Results for 'expert witness'

999 found
Order:
  1.  12
    How Many Interpreters Does It Take to Interpret the Testimony of an Expert Witness? A Case Study of Interpreter-Mediated Expert Witness Examination.Jieun Lee - 2015 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 28 (1):189-208.
    Through the analysis of the discourse of an interpreter-mediated expert witness examination in a Korean criminal courtroom, this paper examines challenges in obtaining evidence from an expert witness through unskilled interpreters and the related complexity of participation status during the multiparty interactions, namely the courtroom examination. This paper, drawing on the participation framework theories, demonstrates how all participants are engaged in negotiation and interpretation of the meaning of the expert testimony. The two unskilled interpreters, who (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  15
    Bioethics in a Legal Forum: Confessions of an "Expert" Witness.J. C. Fletcher - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (4):297-324.
    This article reflects on the author's modest experience as an expert witness in two trials: Osheroff vs. Greenspan (1983), and In the Matter of Baby K (1994). Bioethicists' expertise as scholar-teachers and consultants on particular issues merits qualification by judges as expert witnesses. The article argues that a different kind of expertise – strong moral advocacy – is required to be an effective expert witness. The major lessons of expert witnessing for the author concern (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  3.  7
    The Expert Witness: Lessons From the U.S. Experience.Susan Haack - 2015 - Humana Mente 8 (28).
    The first section of this paper explains why assessing the worth of expert testimony poses special epistemological difficulties. The second traces the history of the various rules and procedures by means of which the U.S. legal system has tried to ensure, or at least control, the quality of the expert testimony on which it so often relies—from the Frye Rule, the Federal Rules of Evidence, and the Daubert trilogy to recent constitutional cases regarding the appearance of forensic witnesses (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Expert Witness: Manipulated or Manipulator? A Deconstruction of the Role of the Expert Witness in the British Civil Justice System.M. A. Eby - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (2):174-174.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  7
    The Expert Witness in Medical Liability Cases.S. S. Sanbar & Leonard I. Pataki - 1978 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 6 (2):7-9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The Expert Witness in Medical Liability Cases.S. S. Sanbar & Leonard I. Pataki - 1978 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 6 (2):7-9.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Philosopher of Science as Expert Witness.Philip L. Quinn - 1984 - In James T. Cushing, C. F. Delany & Gary M. Gutting (eds.), Science and Reality: Recent Work in the Philosophy of Science. University of Notre Dame Press.
  8.  34
    History, Memory, and the Law: The Historian as Expert Witness.Richard J. Evans - 2002 - History and Theory 41 (3):326–345.
    There has been a widespread recovery of public memory of the events of the Second World War since the end of the 1980s, with war crimes trials, restitution actions, monuments and memorials to the victims of Nazism appearing in many countries. This has inevitably involved historians being called upon to act as expert witnesses in legal actions, yet there has been little discussion of the problems that this poses for them. The French historian Henry Rousso has argued that this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9.  18
    The Journalism Educator as Expert Witness.Roy L. Moore - 1997 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (2):82 – 95.
    Journalism educators who appear as expert witnesses and consultants in media law cases such as libel and invasion of privacy are often unfamiliar with the practical aspects of serving as an eflective, efficient, and ethical expert. These practical dimensions include federal and state rules of evidence and civil procedure, the process of deciding whether or not to accept a case, negotiations over fees and employment conditions, ethical conflicts associated with representation, the litigation process, and post-trial issues. It is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  5
    Decisional Dimensions in Expert Witness Testimony – A Structural Analysis.Alex Biedermann & Kyriakos N. Kotsoglou - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  12
    Recent Developments. Expert Witness Evidence in Cases of Alleged Shaken Baby Syndrome.John Coggon - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (3):277-278.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  5
    The Case Manager as Expert Witness.Lynn S. Muller - 2008 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 10 (1):27-31.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Commentary: The Academic as Expert Witness.Harold P. Green - 1986 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 11 (2):74-75.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Commentary: The Academic as Expert Witness.Michael Ruse - 1986 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 11 (2):68-73.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  12
    Witness for the Plaintiff: Ethical Considerations of Being a Libel Plaintiff's Expert Witness.Michael Perkins - 1997 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (2):69 – 81.
    This article argues that a potential expert witness's decision about testifying for a libel plaintif should not be driven by an unexamined loyalty to journalists, to the press, or to broad principles of expression. Real harm done to a plaintif by libel and the advantage to the press corps and to the system of expression of having a knowledgeable expert testihing for a libel plaintif are discussed as factors that might outweigh the traditional loyalties. An ethical framework (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Heteroglossic Representations of Scientific Uncertainty: A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Expert Witness Testimony to the Bristol Inquiry. [REVIEW]Beth Kewell - 2011 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 36 (6):816-841.
    The Bristol Inquiry is arguably one of the most important cases of judicial medical investigation held in the United Kingdom, which continues to raise important insights into the social construction of medical and scientific risks. As a way of marking the inquiry’s tenth anniversary year, this article returns to an important conversation held between noted pediatric cardiothoracic and cardiovascular specialists, on days 49 and 50 of the inquiry’s proceedings. Their conversance principally describes a pathway of scientific advancement across four decades. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  13
    Ethical Considerations for the Forensic Engineer Serving as an Expert Witness.Kenneth L. Carper - 1990 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 9 (1/2):21-34.
  18.  9
    The Physician's Dis-Ease as an Expert Witness: Its Semantic Pathology.Russell Meyers - 1967 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 10 (2):211-225.
  19. Personal Injury : Consultation, Evaluation, and the Expert Witness.David D. Stein - 2009 - In Steven F. Bucky (ed.), Ethical and Legal Issues for Mental Health Professionals: In Forensic Settings. Brunner-Routledge. pp. 21.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Personal Injury Consultation, Evaluation, and the Expert Witness David D. Stein.David D. Stein - 2009 - In Steven F. Bucky (ed.), Ethical and Legal Issues for Mental Health Professionals: In Forensic Settings. Brunner-Routledge. pp. 21.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  10
    Confessions of an Expert Ethics Witness.K. Kipnis - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (4):325-343.
    The aim of this essay is to describe and reflect upon the concrete particulars of one academician's work as an expert ethics witness. The commentary on my practices and the narrative descriptions of three cases are offered as evidence for the thesis that it is possible to act honorably within a role that some have considered to be inherently illicit. Practical measures are described for avoiding some of the best known pitfalls. The discussion concludes with a listing of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  22.  23
    Expert Testimony by Persons Trained in Ethical Reasoning: The Case of Andrew Sawatzky.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):224-231.
    In February 1999, I received a call from a lawyer at Hill Abra Dewar stating that she had instructions to retain my services as an expert witness in the case of Sawatzky v. Riverview Health Centre. She was representing the Manitoba League of Persons with Disabilities which had intervenor status.In Canada the admission of expert testimony depends upon the application of four criteria outlined in R. v. Mohan by Justice Sopinka. These criteria are: relevance; necessity in assisting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23.  40
    Expert Testimony by Persons Trained in Ethical Reasoning: The Case of Andrew Sawatzky.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):224-231.
    In February 1999, I received a call from a lawyer at Hill Abra Dewar stating that she had instructions to retain my services as an expert witness in the case of Sawatzky v. Riverview Health Centre. She was representing the Manitoba League of Persons with Disabilities which had intervenor status.In Canada the admission of expert testimony depends upon the application of four criteria outlined in R. v. Mohan by Justice Sopinka. These criteria are: relevance; necessity in assisting (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24.  63
    Argument From Expert Opinion as Legal Evidence: Critical Questions and Admissibility Criteria of Expert Testimony in the American Legal System.David M. Godden & Douglas Walton - 2006 - Ratio Juris 19 (3):261-286.
    While courts depend on expert opinions in reaching sound judgments, the role of the expert witness in legal proceedings is associated with a litany of problems. Perhaps most prevalent is the question of under what circumstances should testimony be admitted as expert opinion. We review the changing policies adopted by American courts in an attempt to ensure the reliability and usefulness of the scientific and technical information admitted as evidence. We argue that these admissibility criteria are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  25.  14
    Rebuttal: Expert Ethics Testimony.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):240-242.
    According to Giles Scofield, ethicists can provide expert testimony in descriptive ethics and metaethics, but not normative ethics. Lawrence Schneiderman appears to disagree with this view, and presumably believes that it is appropriate for an expert witness in ethics to provide ethics testimony in all three areas. I draw this conclusion from several claims made in his commentary which aim to show that we would be contending experts if both invited to testify on a case involving claims (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  14
    Rebuttal: Expert Ethics Testimony.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):240-242.
    According to Giles Scofield, ethicists can provide expert testimony in descriptive ethics and metaethics, but not normative ethics. Lawrence Schneiderman appears to disagree with this view, and presumably believes that it is appropriate for an expert witness in ethics to provide ethics testimony in all three areas. I draw this conclusion from several claims made in his commentary which aim to show that we would be contending experts if both invited to testify on a case involving claims (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  18
    Expert Evidence As Context: Historical Patterns and Contemporary Attitudes in the Prosecution of Sexual Offences.Fiona E. Raitt - 2004 - Feminist Legal Studies 12 (2):233-244.
    In H.M. Advocate v. Grimmond1 the judge in a Scottish High Court trial refused permission for expert psychological evidence to be admitted on behalf of the Crown in a prosecution involving sexual offences against two children. The Crown had sought to lead an expert witness to explain to the jury about patterns of disclosure in child sexual abuse cases. The case was remarkable, not so much for the strict application of the longstanding rule in R. v. Turner (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  51
    Argument From Expert Opinion as Legal Evidence: Critical Questions and Admissibility Criteria of Expert Testimony in the American Legal System.Douglas Walton David M. Godden - 2006 - Ratio Juris 19 (3):261-286.
    . While courts depend on expert opinions in reaching sound judgments, the role of the expert witness in legal proceedings is associated with a litany of problems. Perhaps most prevalent is the question of under what circumstances should testimony be admitted as expert opinion. We review the changing policies adopted by American courts in an attempt to ensure the reliability and usefulness of the scientific and technical information admitted as evidence. We argue that these admissibility criteria (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  29.  20
    The Reluctant Retained Witness: Alleged Sexual Misconduct in the Doctor/Patient Relationship.M. Yarborough - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (4):345-364.
    Testifying as an expert ethics witness raises a number of important issues. These include: the prospect of generating adverse publicity for oneself and one's institution, avoiding bias, giving testimony that is at odds with testimony given by colleagues, potential conflicts of interest introduced by reimbursement, the need of those who hear the testimony of bioethicists to appreciate the nature of moral expertise, the difficulty of assessing the quality of legal evidence which emerges from adversarial legal proceedings, and the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  16
    Is There Any Indication for Ethics Evidence? An Argument for the Admissibility of Some Expert Bioethics Testimony.Lawrence J. Nelson - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):248-263.
    Professor Imwinkelried is surely right: the propriety of bioethicists serving as expert witnesses in litigation is problematic, and, I would add, it should remain problematic. Such testimony most certainly does not belong everywhere it will be offered by lawyers and litigants in an effort to advance their interests. Yet in contrast to some commentators, Imwinkelried and I both see a place for bioethicists serving as expert witnesses, although we differ significantly on how to understand and justify this place. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  8
    Is There Any Indication for Ethics Evidence? An Argument for the Admissibility of Some Expert Bioethics Testimony.Lawrence J. Nelson - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):248-263.
    Professor Imwinkelried is surely right: the propriety of bioethicists serving as expert witnesses in litigation is problematic, and, I would add, it should remain problematic. Such testimony most certainly does not belong everywhere it will be offered by lawyers and litigants in an effort to advance their interests. Yet in contrast to some commentators, Imwinkelried and I both see a place for bioethicists serving as expert witnesses, although we differ significantly on how to understand and justify this place. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  7
    Tipping the Scales of Justice: Deconstructing an Expert's Testimony on Cross-Examination.Pamela Hobbs - 2002 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 15 (4):411-424.
    American law is not a singlediscourse, but is the product of diverse andoften discordant voices; nowhere is this moreapparent than during the cross-examination ofparties and witnesses at trial. The sequentialorganization of witness examinations has drawn the attention of conversation analysts,who have examined the effects of theturn-taking system governing suchexaminations on the organization of theinteraction that occurs. This article appliesthe theoretical framework thus developed to theanalysis of an attorney's management of expertcross-examination in a medicalmalpractice case. The article demonstratesthat, rather than (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  70
    Healthy Skepticism: The Emperor has Very Few Clothes.K. Wm Wildes - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (4):365-371.
    The role of an expert witness in ethics, as part of a legal proceeding, is examined in this essay. The essay argues that the use of such expertise rests on confusions about normative and non-normative ethics compounded by misunderstandings about the challenges of moral argument in secular, morally pluralistic societies.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34.  17
    The Professor and the Pea: Lives and Afterlives of William Bateson’s Campaign for the Utility of Mendelism.Gregory Radick - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (2):280-291.
    As a defender of the fundamental importance of Mendel’s experiments for understanding heredity, the English biologist William Bateson did much to publicize the usefulness of Mendelian science for practical breeders. In the course of his campaigning, he not only secured a reputation among breeders as a scientific expert worth listening to but articulated a vision of the ideal relations between pure and applied science in the modern state. Yet historical writing about Bateson has tended to underplay these utilitarian elements (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35.  2
    Methodological Challenges in Deliberative Empirical Ethics.Stacy M. Carter - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):382-383.
    The empirical turn in bioethics and the deliberative turn in democracy theory occurred at around the same time, one at the intersection of bioethics and social science,1 2 the other at the intersection of political philosophy and political science.3–5 Empirical bioethics and deliberative democratic approaches both engage with immediate problems in policy and practice with normative intent, so it was perhaps inevitable that they would eventually find one another,6–8 and that deliberative research would become more common in bioethics.9 This commentary (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Translating Scientific Evidence Into the Language of the ‘Folk’: Executive Function as Capacity-Responsibility.Katrina L. Sifferd - 2013 - In Nicole A. Vincent (ed.), Legal Responsibility and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
    There are legitimate worries about gaps between scientific evidence of brain states and function (for example, as evidenced by fMRI data) and legal criteria for determining criminal culpability. In this paper I argue that behavioral evidence of capacity, motive and intent appears easier for judges and juries to use for purposes of determining criminal liability because such evidence triggers the application of commonsense psychological (CSP) concepts that guide and structure criminal responsibility. In contrast, scientific evidence of neurological processes and function (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  27
    Calculating and Understanding the Value of Any Type of Match Evidence When There Are Potential Testing Errors.Norman Fenton, Martin Neil & Anne Hsu - 2014 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 22 (1):1-28.
    It is well known that Bayes’ theorem (with likelihood ratios) can be used to calculate the impact of evidence, such as a ‘match’ of some feature of a person. Typically the feature of interest is the DNA profile, but the method applies in principle to any feature of a person or object, including not just DNA, fingerprints, or footprints, but also more basic features such as skin colour, height, hair colour or even name. Notwithstanding concerns about the extensiveness of databases (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  20
    Folk Psychology Wins the DAY! Daubert and the Challenge of False Confessions.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (3):269-281.
    It has been more than 20 years since the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark decision in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. on the admissibility of scientific expert witness testimony in legal proceedings. It is time, perhaps, to look back at the history of Daubert decisions to determine whether it and its progeny have lived up to their collective promises to keep bad science out of the courtroom, while allowing in good, especially where the mind and brain sciences are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  60
    Medical Ethics in the Wake of the Holocaust: Departing From a Postwar Paper by Ludwik Fleck.Eva Hedfors - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (3):642-655.
    In 1948 Ludwik Fleck published a paper in Polish discussing the use of humans in medical experiments, thereby addressing his peers. Though the paper has so far not been translated or studied, it has been taken to indicate Fleck’s deep commitment to ethical questions, notably the question of informed consent. In being written by a former victim of the Nazi policy and a survivor of the Holocaust also acting as an expert witness in the trial of the IG (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40.  37
    Evaluating Corroborative Evidence.Douglas Walton & Chris Reed - 2008 - Argumentation 22 (4):531-553.
    How should we evaluate an argument in which two witnesses independently testify to some claim? In fact what would happen is that the testimony of the second witness would be taken to corroborate that of the first to some extent, thereby boosting up the plausibility of the first argument from testimony. But does that commit the fallacy of double counting, because the second testimony is already taken as independent evidence supporting the claim? Perhaps the corroboration effect should be considered (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  41.  15
    Going Public: A Cautionary Tale.Michael Lynch - 2009 - Spontaneous Generations 3 (1):213-219.
    A colleague who was participating in one of the many Darwin bicentennial events on university campuses this year recently asked me, “What was Fuller thinking?” In reply, I sent him a copy of Steve Fuller’s (2009) opinion piece, which had just come out in this journal. In it, Fuller attempts to explain why he decided to perform as an expert witness for the defense in Kitzmiller et al. v. Dover Area School District (US Federal Court, Eastern District of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  46
    Ethical Issues in Child Protection.Vic Larcher - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (4):208-212.
    The management of child protection concerns arouses strong emotions and controversies and creates ethical tensions for all concerned. This paper provides a rational analysis of some of the issues involved and suggests responses to them. The ethical and legal duties of health-care professionals are to act in the best interests of the child by safeguarding children and reporting concerns. But this may involve conflicts with parents and produce reluctance of professionals to become involved, especially in controversial types of abuse. Mandatory (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  18
    Demonstrating “Reasonable Fear” at Trial: Is It Science or Junk Science?Stacy Lee Burns - 2008 - Human Studies 31 (2):107-131.
    This paper explores how scientific knowledge is used in a criminal case. I examine materials from an admissibility hearing in a murder trial and discuss the dynamics of contesting expert scientific opinion and evidence. The research finds that a purported form of "science" in the relevant scientific community is filtered through, tested by, and subjected to legal standards, conceptions, and procedures for determining admissibility. The paper details how the opposing lawyers, the expert witness, and the judge vie (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  14
    Ethics Expertise in Civil Litigation.Kenneth Kipnis - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):274-278.
    I am an academically trained philosopher who has taught and written about medical ethics for three decades, who has done extra-mural ethics consultation in clinical and other settings for two decades, and who has served as an expert ethics witness in the courts for more than ten years. Trained as a traditional academic, none of these three pursuits have come easily. Like most philosophers, my education did not prepare me for such responsibilities. Indeed, regardless of a bioethicist's initial (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  4
    Ethics Expertise in Civil Litigation.Kenneth Kipnis - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):274-278.
    I am an academically trained philosopher who has taught and written about medical ethics for three decades, who has done extra-mural ethics consultation in clinical and other settings for two decades, and who has served as an expert ethics witness in the courts for more than ten years. Trained as a traditional academic, none of these three pursuits have come easily. Like most philosophers, my education did not prepare me for such responsibilities. Indeed, regardless of a bioethicist's initial (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  46
    Homo Economicus on Trial: Plato, Schopenhauer and the Virtual Jury.Doris Schroeder - 2001 - Philosophy of Management 1 (2):65-74.
    The concept of Homo economicus, one of the major foundations of neoclassical economics and a subset of the ideology of laisser-faire capitalism, was recently charged and tried in the island high court. Using the island's virtual jury system for the first time, the accused was tried before a jury of three - Plato, Schopenhauer and feminist economists - chosen by him while under a veil of ignorance of the charge. All three returned guilty verdicts. Plato's was prescriptive: 'One ought not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  24
    L’expertise judiciaire : choix et rôle des experts.Marie-Odile Bertella-Geffroy - 2012 - Hermès: La Revue Cognition, communication, politique 64 (3):, [ p.].
    L’expertise se trouve bien souvent au cœur des dossiers judiciaires relatifs à la responsabilité en matière de santé publique. L’expert est chargé de reconstituer les faits ou d’évaluer le travail de ses collègues agissant comme conseillers des décideurs, pour établir si la qualité de l’expertise et du conseil a été à la hauteur des enjeux sanitaires. En France, les experts judiciaires ont un statut officiel à l’issue d’un processus réglementé et de contrôles spécifiques réguliers. Si cette procédure permet d’identifier (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  99
    When Experts Argue: Explaining the Best and the Worst of Reasoning. [REVIEW]Hugo Mercier - 2011 - Argumentation 25 (3):313-327.
    Expert reasoning is responsible for some of the most stunning human achievements, but also for some of the most disastrous decisions ever made. The argumentative theory of reasoning has proven very effective at explaining the pattern of reasoning’s successes and failures. In the present article, it is expanded to account for expert reasoning. The argumentative theory predicts that reasoning should display a strong confirmation bias. If argument quality is not sufficiently high in a domain, the confirmation bias will (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  49.  35
    Witnesses of the Body: Medico-Legal Cases in Seventeenth-Century Rome.Silvia De Renzi - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):219-242.
    Studying early modern medico-legal testimonies can enrich our understanding of witnessing, the focus of much research in the history of science. Expert testimonies were well established in the Roman Canon law, but the sphere of competence of expert witnesses—one of the grounds on which seventeenth-century physicians claimed social and intellectual authority—troubled contemporary jurists. By reconstructing these debates in Counter Reformation Rome, and by placing in them the testimonies given by Paolo Zacchia, one of the founding fathers of legal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  14
    Medical Practice: Defendants and Prisoners.P. Bowden - 1976 - Journal of Medical Ethics 2 (4):163-172.
    It is argued in this paper that a doctor cannot serve two masters. The work of the prison medical officer is examined and it is shown that his dual allegiance to the state and to those individuals who are under his care results in activities which largely favour the former. The World Health Organisation prescribes a system of health ethics which indicates, in qualitative terms, the responsibility of each state for health provisions. In contrast, the World Medical Association acts as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 999