Results for 'food security'

993 found
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  1.  39
    Integrating Food Security Into Public Health and Provincial Government Departments in British Columbia, Canada.Barbara Seed, Tim Lang, Martin Caraher & Aleck Ostry - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):457-470.
    Food security policy, programs, and infrastructure have been incorporated into Public Health and other areas of the Provincial Government in British Columbia, including the adoption of food security as a Public Health Core Program. A policy analysis of the integration into Public Health is completed by merging findings from 48 key informant interviews conducted with government, civil society, and food supply chain representatives involved in the initiatives along with relevant documents and participant/direct observations. The paper (...)
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  2. Food Security and Biodiversity: Can We Have Both? An Agroecological Analysis. [REVIEW]Michael Jahi Chappell & Liliana A. LaValle - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):3-26.
    We present an extensive literature review exploring the relationships between food insecurity and rapid biodiversity loss, and the competing methods proposed to address each of these serious problems. Given a large and growing human population, the persistence of widespread malnutrition, and the direct and significant threats the expanding agricultural system poses to biodiversity, the goals of providing universal food security and protecting biodiversity seem incompatible. Examining the literature shows that the current agricultural system already provides sufficient (...) on a worldwide basis, but in doing so methodically undermines the capacity of agroecosystems to preserve biodiversity. However, the available evidence emphasizes the interdependence of biodiversity and agriculture, and the important role each plays in the maintenance of the other. Thus, our review supports the claim that the solutions to the problems of widespread food insecurity and biodiversity loss need not be mutually exclusive, and that it may be possible to address both using appropriate alternative agricultural practices. (shrink)
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  3.  23
    Community Food Security: Practice in Need of Theory? [REVIEW]Molly D. Anderson & John T. Cook - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):141-150.
    Practitioners and advocates of community food security (CFS) envision food systems that are decentralized, environmentally-sound over a long time-frame, supportive of collective rather than only individual needs, effective in assuring equitable food access, and created by democratic decision-making. These themes are loosely connected in literature about CFS, with no logical linkages among them. Clear articulation in a theoretical framework is needed for CFS to be effective as a guide for policy and action. CFS theory should delimit (...)
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  4.  14
    From Food Security to Food Wellbeing: Examining Food Security Through the Lens of Food Wellbeing in Nepal’s Rapidly Changing Agrarian Landscape.Pashupati Chaudhary, Kamal Khadka, Rachana Devkota, Derek Johnson, Kirit Patel & Hom Gartaula - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):573-589.
    This paper argues that existing food security and food sovereignty approaches are inadequate to fully understand contradictory human development, nutrition, and productivity trends in Nepalese small-scale agriculture. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we developed a new food wellbeing approach that combines insights from food security, food sovereignty, and social wellbeing perspectives. We used the approach to frame 65 semi-structured interviews in a cluster of villages in Kaski district in the mid-hills of (...)
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  5.  27
    On Food Security and Alternative Food Networks: Understanding and Performing Food Security in the Context of Urban Bias.Jane Dixon & Carol Richards - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):191-202.
    This paper offers one explanation for the institutional basis of food insecurity in Australia, and argues that while alternative food networks and the food sovereignty movement perform a valuable function in building forms of social solidarity between urban consumers and rural producers, they currently make only a minor contribution to Australia’s food and nutrition security. The paper begins by identifying two key drivers of food security: household incomes and nutrition-sensitive, ‘fair food’ agriculture. (...)
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  6.  63
    Community Food Security and Environmental Justice: Searching for a Common Discourse. [REVIEW]Robert Gottlieb & Andrew Fisher - 1996 - Agriculture and Human Values 13 (3):23-32.
    Community food security and environmental justice are parallel social movements interested in equity and justice and system-wide factors. They share a concern for issues of daily life and the need to establish community empowerment strategies. Both movements have also begun to reshape the discourse of sustainable agriculture, environmentalism and social welfare advocacy. However, community food security and environmental justice remain separate movements, indicating an incomplete process in reshaping agendas and discourse. Joining these movements through a common (...)
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  7.  9
    Food Security: One of a Number of ‘Securities’ We Need for a Full Life: An Australian Perspective.Quentin Farmar-Bowers - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (5):811-829.
    Although agriculture in Australia is very productive, the current food supply systems in Australia fail to deliver healthy diets to all Australians and fail to protect the natural resources on which they depend. The operation of the food systems creates ‘collateral damage’ to the natural environment including biodiversity loss. In coming decades, Australia’s food supply systems will be increasingly challenged by resource price inflation and climate change. Australia exports more than half of its current agricultural production. Government (...)
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  8.  15
    From Food Security to the Enactment of Change: Introduction to the Symposium.Cinzia Piatti & Angga Dwiartama - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):135-139.
  9.  71
    Reweaving the Food Security Safety Net: Mediating Entitlement and Entrepreneurship. [REVIEW]Patricia Allen - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):117-129.
    The American food system has produced both abundance and food insecurity, with production and consumption dealt with as separate issues. The new approach of community food security (CFS) seeks to re-link production and consumption, with the goal of ensuring both an adequate and accessible food supply in the present and the future. In its focus on consumption, CFS has prioritized the needs of low-income people; in its focus on production, it emphasizes local and regional (...) systems. These objectives are not necessarily compatible and may even be contradictory. This article describes the approach of community food security and raises some questions about how the movement can meet its goals of simultaneously meeting the food needs of low-income people and developing local food systems. It explores the conceptual and political promise and pitfalls of local, community-based approaches to food security and examines alternative economic strategies such as urban agriculture and community-supported agriculture. It concludes that community food security efforts are important additions to, but not subsitutes for, a nonretractable governmental safety net that protects against food insecurity. (shrink)
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  10.  22
    Contributing to Food Security in Urban Areas: Differences Between Urban Agriculture and Peri-Urban Agriculture in the Global North.Ina Opitz, Regine Berges, Annette Piorr & Thomas Krikser - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (4):341-358.
    Food security is becoming an increasingly relevant topic in the Global North, especially in urban areas. Because such areas do not always have good access to nutritionally adequate food, the question of how to supply them is an urgent priority in order to maintain a healthy population. Urban and peri-urban agriculture, as sources of local fresh food, could play an important role. Whereas some scholars do not differentiate between peri-urban and urban agriculture, seeing them as a (...)
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  11.  35
    Whose Adequacy? Imagining Food Security with Displaced Women in Medellín, Colombia.Allison Hayes-Conroy & Elizabeth L. Sweet - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (3):373-384.
    Food security scholarship and policy tends to embrace the nutrition status of individual men, women and children as the end-goal of food security efforts. While there has been much value in investigating and trying to ensure sufficient nutrition for struggling households around the world, this overriding emphasis on nutrition status has reduced our understandings of what constitutes food adequacy. While token attention has been paid to more qualitative ideas like “cultural appropriateness,” food security (...)
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  12. Food Security as a Global Public Good.Cristian Timmermann - 2018 - In José Luis Vivero-Pol, Tomaso Ferrando, Olivier de Schutter & Ugo Mattei (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Food as a Commons. London: Routledge. pp. 85-99.
    Food security brings a number of benefits to humanity from which nobody can be excluded and which can be simultaneously enjoyed by all. An economic understanding of the concept sees food security qualify as a global public good. However, there are four other ways of understanding a public good which are worthy of attention. A normative public good is a good from which nobody ought to be excluded. Alternatively, one might acknowledge the benevolent character of a (...)
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  13.  89
    Edible Backyards: A Qualitative Study of Household Food Growing and its Contributions to Food Security[REVIEW]Robin Kortright & Sarah Wakefield - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):39-53.
    Food security is a fundamental element of community health. Informal house-lot food growing, by providing convenient access to diverse varieties of affordable and nutritious produce, can provide an important support for community food security. In this exploratory assessment of the contribution home food gardening makes to community food security, in-depth interviews were conducted with gardeners in two contrasting neighborhoods in Toronto, Canada. A typology of food gardeners was developed, and this qualitative (...)
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  14.  20
    ‘Rescaling’ Alternative Food Systems: From Food Security to Food Sovereignty.Navé Wald & Douglas P. Hill - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):203-213.
    In this paper, we critically interrogate the benefits of an interdisciplinary and theoretically diverse dialogue between ‘local food’ and ‘alternative food networks’ and outline how this dialogue might be enriched by a closer engagement with discourses of food sovereignty and the politics of scale. In arguing for a shift towards a greater emphasis on food sovereignty, we contend that contemporary discourses of food security are inadequate for the ongoing task of ensuring a just and (...)
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  15.  13
    Assembling Local, Assembling Food Security.Angga Dwiartama & Cinzia Piatti - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):153-164.
    The term ‘food security’ has been used in multiple ways and addresses not only issues around availability and accessibility of foods, but also, among others, the sustainability of livelihoods at the local community level—an issue often seen as a basis for the proliferation of local and alternative food networks. Accordingly, in this paper we attempt to develop a theoretical re-framing that is able to link food security with AFNs in arguing that the understanding of the (...)
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  16.  29
    Fish Consumption: Choices in the Intersection of Public Concern, Fish Welfare, Food Security, Human Health and Climate Change.Helena Röcklinsberg - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (3):533-551.
    Future global food insecurity due to growing population as well as changing consumption demands and population growth is sometimes suggested to be met by increase in aquaculture production. This raises a range of ethical issues, seldom discussed together: fish welfare, food security, human health, climate change and environment, and public concern and legislation, which could preferably be seen as pieces in a puzzle, accepting their interdependency. A balanced decision in favour of or against aquaculture needs to take (...)
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  17.  55
    Advancing the Human Right to Food in Canada: Social Policy and the Politics of Hunger, Welfare, and Food Security[REVIEW]Graham Riches - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):203-211.
    This article argues that hunger in Canada, while being an outcome of unemployment, low incomes, and inadequate welfare, springs also from the failure to recognize and implement the human right to food. Food security has, however, largely been ignored by progressive social policy analysis. Barriers standing in the way of achieving food security include the increasing commodification of welfare and the corporatization of food, the depoliticization of hunger by governments and the voluntary sector, and, (...)
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  18.  69
    Community Food Security: Salience and Participation at Community Level. [REVIEW]David L. Pelletier, Vivica Kraak, Christine McCullum, Ulla Unsitalo & Robert Rich - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (4):401-419.
    Community food security (CFS) is an incipient movement based on the re-localization of many food system activities in response to values concerning the social, health, economic, and environmental consequences of the globalizing food system. This study examines the salience of these values based on the action agendas and accomplishments emerging from community planning events in six rural counties of New York, and the nature and type of participation and local support. The study finds a high level (...)
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  19.  20
    Determinants of Food Security in Tanzania: Gendered Dimensions of Household Headship and Control of Resources.Ryan Mason, Patrick Ndlovu, John R. Parkins & Marty K. Luckert - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (3):539-549.
    This paper examines heterogeneous impacts of gendered household headship and control of resources on food security in rural Tanzania. Analysis with minimal attention to heterogeneity in gender considerations indicates no differences in household food security between male and female-headed households. But with a more differentiated household headship variable and accounting for gendered differences in resource ownership, the results differ markedly. Using more gender-disaggregated variables, our results show significant differences between female-headed and male-headed households. In these results (...)
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  20.  26
    World Food Security and Agriculture in a Globalizing World.Eric Tollens & Johan de Tavernier - 2006 - Ethical Perspectives 13 (1):91-115.
    There is an increasing awareness of the importance of food security, of which the UN’s Millennium Development Goals are the best measure. Although some progress has been made in some regions, much progress still needs to be made in Sub-Saharan Africa, where agriculture largely remains subsistence and personal savings extremely low, and where population growth outstrips economic growth.Thus, there has been a renewed effort to bring these problems back on the development agenda. Food insecurity is a major (...)
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  21.  21
    Urban Agriculture, Social Capital, and Food Security in the Kibera Slums of Nairobi, Kenya.Courtney M. Gallaher, John M. Kerr, Mary Njenga, Nancy K. Karanja & Antoinette M. G. A. WinklerPrins - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):389-404.
    Much of the developing world, including Kenya, is rapidly urbanizing. Rising food and fuel prices in recent years have put the food security of the urban poor in a precarious position. In cities worldwide, urban agriculture helps some poor people gain access to food, but urban agriculture is less common in densely populated slums that lack space. In the Kibera slums of Nairobi, Kenya, households have recently begun a new form of urban agriculture called sack gardening (...)
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  22.  33
    Gender, Livestock Assets, Resource Management, and Food Security: Lessons From the SR-CRSP. [REVIEW]Corinne Valdivia - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):27-39.
    North Sumatra and West Java in Indonesia, the Andes of Bolivia and Peru, Western Province, the Coast and Machakos in Kenya, were Small Ruminant Collaborative Research Support Program (SR-CRSP) sites in which the role of small ruminants was studied and where technological interventions were designed. In all cases the target groups were poor rural households that could maintain sheep, goats, or South American camelids. The objective was to increase the welfare of families through the use of small ruminant technologies. Access (...)
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  23.  94
    The Greening of the “Barrios”: Urban Agriculture for Food Security in Cuba. [REVIEW]Miguel A. Altieri, Nelso Companioni, Kristina Cañizares, Catherine Murphy, Peter Rosset, Martin Bourque & Clara I. Nicholls - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):131-140.
    Urban agriculture in Cuba has rapidly become a significant source of fresh produce for the urban and suburban populations. A large number of urban gardens in Havana and other major cities have emerged as a grassroots movement in response to the crisis brought about by the loss of trade, with the collapse of the socialist bloc in 1989. These gardens are helping to stabilize the supply of fresh produce to Cuba's urban centers. During 1996, Havana's urban farms provided the city's (...)
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  24.  10
    Social Capital Dimensions in Household Food Security Interventions: Implications for Rural Uganda.Haroon Sseguya, Robert E. Mazur & Cornelia B. Flora - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (1):117-129.
    We demonstrate that social capital is associated with positive food security outcomes, using survey data from 378 households in rural Uganda. We measured food security with the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale. For social capital, we measured cognitive and structural indicators, with principal components analysis used to identify key factors of the concept for logistic regression analysis. Households with bridging and linking social capital, characterized by membership in groups, access to information from external institutions, and (...)
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  25.  33
    Hunger, Food Security, and the African Land Grab.Richard Schiffman - 2013 - Ethics and International Affairs 27 (3):239-249.
    If you were organizing dinner parties for the world, you would need to put out 219,000 more place settings every night than you had the night before. That is how fast the Earth's population is growing. But global agricultural production is currently failing to keep pace. A June 2012 report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization sees trouble looming ahead, warning that “land and water resources are now much more stressed than in the past and are becoming scarcer.”.
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  26.  48
    Just and Sustainable? Examining the Rhetoric and Potential Realities of UK Food Security.Tom MacMillan & Elizabeth Dowler - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):181-204.
    The dominant discourse in 20th century UK food and agricultural policies of a liberal, free trade agenda was modified at the turn of the 21st to embrace ecological sustainability and “food security.” The latter term has a long international history; the relationship between issues of technical production and equality of distributional access are also much debated. The paper examines shifts in UK policy discourse in the context of international research, policy, and initiatives to promote food (...), and highlights the implications for social justice in and through the food system. (shrink)
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  27.  10
    Food Security and International Relations.Sandy Ross - 2011 - Ethos: Social Education Victoria 19 (2):9.
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  28.  19
    Beyond Food Security: Women’s Experiences of Urban Agriculture in Cape Town.David W. Olivier & Lindy Heinecken - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):743-755.
    Urban agriculture is an important source of food and income throughout Africa. The majority of cultivators on the continent are women who use urban agriculture to provide for their family. Much research on urban agriculture in Africa focuses on the material benefits of urban agriculture for women, but a smaller body of literature considers its social and psychological empowering effects. The present study seeks to contribute to this debate by looking at the ways in which urban agriculture empowers women (...)
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  29.  70
    Schanbacer, William D: The Politics of Food: The Global Conflict Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty: Praeger, Santa Barbara, CA, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-313-36328-3, $34.95 Hardback. [REVIEW]Cornelia Butler Flora - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):545-547.
    Schanbacer, William D: The Politics of Food: The Global Conflict Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9267-1 Authors Cornelia Butler Flora, Iowa State University 317 East Hall Ames IA 50011-1070 USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  30.  12
    Challenges for Food Security in Eritrea - a Descriptive and Qualitative Analysis.Ravinder Rena - unknown
    Food security is about ensuring that all people at all times have both physical and economic access to the basic food they need. In a number of African countries chronic malnutrition and transitory food insecurity are pervasive. Like most African countries, Eritrea is also a victim of the problem of food insecurity. Based on this historical and recurrent food insecurity in Eritrea, an attempt is made in this paper to assess the possible causes of (...)
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  31.  5
    Whose Justice is It Anyway? Mitigating the Tensions Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty.Samantha Noll & Esme G. Murdock - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):1-14.
    This paper explores the tensions between two disparate approaches to addressing hunger worldwide: Food security and food sovereignty. Food security generally focuses on ensuring that people have economic and physical access to safe and nutritious food, while food sovereignty movements prioritize the right of people and communities to determine their agricultural policies and food cultures. As food sovereignty movements grew out of critiques of food security initiatives, they are often (...)
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  32.  3
    Whose Justice is It Anyway? Mitigating the Tensions Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty.Samantha Noll & Esme G. Murdock - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):1-14.
    This paper explores the tensions between two disparate approaches to addressing hunger worldwide: Food security and food sovereignty. Food security generally focuses on ensuring that people have economic and physical access to safe and nutritious food, while food sovereignty movements prioritize the right of people and communities to determine their agricultural policies and food cultures. As food sovereignty movements grew out of critiques of food security initiatives, they are often (...)
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  33.  1
    Achieving Food Security in a Sustainable Development Era.Dan Banik - 2019 - Food Ethics 4 (2):117-121.
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  34.  25
    Not Just What, but How: Creating Agricultural Sustainability and Food Security by Changing Canada's Agricultural Policy Making Process. [REVIEW]Rod MacRae - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):187-202.
    Agriculture has been enormously productive in recent decades. The main problem is that fragmentation of issues, knowledge, and responsibilities has hidden the costs associated with this success. These are mainly environmental, social, and health costs, which have been assigned to other ministries, with their own histories unconnected to agriculture. Now that agricultural policy has achieved its success, its costs are becoming apparent. The current system is preoccupied with traditional views of competitiveness and efficiency. Policies, programs, and regulations are organized to (...)
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  35.  14
    Dignified Food Security for All.William Aiken - 1994 - Agriculture and Human Values 11 (4):84-86.
    Four important and influential policy statements on hunger that have served as national and international standards and guides for action have been reprinted here as a resource. They are (1) the Bellagio Declaration, which was produced by 24 international experts meeting to address the problem of world hunger in 1989 at the Rockefeller Foundation Conference Center in Bellagio, Italy; (2) the Medford Declaration to End Hunger in the U. S., which was designed to be a domestic equivalent of the Bellagio (...)
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  36.  4
    Food Security and Conflict.Per Pinstrup-Andersen - 1999 - Social Research 66.
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  37. Food Security and Global Health.L. McIntyre, K. Rondeau, S. Benatar & G. Brock - 2011 - In S. R. Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.), Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  38.  14
    Agriculture Development and Food Security Policy in Eritrea - an Analysis.Ravinder Rena - unknown
    The main economic activity of the people of Eritrea is agriculture: crop production and livestock herding. Agriculture mainly comprises mixed farming and some commercial concessions. Most agriculture is rain-fed. The main rain-fed crops are sorghum, millet and sesame, and the main irrigated crops are all horticultural crops like bananas, onions and tomatoes and cotton. The major livestock production constraints are disease, water and feed shortages and agricultural expansion especially in the river frontages. The agricultural sector employs eighty percent of the (...)
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  39.  4
    The Evolution of Food Security Governance and Food Sovereignty Movement in China: An Analysis From the World Society Theory.Scott Y. Lin - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (5):667-695.
    Originating in a 1983 Mexican Government Program, the term ‘food sovereignty’ was coined in 1996 by La Via Campesina—a global peasant network—to address concerns within the civil society for food security. Rather than to accept the neoliberal framework of mainstream food security definition and governance, the food sovereignty movement seeks to view food security as the right of peoples to define their own food and agriculture systems with limited corporation intervention. As (...)
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  40.  23
    Consumption Strategies in Mexican Rural Households: Pursuing Food Security with Quality.Kirsten Appendini & Ma Guadalupe Quijada - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2):439-454.
    Food quality is an important issue on the global agenda, particularly in high- and middle-income economies, but of little concern in designing Mexico’s food policy. Food policy has focused on quantity and in the case of maize, on satisfying domestic demand by supporting large commercial agriculture and importing from abroad. However, and as argued in this paper, obtaining a food staple of quality is also an important issue for rural households and contributes to motivating continued smallholder (...)
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  41. Cuba's National Food Program and its Prospects for Food Security.Carmen Diana Deere - 1993 - Agriculture and Human Values 10 (3):35-51.
    Cuba's National Food Program aims to assure its population a minimum degree of food security during the current period of transition from dependency upon the ex-Socialist trading bloc. A number of important elements of the Food Program, however, were conceived before the demise of COMECON in an effort to deepen food import substitution. This paper reviews the degree of Cuba's food import dependence before the breakup of the Socialist bloc, the initial targets of the (...)
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  42.  7
    Inevitable Decay: Debates over Climate, Food Security, and Plant Heredity in Nineteenth-Century Britain.John Lidwell-Durnin - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (2):271-292.
    Climate change and the failure of crops are significant but overlooked events in the history of heredity. Bad weather and dangerously low harvests provided momentum and urgency for answers to questions about how best to improve and acclimatize staple varieties. In the 1790s, a series of crop failures in Britain led to the popularization of and widespread debate over Thomas Andrew Knight’s suggestion that poor weather was in fact largely unconnected to the bad harvests. Rather, Knight argued, Britain’s older varieties—particularly (...)
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  43. The Sociocultural and Food Security Impacts of Genetic Pollution Via Transgenic Crops of Traditional Varieties in Latin American Centers of Peasant Agriculture.Miguel A. Altieri - 2003 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 23 (5):350-359.
    The introduction of transgenic crops into centers of diversity or areas dominated by traditional agriculture threatens genetic diversity as well as indigenous knowledge and culture. It is further argued that the impacts go beyond genetic changes in heterogeneous native crop varieties to embrace effects on evolutionary processes such as gene flow between native crops and wild relatives, and erosion of local knowledge systems such as folk taxonomies and selection of varieties that thrive in marginal environments in which resourcepoor farmers live.
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  44.  15
    Deconstructing Homegardens: Food Security and Sovereignty in Northern Nicaragua.Karie Boone & Peter Leigh Taylor - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2):239-255.
    Development scholars and practitioners are promoting food security, food sovereignty, and the localization of food systems to prepare for the projected negative impacts of climate change. The implementation of biodiverse homegardens is often seen as a way not only to localize food production but also as a strategy in alignment with a food sovereignty agenda. While much scholarship has characterized and critiqued food security and sovereignty conceptualizations, relatively little research has examined people’s (...)
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  45.  3
    The Evolution of Food Security Governance and Food Sovereignty Movement in China: An Analysis From the World Society Theory.Scott Y. Lin - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (5):667-695.
    Originating in a 1983 Mexican Government Program, the term ‘food sovereignty’ was coined in 1996 by La Via Campesina—a global peasant network—to address concerns within the civil society for food security. Rather than to accept the neoliberal framework of mainstream food security definition and governance, the food sovereignty movement seeks to view food security as the right of peoples to define their own food and agriculture systems with limited corporation intervention. As (...)
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  46.  28
    The Relationship Between Food Security and Trade Liberalization.Siti Musa - 2009 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 4:191-208.
    This paper addresses the issue of food security in developing countries and how agriculture plays an important role in achieving not only food security, but also in reducing poverty and promoting sustainable development. The promotion of trade liberalization by the World Trade Organization (WTO) through the Agreement on Agriculture (AoA) has undermined the productive capacity of developing countries and their comparative advantage in the agricultural sector, marginalizing small-scale farmers and benefitting the big corporations. The paper looks (...)
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  47.  25
    Henk Bakker: Food Security in Africa and Asia, Strategies for Small-Scale Agricultural Development: CAB International, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, 2011, 231 Pp, ISBN 978-1845938413. [REVIEW]Aakash Goyal & M. Asif - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):555-556.
  48.  7
    Michael S. Carolan: Reclaiming Food Security: Routledge, Abingdon, Oxon, 2013, 216 Pp, ISBN-10: 0415816963.Justa Hopma - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (1):157-158.
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    Ying Chen: Trade, Food Security, and Human Rights: The Rules for International Trade in Agricultural Products and the Evolving World Food Crisis: Ashgate Publishing Company, Burlington, VT, 2014, 282 Pp, ISBN: 978-1-4724-3742-6.Mario R. Machado - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (4):795-796.
  50.  9
    The Pragmatic Pyramid: John Dewey on Gardening and Food Security.Shane J. Ralston - 2014 - Social Philosophy Today 30:63-76.
    Despite the minimal attention paid by philosophers to gardening, the activity has a myriad of philosophical implications—aesthetic, ethical, political, and even edible. The same could be said of community food security and struggles for food justice. Two of gardening’s most significant practical benefits are that it generates communal solidarity and provides sustenance for the needy and undernourished during periods of crisis. In the twentieth century, large-scale community gardening in the U.S. and Canada coincided with relief projects during (...)
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