - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):43.
    With a view to addressing the moral concerns about the use of donor siblings, the Policy Statement of the American Academy of Pediatrics - Children as Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donors (the Policy) has laid out the criteria upon which tissue harvest from a minor would be permissible.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  9
    Neuroethics and Stem Cell Transplantation.Dieter Birnbacher - 2009 - Medicine Studies 1 (1):67-76.
    Is there anything special about the ethical problems of intracerebral stem-cell transplantation and other forms of cell or tissue transplantation in the brain that provides neuroethics with a distinctive normative profile, setting it apart from other branches of medical ethics? This is examined with reference to some of the ethical problems associated with interventions in the brain such as potential changes in personal identity and potential changes in personality. It is argued that these problems are not sufficiently (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  5
    Unproven Stem Cell-Based Interventions & Physicians’ Professional Obligations; a Qualitative Study with Medical Regulatory Authorities in Canada.Amy Zarzeczny & Marianne Clark - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):75.
    The pursuit of unproven stem cell-based interventions is an emerging issue that raises various concerns. Physicians play different roles in this market, many of which engage their legal, ethical and professional obligations. In Canada, physicians are members of a self-regulated profession and their professional regulatory bodies are responsible for regulating the practice of medicine and protecting the public interest. They also provide policy guidance to their members and discipline members for unprofessional conduct.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  86
    Stem Cell Lineages: Between Cell and Organism.Melinda Bonnie Fagan - 2017 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 9 (6).
    Ontologies of living things are increasingly grounded on the concepts and practices of current life science. Biological development is a process, undergone by living things, which begins with a single cell and (in an important class of cases) ends with formation of a multicellular organism. The process of development is thus prima facie central for ideas about biological individuality and organismality. However, recent accounts of these concepts do not engage developmental biology. This paper aims to fill the gap, proposing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  43
    Who Should Control the Use of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines: A Defence of the Donors' Ability to Control. [REVIEW]Søren Holm - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):55-68.
    In this paper I analyse who should be able to control the use of human embryonic stem cell lines. I distinguish between different kinds of control and analyse a set of arguments that purport to show that the donors of gametes and embryos should not be able to control the use of stem cell lines derived from their embryos. I show these arguments to be either deficient or of so general a scope that they apply not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  28
    Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity.David B. Resnik - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (3):211-222.
    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. The Ambiguity of the Embryo: Ethical Inconsistency in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate.Katrien Devolder & John Harris - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):153–169.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  42. Compromise and Moral Complicity in the Embryonic Stem Cell Debate.Katrien Devolder & John Harris - 2005 - In Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.), Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43.  65
    Evaluating the First-in-Human Clinical Trial of a Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Based Therapy.Audrey R. Chapman & Courtney C. Scala - 2012 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (3):243-261.
    The transition of novel and potentially promising medical therapies into their initial human clinical trials can engender conflicting pressures. On the one side, because Phase I trials raise greater ethical and human protection challenges than later stage clinical trials, there is a need to proceed cautiously. This is particularly the case for Phase I trials with a novel therapy being tested in humans for the first time, usually termed first-in-human (FIH) trials, especially if the FIH trial involves significant risks. On (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  10
    Blood Stem Cell Products: Toward Sustainable Benchmarks for Clinical Translation.Elizabeth Csaszar, Sandra Cohen & Peter W. Zandstra - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (3):201-210.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  24
    Human Embryonic Stem Cell (HESC) Research in Malaysia: Multi-Faith Perspectives.Patrick Foong - 2011 - Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):182-206.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  79
    Respecting Human Embryos Within Stem Cell Research: Seeking Harmony.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):226-244.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Ethical Issues in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Philip J. Nickel - 2008 - In Kristen Renwick Monroe, Ronald B. Miller & Jerome Tobis (eds.), Fundamentals of the Stem Cell Debate: The Scientific, Religious, Ethical & Political Issues. University of California Press.
    As a moral philosopher, the perspective I will take in this chapter is one of argumentation and informed judgment about two main questions: whether individuals should ever choose to conduct human embryonic stem cell research, and whether the law should permit this type of research. I will also touch upon a secondary question, that of whether the government ought to pay for this type of research. I will discuss some of the main arguments at stake, and explain how (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  28
    An Ironic Reductio for a 'Pro-Life' Argument:1 Hurlbut's Proposal for Stem Cell Research.Kevin Elliott - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (2):98–110.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  39
    Inflamm‐Aging of the Stem Cell Niche: Breast Cancer as a Paradigmatic Example.Massimiliano Bonafè, Gianluca Storci & Claudio Franceschi - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (1):40-49.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  43
    Rescuing Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: The Possibility of Embryo Reconstitution After Stem Cell Derivation.Katrien Devolder & Christopher M. Ward - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):245–263.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000