Results for 'fictionality'

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  1.  64
    Walton on Fictionality.Richard Woodward - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (12):825-836.
    This paper provides an overview of the account of fictionality — i.e. the phenomenon of things being true “in” or “according to” fictions — that lies at the heart of Kendall Walton's account of representational art. Walton's central idea is that what it is for a proposition to be fictional is for there to be a prescription to imagine that proposition. As we shall see, however, properly understanding this proposal requires an antecedent grasp of Walton's picture of games of (...)
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  2.  36
    Fictionality and Photography.Richard Woodward - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):279-289.
    In Mimesis as Make-Believe, Kendall Walton gave a pioneering account of the nature of fictionality, which holds that what it is for p to be fictional is for there to exist a prescription to imagine that p. But Walton has recently distanced himself from his original analysis and now holds that prescriptions to imagine are merely necessary conditions on fictionality. Many of the alleged counterexamples that have prompted Walton's retreat are drawn from the field of photography, and it (...)
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  3.  97
    Fictionality and Imagination, Revisited.Lee Walters - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):15-21.
    I present and discuss a counterexample to Kendall Walton's necessary condition for fictionality that arises from considering serial fictions. I argue that although Walton has not in fact provided a necessary condition for fictionality, a more complex version of Walton's condition is immune from the counterexample.
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  4.  93
    Word-Sculpture, Speech Acts, and Fictionality.Peter Alward - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):389-399.
    A common approach to drawing boundary between fiction and non-fiction is by appeal to the kinds of speech acts performed by authors of works of the respective categories. Searle, for example, takes fiction to be the product of illocutionary pretense of various kinds on the part of authors and non-fiction to be the product of genuine illocutionary action.1 Currie, in contrast, takes fiction to be the product of sui generis fictional illocutionary action on the part of authors and non-fiction to (...)
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  5. The Renaissance Dialogue and Its Zero-Degree Fictionality.Eva Kushner - 1996 - In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction Updated: Theories of Fictionality, Narratology, and Poetics. University of Toronto Press. pp. 165--72.
     
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  6.  62
    Leibniz's Infinitesimals: Their Fictionality, Their Modern Implementations, and Their Foes From Berkeley to Russell and Beyond. [REVIEW]Mikhail G. Katz & David Sherry - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (3):571-625.
    Many historians of the calculus deny significant continuity between infinitesimal calculus of the seventeenth century and twentieth century developments such as Robinson’s theory. Robinson’s hyperreals, while providing a consistent theory of infinitesimals, require the resources of modern logic; thus many commentators are comfortable denying a historical continuity. A notable exception is Robinson himself, whose identification with the Leibnizian tradition inspired Lakatos, Laugwitz, and others to consider the history of the infinitesimal in a more favorable light. Inspite of his Leibnizian sympathies, (...)
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  7.  34
    Interactivity, Fictionality, and Incompleteness.Nathan Wildman & Richard Woodward - forthcoming - In Grant Tavinor & Jon Robson (eds.), The Aesthetics of Videogames. Routledge.
  8.  37
    Fictive Utterance and the Fictionality of Narratives and Works.David Davies - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):39-55.
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  9.  28
    Imaginative and Fictionality Failure: A Normative Approach.Nils-Hennes Stear - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    If a work of literary fiction prescribes us to imagine that the Devil made a bet with God and transformed into a poodle, then that claim is true in the fiction and we imagine accordingly. Generally, we cooperate imaginatively with literary fictions, however bizarre, and the things authors write into their stories become true in the fiction. But for some claims, such as moral falsehoods, this seems not to be straightforwardly the case, which raises the question: Why not? The puzzles (...)
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  10. The Fictionality of Plays.John Dilworth - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):263–273.
    The category of works of fiction is a very broad and heterogeneous one. I do have a general thesis in mind about such works, namely, that they themselves are fictional, in much the same way as are the fictional events or entities that they are about. But a defense of such a broad thesis would provide an intractably complex topic for an introductory essay, so I shall here confine myself to a presentation of a similar thesis for narrative theatrical works (...)
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  11.  48
    Fiction, Fiction-Making, and Styles of Fictionality.Kendall L. Walton - 1983 - Philosophy and Literature 7 (1):78-88.
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  12.  60
    Incompleteness and Fictionality in Meinong's Object Theory.R. Haller - 1989 - Topoi 8 (1):63-70.
  13.  13
    Novel Fictionality. K. Ní Mheallaigh Reading Fiction with Lucian. Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality. Pp. XII + 305. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Cased, £65, Us$99. Isbn: 978-1-107-07933-5. [REVIEW]Sasha-Mae Eccleston - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):78-80.
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  14.  14
    Fictionality and the Logic of Relations.John Woods - 1969 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):51-63.
  15.  7
    Panagiotis Roilos, Ed., Medieval Greek Storytelling: Fictionality and Narrative in Byzantium. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2014. Pp. 260; 11 Black-and-White Figures, 1 Diagram, and 19 Tables. €74. ISBN: 978-3-447-10105-9.Table of Contents Available Online at Http://Www.Harrassowitz-Verlag.De/Dzo/Artikel/201/168_201.Pdf?T=1415196997. [REVIEW]Ingela Nilsson - 2016 - Speculum 91 (1):250-252.
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  16.  14
    Fiction, Creation and Fictionality : An Overview.Matthieu Fontaine & Shahid Rahman - 2010 - Methodos 10.
    La réflexion philosophique sur la non-existence est une thématique qui a été abordée au commencement même de la philosophie et qui suscite, depuis la publication en 1905 de « On Denoting » par Russell, les plus vifs débats en philosophie analytique. Cependant, le débat féroce sur la sémantique des noms propres et des descriptions définies qui surgirent suite à la publication du « On Referring » par Strawson en 1950 n’engagea pas d’étude systématique de la sémantique des fictions. En fait, (...)
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  17.  2
    Fictionality and the Logic of Relations.John Woods - 1969 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):51-63.
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  18. Fictionality.Zoltán Kanyó (ed.) - 1984 - Jate Sokszorosit Ó Üzemében.
     
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  19. Fiction Updated: Theories of Fictionality, Narratology, and Poetics.Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.) - 1996 - University of Toronto Press.
     
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  20. Imagining Fact and Fiction.Stacie Friend - 2008 - In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomsen-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 150-169.
  21. Truth in Fiction.David Lewis - 1978 - American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (1):37--46.
    It is advisable to treat some sorts of discourse about fiction with the aid of an intensional operator "in such-And-Such fiction...." the operator may appear either explicitly or tacitly. It may be analyzed in terms of similarity of worlds, As follows: "in the fiction f, A" means that a is true in those of the worlds where f is told as known fact rather than fiction that differ least from our world, Or from the belief worlds of the community in (...)
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  22. Empirically Investigating Imaginative Resistance.Shen-yi Liao, Nina Strohminger & Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):339-355.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. Philosophers have primarily theorized about this phenomenon from the armchair. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of empirical methods for investigating imaginative resistance. We present two studies that help to establish the psychological reality of imaginative resistance, and to uncover one factor that is significant for explaining this phenomenon but low in psychological salience: genre. Furthermore, our studies have the methodological upshot of showing (...)
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  23. The Problem of Imaginative Resistance.Tamar Szabó Gendler & Shen-yi Liao - 2016 - In John Gibson & Noël Carroll (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge. pp. 405-418.
    The problem of imaginative resistance holds interest for aestheticians, literary theorists, ethicists, philosophers of mind, and epistemologists. We present a somewhat opinionated overview of the philosophical discussion to date. We begin by introducing the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. We then review existing responses to the problem, giving special attention to recent research directions. Finally, we consider the philosophical significance that imaginative resistance has—or, at least, is alleged to have—for issues in moral psychology, theories of cognitive architecture, and modal epistemology.
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  24. The Nature of Fiction.Gregory Currie - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This important new book provides a theory about the nature of fiction, and about the relation between the author, the reader, and the fictional text.
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  25. Imaginative Resistance, Narrative Engagement, Genre.Shen-yi Liao - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (2):461-482.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. On one influential diagnosis of imaginative resistance, the systematic difficulties are due to these particular propositions’ discordance with real-world norms. This essay argues that this influential diagnosis is too simple. While imagination is indeed by default constrained by real-world norms during narrative engagement, it can be freed with the power of genre conventions and expectations.
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  26. Morality, Fiction, and Possibility.Brian Weatherson - 2004 - Philosophers' Imprint 4:1-27.
    Authors have a lot of leeway with regard to what they can make true in their story. In general, if the author says that p is true in the fiction we’re reading, we believe that p is true in that fiction. And if we’re playing along with the fictional game, we imagine that, along with everything else in the story, p is true. But there are exceptions to these general principles. Many authors, most notably Kendall Walton and Tamar Szabó Gendler, (...)
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  27. Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality (I).Kendall Lewis Walton - 1994/2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 68:27-50.
  28. Imaginability, Morality, and Fictional Truth: Dissolving the Puzzle of 'Imaginative Resistance'.Cain Samuel Todd - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 143 (2):187-211.
    This paper argues that there is no genuine puzzle of ‘imaginative resistance’. In part 1 of the paper I argue that the imaginability of fictional propositions is relative to a range of different factors including the ‘thickness’ of certain concepts, and certain pre-theoretical and theoretical commitments. I suggest that those holding realist moral commitments may be more susceptible to resistance and inability than those holding non-realist commitments, and that it is such realist commitments that ultimately motivate the problem. However, I (...)
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  29. What Does Batman Think About Spongebob? Children's Understanding of the Fantasy/Fantasy Distinction.Deena Skolnick & Paul Bloom - 2006 - Cognition 101 (1):B9-B18.
  30. On the (so-Called) Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance.Kendall Lewis Walton - 2006 - In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press. pp. 137-148.
  31. Unrealistic Fictions.Allan Hazlett & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):33--46.
    In this paper, we develop an analysis of unrealistic fiction that captures the everyday sense of ‘unrealistic’. On our view, unrealistic fictions are a species of inconsistent fictions, but fictions for which such inconsistency, given the supporting role we claim played by genre, needn’t be a critical defect. We first consider and reject an analysis of unrealistic fiction as fiction that depicts or describes unlikely events; we then develop our own account and make an initial statement of it: unrealistic fictions (...)
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  32. Fictional Assent and the (so-Called) `Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance'.Derek Matravers - 2003 - In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge. pp. 91-106.
    This article criticises existing solutions to the 'puzzle of imaginative resistance', reconstrues it, and offers a solution of its own. About the Book : Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts is the first comprehensive collection of papers by philosophers examining the nature of imagination and its role in understanding and making art. Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of (...)
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  33. Ornamentality in the New Media.Eran Guter - 2010 - In Anat Biletzki (ed.), Hues of Philosophy: Essays in Memory of Ruth Manor. College Publications. pp. 83-96.
    Ornamentality is pervasive in the new media and it is related to their essential characteristics: dispersal, hypertextuality, interactivity, digitality and virtuality. I utilize Kendall Walton's theory of ornamentality in order to construe a puzzle pertaining to the new media. the ornamental erosion of information. I argue that insofar as we use the new media as conduits of real life, the excessive density of ornamental devices which is prevalent in certain new media environments, forces us to conduct our inquiries under conditions (...)
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  34.  64
    Comics and Genre.Catharine Abell - 2012 - In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Blackwell. pp. 68--84.
    An adequate account of the nature of genre and of the criteria for genre membership is essential to understanding the nature of the various categories into which comics can be classified. Because they fail adequately to distinguish genre categories from other ways of categorizing works, including categorizations according to medium or according to style, previous accounts of genre fail to illuminate the nature of comics categories. I argue that genres are sets of conventions that have developed as means of addressing (...)
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  35. Fictional and Aesthetic Objects: Meinong’s Point of View.Venanzio Raspa - 2006 - In A. Bottani & R. Davies (eds.), Modes of Existence. Papers in Ontology and Philosophical Logic. Ontos Verlag. pp. 47-80.
  36.  94
    A Yablovian Dilemma.Richard Woodward - 2012 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):200-209.
    Stephen Yablo (2001) argues that traditional fictionalist strategies run into trouble due to a mismatch between the modal status of a claim like ‘2 + 3 = 5’ and the modal status of its fictionalist paraphrase. I argue here that Yablo is best seen as confronting the fictionalist with a dilemma, and then go on to show how this dilemma can be resolved.
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  37.  47
    Toward an Aesthetics of New-Media Environments.Eran Guter - 2016 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics.
    In this paper I suggest that, over and above the need to explore and understand the technological newness of computer art works, there is a need to address the aesthetic significance of the changes and effects that such technological newness brings about, considering the whole environmental transaction pertaining to new media, including what they can or do offer and what users do or can do with such offerings, and how this whole package is integrated into our living spaces and activities. (...)
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  38. Postscript to Truth in Fiction.David Lewis - 1983 - In Philosophical Papers. Oxford University Press. pp. 276-280.
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  39.  2
    Coherence and Truthfulness in Communication: Intracommunicational and Extracommunicational Indexicality.Lars Elleström - 2018 - Semiotica.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Heft: Ahead of print.
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  40.  64
    Belief in Make-Believe.Stephen Everson - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):63–81.
  41.  17
    An Essay In The Aid Of Writing History: Fictions Of Historiography.Sol Cohen - 2004 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (5-6):317-332.
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  42.  17
    Zum Systematischen Stand der Fiktionstheorie.K. Ludwig Pfeiffer - 1990 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 21 (1):135 - 156.
    Reflections on the Systematic State of the Theory of Fiction. The theory of fiction is systematically located between different types of discourse, of which philosophy, literary criticism and psychology/psychoanalysis are perhaps the most important. My thesis is that empiricist, mainly British philosophical approaches provide fascinating historical models for an analysis of the situation in which we seem caught today between tendencies towards panfictionalization (since Vaihinger) and towards fairly rigid distinctions between fiction and reality. In my perspective, empiricist philosophy is not (...)
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  43.  7
    A Search for a Post‐Postmodern Theory of History.Georg G. Iggers - 2009 - History and Theory 48 (1):122-128.
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  44.  6
    L’estetica dimenticata: la vicenda della scuola di Graz.Venanzio Raspa - 2014 - Rivista di Estetica 56:217-252.
    The essay gives an account of the aesthetics of the Graz school, focusing on the standpoint of the object as well as on that of emotions. Meinong’s reflection on aesthetics stems from a psychological background and comes subsequently to an ontological grounding. After examining the notions of imagination, phantasy-representation, relation and complexion, I show how the theory of production of representations, as well as that of higher-order objects, develops under the impulse of Ehrenfels’ concept of Gestalt qualities; both these theories (...)
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  45.  7
    Commentary of Exploring Meinong’s Jungle and Beyond: An Investigation of Noneism and the Theory of Items by R. Routley. [REVIEW]M. Paolini Paoletti - 2013 - Humana Mente 25:275-292.
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  46.  3
    Segni, espressioni “umbratili” e oggetti finzionali. Semiotica e teoria della finzione in Meinong.Venanzio Raspa - 2011 - Studi Urbinati. B: Scienze Umane E Sociali 81:161-193.
    The aim of this paper is to apply Meinong’s theory of signs to an analysis of literary texts. The focus lies on words and sentences which, according to Meinong, expressing fantasy experiences when they occur in literary texts. He distinguishes between “serious-like” and “shadow-like” fantasy experiences. The former can be detached from their fictional context, i.e., they are also understandable in other contexts. The latter, instead, are dependent on their fictional contexts. This implies that shadow-like fantasy experiences are less specific (...)
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  47.  6
    Zum Systematischen Stand der FiktionstheorieReflections on the Systematic State of the Theory of Fiction.K. Ludwig Pfeiffer - 1990 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 21 (1):135-156.
    The theory of fiction is systematically locatedbetween different types of discourse, of which philosophy, literary criticism and psychology/psychoanalysis are perhaps the most important. Mythesis is thatempiricist, mainly British philosophical approaches provide fascinatinghistorical models for an analysis of the situation in which we seem caught today between tendencies towards panfictionalization (since Vaihinger) and towards fairly rigid distinctions between fiction and reality. In my perspective, empiricist philosophy is not so much concerned with what isgiven, but with thecontrol of distinctions between the real (...)
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  48.  32
    Meinong Strikes Again.Michele Paolini Paoletti & L. Mari (eds.) - 2013
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  49.  3
    The Aesthetics of the Graz School.Venanzio Raspa (ed.) - 2010 - Ontos Verlag.
    This is the first volume devoted to the aesthetics of the Graz school. V. Raspa’s introduction gives an outline of the aesthetic themes and exponents of the school. D. Jacquette argues for a Meinongian subjectivistic aesthetic value theory. B. Langlet deals with aesthetic properties and emotions. Ch.G. Allesch presents Witasek's aesthetics in its historical context. Í. Vendrell Ferran investigates the aesthetic experience and quasi-feelings in Meinong, Witasek, Saxinger and Schwarz. R. Martinelli illustrates the musical aesthetics of Ehrenfels, Höfler and Witasek. (...)
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  50. Truth, Fiction, and Literature: A Philosophical Perspective.Peter Lamarque & Stein Haugom Olsen - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the complex and varied ways in which fictions relate to the real world, and offers a precise account of how imaginative works of literature can use fictional content to explore matters of universal human interest. While rejecting the traditional view that literature is important for the truths that it imparts, the authors also reject attempts to cut literature off altogether from real human concerns. Their detailed account of fictionality, mimesis, and cognitive value, founded on the methods (...)
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