Results for 'ethical perceptions'

999 found
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  1.  54
    Shaping Ethical Perceptions: An Empirical Assessment of the Influence of Business Education, Culture, and Demographic Factors.Yvette P. Lopez, Paula L. Rechner & Julie B. Olson-Buchanan - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):341-358.
    Recent events at Enron, K-Mart, Adelphia, and Tyson would seem to suggest that managers are still experiencing ethical lapses. These lapses are somewhat surprising and disappointing given the heightened focus on ethical considerations within business contexts during the past decade. This study is designed, therefore, to increase our understanding of the forces that shape ethical perceptions by considering the effects of business school education as well as a number of other individual-level factors (such as intra-national culture, (...)
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  2.  47
    An Empirical Investigation of the Ethical Perceptions of Future Managers with a Special Emphasis on Gender – Turkish Case.M. G. Serap Atakan, Sebnem Burnaz & Y. Ilker Topcu - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):573 - 586.
    This study presents an empirical investigation of the ethical perceptions of the future managers - Turkish university students majoring in the Business Administration and Industrial Engineering departments of selected public and private Turkish universities - with a special emphasis on gender. The perceptions of the university students pertaining to the business world, the behaviors of employees, and the factors leading to unethical behavior are analyzed. The statistically significant differences reveal that female students have more ethical (...) about the Turkish business climate, behavior of employees, and the ethicalness of the behavior of the employees in comparison with their male counterparts. (shrink)
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  3.  54
    A Comparative Study of Ethical Perceptions of Managers and Non–Managers.Noel Y. M. Siu & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):167 - 183.
    This study provides a comparison of the ethical perceptions of managers and non-managers, including professionals, teachers, sales persons and clerks, as well as technical and plant workers. Data of working individuals were collected in Hong Kong in the form of questionnaires which contain vignettes of questionable ethical issues. Factor analysis was used to identify the major ethical dimensions which were then used as the basis of comparison. Regression analyses were used to study the effect of various (...)
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  4.  28
    Have Ethical Attitudes Changed? An Intertemporal Comparison of the Ethical Perceptions of College Students in 1985 and 2001.Tisha L. N. Emerson & Stephen J. Conroy - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 50 (2):167-176.
    Recent ethical breeches by corporate governorsat the highest levels have called into questionwhether ethical attitudes have changed sincethe Corporate Raider scandals of the mid-1980s. We exploit a unique opportunity to follow-up ona previous investigation of college students inthe mid-1980s to analyze this question. Usinga similar survey instrument, we find thatstudents surveyed in 2001 are significantlyless accepting of the ethically questionablesituations in seven of 15 scenarios and moreaccepting in only one. Seven scenarios showedno significant change. We conclude that,overall, (...) attitudes of students in 2001appear to have become higher over time. To theextent that current students are futurebusiness leaders, we find these results to beencouraging for the long term. (shrink)
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  5.  22
    Managerial and Other White-Collar Employees' Perceptions of Ethical Issues in Their Workplaces.Sally J. Power & Lorman L. Lundsten - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (2):185 - 193.
    Understanding what types of issues working adults perceive as ethical in their workplaces will allow better teaching of business ethics. This study reports findings of a thematic analysis of 764 ethical challenges described by working adults in a part-time MBA program and combines its findings with the other published studies on perceptions of ethical issues in the workplace. The results indicate that most people are assured about what they describe as ethical transgressions although experts might (...)
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  6.  32
    Gender Differences in Ethical Perceptions of Salespeople: An Empirical Examination in Turkey. [REVIEW]Azize Ergeneli & Semra Arıkan - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 40 (3):247 - 260.
    Researchers on gender and ethical decision-making have recently emphasized the differences between men's and women's ethical perceptions. This study is concerned with the perceptions of salespeople working in clothing and medical equipment sectors in Turkey. It regards the perceptions of colleagues of opposing genders in ethically questionable situations. The evaluation of salespeople's responses for 14 ethical scenarios indicates that there is no significant difference in ethical perception based on gender. Each gender predicted that (...)
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  7.  46
    University Students' Perceptions Regarding Ethical Marketing Practices: Affecting Change Through Instructional Techniques. [REVIEW]Charles D. Bodkin & Thomas H. Stevenson - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):207 - 228.
    Many believe that colleges of business have a role to play in improving the level of marketing ethics practiced in the business world, while others believe that by the time students reach the level of university education, their ethical beliefs are so ingrained as to be virtually unalterable. The purpose of this study is to add to the literature regarding university students’ ethical value judgments. It utilizes scenario studies to assess base line ethical values of junior level (...)
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  8.  75
    The Effect of Country and Culture on Perceptions of Appropriate Ethical Actions Prescribed by Codes of Conduct: A Western European Perspective Among Accountants.Donald F. Arnold, Richard A. Bernardi, Presha E. Neidermeyer & Josef Schmee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):327-340.
    Recognizing the growing interdependence of the European Union and the importance of codes of conduct in companies’ operations, this research examines the effect of a country’s culture on the implementation of a code of conduct in a European context. We examine whether the perceptions of an activity’s ethicality relates to elements found in company codes of conduct vary by country or according to Hofstede’s (1980, Culture’s Consequences (Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA)) cultural constructs of: Uncertainty Avoidance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism, and (...)
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  9.  51
    Ethical Perceptions of Hong Kong Chinese Business Managers.Gael M. McDonald & Raymond A. Zepp - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):835 - 845.
    This paper investigates ethical perceptions among Hong Kong Chinese managers of themselves and peers according to age, location of education and employment (local vs. multinational), based upon responses to thirteen potentially unethical situations.The major conclusions of the study are: (1) there is little consistency among perceptions of ethical situations; (2) Hong Kong managers perceive their peers as more unethical than themselves; (3) ethical perceptions in some situations are affected by age and to a lesser (...)
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  10.  7
    An Empirical Investigation of the Ethical Perceptions of Future Managers with a Special Emphasis on Gender – Turkish Case.M. G. Serap Atakan, Sebnem Burnaz & Y. Ilker Topcu - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):573-586.
    This study presents an empirical investigation of the ethical perceptions of the future managers - Turkish university students majoring in the Business Administration and Industrial Engineering departments of selected public and private Turkish universities - with a special emphasis on gender. The perceptions of the university students pertaining to the business world, the behaviors of employees, and the factors leading to unethical behavior are analyzed. The statistically significant differences reveal that female students have more ethical (...) about the Turkish business climate, behavior of employees, and the ethicalness of the behavior of the employees in comparison with their male counterparts. (shrink)
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  11.  30
    Does Management Experience Change the Ethical Perceptions of Retail Professionals: A Comparison of the Ethical Perceptions of Current Students with Those of Recent Graduates? [REVIEW]Ann M. DuPont & Jane S. Craig - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (8):815 - 826.
    The purpose of this study was to extend the previous research on ethics in retailing. Prior research of Dornoff and Tankersley (1985–1976), Gifford and Norris (1987), Norris and Gifford (1988), and Burns and Rayman (1989) examined the ethics orientation of retail sales persons, sales managers, and business school students. These studies found the college students less ethically-oriented than retail sales people and retail managers. The present study attempts to extend the research on ethics formation to a geographically and academically diverse (...)
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  12.  22
    A Comparative Study of Ethical Perceptions of Managers and Non-Managers.Noel Y. M. Siu & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):167-183.
    This study provides a comparison of the ethical perceptions of managers and non-managers, including professionals, teachers, sales persons and clerks, as well as technical and plant workers. Data of working individuals were collected in Hong Kong in the form of questionnaires which contain vignettes of questionable ethical issues. Factor analysis was used to identify the major ethical dimensions which were then used as the basis of comparison. Regression analyses were used to study the effect of various (...)
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  13.  25
    Ethical Perceptions of Marketers: The Interaction Effects of Machiavellianism and Organizational Ethical Culture. [REVIEW]Anusorn Singhapakdi - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (5):407 - 418.
    This study examines the interaction effects of Machiavellianism and organizational ethical culture on two components of a marketer''s ethical decision — perceptions of an ethical problem and perceptions of remedial alternatives. The results suggest that certain aspects of ethical perceptions are related to the interaction between Machiavellianism and organizational ethical culture.
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  14.  38
    Business Students' Ethical Perceptions of Retail Situations: A Microcultural Comparison. [REVIEW]David J. Burns, Jeffrey K. Fawcett & John Lanasa - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (9):667 - 679.
    Due in part to a growing realization of the importance of the role that retailing plays in the marketing channel, and to the increasing numbers of college graduates being employed by retailers, growing attention is being placed on business students'' ethical perceptions of retailing practices. This study continues this focus by examining the ethical perceptions of collegiate business students attending two different universities which likely represent two different microcultures — conservative evangelical Protestant and secular.The results suggest (...)
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  15.  5
    Does Management Experience Change the Ethical Perceptions of Retail Salespeople? A Comparison of the Ethical Perceptions of Current Students with Those of Recent Graduates.M. DuPont Ann & S. Craig Jane - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (8):815-826.
    The purpose of this study was to extend the previous research on ethics in retailing. Prior research of Dornoff and Tankersley, Gifford and Norris, Norris and Gifford, and Burns and Rayman examined the ethics orientation of retail sales persons, sales managers, and business school students. These studies found the college students less ethically-oriented than retail sales people and retail managers. The present study attempts to extend the research on ethics formation to a geographically and academically diverse sample, and to determine (...)
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  16.  36
    Business Ethical Perceptions of Business People in East China.Xinwen Wu - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (3):541-558.
    This paper deals with the ethical perceptions of business people and the current state of business ethics in east China. After surveying 800 business people in 59 enterprises and interviewing 42 chief executive officers, chairs and senior managers among them, thefollowing conclusions can be drawn: First of all, business ethics has become a new and popular topic in east China. Second, quite a lotof business people are pessimistic about the ethical standards of their superiors and co-workers, and (...)
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  17.  2
    The Role of Ethical Perceptions in Consumers’ Participation and Value Co-Creation on Sharing Economy Platforms.Waqar Nadeem, Mari Juntunen, Nick Hajli & Mina Tajvidi - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.
    Consumers’ participation on sharing economy platforms is crucial for the success of the products, services, and companies on those platforms. The participation of consumers enables companies to not only exist, but also to create value for consumers. The sharing economy has witnessed enormous growth in recent years and consumers’ concerns regarding the ethics surrounding these platforms have also risen considerably. The vast majority of the previous research on this topic is either conceptual and focused on organizational aspects, or only discusses (...)
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  18.  20
    Have Ethical Perceptions Changed? A Comparative Study on the Ethical Perceptions of Turkish Faculty Members.Y. Ilker Topcu - 2010 - Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):137-151.
    This study presents a comparative investigation of ethical perceptions of the faculty members, working in selected departments of Turkish universities. A descriptive research design is used in order to reveal the perceptions regarding the ethical dilemmas related to instruction, research, and outside employment activities in both 2003 and 2008. The set of activities that are considered unethical by faculty members, as well as the occurrence of potential ethical dilemmas are identified on a comparative basis. According (...)
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  19.  17
    Ethical Perceptions in the Retail Buyer-Seller Dyad.Rajan Nataraajan, Wen-Yeh Huang & Alan J. Dubinsky - 2006 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 25 (1):19-38.
    Extensive empirical work has examined ethical perceptions of different occupational groups in marketing. Additionally, researchers have explored ethical apperceptions of industrial customers and retail consumers. Minimal effort, though, has been directed at investigating differences in ethical perceptions between buyers and sellers, notwithstanding considerable theoretical arguments for doing so. This paper reports the results of a study that focused on differences between retail customers’ and retail salespeople’s perceptions of questionable buying and selling behaviors. Findings indicate (...)
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  20.  76
    Case Studies of Ethics Scandals: Effects on Ethical Perceptions of Finance Students.Julie A. B. Cagle & Melissa S. Baucus - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):213-229.
    Ethics instructors often use cases to help students understand ethics within a corporate context, but we need to know more about the impact a case-based pedagogy has on students’ ability to make ethical decisions. We used a pre- and post-test methodology to assess the effect of using cases to teach ethics in a finance course. We also wanted to determine whether recent corporate ethics scandals might have impacted students’ perceptions of the importance and prevalence of ethics in business, (...)
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  21.  33
    Ethical Perceptions of Organizational Politics: A Comparative Evaluation of American and Hong Kong Managers. [REVIEW]David A. Ralston, Robert A. Giacalone & Robert H. Terpstra - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (12):989 - 999.
    This paper presents a cross-cultural analysis of ethics with U.S. and Hong Kong Chinese managers as subjects. These managers were given the Strategies of Upward Influence instrument and asked to evaluate the ethics of using various political strategies to attain influence within their organizations. Differences were found between Hong Kong and U.S. managers on a variety of dimensions, indicating important differences between these two groups on their perceptions of ethical behavior. In the paper, we identify potential reasons for (...)
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  22.  25
    A Comparative Analysis of Ethical Perceptions in Marketing Research: U.S.A. Vs. Canada. [REVIEW]Ralph W. Giacobbe & Madhav N. Segal - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 27 (3):229 - 245.
    The study compares Canadian and U.S. marketing researchers' attitudes, perceptions and intentions related to several areas of ethical concern. A particular focus involves salience of norms common to marketing research codes of ethics (COEs) and familiarity of such codes to marketing research professionals. Researchers' attitudes towards today's ethical climate are identified and compared between the two countries. Relationships are examined between familiarity, ethical intention and salience. Results indicate that U.S. and Canadian marketing researchers have similar (...) of the relative importance of specific ethical norms, but worldwide COEs do not reflect these perceptions. Canadian marketing researchers report having a greater familiarity with their firms' adopted COEs, but this finding is moderated by the type of researcher. Among other findings, results indicate that familiarity influences ethical intention only for highly salient issues. (shrink)
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  23.  43
    The Effects of Ethical Codes on Ethical Perceptions of Actions Toward Stakeholders.Joseph A. McKinney, Tisha L. Emerson & Mitchell J. Neubert - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):505 - 516.
    As a result of numerous, highly publicized, ethical breaches, firms and their agents are under ongoing scrutiny. In an attempt to improve both their image and their ethical performance, some firms have adopted ethical codes of conduct. Past research investigating the effects of ethical codes of conduct on behavior and ethical attitudes has yielded mixed results. In this study, we again take up the question of the effect of ethical codes on ethical attitudes (...)
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  24.  61
    Ethics Codes and Sales Professionals' Perceptions of Their Organizations' Ethical Values.Sean Valentine & Tim Barnett - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 40 (3):191 - 200.
    Most large companies and many smaller ones have adopted ethics codes, but the evidence is mixed as to whether they have a positive impact on the behavior of employees. We suggest that one way that ethics codes could contribute to ethical behavior is by influencing the perceptions that employees have about the ethical values of organizations. We examine whether a group of sales professionals in organizations with ethics codes perceive that their organizational context is more supportive of (...)
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  25.  44
    Understanding Factors Affecting Salespeople's Perceptions of Ethical Behavior in South Africa.Russell Abratt & Neale Penman - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (4):269 - 280.
    Sales professionals have been frequent targets of ethical criticism. This paper reports on a survey on ethics of sales professionals in South Africa. The results revealed salespeoples views on controversial sales practices that involve direct monetary consequences; on practices that adversely affect customers, employers and competitors; and on sales peoples sensitization of ethical issues. Stealing from a competitor at a trade show was viewed as the most unethical of the scenarios, while phone sabotage and lying to a customer (...)
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  26.  68
    The Moderating Effect of Individuals' Perceptions of Ethical Work Climate on Ethical Judgments and Behavioral Intentions.Tim Barnett & Cheryl Vaicys - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 27 (4):351 - 362.
    Dimensions of the ethical work climate, as conceptualized by Victor and Cullen (1988), are potentially important influences on individual ethical decision-making in the organizational context. The present study examined the direct and indirect effects of individuals' perceptions of work climate on their ethical judgments and behavioral intentions regarding an ethical dilemma. A national sample of marketers was surveyed in a scenario-based research study. The results indicated that, although perceived climate dimensions did not have a direct (...)
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  27.  41
    Differences in Ethical Perceptions Between Male and Female Managers: Myth or Reality? [REVIEW]Jeaneen M. Kidwell, Robert E. Stevens & Art L. Bethke - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (6):489 - 493.
    This study sought to identify whether or not differences exist between the ethical decisions of male and female managers; and, if they do exist, to identify the areas in which differences occurred. An additional evaluation was conducted to determine how each perceived their counterpart would respond to the same ethical decision making situations.Data were collected from 50 male managers and 50 female managers by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Distinctive demographic characteristics were noted among the segments.
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  28.  77
    Ethical Perceptions of Business Students in a New Zealand University: Do Gender, Age and Work Experience Matter?Gabriel Eweje & Margaret Brunton - 2010 - Business Ethics 19 (1):95-111.
    Ethical issues at the workplace have once again become topical and important due to considerable adverse publicity surrounding reports of unethical business practices by corporate managers. Accordingly, this paper re-visits the question of whether gender, age and work experience do have an effect on ethical judgement, using 655 business students as respondents. This is necessary as business students are likely to become managers during their career and will face complex ethical concerns and dilemmas in their daily, routine (...)
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  29.  41
    Perceptions of the Ethical Work Climate and Covenantal Relationships.Tim Barnett & Elizabeth Schubert - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):279 - 290.
    Employees perception of the existence of a covenantal relationship between themselves and their employer indicates that they believe there is a mutual commitment to shared values and the welfare of the other party in the relationship. Research suggests that these types of employment relationships have positive benefits for both employees and employers. There has been little research, however, on the factors that determine whether such relationships will develop and thrive.In this paper, we suggest that the organizations ethical work climate (...)
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  30.  50
    Ethical Perceptions of Business Students: Differences Between East Asia and the USA and Among "Confucian" Cultures. [REVIEW]Kun Young Chung, John W. Eichenseher & Teruso Taniguchi - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1-2):121 - 132.
    This paper reports the results of a survey of 842 undergraduate business students in four nations - the United States of America (the USA), the Peoples' Republic of China (the PRC), Japan, and the Republic of Korea (the ROK). This survey asked students to respond to four scenarios with potentially unethical business behavior and a string of questions related to the importance of ethics in business strategy and in personal behaviors. Based on arguments related to differences in recent historical experiences, (...)
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  31.  30
    Ethical Perceptions of Expatriate and Local Managers in Hong Kong.Gael M. McDonald & Pak Cho Kan - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (15):1605-1623.
    In an effort to build on the current knowledge of ethical behaviour in Asia this paper proposes to replicate existing ethical research and to investigate specific questions relating to intra-cultural differences in Hong Kong. Four major conclusions were derived from this descriptive empirical study. A statistically significant correlation exists between age and ethical beliefs, with older employees less likely to express agreement to an unethical action than younger employees. In contrast to many previous studies no statistically significant (...)
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  32.  11
    Ethical Perceptions of Business Students: Differences Between East Asia and the USA and Among “Confucian” Cultures.Kun Young Chung, John W. Eichenseher & Teruso Taniguchi - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1-2):121-132.
    This paper reports the results of a survey of 842 undergraduate business students in four nations - the United States of America, the Peoples' Republic of China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea. This survey asked students to respond to four scenarios with potentially unethical business behavior and a string of questions related to the importance of ethics in business strategy and in personal behaviors. Based on arguments related to differences in recent historical experiences, the authors suggest that student responses (...)
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  33.  55
    You Support Diversity, But Are You Ethical? Examining the Interactive Effects of Diversity and Ethical Climate Perceptions on Turnover Intentions. [REVIEW]Robert Stewart, Sabrina D. Volpone, Derek R. Avery & Patrick McKay - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (4):581 - 593.
    Efforts to identify antecedents of employee turnover are likely to offer value to organizations through money saved on recruitment and new-hire training. The authors utilized the stakeholder perspective to corporate social responsibility to examine the effects of a perceived climate for ethics on the relationship between diversity climate and voluntary turnover intentions. Specifically, they examined how ethics climate (employees' perceptions that their organization values and enforces ethically correct behavior) affected the diversity climate-turnover intentions relationship. Results indicated that ethics climate (...)
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  34.  27
    Effects of Materiality, Risk, and Ethical Perceptions on Fraudulent Reporting by Financial Executives.William Shafer - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 38 (3):243 - 262.
    This paper examines fraudulent financial reporting within the context of Jones' (1991) ethical decision making model. It was hypothesized that quantitative materiality would influence judgments of the ethical acceptability of fraud, and that both materiality and financial risk would affect the likelihood of committing fraud. The results, based on a study of CPAs employed as senior executives, provide partial support for the hypotheses. Contrary to expectations, quantitative materiality did not influence ethical judgments. ANCOVA results based on participants' (...)
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  35.  24
    The Influence of Roles and Organizational Fit on Accounting Professionals’ Perceptions of Their Firms’ Ethical Environment.Donna D. Bobek, Amy M. Hageman & Robin R. Radtke - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (1):125-141.
    A public accounting firm’s ethical environment has an important role in encouraging ethical behavior, but prior research has shown that firm leaders perceive the ethical environment of their firms to be stronger than do non-leaders : 637–654, 2010). This study draws on several research streams in management to investigate the reasons behind this discrepancy. Our online questionnaire was completed by 139 accounting professionals. We find that when non-leader accounting professionals believe that they have a meaningful role in (...)
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  36.  42
    Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in the Korean Tourism Industry.Nan Young Kim & Graham Miller - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):941-954.
    This study investigates the ethical climate types presented in the Korean tourism industry, the differences in the perceptions of these ethical climate types based on individual/organizational characteristics, and the influence of ethical climate types based on job satisfaction/organizational commitment. Empirical findings of this study identify six ethical climate types and demonstrate significant difference and significant influence of the proposed relationships. This research contributes to the existing body of academic work by using empirical data collected from (...)
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  37.  37
    Financial Accountants' Perceptions of Management's Ethical Standards.Jill M. D'Aquila - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (3):233 - 244.
    It is believed that the atmosphere in which employees carry out their responsibilities influences whether employees will behave ethically. An important factor contributing to the integrity of the financial reporting process is the tone set by senior management (i.e., the corporate environment). This study was conducted to describe financial accountants'' perceptions of management''s ethical standards. These perceptions are based on both management''s actions and management''s expectations of the employee. This researcher also attempted to identify demographic variables that (...)
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  38.  28
    Bribery and Extortion in International Business: Ethical Perceptions of Greeks Compared to Americans. [REVIEW]John Tsalikis & Michael S. LaTour - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (4):249 - 264.
    This study investigates the differences in he way bribery and extortion is perceived by two different cultures — American and Greek. Two hundred and forty American business students and two hundred and four Greek business students were presented with three scenarios describing a businessman offering a bribe to a government official and three scenarios describing a businessman being forced to pay a bribe to an official in order to do business. The Reidenbach-Robin instrument was used to measure the ethical (...)
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  39.  37
    The Impact of a Shift in Organizational Role on Ethical Perceptions: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW]Shohreh A. Kaynama, Algin King & Louise W. Smith - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (5):581 - 590.
    This study investigates ethical decision-making by considering the differences in ethical judgments between undergraduate business and MBA students on selected ethical issues facing employees and managers of today's businesses. The study further investigates differences in ethical judgments between undergraduates and MBAs in terms of a perceived position as an employee or as a manager. The findings indicate that undergraduate students tend to be more ethical than MBA students and that both groups tend to be more (...)
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  40.  18
    Investigating Socialization, Work-Related Norms, and the Ethical Perceptions of Marketing Practitioners.Nicholas McClaren, Stewart Adam & Andrea Vocino - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):95 - 115.
    This study examines the influence of socialization on work-related norms (WORKNORM).We tested the hypothesis that organizational (ORGSOC) and professional socialization (PROFSOC) are antecedent influences on WORKNORM, employing a sample of 339 marketing practitioners. The results of covariance structural analysis indicate that ORGSOC and PROFSOC and WORKNORM are discriminant constructs within the tested model. The study also reveals that the influence of ORGSOC on WORKNORM is stronger than the influence of PROFSOC on these same norms.Because this social learning occurs in work-related (...)
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  41.  30
    Identifying the Gaps in Ethical Perceptions Between Managers and Salespersons: A Multidimensional Approach. [REVIEW]Tony L. Henthorne, Donald P. Robin & R. Eric Reidenbach - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (11):849 - 856.
    This research examines, in a general manner, the degree and character of perceptual congruity between salespeople and managers on ethical issues. Salespeople and managers from a diversity of organizations were presented with three scenarios having varying degrees of ethical content and were asked to evaluate the action of the individual in each scenario. Findings indicate that, in every instance, the participating managers tended (1) to be more critical of the action displayed in the scenarios, (2) to view the (...)
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  42.  32
    An Investigation of Ethical Perceptions of Public Sector Mis Professionals.Ken Udas, William L. Fuerst & David B. Paradice - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (7):721 - 734.
    Management information system (MIS) professionals have a central role in technology development, determining how technology is used in organizations, and the effects it has on clients and society. MIS stakeholders have expressed concern regarding MIS professional's role in computer crime, and security of electronically stored information. It is recognized that MIS professionals must make decisions based on their professional ethics. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Data Processing Management Association (DPMA) have developed codes of ethics to help guide (...)
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  43.  35
    A Comparison of Ethical Perceptions of Business and Engineering Majors.Priscilla O'Clock & Marilyn Okleshen - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (9):677 - 687.
    Previous research has reported that ethical values of business students are lower than those of their peers in other majors. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a self-selection bias with respect to ethical values exists among students enrolled as business majors when compared with students planning to enter the engineering profession. Engineering students are exposed to a similar technical orientation in academic curricula and also supply the market for managers.A survey instrument was administered to 195 (...)
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  44.  12
    Malnutrition in Elder Care: Qualitative Analysis of Ethical Perceptions of Politicians and Civil Servants. [REVIEW]Anna-Greta Mamhidir, Mona Kihlgren & Venke Soerlie - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundFew studies have paid attention to ethical responsibility related to malnutrition in elder care. The aim was to illuminate whether politicians and civil servants reason about malnutrition in elder care in relation to ethical responsibility, and further about possible causes and how to address them.MethodEighteen elected politicians and appointed civil servants at the municipality and county council level from two counties in Sweden were interviewed. They worked at a planning, control and executive level, with responsibility for both the (...)
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  45.  14
    Registered Nurses' Perceptions of Moral Distress and Ethical Climate.Bernadette Pauly, Colleen Varcoe, Janet Storch & Lorelei Newton - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (5):561-573.
    Moral distress is a phenomenon of increasing concern in nursing practice, education and research. Previous research has suggested that moral distress is associated with perceptions of ethical climate, which has implications for nursing practice and patient outcomes. In this study, a randomly selected sample of registered nurses was surveyed using Corley’s Moral Distress Scale and Olson’s Hospital Ethical Climate Survey (HECS). The registered nurses reported moderate levels of moral distress intensity. Moral distress intensity and frequency were found (...)
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  46.  1
    Nurses’ Ethical Perceptions of Health Care and of Medical Clinical Research: An Audit in a French University Teaching Hospital.G. Benhamou-Jantelet - 2001 - Nursing Ethics 8 (2):114-122.
    Very few data exist in France on: nurses’ knowledge and behaviour concerning ethical decisions in clinical practice; and their knowledge of ethical rules in clinical research. This questionnaire-based audit tried mainly to assess these questions in a large French university teaching hospital. Of the 257 questionnaires distributed to nurses in 23 clinical units of the hospital, 206 were returned. When responding to the vignette describing a clinical situation requiring an ethical decision to be made, most nurses acted (...)
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  47.  5
    Do International Business Professionals’ Ethical Perceptions Associate with Their Prior Education, Country, or Gender?Haseena Niazi, Richard A. Bernardi & Susan M. Bosco - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 14:41-68.
    While most ethics studies use student samples, the participants in our research were 306 business professionals from Afghanistan, Germany, Philippines and the United States. Our sample included 168 male business professionals and 138 female business professionals. Our research examined whether factors such as taking a college ethics course, gender, or being from a specific country significantly associate to being sensitive to ethical dilemmas. Our data indicate that individuals who had taken an ethics course in college were more sensitive to (...)
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  48.  17
    Public Perceptions of Biological Control of Rabbits in New Zealand: Some Ethical and Practical Issues. [REVIEW]Roger Wilkinson & Gerard Fitzgerald - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):273-282.
    Rabbits are a major vertebrate pest in New Zealand. An application has been made recently to import and release in New Zealand the biological control agent Rabbit Calicivirus Disease. In this paper we discuss the findings from a qualitative study and a national survey of New Zealanders' perceptions of rabbits, rabbit control, and RCD. New Zealanders' position on the introduction of RCD is complex, and includes concern for the rabbit as a sentient individual that deserves a humane death if (...)
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  49.  24
    A Qualitative Exploration Into Voters' Ethical Perceptions of Political Advertising: Discourse, Disinformation, and Moral Boundaries. [REVIEW]Steven Kates - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (16):1871-1885.
    Political campaign advertising continues to be a controversial policy topic in advertising and marketing research. It is also a prime subject for investigating the ethical evaluations of consumers (or voters). The following study draws from postmodern communication theory and employs a qualitative research methodology in order to explore voters' intimate and subjective views about politics, candidates, and political advertising. The findings include emergent themes relating to significant media rituals in voters' lives, the cynical perspective of politics as a game, (...)
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  50.  23
    The Effects of Ethical Codes on Ethical Perceptions of Actions Toward Stakeholders.J. Neubert Mitchell - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    As a result of numerous, highly publicized, ethical breaches, firms and their agents are under ongoing scrutiny. In an attempt to improve both their image and their ethical performance, some firms have adopted ethical codes of conduct. Past research investigating the effects of ethical codes of conduct on behavior and ethical attitudes has yielded mixed results. In this study, we again take up the question of the effect of ethical codes on ethical attitudes (...)
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