Results for 'epithets'

73 found
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  1. The Semantics of Racial Epithets.Christopher Hom - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy 105 (8):416-440.
    Racial epithets are derogatory expressions, understood to convey contempt toward their targets. But what do they actually mean, if anything? While the prevailing view is that epithets are to be explained pragmatically, I argue that a careful consideration of the data strongly supports a particular semantic theory. I call this view Combinatorial Externalism. CE holds that epithets express complex properties that are determined by the discriminatory practices and stereotypes of their corresponding racist institutions. Depending on the character (...)
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  2. Condition C and Epistemic Contexts : A Case Study of Epithets and Anti-Logophoricity Pronouns in French.Pierre Pica - 1995 - In Young-Sun Kim, Byung-Choon Lee, Kyoung-Jae Lee, Kyun-Kwon Yang & Jong-Kuri Yoon (eds.), A Festchrift for Dong-Whee Yang. Hankuk Publishing.
    Epithets and pronominals 'en' and 'y' in French have a variety of Binding properties that are unexpected on conventional approach to Binding Theory. We argue that the linguistic variety observed cross-linguistically (and perhaps, more surprinsingly, within a single language) - derives from the morphological properties of the anaphoric element - which we claim lack number features. Epithets and pronominal like 'en' and 'y' are predicates modifying null but semantically active nouns, and must theefore refer to the Speaker. These (...)
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  3.  5
    Homeric Epithets For Things.D. H. F. Geay - 1947 - Classical Quarterly 41 (3-4):109-.
    The assumption that a particular object mentioned in the Iliad or Odyssey must be described by epithets which are consistent with each other and with the narrative has complicated every attempt to relate the evidence of archaeology to the poems. It may fairly be assumed that a modern writer wants to be consistent and that, apart from oversights, he will not use an epithet unless it is directly appropriate to the object which he is creating for his immediate purpose; (...)
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  4.  2
    Personal Protection and Tailor-Made Deities: The Use of Individual Epithets.Jenny Wallensten - 2008 - Kernos 21.
    The use of epithets was a fundamental component of Greek polytheism. The present study brings attention to a small subgroup of such divine bynames, referred to as individual epithets because they stem from the names of mortal individuals. The function of these epithets is to designate a deity specifically concerned with the individual in question, thereby providing a close relationship and personal benefits for the eponymous worshipper and his or her close kin. The article exemplifies the phenomenon (...)
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  5. Bad Words Remarks on Mark Richard “Epithets and Attitudes”.Robert May - unknown
    “Choose your words wisely,” my mother used to say, “because you never know who’s listening.” Oddly, this is something about which my dear mother and Mark Richard apparently would agree. They both seem to think that the words you use say something about who you are, and if you use bad words, then you are a bad person. About this, I have no doubt that they are right - those who use slurs, at least in the context of many assertive (...)
     
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  6. A Gricean Rearrangement of Epithets.Zsófia Zvolenszky - 2012 - In Ferenc Kiefer & Zoltán Bánréti (eds.), 20 Years of Theoretical Linguistics in Budapest: A selection of papers from the 2010 conference celebrating the twentieth anniversary of the Theoretical Linguistics Programme of Eötvös Loránd University. Tinta Publishing House. pp. 183-218.
  7.  23
    Minimize Restrictors!(Notes on Definite Descriptions, Condition Cand Epithets).Philippe Schlenker - 2005 - In Emar Maier, Corien Bary & Janneke Huitink (eds.), Proceedings of Sub9.
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  8.  34
    Epithets in the Orphic Hymns.W. K. C. Guthrie - 1930 - The Classical Review 44 (06):216-221.
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  9.  13
    Formular Epithets in Homer. [REVIEW]J. B. Hainsworth - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):205-207.
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  10.  12
    Characters and Epithets: A Study in Vergtl's Aeneid. By N. Moseley, Professor of Classics in Albertus Magnus College. Pp. 104 + Liv. London: H. Milford, 1926. 10s. 6d. [REVIEW]J. W. Mackail - 1927 - The Classical Review 41 (02):88-.
  11.  22
    Formular Epithets in Homer Richard Sacks: The Traditional Phrase in Homer: Two Studies in Form, Meaning and Interpretation. Pp. X + 241. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1989. [REVIEW]J. B. Hainsworth - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (02):205-207.
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  12.  15
    Metaphor, with a Note on Transference of Epithets.W. Headlam - 1902 - The Classical Review 16 (09):434-442.
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  13.  14
    Paolo Vivante: The Epithets in Homer. A Study in Poetic Values. Pp. X + 222. New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 1982. £17. [REVIEW]Peter V. Jones - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (02):304-305.
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  14.  6
    Chapter Four. Insults, Epithets, and “Hate Speech”.Kent Greenawalt - 1996 - In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press. pp. 47-70.
  15.  6
    Homeric Epithets for Troy.C. M. Bowra - 1960 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 80:16.
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  16.  11
    Blameless Aegisthus Anne Amory Parry: Blameless Aegisthus: A Study of ΑΜΜΩΝ and Other Homeric Epithets. (Mnemosyne Suppl. Xxvi). Pp. X + 292. Leiden: Brill, 1973. Paper, Fl.78. [REVIEW]J. B. Hainsworth - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (02):167-168.
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  17.  11
    The Buddha as Pramā $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$}}{N} " />Abhūta: Epithets and Arguments in the Buddhist “Logical” Tradition. [REVIEW]Roger R. Jackson - 1988 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (4).
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  18.  8
    Homeric Epithets in Greek Lyric Poetry.A. E. Harvey - 1957 - Classical Quarterly 7 (3-4):206-.
  19.  2
    'Pronominal Epithets' and Similar Items.Paul M. Postal - 1972 - Foundations of Language 9 (2):246-248.
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  20.  1
    Epithets in the ṚgvedaEpithets in the Rgveda.H. D. Velankar & J. Gonda - 1961 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 81 (3):327.
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  21.  1
    Latin Grammarians Echoing the Greeks: The Doctrine of Proper Epithets and the Adjective.Javier Uría - 2010 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 154 (1).
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  22.  2
    The Buddha as Pram? $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$$ Abh?Ta: Epithets and Arguments in the Buddhist ?Logical? Tradition. [REVIEW]RogerR Jackson - 1988 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (4):335-365.
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  23.  1
    Revising Illegitimacy: The Use of Epithets in the Homeric Hymn to Hermes.Elizabeth S. Greene - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (02):343-349.
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  24.  1
    Blameless Aegisthus: A Study of Amumwn & Other Homeric Epithets.Stephanie West & A. A. Parry - 1975 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 95:193.
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  25. A Study of the Sense Epithets of Shelley and Keats.Charles B. Bliss - 1899 - Psychological Review 6 (3):332-332.
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  26. A List Of The Divine And Demonic Epithets In The Avesta.Louis H. Gray - 1926 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 46:97-153.
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  27. The Buddha as Pramanabhuta: Epithets and Arguments in the Buddhist "Logical" Tradition.Roger R. Jackson - 1988 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (4):335.
     
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  28. The Epithets in Homer. A Study in Poetic Values. [REVIEW]Peter Jones - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (2):304-305.
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  29. Characters and Epithets: A Study in Vergtl's Aeneid. [REVIEW]J. W. Mackail - 1927 - The Classical Review 41 (2):88-88.
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  30. Illuminatory of the Wide Earth, Strong Weapon of the Gods, Unbribable Judge : Intuitive Ontologies and the Use of Divine Epithets in Assyro-Bablylonian Texts.Peter Westh - 2010 - In Luther H. Martin & Jesper Sørensen (eds.), Past Minds: Studies in Cognitive Historiography. Equinox.
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  31. Genocidal Language Games.Lynne Tirrell - 2012 - In Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan (eds.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. Oxford University Press. pp. 174--221.
    This chapter examines the role played by derogatory terms (e.g., ‘inyenzi’ or cockroach, ‘inzoka’ or snake) in laying the social groundwork for the genocide of the Tutsi in Rwanda in 1994. The genocide was preceded by an increase in the use of anti-Tutsi derogatory terms among the Hutu. As these linguistic practices evolved, the terms became more openly and directly aimed at Tutsi. Then, during the 100 days of the genocide, derogatory terms and coded euphemisms were used to direct killers (...)
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  32.  27
    Argument or No Argument?Geoffrey K. Pullum & Kyle Rawlins - 2007 - Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (2):277 - 287.
    We examine an argument for the non-context-freeness of English that has received virtually no discussion in the literature. It is based on adjuncts of the form 'X or no X', where X is a nominal. The construction has been held to exemplify unbounded syntactic reduplication. We argue that although the argument can be made in a mathematically valid form, its empirical basis is not secure. First, the claimed unbounded syntactic identity between nominals does not always hold in attested cases, and (...)
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  33.  94
    Pejoratives as Fiction.Christopher Hom & Robert May - forthcoming - In David Sosa (ed.), Bad Words. Oxford University Press.
    Fictional terms are terms that have null extensions, and in this regard pejorative terms are a species of fictional terms: although there are Jews, there are no kikes. That pejoratives are fictions is the central consequence of the Moral and Semantic Innocence (MSI) view of Hom et al. (2013). There it is shown that for pejoratives, null extensionality is the semantic realization of the moral fact that no one ought to be the target of negative moral evaluation solely in virtue (...)
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  34. When Truth Gives Out.Mark Richard - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Is the point of belief and assertion invariably to think or say something true? Is the truth of a belief or assertion absolute, or is it only relative to human interests? Most philosophers think it incoherent to profess to believe something but not think it true, or to say that some of the things we believe are only relatively true. Common sense disagrees. It sees many opinions, such as those about matters of taste, as neither true nor false; it takes (...)
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  35. Derogatory Terms: Racism, Sexism and the Inferential Role Theory of Meaning.Lynne Tirrell - 1999 - In Kelly Oliver & Christina Hendricks (eds.), Language and Liberation: Feminism, Philosophy and Language,. SUNY Press.
    Derogatory terms (racist, sexist, ethnic, and homophobic epithets) are bully words with ontological force: they serve to establish and maintain a corrupt social system fuelled by distinctions designed to justify relations of dominance and subordination. No wonder they have occasioned public outcry and legal response. The inferential role analysis developed here helps move us away from thinking of the harms as being located in connotation (representing mere speaker bias) or denotation (holding that the terms fail to refer due to (...)
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  36. Aesthetic Derogation: Hate Speech, Pornography, and Aesthetic Contexts,.Lynne Tirrell - 1999 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Aesthetics and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Cambridge University Press.
    Derogatory terms (racist, sexist, ethnic epithets) have long played various roles and achieved diverse ends in works of art. Focusing on basic aspects of an aesthetic object or work, this article examines the interpretive relation between point of view and content, asking how aesthetic contextualization shapes the impact of such terms. Can context, particularly aesthetic contexts, detach the derogatory force from powerful epithets and racist and sexist images? What would it be about aesthetic contexts that would make this (...)
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  37.  30
    Toxic Speech: Toward an Epidemiology of Discursive Harm.Lynne Tirrell - 2017 - Philosophical Topics 45 (2):139-161.
    Applying a medical conception of toxicity to speech practices, this paper calls for an epidemiology of discursive toxicity. Toxicity highlights the mechanisms by which speech acts and discursive practices can inflict harm, making sense of claims about harms arising from speech devoid of slurs, epithets, or a narrower class I call ‘deeply derogatory terms.’ Further, it highlights the role of uptake and susceptibility, and so suggests a framework for thinking about damage variation. Toxic effects vary depending on one’s epistemic (...)
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  38. Millian Principles, Freedom of Expression, and Hate Speech.David O. Brink - 2001 - Legal Theory 7 (2):119-157.
    Hate speech employs discriminatory epithets to insult and stigmatize others on the basis of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other forms of group membership. The regulation of hate speech is deservedly controversial, in part because debates over hate speech seem to have teased apart libertarian and egalitarian strands within the liberal tradition. In the civil rights movements of the 1960s, libertarian concerns with freedom of movement and association and equal opportunity pointed in the same direction as egalitarian concerns (...)
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  39.  27
    Strategies of Character Attack.Fabrizio Macagno - 2013 - Argumentation 27 (4):1-33.
    Why are personal attacks so powerful? In political debates, speeches, discussions and campaigns, negative character judgments, aggressive charges and charged epithets are used for different purposes. They can block the dialogue, trigger value judgments and influence decisions; they can force the interlocutor to withdraw a viewpoint or undermine his arguments. Personal attacks are not only multifaceted dialogical moves, but also complex argumentative strategies. They can be considered as premises for further arguments based on signs, generalizations or consequences. They involve (...)
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  40.  7
    Contested Modelling: The Case of Economics.Uskali Mäki - 2013 - In Ulrich Gähde, Stephan Hartmann & Jörn Henning Wolf (eds.), Models, Simulations, and the Reduction of Complexity. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 87-106.
    Economics is a culturally and politically powerful and contested discipline, and it has been that way as long as it has existed. For some commentators, economics is the "queen of the social sciences", while others view it as a "dismal science" (and both of these epithets allow for diverse interpretations; see Mäki 2002). Economics is also a discipline that deals with a dynamically complex subject matter and has a tradition of reducing this complexity by using systematic procedures of simplification. (...)
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  41.  16
    Assessing Professional Know‐How.Christopher Winch - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):554-572.
    This article considers how professional knowledge should be assessed. It is maintained that the assessment of professional know-how raises distinctive issues from the assessment of know-how more generally. Intellectualist arguments which suggest that someone's giving an account of how to F should suffice for attributing to them knowledge of how to F are set out. The arguments fail to show that there is no necessary distinction between two kinds of know-how, namely the ability to F and knowing that w is (...)
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  42.  9
    Fact and Fiction in Economics: Models, Realism and Social Construction.Uskali Mäki (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    There is an embarrassing polarization of opinions about the status of economics as an academic discipline, as reflected in epithets such as the Dismal Science and the Queen of the Social Sciences. This collection brings together some of the leading figures in the methodology and philosophy of economics to provide a thoughtful and balanced overview of the current state of debate about the nature and limits of economic knowledge. Authors with partly rival and partly complementary perspectives examine how abstract (...)
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  43.  40
    Metaphorical Singular Reference. The Role of Enriched Composition in Reference Resolution.Anne Bezuidenhout - 2007 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3 (1).
    It is widely accepted that, in the course of interpreting a metaphorical utterance, both literal and metaphorical interpretations of the utterance are available to the interpreter, although there may be disagreement about the order in which these interpretations are accessed. I call this the dual availability assumption. I argue that it does not apply in cases of metaphorical singular reference. These are cases in which proper names, complex demonstratives or definite descriptions are used metaphorically; e.g., ‘That festering sore must go’, (...)
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  44.  15
    Sustainability and Higher Education: From Arborescent to Rhizomatic Thinking.Lesley Lionel Leonard Le Grange - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):742-754.
    Currently, global society is delicately poised on a civilisational threshold similar to that of the feudal era. This is a time when outmoded institutions, values, and systems of thought and their associated dogmas are ripe for transcendence by more relevant systems of organization and knowledge (Davidson, 2000). The foundations of the modern era (including modern educational institutions) are under sharp scrutiny; the fragmentation of nature, society and self is evidence of the cracks in the foundations. In times of crises old (...)
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  45. Freedom of Expression, Hate Speech, and Censorship.Peter Vallentyne - 1996 - For Good Reason.
    In a narrow sense, hate speech is symbolic representation that expresses, hatred, contempt, or disregard for another person or group of persons. The use of deeply insulting racial or ethnic epithets is an example of such hate speech. In a broader sense, hate speech also includes the symbolic representation of views are deeply offensive to others. The expression of the view that women are morally inferior to (or less intelligent than) men is example of hate speech in the broader (...)
     
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  46.  26
    Curing Diseases of Belief and Desire: Buddhist Philosophical Therapy.David Burton - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 66:187-217.
    It seems uncontroversial that Buddhism is therapeutic in intent. The word ‘therapy’ is often used, however, to denote methods of treating medically defined mental illnesses, while in the Buddhist context it refers to the treatment of deep-seated dissatisfaction and confusion that, it is claimed, afflict us all. The Buddha is likened to a doctor who offers a medicine to cure the spiritual ills of the suffering world. In the Pāli scriptures, one of the epithets of the Buddha is ‘the (...)
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  47.  2
    .Marc Forster - unknown
    There is a vacuum in three generations of the Grotowski men�s lives�this becomes clear within the film�s first ten minutes. First Hank wakes alone in the middle of the night, vomits for no apparent reason, and makes a ritual trip to a lonely diner. Next Hank�s boy Sonny perfunctorily screws a prostitute who�after they have finished�tells him "you look so sad." Finally, Buck�the eldest played by Peter Boyle�wanders through the house sucking breath from an oxygen tank, adds a new page (...)
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  48.  1
    Consécration d’un enclos funéraire à Ennodia Ilias à Larisa.Bruno Helly - 2010 - Kernos 23:53-65.
    Dans deux études à paraître, José Luis Garcia Ramón et moi avons proposé de nouvelles interprétations de quelques épiclèses de la déesse thessalienne Ennodia : Ennodia est Κορουταρρα, « celle qui fait grandir », et plus précisément « celle qui dote de nourriture / de croissance », Στροπικά, déesse « aux éclairs », porteuse de lumière, et encore Μυκαικα, « déesse des tombeaux ». Cette interprétation nouvelle de l’épiclèse Μυκαικα apporte un témoignage supplémentaire sur le caractère de déesse protectrice des (...)
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  49.  9
    Visual Trope and the Portland Vase Frieze: A New Reading and Exegesis.Randall L. Skalsky - Winter 1992 - Arion 2 (1).
    Among the extant masterworks of Roman art, there is probably none that has generated more scholarly debate than the Portland Vase over the interpretation of its elegant frieze. No fewer than forty-four different theories attempting to interpret the scenes on the vase have appeared in the last 400 years. In the main, the theories fall into two categories, those relating the frieze to Greek myth, and those linking the figures to Roman personages. Moreover, there is no consensus whether the frieze (...)
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  50.  6
    Philosophy: The Next Step.Anand Jayprakash Vaidya - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):922-932.
    Comparative Philosophy without Borders, edited by Arindam Chakrabarti and Ralph Weber is an outstanding and groundbreaking anthology that is also a prolegomena to all future philosophy, not just comparative philosophy. The anthology sets forward an agenda that is arguably the next step for philosophy. Chakrabarti and Weber have a dream : Our dream is that future fusion philosophy will shed its local epithets, even the epithet “comparative.” All good philosophy should be unapologetically, and, eventually, unself-consciously, comparative and culturally hybrid....
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