Results for 'food as art'

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  1. Food as Art: The Problem of Function.Marienne L. Quinet - 1981 - British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (2):159-171.
    Works of culinary expertise are not typically regarded as works of "fine" art, in the way that, say, paintings, etchings, symphonies and sculptures are. I argue, however, that any form of creativity embodied in a perceptible work reflecting it is a subject about which we might exercise "aesthetic judgments" that do not differ fundamentally from the sorts typical with regard to the usual "fine" arts. To reserve a special notion for marking off the latter simply disguises the fact that it (...)
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  2.  18
    Tasting the World: Environmental Aesthetics and Food as Art.Glenn Kuehn - 2012 - Contemporary Pragmatism 9 (1):85-98.
    Food can provide an unique insight into both the human conditions of embodiment and interactive experience, and aesthetic education of environmental awareness. My project is to present an opportunity for a far-reaching pragmatic vision by treating aesthetics as having to do with the elements that make up an environment. This provides a sufficiently extensive ground on which to argue for environmental eating as one of the most profound meanings we can experience. Environmental eating, then, means tasting a world - (...)
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  3. Morality and Aesthetics of Food.Shen-yi Liao & Aaron Meskin - 2018 - In Anne Barnhill, Mark Budolfson & Tyler Doggett (eds.), The Oxford Handbook on Food Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 658-679.
    This chapter explores the interaction between the moral value and aesthetic value of food, in part by connecting it to existing discussions of the interaction between moral and aesthetic values of art. Along the way, this chapter considers food as art, the aesthetic value of food, and the role of expertise in uncovering aesthetic value. Ultimately this chapter argues against both food autonomism (the view that food's moral value is unconnected to its aesthetic value) and (...)
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  4. David Davies, Art as Performance.Reviews by Robert Stecker & John Dilworth - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):75–80.
    In his absorbing book Art as Performance, David Davies argues that artworks should be identified, not with artistic products such as paintings or novels, but instead with the artistic actions or processes that produced such items. Such a view had an earlier incarnation in Currie’s widely criticized “action type hypothesis”, but Davies argues that it is instead action tokens rather than types with which artworks should be identified. This rich and complex work repays the closest study in spite of some (...)
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  5. Food Security as a Global Public Good.Cristian Timmermann - forthcoming - In José Luis Vivero-Pol, Tomaso Ferrando, Olivier de Schutter & Ugo Mattei (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Food as a Commons. London: Routledge.
    Food security brings a number of benefits to humanity from which nobody can be excluded and which can be simultaneously enjoyed by all. An economic understanding of the concept sees food security qualify as a global public good. However, there are four other ways of understanding a public good which are worthy of attention. A normative public good is a good from which nobody ought to be excluded. Alternatively, one might acknowledge the benevolent character of a public good. (...)
     
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  6.  5
    Once Again, What Counts as Art?Margarita Vega - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-12.
    The question of what art is and why certain objects and events are considered art is examined. In the light of John Searle’s Social Philosophy, a hybrid Institutionalist-Functionalist explanation of what counts as art is presented. However, Searle’s apparatus applied to the ontology of the work of art is not enough to answer the question of why art has the status it exhibits. The proposal is to trace back the ontology of art to the origins of the dichotomy between freedom (...)
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  7.  25
    Morality as Art: Dewey, Metaphor, and Moral Imagination.Steven Fesmire - 1999 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 35 (3):527-550.
    [drawn from the later development of these ideas in ch. 6, "The Moral Artist," in John Dewey and Moral Imagination.] It is a familiar thesis that art affects moral imagination. But as a metaphor or model for moral experience, artistic production and enjoyment have been overlooked. This is no small oversight, not because artists are more saintly than the rest of us, but because seeing imagination so blatantly manifested gives us new eyes with which to see what can be made (...)
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  8.  2
    The Gift of Beauty: The Good as Art.Stephen David Ross - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Traces the history of the idea of art as an ethical movement, interpreting the good as nature's abundance, giving rise to an ethics of inclusion, expressed in art.
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  9.  3
    Film as Art.Rudolf Arnheim & Arthur Knight - 1958 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 17 (2):260-262.
    In the fall of 1957 the University of California Press expanded Arnheim’s 1933 book _Film_ by four essays and brought that landmark work back into print as _Film as Art._ Now nearly fifty years after that re-edition, the book continues to occupy an important place in the literature of film. Arnheim’s method, provocative in this age of technological wizardry, was to focus on the way art in film was derived from that medium’s early limitations: no sound, no color, no three-dimensional (...)
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  10.  44
    Food as Touch/Touching the Food: The Body in‐Place and Out‐of‐Place in Preschool.Nina Rossholt - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (3):323-334.
    The article explores the need to eat as a biological and social practice among children in a preschool in Norway. The children in this preschool are aged from one to two years of age, and some of them have just started there. Different events from mealtimes relate to Derrida's concept of touch and Grosz's notion of bodies in-place and out-of-place. How food touches the children and the practitioners is further discussed through a consideration of body/place relations, which are both (...)
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  11.  25
    Nursing Art as a Practical Art: The Necessary Relationship Between Nursing Art and Nursing Ethics.Danielle Blondeau - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):252-259.
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  12. The Art of Food.Aaron Meskin - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):81-86.
  13.  73
    'Must We Burn Foucault?' Ethics as Art of Living: Simone de Beauvoir and Michel Foucault. [REVIEW]Karen Vintges - 2001 - Continental Philosophy Review 34 (2):165-181.
    The title of this article refers to Beauvoir's essay Must We Burn De Sade?. Analogous to Beauvoir's essay on Sade, this article is something of an apology for Foucault. I use Beauvoir's essay on Sade to discuss Foucault's concept of ethics as an art of living. I conclude that the final Foucault's thought on ethics can be labelled a post-existentialism, combining postmodern thinking and the issues of freedom and commitment in an inspiring way. I argue, however, that the heuristics of (...)
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  14.  29
    Experience as Art.Sor-Hoon Tan - 1999 - Asian Philosophy 9 (2):107 – 122.
    Chinese philosophy views experience as intrinsically aesthetic. This world view could be elucidated through a consideration of John Dewey's aesthetics and features of Chinese art. Dewey's philosophy of art starts with an understanding of experience as 'live processes' of living creatures interacting with their environment. Such processes are autopoietic in being self-sustaining, ever-changing, capable of increasing complexity, capable of generating novelty, direction and progress on its own. Its autopoietic character is a precondition of the aesthetic in the process of experience. (...)
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  15.  7
    The Trajectory of Food as a Symbolic Resource for International Migrants.Sara Greco Morasso & Tania Zittoun - 2014 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 15 (1):28-48.
    This paper explores the trajectories of food and how culinary practices evolve over time in relation to a migrant’s experience. Our focus is on international mothers adjusting to life in London. We identify a connection between eating practices and evolving identities. In line with a stream of research in cultural psychology, we consider food as a symbolic resource mobilized by migrants to provide some material support to their processes of adaptation to a new country. In this respect, we (...)
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  16.  2
    Vibrantly Entangled in Sri Lanka: Food as the Polyrhythmic and Polyphonic Assemblage of Life.Wim Van Daele - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (1):85-102.
    Creatively operationalizing Claude Lévi-Strauss’ predicament that food is good to think with, I initiate a methodological conceptualization of food by exploring the ways in which it is apt to study Sri Lankan domestic and collective village life. Food is approached as an assemblage that is an emergent resultant of heterogeneous aspects with which it is deeply entangled and by way of which it turns into a potent agent shaping life. More specifically, I explore the vibrancy of these (...)
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  17. Film as Art, 50th Anniversary Printing.Rudolf Arnheim - 2006 - University of California Press.
    In the fall of 1957 the University of California Press expanded Arnheim’s 1933 book _Film_ by four essays and brought that landmark work back into print as _Film as Art._ Now nearly fifty years after that re-edition, the book continues to occupy an important place in the literature of film. Arnheim’s method, provocative in this age of technological wizardry, was to focus on the way art in film was derived from that medium’s early limitations: no sound, no color, no three-dimensional (...)
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  18.  7
    Life as Art: Aesthetics and the Creation of Self.Zachary Simpson - 2012 - Lexington Books.
    Life as Art synthesizes a number of aesthetic theories in philosophy after 1850 and shows the ways in which they contribute to a unified field of analysis and potential implementation. The book is framed both as a secondary text, analyzing 19th and 20th Century aesthetics, and a primary argument for the viability of life as art as a unified philosophical position.
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  19.  10
    Showing the Concealed as Concealed: On Phenomenology and Walking as Art.Andrew Chesher - unknown
    In Phenomenology of Perception Merleau-Ponty tells us of how the phenomenon unfolds and its unfolding is never complete: there is no total view of being to be had. Being as phenomenon is, because of this, non-objective: it is disclosed, as Heidegger would put it, in proportion to its being concealed. Both Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty suggest, in their different ways, that this obscure counterpart to the disclosed world, forgotten in objective thought and instrumental rationality, is nonetheless shown, made visible, in art. (...)
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  20.  10
    The Metaphysics and Ethics of Food as Activity.Ileana F. Szymanski - 2014 - Radical Philosophy Review 17 (2):351-370.
    The many ways in which we interact with food, e.g., eating, cooking, purchasing, farming, legislating, etc., are intersected by ethics and politics. The terms of our interactions with food are dictated in a significant way by how we understand its metaphysical underpinnings; that is to say, by how we define “food.” When food is understood as nothing more than it becomes easier to dismiss our political and ethical obligations since, after all, food is only a (...)
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  21.  3
    Theater as Art.G. Shpet - 1989 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 28 (3):61-88.
    Theater is an art or theater is not an independent art. Each of these antithetical propositions has its supporters. It is usually the supporters of the second who come up with anything resembling intelligible argumentation. The first is usually accepted as fact, sanctified by universal acknowledgement, without criticism, without much reflection—it is just accepted: theater unquestionably gives satisfaction. What kind? Aesthetic! And so, theater is an art!
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  22. The Real Challenge to Photography (as Communicative Representational Art).Robert Hopkins - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (2):329-348.
    I argue that authentic photography is not able to develop to the full as a communicative representational art. Photography is authentic when it is true to its self-image as the imprinting of images. For an image to be imprinted is for its content to be linked to the scene in which it originates by a chain of sufficient, mind-independent causes. Communicative representational art (in any medium: photography, painting, literature, music, etc.) is art that exploits the resources of representation to achieve (...)
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  23.  63
    Food Sovereignty or the Human Right to Adequate Food: Which Concept Serves Better as International Development Policy for Global Hunger and Poverty Reduction? [REVIEW]Tina D. Beuchelt & Detlef Virchow - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):259-273.
    The emerging concept of food sovereignty refers to the right of communities, peoples, and states to independently determine their own food and agricultural policies. It raises the question of which type of food production, agriculture and rural development should be pursued to guarantee food security for the world population. Social movements and non-governmental organizations have readily integrated the concept into their terminology. The concept is also beginning to find its way into the debates and policies of (...)
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  24.  20
    Phylosohpy as Art of Measure in Plato.Ignacio García Peña - 2007 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 24:7-41.
    The given work analyses several aspects of the concept te’cnh in Plato´s philosophy. At the same time, it deals with his attempt of finding a type of behaviour which counts on the same features as arts and science, in other words, a behaviour based on rational principles that will enable us to act accurately and according to our principles. He followed the path of Socrates in the process of the search for such behaviour. The sophists were proud of teaching a (...)
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  25. Art as a Social System.Niklas Luhmann - 2000 - Stanford University Press.
    Germany's leading contemporary social theorist provides a definitive analysis of art as a social and perceptual system which not only represents an important intellectual step in discussions of art but also an important advance in systems theory. Luhmann insists on the radical incommensurability between psychic systems (perception) and social systems (communication). Art is a special kind of communication that operates at the boundary between the social system and consciousness in ways that profoundly irritate communication while remaining strictly internal to the (...)
     
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  26.  18
    Understanding Agri-Food Networks as Social Relations.Lucy Jarosz - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):279-283.
    Actor network theory and supply chainmanagement theory provide suggestive researchdirections for understanding regional agri-foodnetworks. These theories claim that relationshipsbased upon trust and cooperation are critical to thestrength and vitality of the network. This means thatexploring and detailing these relationships among thesuppliers, producers, workers, processors, brokers,wholesalers, and retailers within specific regionalgeographies of these networks are critical forfurthering cooperation and trust. Key areas ofcooperation include resource sharing andapprenticeship programs. Employing food networks as akey unit of contextual analysis will deepen ourunderstanding of (...)
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  27. Instructional Leadership as Art: Connecting Isllc and Aesthetic Inspiration.Zach Kelehear & Carl Glickman - 2008 - R&L Education.
    In this book, Zach Kelehear offers readers a new perspective on an important, dynamic, and sometimes daunting issue: managing successful school-based leadership. The author uses an arts-based approach to weave together notions of research-based leadership skills for successful school-based management with standards of professional competence as represented by the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium Standards for School Leaders.
     
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  28.  22
    Games: Agency as Art.C. Thi Nguyen - forthcoming - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Games occupy a unique and valuable place in our lives. Game designers do not simply create worlds; they design temporary selves. Game designers set what our motivations are in the game and what our abilities will be. Thus: games are the art form of agency. By working in the artistic medium of agency, games can offer a distinctive aesthetic value. They support aesthetic experiences of deciding and doing. -/- And the fact that we play games shows something remarkable about us. (...)
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  29.  12
    Food Community Networks as Leverage for Social Embeddedness.Giuseppina Migliore, Giorgio Schifani, Giovanni Dara Guccione & Luigi Cembalo - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):549-567.
    Social embeddedness, defined as the interaction of economic activities and social behavior, is used in this study as a conceptual tool to describe the growing phenomenon of food community networks (FCNs). The aim in this paper was to map the system of relations which the FCNs develop both inside and outside the network and, from the number of relations, it was inferred the influence of each FCN upon the formation of new socially embedded economic realities. A particular form of (...)
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  30. Mirrors of the Soul and Mirrors of the Brain? The Expression of Emotions as the Subject of Art and Science.Machiel Keestra - 2014 - In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. nai010 publishers. pp. 81-92.
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
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  31.  17
    Food Education as Food Literacy: Privatized and Gendered Food Knowledge in Contemporary Japan. [REVIEW]Aya H. Kimura - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (4):465-482.
    This paper analyzes politics of food education in Japan where food education has become one of the central motifs of food policy in recent years. It describes the emergence of private enterprise institutions that offer credentials for people as “food education experts,” the majority of whom are women. Based on a survey of more than one hundred food education experts, the paper explores motivations of these women and finds that the reasons for the popularity of (...)
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  32.  74
    Art as a Metaphor of the Mind.Andrea Lavazza - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):159-182.
    This paper focuses on the emergent neo-Jamesian perspective concerning the phenomenology of art and aesthetic experience. Starting from the distinction between nucleus and fringe in the stream of thought described by William James, it can be argued that our appreciation of a work of art is guided by a vague and blurred perception of a much more powerful content, of which we are not fully aware. Accordingly, a work of art is seen as a kind of metaphor of our mental (...)
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  33.  32
    The Complexities of Globalization: The UK as a Case Study of Tensions Within the Food System and the Challenge to Food Policy. [REVIEW]Tim Lang - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):169-185.
    This article proposes a number of arguments about the contemporary food system. Using the UK as a case study, it argues that the food system is marked by tensions and conflicts. The paper explores different strands of public policy as applied to the food system over the last two centuries. It differentiates between various uses of the term globalization and proposes that the real features and dynamics of the new world food order are complex and neither (...)
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  34.  8
    Difference: A Critical Investigation of the Creative Arts with Attention to Art as a Site of Knowledge.Elizabeth Grierson - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):531–542.
    This paper brings a critical focus to difference and the creative arts in education with specific attention to art as a site of knowledge in New Zealand conditions. The 1990s and early 2000s are marked by a paucity of critically engaged literature on the arts in education and a conspicuous absence of discussions on the politics of difference. Alongside the global return to empirical research in education where quantifiable data‐based projects tend to attract attention ahead of fundamentally crucial questions of (...)
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  35.  7
    Approaching Aisthetics Or: Installation Art and Environmental Aesthetics as Investigative Activity.Benno Hinkes - 2017 - Espes 6 (2):62-71.
    The article discusses installation art and its potential contribution to a transdisciplinary research practice, in which not only artistic, but also aesthetic theoretical approaches could play a central role. However, as the article shows, this firstly requires a change in perspective concerning the way we approach art. Secondly, it entails changes to a common understanding of aesthetic theory and, thereby, philosophy. A term of central significance in this context is the notion of aisthesis. The article will illustrate these thoughts through (...)
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  36.  48
    Ethical Autonomism. The Work of Art as a Moral Agent.Rob van Gerwen - 2004 - Contemporary Aesthetics 2.
    Much contemporary art seems morally out of control. Yet, philosophers seem to have trouble finding the right way to morally evaluate works of art. The debate between autonomists and moralists, I argue, has turned into a stalemate due to two mistaken assumptions. Against these assumptions, I argue that the moral nature of a work's contents does not transfer to the work and that, if we are to morally evaluate works we should try to conceive of them as moral agents. Ethical (...)
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  37.  25
    Local Food Policy Coalitions: Evaluation Issues as Seen by Academics, Project Organizers, and Funders. [REVIEW]Karen L. Webb, David Pelletier, Audrey N. Maretzki & Jennifer Wilkins - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):65-75.
    Several different evaluation issuesare perceived as important by people involved withinnovative projects intended to improve local food andnutrition systems; particularly the establishment oflocal food policy coalitions. Several such coalitionshave been formed in North America, Europe, andAustralia with the goal of improving community foodsecurity and promoting sustainable local food systems.Pioneer coalitions have served as models, yet therehas been little systematic evaluation of thesemodels. A qualitative study was conducted to identifyfactors that may hinder evaluation efforts. In grouptelephone interviews, we (...)
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  38.  38
    Fine Art as Preparation for Christian Love.Ian Rottenberg - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):243-262.
    This essay links Jean-Luc Marion's phenomenology of fine art to his description of Christian love. It does so by carefully showing how Marion's overall project is closely related to Kant's well-known account of the relationship between aesthetics and morality. While Kant and Marion both believe that aesthetic experience can lay the groundwork for moral action, their contrasting views of morality lead them to very different articulations of such a relationship. While Kant sees encounters with fine art as preparing individuals for (...)
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  39.  33
    Cuisines of Poverty as Means of Empowerment: Arab Food in Israel. [REVIEW]Liora Gvion - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):299-312.
    This paper suggests looking at cuisines of poverty as practical and political systems practiced by urban and rural Palestinian citizens of Israel. It is an important and interesting case study within which political and economical considerations govern and enhance the development, change, and acceptance of culinary knowledge. Cuisines of poverty operate in two simultaneous arenas. As systems of practical knowledge, they repeatedly center on the ability to maintain the traditional kitchen, turning it into a tool-kit out of which information is (...)
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  40.  15
    Embodied Meaning and Art as Sense-Making: A Critique of Beiser’s Interpretation of the ‘End of Art Thesis'.Paul Giladi - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Culture 8:http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/jac.v8.
    The aim of this paper is to challenge Fred Beiser’s interpretation of Hegel’s meta-aesthetical position on the future of art. According to Beiser, Hegel’s comments about the ‘pastness’ of art commit Hegel to viewing postromantic art as merely a form of individual self-expression. I both defend and extend to other territory Robert Pippin’s interpretation of Hegel as a proto-modernist, where such modernism involves (i) his rejection of both classicism and Kantian aesthetics, and (ii) his espousal of what one may call (...)
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  41. African Art as Philosophy: Senghor, Bergson, and the Idea of Negritude.Souleymane Bachir Diagne - 2011 - Seagull Books.
    Le;opold Se;dar Senghor (1906–2001) was a Senegalese poet and philosopher who in 1960 also became the first president of the Republic of Senegal. In African Art as Philosophy , Souleymane Bachir Diagne takes a unique approach to reading Senghor’s influential works, taking as the starting point for his analysis Henri Bergson’s idea that in order to understand philosophers one must find the initial intuition from which every aspect of their work develops. In the case of Senghor, Diagne argues that his (...)
     
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  42. Art as Testimony of Tradition and as Testimony of Order.Theodore George - 2017 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Hermeneutik 16 (1):107-120.
    Some critics charge that Gadamer’s approach to our experience of art remains mired in conservatism because he believes our experience of artworks depends on tradition. In this essay, I argue that this charge fails to address the full scope of Gadamer’s considerations of our experience of art. This becomes clear with an emendation that Gadamer appears to make to his Truth and Method account of artistic imitation, or, mimesis, in his later essay “Art and Imitation.” Whereas Gadamer’s approach to mimesis (...)
     
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  43. Food for Thought: Philosophy and Food.Elizabeth Telfer - 1996 - Routledge.
    The importance of food in our individual lives raises moral questions from the debate over eating animals to the prominence of gourmet cookery in the popular media. Through philosophy, Elizabeth Telfer discusses issues including our obligations to those who are starving; the value of the pleasure of food; food as art; our duties to animals; and the moral virtues of hospitableness and temperance. Elizabeth Telfer shows how much traditional philosophy, from Plato to John Stuart Mill, has to (...)
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  44.  16
    Taste and Other Senses: Reconsidering the Foundations of Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2018 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 26 (54).
    The sense of taste has served as a governing metaphor for aesthetic discernment for several centuries, and recent philosophical perspectives on this history have invited literal, gustatory taste into aesthetic relevance. This paper summarizes the disposition of taste in aesthetics by means of three stories, the most recent of which considers food in terms of aesthetics and its employment in works of art. I conclude with some reflections on the odd position that taste has achieved in the postmodern art (...)
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  45.  13
    Conversations on Art and Aesthetics.Hans Maes - 2017 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    What is art? What counts as an aesthetic experience? Does art have to beautiful? Can one reasonably dispute about taste? What is the relation between aesthetic and moral evaluations? How to interpret a work of art? Can we learn anything from literature, film or opera? What is sentimentality? What is irony? How to think philosophically about architecture, dance, or sculpture? What makes something a great portrait? Is music representational or abstract? Why do we feel terrified when we watch a horror (...)
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  46.  23
    Art as Alchemy: The Bildobjekt Interpretation of Pictorial Illusion.Jens Dam Ziska - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (2):225-234.
    I argue that if we read E. H. Gombrich's Art and Illusion with the charity that it deserves, we will find a much subtler theory of depiction than the illusion theory that is usually attributed to Gombrich. Instead of suggesting that pictures are illusory because they cause us to have experiences as of seeing the depicted objects face to face, I argue that Art and Illusion is better read as making the point that naturalistic pictures are illusory because they cause (...)
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  47.  6
    Extinction by Omission of Food as a Function of Goal-Box Confinement.Walter C. Stanley & Marc I. Rowe - 1954 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (4):271.
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  48.  3
    Extinction by Omission of Food as Related to Partial and Secondary Reinforcement.Stewart H. Hulse Jr & Walter C. Stanley - 1956 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (4):221.
  49.  2
    ''œFood Metaphors and Ethics: Towards More Attention for Bodily Experience''.Cor Weele - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (3):313-324.
    Official Dutch food information apparently tries to avoid images but is implicitly shaped by the metaphor that food is fuel. The image of food as fuel and its accompanying view of the body as a machine are not maximally helpful for integrating two important human desires: health and pleasure. At the basis of the split between health and pleasure is the traditional mind¿body dichotomy, in which the body is an important source of evil and bodily pleasure is (...)
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  50.  32
    Food Metaphors and Ethics: Towards More Attention for Bodily Experience”. [REVIEW]Cor van der Weele - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (3):313-324.
    Official Dutch food information apparently tries to avoid images but is implicitly shaped by the metaphor that food is fuel. The image of food as fuel and its accompanying view of the body as a machine are not maximally helpful for integrating two important human desires: health and pleasure. At the basis of the split between health and pleasure is the traditional mind–body dichotomy, in which the body is an important source of evil and bodily pleasure is (...)
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