Results for 'euthanasia'

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Bibliography: Euthanasia in Applied Ethics
  1. A History of Ideas Concerning the Morality of Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Voluntary Euthanasia.Craig Paterson - 2009 - In Rajitha Tadikonda (ed.), Physician Assisted Euthanasia. Icfai University Press.
    In the chapter “A History of Ideas Concerning the Morality of Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Voluntary Euthanasia ” author Craig Paterson explores questions concerning the legitimacy of the practices of suicide, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. The aim of this article is of identifying some of the main historical protagonists, and delineating some of the key arguments that have been used for the acceptance or rejection of these practices.
     
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  2. “You Got Me Into This…”: Procreative Responsibility and Its Implications for Suicide and Euthanasia.Rivka Weinberg - 1st ed. 2015 - In Jukka Varelius & Michael Cholbi (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag.
    This paper investigates connections between procreative ethics and the ethics of suicide and euthanasia. While there are good reasons for distinguishing between lives worth starting and lives worth continuing, I argue that those reasons provide no reason for denying that there is a relationship between procreative and end of life ethics. Regarding euthanasia/assisted suicide, we might think it too demanding to ask parents to help euthanize their terminally ill, suffering child, but had the parents not procreated, thereby exposing (...)
     
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  3. Euthanasia, or Mercy Killing.Nathan Nobis - 2019 - 1000-Word Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology.
    Sadly, there are people in very bad medical conditions who want to die. They are in pain, they are suffering, and they no longer find their quality of life to be at an acceptable level anymore. -/- When people like this are kept alive by machines or other medical treatments, can it be morally permissible to let them die? -/- Advocates of “passive euthanasia” argue that it can be. Their reasons, however, suggest that it can sometimes be not wrong (...)
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  4. The Morality of Euthanasia.Adam Greif - forthcoming - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu.
    In this paper, I defend the view that the requested euthanasia of adults is morally permissible and should be legalised; I use an argument from analogy which compares physician-assisted euthanasia with morally less ambiguous and, in my opinion, an acceptable instance of mercy killing. I also respond to several objections that either try to prove that the instance of mercy killing is not acceptable, or that there is a fundamental difference between these two cases of killing. Furthermore, in (...)
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  5. Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Craig Paterson - 2010 - Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just why (...)
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  6. Euthanasia, Ethics, and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legalisation.John Keown - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Whether the law should permit voluntary euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is one of the most vital questions facing all modern societies. Internationally, the main obstacle to legalisation has proved to be the objection that, even if they were morally acceptable in certain 'hard cases', voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide could not be effectively controlled; society would slide down a 'slippery slope' to the killing of patients who did not make a free and informed request, or for whom palliative (...)
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  7.  73
    Why Letting Die Instead of Killing? Choosing Active Euthanasia on Moral Grounds.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy.
    Ever since the debate concerning euthanasia was ignited, the distinction between active and passive euthanasia – or, letting die and killing – has been marked as one of its key issues. In this paper I will argue that a) the borderline between act and omission is an altogether blurry one, and it gets even vaguer when it comes to euthanasia, b) there is no morally significant difference between active and passive euthanasia, and c) if there is (...)
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  8. Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways (...)
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  9.  60
    Two Decades of Research on Euthanasia From the Netherlands. What Have We Learnt and What Questions Remain?and Agnes van der Heide Judith A. C. Rietjens, Paul J. Van der Maas, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Johannes J. M. Van Delden - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):271.
    Two decades of research on euthanasia in the Netherlands have resulted into clear insights in the frequency and characteristics of euthanasia and other medical end-of-life decisions in the Netherlands. These empirical studies have contributed to the quality of the public debate, and to the regulating and public control of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. No slippery slope seems to have occurred. Physicians seem to adhere to the criteria for due care in the large majority of cases. Further, it (...)
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  10. Suicide, Euthanasia and Human Dignity.Friderik Klampfer - 2001 - Acta Analytica 27:7-34.
    Kant has famously argued that human beings or persons, in virtue of their capacity for rational and autonomous choice and agency, possess dignity, which is an intrinsic, final, unconditional, inviolable, incomparable and irreplaceable value. This value, wherever found, commands respect and imposes rather strict moral constraints on our deliberations, intentions and actions. This paper deals with the question of whether, as some Kantians have recently argued, certain types of (physician-assisted) suicide and active euthanasia, most notably the intentional destruction of (...)
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  11. Managing Intentions: The End-of-Life Administration of Analgesics and Sedatives, and the Possibility of Slow Euthanasia.Charles Douglas, Ian Kerridge & Rachel Ankeny - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (7):388-396.
    There has been much debate regarding the 'double-effect' of sedatives and analgesics administered at the end-of-life, and the possibility that health professionals using these drugs are performing 'slow euthanasia.' On the one hand analgesics and sedatives can do much to relieve suffering in the terminally ill. On the other hand, they can hasten death. According to a standard view, the administration of analgesics and sedatives amounts to euthanasia when the drugs are given with an intention to hasten death. (...)
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  12. Child Euthanasia: Should We Just Not Talk About It?Luc Bovens - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):630-634.
    Belgium has recently extended its euthanasia legislation to minors, making it the first legislation in the world that does not specify any age limit. I consider two strands in the opposition to this legislation. First, I identify five arguments in the public debate to the effect that euthanasia for minors is somehow worse than euthanasia for adults—viz. arguments from weightiness, capability of discernment, pressure, sensitivity and sufficient palliative care—and show that these arguments are wanting. Second, there is (...)
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  13. Factors Associated with the Rejection of Active Euthanasia: A Survey Among the General Public in Austria. [REVIEW]Willibald Stronegger, Nathalie Burkert, Franziska Grossschädl & Wolfgang Freidl - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):26.
    In recent decades, the general public has become increasingly receptive toward a legislation that allows active voluntary euthanasia. The purpose of this study was to survey the current attitude towards AVE within the Austrian population and to identify explanatory factors in the areas of socio-demographics, personal experiences with care, and ideological orientation. A further objective was to examine differences depending on the type of problem formulation for the purpose of measuring attitude.
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  14. Living to the Bitter End? A Personalist Approach to Euthanasia in Persons with Severe Dementia.Jan de Lepeleire & Chris Gastmans - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (2):78-86.
    The number of people suffering from dementia will rise considerably in the years to come. This will have important implications for society. People suffering from dementia have to rely on relatives and professional caregivers when their disorder progresses. Some people want to determine for themselves their moment of death, if they should become demented. They think that the decline in personality caused by severe dementia is shocking and unacceptable. In this context, some people consider euthanasia as a way to (...)
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  15. A History of Ideas Concerning Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.Craig Paterson - manuscript
    The article examines from an historical perspective some of the key ideas used in contemporary bioethics debates both for and against the practices of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Key thinkers examined--spanning the Ancient, Medieval and Modern periods--include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, and Mill. The article concludes with a synthesizing summary of key ideas that oppose or defend assisted suicide and euthanasia.
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  16.  37
    Aktive Und Passive Sterbehilfe – Zur Rehabilitation Einer Stark Kritisierten Deskriptiven UnterscheidungActive and Passive Euthanasia – The Rehabilitation of an Often Criticized Descriptive Difference.Bernward Gesang - 2001 - Ethik in der Medizin 13 (3):161-175.
    Definition of the problem: In order to discuss the normative aspects of euthanasia one has to clarify what is meant by active and passive euthanasia. Arguments and conclusion: Many theoreticians deny the possibility of distinguishing between the two by purely descriptive means, e.g. on the basis of theories of action or the differences between acting and omitting. On the contrary, such a purely descriptive distinction will be defended in this paper by summarizing and refining the theory of Dieter (...)
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  17. The Euthanasia of Companion Animals.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - In Christine Overall (ed.), Pets and People: The Ethics of our Relationships with Companion Animals. Oxford University Press. pp. 264-278.
    Argues that considerations central to the justification of euthanizing humans do not readily extrapolate to the euthanasia of pets and companion animals; that the comparative account of death's badness can be successfully applied to such animals to ground the justification of their euthanasia and its timing; and proposes that companion animal guardians have authority to decide to euthanize such animals because of their epistemic standing regarding such animals' welfare.
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  18.  65
    Euthanasia and End-of-Life Practices in France and Germany. A Comparative Study.Ruth Horn - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):197-209.
    The objective of this paper is to understand from a sociological perspective how the moral question of euthanasia, framed as the “right to die”, emerges and is dealt with in society. It takes France and Germany as case studies, two countries in which euthanasia is prohibited and which have similar legislation on the issue. I presuppose that, and explore how, each society has its own specificities in terms of practical, social and political norms that affect the ways in (...)
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  19.  36
    News Media Coverage of Euthanasia: A Content Analysis of Dutch National Newspapers.Judith Ac Rietjens, Natasja Jh Raijmakers, Pauline Sc Kouwenhoven, Clive Seale, Ghislaine Jmw van Thiel, Margo Trappenburg, Johannes Jm van Delden & Agnes van der Heide - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):11.
    The Netherlands is one of the few countries where euthanasia is legal under strict conditions. This study investigates whether Dutch newspaper articles use the term ‘euthanasia’ according to the legal definition and determines what arguments for and against euthanasia they contain.
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  20.  50
    Living to the Bitter End? A Personalist Approach to Euthanasia in Persons with Severe Dementia.Chris Gastmans & Jan de Lepeleire - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (2):78-86.
    The number of people suffering from dementia will rise considerably in the years to come. This will have important implications for society. People suffering from dementia have to rely on relatives and professional caregivers when their disorder progresses. Some people want to determine for themselves their moment of death, if they should become demented. They think that the decline in personality caused by severe dementia is shocking and unacceptable. In this context, some people consider euthanasia as a way to (...)
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  21. Response: A Defence of a New Perspective on Euthanasia.David Shaw - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):123-125.
    In two recent papers, Hugh McLachlan, Jacob Busch and Raffaele Rodogno have criticised my new perspective on euthanasia. Each paper analyses my argument and suggests two flaws. McLachlan identifies what he sees as important points regarding the justification of legal distinctions in the absence of corresponding moral differences and the professional role of the doctor. Busch and Rodogno target my criterion of brain life, arguing that it is a necessary but not sufficient condition and that it is not generalisable. (...)
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  22. The Body as Unwarranted Life Support: A New Perspective on Euthanasia.David Shaw - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):519-521.
    It is widely accepted in clinical ethics that removing a patient from a ventilator at the patient’s request is ethically permissible. This constitutes voluntary passive euthanasia. However, voluntary active euthanasia, such as giving a patient a lethal overdose with the intention of ending that patient’s life, is ethically proscribed, as is assisted suicide, such as providing a patient with lethal pills or a lethal infusion. Proponents of voluntary active euthanasia and assisted suicide have argued that the distinction (...)
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  23. Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide and the Professional Obligations of Physicians.Lucie White - 2010 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3:1-15.
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have proved to be very contentious topics in medical ethics. Some ethicists are particularly concerned that allowing physicians to carry out these procedures will undermine their professional obligations and threaten the very goals of medicine. However, I maintain that the fundamental goals of medicine not only do not preclude the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide by physicians, but can in fact be seen to support these practices in some instances. I look at two (...)
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  24. Neonatal Euthanasia: Why Require Parental Consent? [REVIEW]Jacob M. Appel - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):477-482.
    The Dutch rules governing neonatal euthanasia, known as the Groningen Protocol, require parental consent for severely disabled infants with poor prognoses to have their lives terminated. This paper questions whether parental consent should be dispositive in such cases, and argues that the potential suffering of the neonate or pediatric patient should be the decisive factor under such unfortunate circumstances.
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  25. Nurses' Attitudes to Euthanasia: The Influence of Empirical Studies and Methodological Concerns on Nursing Practice.Janet Holt - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):257-272.
    This paper introduces the controversy surrounding active voluntary euthanasia and describes the legal position on euthanasia and assisted suicide in the UK. Findings from studies of the nurses' attitudes to euthanasia from the national and international literature are reviewed. There are acknowledged difficulties in carrying out research into attitudes to euthanasia and hence the review of findings from the published studies is followed by a methodological review. This methodological review examines the research design and data collection (...)
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  26. Neonatal Euthanasia is Unsupportable: The Groningen Protocol Should Be Abandoned.Alexander A. Kon - 2007 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):453-463.
    The growing support for voluntary active euthanasia is evident in the recently approved Dutch Law on Termination of Life on Request. Indeed, the debate over legalized VAE has increased in European countries, the United States, and many other nations over the last several years. The proponents of VAE argue that when a patient judges that the burdens of living outweigh the benefits, euthanasia can be justified. If some adults suffer to such an extent that VAE is justified, then (...)
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  27. News Media Coverage of Euthanasia: A Content Analysis of Dutch National Newspapers. [REVIEW]Rosemarie D. L. C. Bernabe, Ghislaine J. M. W. Van Thiel, Jan A. M. Raaijmakers & Johannes J. M. Van Delden - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):6-.
    BackgroundThe Netherlands is one of the few countries where euthanasia is legal under strict conditions. This study investigates whether Dutch newspaper articles use the term ‘euthanasia’ according to the legal definition and determines what arguments for and against euthanasia they contain.MethodsWe did an electronic search of seven Dutch national newspapers between January 2009 and May 2010 and conducted a content analysis.ResultsOf the 284 articles containing the term ‘euthanasia’, 24% referred to practices outside the scope of the (...)
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  28. Execution by Lethal Injection, Euthanasia, Organ‐Donation and the Proper Goals of Medicine.Jukka Varelius - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):140-149.
    ABSTRACTIn a recent issue of this journal, David Silver and Gerald Dworkin discuss the physicians' role in execution by lethal injection. Dworkin concludes that discussion by stating that, at that point, he is unable to think of an acceptable set of moral principles to support the view that it is illegitimate for physicians to participate in execution by lethal injection that would not rule out certain other plausible moral judgements, namely that euthanasia is under certain conditions legitimate and that (...)
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  29.  26
    Determinants of Acceptance of End-of-Life Interventions: A Comparison Between Withdrawing Life-Prolonging Treatment and Euthanasia in Austria.Erwin Stolz, Franziska Großschädl, Hannes Mayerl, Éva Rásky & Wolfgang Freidl - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundEnd-of-life decisions remain a hotly debated issue in many European countries and the acceptance in the general population can act as an important anchor point in these discussions. Previous studies on determinants of the acceptance of end-of-life interventions in the general population have not systematically assessed whether determinants differ between withdrawal of life-prolonging treatment and euthanasia.MethodsA large, representative survey of the Austrian adult population conducted in 2014 included items on WLPT and EUT. We constructed the following categorical outcome: rejection (...)
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  30.  24
    Aktive Sterbehilfe: Ungereimtheiten in der Euthanasie-DebatteActive Euthanasia: On Some Inconsistencies in the Current Debate on Euthanasia.Hans Günther Ruß - 2002 - Ethik in der Medizin 14 (1):11-19.
    Definition of the problem: Concerning the debate on euthanasia, a widely held position is that it should be accepted in its so-called passive and indirect form, while so-called active euthanasia should be rejected. The problem, now, is that at least some of the usual arguments to defend this view are invalid. Arguments: Three kinds of failures are examinded: First, if taken seriously, some of the arguments against active euthanasia undermine the accepted passive and indirect forms, too. For (...)
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  31. Kant on Euthanasia and the Duty to Die: Clearing the Air.Michael Cholbi - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):607-610.
    Thanks to recent scholarship, Kant is no longer seen as the dogmatic opponent of suicide he appears at first glance. However, some interpreters have recently argued for a Kantian view of the morality of suicide with surprising, even radical, implications. More specifically, they have argued that Kantianism requires that those with dementia or other rationality-eroding conditions end their lives before their condition results in their loss of identity as moral agents, and requires subjecting the fully demented or those confronting future (...)
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  32. Euthanasia and the Active‐Passive Distinction.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (1):51-73.
    I consider four recently suggested difference between killing and letting die as they apply to active and passive euthanasia : taking vs. taking no action; intending vs. not intending the death of the person; the certainty of the result vs. leaving the situation open to other possible alternative events; and dying from unnatural vs. natural causes. The first three fail to constitute clear differences between killing and letting die, and "ex posteriori" cannot constitute morally significant differences. The last constitutes (...)
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  33. The Dangers of Euthanasia and Dementia: How Kantian Thinking Might Be Used to Support Non-Voluntary Euthanasia in Cases of Extreme Dementia.Robert Sharp - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (5):231-235.
    Some writers have argued that a Kantian approach to ethics can be used to justify suicide in cases of extreme dementia, where a patient lacks the rationality required of Kantian moral agents. I worry that this line of thinking may lead to the more extreme claim that euthanasia is a proper Kantian response to severe dementia (and similar afflictions). Such morally treacherous thinking seems to be directly implied by the arguments that lead Dennis Cooley and similar writers to claim (...)
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  34.  51
    Euthanasia and Cryothanasia.Francesca Minerva & Anders Sandberg - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (7):526-533.
    In this article we discuss the moral and legal aspects of causing the death of a terminal patient in the hope of extending their life in the future. We call this theoretical procedure cryothanasia. We argue that administering cryothanasia is ethically different from administering euthanasia. Consequently, objections to euthanasia should not apply to cryothanasia, and cryothanasia could also be considered a legal option where euthanasia is illegal.
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  35. Moral Permissibility of Euthanasia: A Case Discussion From Bangladesh.Azam Golam - 2007 - The Dhaka University Studies 63 (2):157-169.
    Euthanasia or mercy killing is, now a day, a major problem widely discussed in medical field. Medical professionals are facing dilemma to take decision regarding their incompetent patient while tend to do euthanasia. The dilemma is by nature moral i.e. whether it is morally permissible or not. In some countries of Europe and in some provinces of USA euthanasia is legally permitted fulfilling some conditions. It is claimed by Rachels that in our practical medical practice we do (...)
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  36. Aiming to Kill: The Ethics of Suicide and Euthanasia.Nigel Biggar - 2004 - Pilgrim Press.
    1. The traditional position and the pressures for change. The Western legal tradition -- The Christian ethical hinterland -- The exceptional value of human life -- The justification of taking human life -- Suicide -- Christian ethics, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia -- The cultural pressures for change -- 2. The value of human life -- 3. The morality of acts of killing -- 4. Slippery slopes.
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  37.  23
    Trust Increases Euthanasia Acceptance: A Multilevel Analysis Using the European Values Study.Vanessa Köneke - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):86.
    This study tests how various kinds of trust impact attitudes toward euthanasia among the general public. The indication that trust might have an impact on euthanasia attitudes is based on the slippery slope argument, which asserts that allowing euthanasia might lead to abuses and involuntary deaths. Adopting this argument usually leads to less positive attitudes towards euthanasia. Tying in with this, it is assumed here that greater trust diminishes such slippery slope fears, and thereby increases (...) acceptance. (shrink)
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  38.  40
    Euthanasia: Agreeing to Disagree? [REVIEW]Søren Holm - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):399-402.
    In discussions about the legalisation of active, voluntary euthanasia it is sometimes claimed that what should happen in a liberal society is that the two sides in the debate “agree to disagree”. This paper explores what is entailed by agreeing to disagree and shows that this is considerably more complicated than what is usually believed to be the case. Agreeing to disagree is philosophically problematic and will often lead to an unstable compromise.
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  39. Illness, Suffering and Voluntary Euthanasia.Jukka Varelius - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (2):75–83.
    It is often accepted that we may legitimately speak about voluntary euthanasia only in cases of persons who are suffering because they are incurably injured or have an incurable disease. This article argues that when we consider the moral acceptability of voluntary euthanasia, we have no good reason to concentrate only on persons who are ill or injured and suffering.
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  40.  44
    Living in the Hands of God. English Sunni E-Fatwas on Voluntary Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):29-41.
    Ever since the start of the twentieth century, a growing interest and importance of studying fatwas can be noted, with a focus on Arabic printed fatwas (Wokoeck 2009). The scholarly study of end-of-life ethics in these fatwas is a very recent feature, taking a first start in the 1980s (Anees 1984; Rispler-Chaim 1993). Since the past two decades, we have witnessed the emergence of a multitude of English fatwas that can easily be consulted through the Internet (‘e-fatwas’), providing Muslims worldwide (...)
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  41.  20
    Opinions About Euthanasia and Advanced Dementia: A Qualitative Study Among Dutch Physicians and Members of the General Public.Pauline S. C. Kouwenhoven, Natasja J. H. Raijmakers, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Judith A. C. Rietjens, Donald G. Van Tol, Suzanne van de Vathorst, Nienke de Graeff, Heleen A. M. Weyers, Agnes van der Heide & Ghislaine J. M. W. van Thiel - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):7.
    The Dutch law states that a physician may perform euthanasia according to a written advance euthanasia directive when a patient is incompetent as long as all legal criteria of due care are met. This may also hold for patients with advanced dementia. We investigated the differing opinions of physicians and members of the general public on the acceptability of euthanasia in patients with advanced dementia.
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  42. Euthanasia in Psychiatry Can Never Be Justified. A Reply to Wijsbek.Christopher Cowley - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (3):227-238.
    In a recent article, Henri Wijsbek discusses the 1991 Chabot “psychiatric euthanasia” case in the Netherlands, and argues that Chabot was justified in helping his patient to die. Dutch legislation at the time permitted physician assisted suicide when the patient’s condition is severe, hopeless, and unbearable. The Dutch Supreme Court agreed with Chabot that the patient met these criteria because of her justified depression, even though she was somatically healthy. Wijsbek argues that in this case, the patient’s integrity had (...)
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  43. Autonomy-Based Arguments Against Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Critique. [REVIEW]Manne Sjöstrand, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):225-230.
    Respect for autonomy is typically considered a key reason for allowing physician assisted suicide and euthanasia. However, several recent papers have claimed this to be grounded in a misconception of the normative relevance of autonomy. It has been argued that autonomy is properly conceived of as a value, and that this makes assisted suicide as well as euthanasia wrong, since they destroy the autonomy of the patient. This paper evaluates this line of reasoning by investigating the conception of (...)
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  44.  49
    The Extension of Belgium’s Euthanasia Law to Include Competent Minors.Kasper Raus - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):305-315.
    Following considerable debate, the practice of euthanasia was legalized in Belgium in 2002, thereby making Belgium one of the few places in the world where this practice is legal. In 2014 the law was amended for the first time. The 2014 amendment makes euthanasia legally possible for all minors who repeatedly and voluntarily request euthanasia and who are judged to possess “capacity of discernment”, as well as fulfil a number of other criteria of due care. This extension (...)
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  45. Killing People: What Kant Could Have Said About Suicide and Euthanasia but Did Not.I. Brassington - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):571-574.
    An agent who takes his own life acts in violation of the moral law, according to Kant; suicide, and, by extension, assisted suicide are therefore wrong. By a similar argument, and with a few important exceptions, killing is wrong; implicitly, then, voluntary euthanasia is also wrong. Kant's conclusions are uncompelling and his argument in these matters is undermined on considering other areas of his thought. Kant, in forbidding suicide and euthanasia, is conflating respect for persons and respect for (...)
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  46. Euthanasia and Eudaimonia.David Shaw - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (9):530-533.
    This paper re-evaluates euthanasia and assisted suicide from the perspective of eudaimonia, the ancient Greek conception of happiness across one’s whole life. It is argued that one cannot be said to have fully flourished or had a truly happy life if one’s death is preceded by a period of unbearable pain or suffering that one cannot avoid without assistance in ending one’s life. While death is to be accepted as part of life, it should not be left to nature (...)
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    Ontology or Phenomenology? How the Lvad Challenges the Euthanasia Debate.Felicitas Kraemer - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (3):140-150.
    This article deals with the euthanasia debate in light of new life-sustaining technologies such as the left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The question arises: does the switching off of a LVAD by a doctor upon the request of a patient amount to active or passive euthanasia, i.e. to ‘killing’ or to ‘letting die’? The answer hinges on whether the device is to be regarded as a proper part of the patient's body or as something external. We usually regard (...)
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  48. The Dead Donor Rule, Voluntary Active Euthanasia, and Capital Punishment.Christian Coons & Noah Levin - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (5):236-243.
    We argue that the dead donor rule, which states that multiple vital organs should only be taken from dead patients, is justified neither in principle nor in practice. We use a thought experiment and a guiding assumption in the literature about the justification of moral principles to undermine the theoretical justification for the rule. We then offer two real world analogues to this thought experiment, voluntary active euthanasia and capital punishment, and argue that the moral permissibility of terminating any (...)
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    Euthanasie: Strafbar Und Doch Zugestanden? Die Niederländische Duldungspolitik in Sachen EuthanasieEuthanasia: Criminal and yet Permitted? The Dutch Policy of Tolerance Concerning Euthanasia.Bert Gordijn - 1998 - Ethik in der Medizin 10 (1):12-25.
    Definition of the problem: The Dutch policy regarding euthanasia has been causing amazement in other countries over and over again: Although euthanasia is illegal in the Netherlands, there are cases of euthanasia in which no criminal prosecution follows. The latter are regulated actively and in public by the Dutch authorities. In other countries certain cases of euthanasia are sometimes tolerated as well, however, there it is in most cases merely tacitly consented to. In contrast to these (...)
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    Legal Standards for Brain Death and Undue Influence in Euthanasia Laws.Thaddeus Mason Pope & Michaela E. Okninski - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):173-178.
    A major appellate court decision from the United States seriously questions the legal sufficiency of prevailing medical criteria for the determination of death by neurological criteria. There may be a mismatch between legal and medical standards for brain death, requiring the amendment of either or both. In South Australia, a Bill seeks to establish a legal right for a defined category of persons suffering unbearably to request voluntary euthanasia. However, an essential criterion of a voluntary decision is that it (...)
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