Results for 'for the European End-of-Life'

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  1.  4
    Forgoing Treatment at the End of Life in 6 European Countries.Bosshard Georg, , Nilstun Tore, , Bilsen Johan, , Norup Michael, , Miccinesi Guido, , J. M. van Delden Johannes, Faisst Karin, , van der Heide Agnes & Consortium for the European End-of-Life - 2005 - .
    Modern medicine provides unprecedented opportunities in diagnostics and treatment. However, in some situations at the end of a patient’s life, many physicians refrain from using all possible measures to prolong life. We studied the incidence of different types of treatment withheld or withdrawn in 6 European countries and analyzed the main background characteristics.
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  2.  23
    Forgoing Treatment at the End of Life in 6 European Countries.Georg Bosshard, , Tore Nilstun, , Johan Bilsen, , Michael Norup, , Guido Miccinesi, , Johannes J. M. van Delden, Karin Faisst, , Agnes van der Heide & for the European End-of-Life - unknown
    Modern medicine provides unprecedented opportunities in diagnostics and treatment. However, in some situations at the end of a patient’s life, many physicians refrain from using all possible measures to prolong life. We studied the incidence of different types of treatment withheld or withdrawn in 6 European countries and analyzed the main background characteristics.
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  3.  32
    Determinants of Acceptance of End-of-Life Interventions: A Comparison Between Withdrawing Life-Prolonging Treatment and Euthanasia in Austria.Erwin Stolz, Franziska Großschädl, Hannes Mayerl, Éva Rásky & Wolfgang Freidl - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundEnd-of-life decisions remain a hotly debated issue in many European countries and the acceptance in the general population can act as an important anchor point in these discussions. Previous studies on determinants of the acceptance of end-of-life interventions in the general population have not systematically assessed whether determinants differ between withdrawal of life-prolonging treatment and euthanasia.MethodsA large, representative survey of the Austrian adult population conducted in 2014 included items on WLPT and EUT. We constructed the following (...)
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  4.  26
    The Impact of Regional Culture on Intensive Care End of Life Decision Making: An Israeli Perspective From the ETHICUS Study.F. D. Ganz - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):196-199.
    Background: Decisions of patients, families, and health care providers about medical care at the end of life depend on many factors, including the societal culture. A pan-European study was conducted to determine the frequency and types of end of life practices in European intensive care units , including those in Israel. Several results of the Israeli subsample were different to those of the overall sample.Objective: The objective of this article was to explore these differences and provide (...)
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  5.  64
    Three Myths in End-of-Life Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):389-390.
    Huang and colleagues provide some intriguing insights into the attitudes about end of life care of practising Taiwanese neonatal doctors and nurses.1 There are some similarities with surveys from other parts of the world. Most Taiwanese neonatologists and nurses agreed that it was potentially appropriate to withhold or limit treatment for infants who were dying. A very high proportion was opposed to active euthanasia of such infants. But there were also some striking differences. Only 21% of Taiwanese doctors ‘agreed’ (...)
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  6. The End of Life: Euthanasia and Morality.James Rachels - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    In this provocative book, a professor of philosophy examines the arguments for and against euthanasia, analyzes specific case studies, including those of Baby Jane Doe and Barney Clark, and offers an alternate theory on the morality of euthanasia. Various traditional distinctions--between "human" and "non-human," intentional and nonintentional, killing and "letting die"--are taken into account to determine whether euthanasia is permissible or not. Rachels presents a systematic argument against the traditional view, defending an alternative position based on the belief that there (...)
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  7.  18
    Caring for a Dignified End of Life in a Christian Health Care Institution: The View of Caritas Catholica Vlaanderen.Chris Gastmans - 2002 - Ethical Perspectives 9 (2-3):134-145.
    Immediately following the approval of the Belgian law on euthanasia, Caritas Catholica Vlaanderen sent a position paper to all affiliated institutions in which its standpoint regarding care for a dignified end of life is clarified. We would like to sketch very briefly the context in which this position paper should be placed, before reproducing the complete text of the recommendation.Caritas Catholica Vlaanderen is an umbrella organization for cooperation and consultation between the Verbond der Verzorgingsinstellingen [Association of Care Institutions], grouping (...)
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  8. A Failing Grade for the German End-of-Life Vehicles Take-Back System.Willem H. Vanderburg & Nina Nakajima - 2005 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 25 (2):170-186.
    The German end-of-life vehicle take-back system is described and analyzed in terms of its impact on the environment and the car companies involved. It is concluded that although this system is often cited as an example of a successful take-back scheme, it is not one that maximizes the value recovered from end-of-life vehicles. As a result, corporations do not achieve the potential benefits that can be realized from an alternate value chain based on recovering value from end-of-life (...)
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  9.  56
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decision‐making in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 (...)
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  10.  14
    The Spectrum of End of Life Care: An Argument for Access to Medical Assistance in Dying for Vulnerable Populations.Alysia C. Wright & Jessica C. Shaw - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (2):211-219.
    Medical assistance in dying was legalized by the Supreme Court of Canada in June 2016 and became a legal, viable end of life care option for Canadians with irremediable illness and suffering. Much attention has been paid to the balance between physicians’ willingness to provide MAiD and patients’ legal right to request medically assisted death in certain circumstances. In contrast, very little attention has been paid to the challenge of making MAiD accessible to vulnerable populations. The purpose of this (...)
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  11.  45
    The Morality of Experience Machines for Palliative and End of Life Care.Dan Weijers - 2017 - In Mark Silcox (ed.), Experience Machines: The Philosophy of Virtual Worlds. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 183-201.
    Experience machines, popularized in print by Robert Nozick and on the screen by the Wachowskis’ film The Matrix, provide highly or perfectly realistic experiences that are more pleasant and less painful than those generated in real life.1 The recent surge in virtual reality and neuro-prosthetic technologies is making the creation of real-world experience machines seem inevitable and perhaps imminent.2 Given the likelihood of the near-future availability of such machines, it behooves ethicists to consider the moral status of their potential (...)
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  12.  24
    Mental Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making Towards the End of Life.M. Strätling, V. E. Scharf & P. Schmucker - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):209-215.
    German legislation demands that decisions about the treatment of mentally incompetent patients require an ‘informed consent’. If this was not given by the patient him-/herself before he/she became incompetent, it has to be sought by the physician from a guardian, who has to be formally legitimized before. Additionally this surrogate has to seek the permission of a Court of Guardianship (Vormundschaftsgericht), if he/she intends to consent to interventions, which pose significant risks to the health or the life of the (...)
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  13.  18
    Are Advance Directives Helpful for Good End of Life Decision Making: A Cross Sectional Survey of Health Professionals.Eimantas Peicius, Aurelija Blazeviciene & Raimondas Kaminskas - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):40.
    This paper joins the debate over changes in the role of health professionals when applying advance directives to manage the decision-making process at the end of life care. Issues in relation to advance directives occur in clinical units in Lithuania; however, it remains one of the few countries in the European Union where the discussion on advance directives is not included in the health-care policy-making agenda. To encourage the discussion of advance directives, a study was designed to examine (...)
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  14.  39
    End-of-Life Decisions in Medical Care: Principles and Policies for Regulating the Dying Process.Stephen W. Smith - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction -- Moral status -- The value of life -- Killing versus letting die and moral responsibility -- Autonomy and paternalism -- Beneficence, non-maleficence and harm -- Dignity -- A comprehensive ethical approach -- Introduction to Part Two -- Protection of patients -- The impact on health care practitioners -- Greater societal issues -- Slippery slope arguments -- Necessary procedural protections -- Conclusions.
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  15.  17
    End-of-Life Decisions for Children Under 1 Year of Age in the Netherlands: Decreased Frequency of Administration of Drugs to Deliberately Hasten Death.Katja ten Cate, Suzanne van de Vathorst, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & Agnes van der Heide - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (10):795-798.
  16.  44
    End‐of‐Life Decisions and the Reinvented Rule of Double Effect: A Critical Analysis.Anna Lindblad, Niels Lynöe & Niklas Juth - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (7):368-377.
    The Rule of Double Effect (RDE) holds that it may be permissible to harm an individual while acting for the sake of a proportionate good, given that the harm is not an intended means to the good but merely a foreseen side-effect. Although frequently used in medical ethical reasoning, the rule has been repeatedly questioned in the past few decades. However, Daniel Sulmasy, a proponent who has done a lot of work lately defending the RDE, has recently presented a reformulated (...)
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  17.  90
    End‐of‐Life Care in the 21st Century: Advance Directives in Universal Rights Discourse.Violeta Beširević - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (3):105-112.
    ABSTRACTThis article explores universal normative bases that could help to shape a workable legal construct that would facilitate a global use of advance directives. Although I believe that advance directives are of universal character, my primary aim in approaching this issue is to remain realistic. I will make three claims. First, I will argue that the principles of autonomy, dignity and informed consent, embodied in the Oviedo Convention and the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, could arguably be regarded (...)
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  18. Managing Intentions: The End-of-Life Administration of Analgesics and Sedatives, and the Possibility of Slow Euthanasia.Charles Douglas, Ian Kerridge & Rachel Ankeny - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (7):388-396.
    There has been much debate regarding the 'double-effect' of sedatives and analgesics administered at the end-of-life, and the possibility that health professionals using these drugs are performing 'slow euthanasia.' On the one hand analgesics and sedatives can do much to relieve suffering in the terminally ill. On the other hand, they can hasten death. According to a standard view, the administration of analgesics and sedatives amounts to euthanasia when the drugs are given with an intention to hasten death. In (...)
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  19.  58
    Suffering at the End of Life.Jukka Varelius - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):195-200.
    In the end‐of‐life context, alleviation of the suffering of a distressed patient is usually seen as a, if not the, central goal for the medical personnel treating her. Yet it has also been argued that suffering should be seen as a part of good dying. More precisely, it has been maintained that alleviating a dying patient’s suffering can make her unable to take care of practical end‐of‐life matters, deprive her of an opportunity to ask questions about and find (...)
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  20.  58
    The Ethics of End-of-Life Care for Prison Inmates.Felicia Cohn - 1999 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (3):252-259.
    Terminally ill elderly and long-term disabled persons under our system of health care are eligible for Medicare and may qualify for the hospice care benefit. Despite such provisions, research shows that individuals still frequently do not receive the health care they need. But, as inadequate as end-of-life care can be for the general population, these inadequacies are exacerbated for individuals incarcerated in U.S. prisons and jails. Although inmates are guaranteed a basic level of health care under the Eighth Amendment (...)
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  21.  39
    Multiculturalism and End-of-Life Care: The New Israeli Law for the Terminally III Patient.Alan Jotkowitz & Avraham Steinberg - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):17 – 19.
  22.  34
    The Ethics of End-of-Life Care for Prison Inmates.Felicia Cohn - 1999 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (3):252-259.
    Terminally ill elderly and long-term disabled persons under our system of health care are eligible for Medicare and may qualify for the hospice care benefit. Despite such provisions, research shows that individuals still frequently do not receive the health care they need. But, as inadequate as end-of-life care can be for the general population, these inadequacies are exacerbated for individuals incarcerated in U.S. prisons and jails. Although inmates are guaranteed a basic level of health care under the Eighth Amendment (...)
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  23.  18
    Ethical Problems in End-of-Life Decisions for Elderly Norwegians.Marjorie A. Schaffer - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (2):242-257.
    Norwegian health professionals, elderly people and family members experience ethical problems involving end-of-life decision making for elders in the context of the values of Norwegian society. This study used ethical inquiry and qualitative methodology to conduct and analyze interviews carried out with 25 health professionals, six elderly people and five family members about the ethical problems they encountered in end-of-life decision making in Norway. All three participant groups experienced ethical problems involving the adequacy of health care for elderly (...)
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  24.  23
    Ethics and End of Life Care: The Liverpool Care Pathway and the Neuberger Review.Anthony Wrigley - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):639-643.
    The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying has recently been the topic of substantial media interest and also been subject to the independent Neuberger Review. This review has identified clear failings in some areas of care and recommended the Liverpool Care Pathway be phased out. I argue that while the evidence gathered of poor incidences of practice by the Review is of genuine concern for end of life care, the inferences drawn from this evidence are inconsistent with the causes (...)
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  25.  25
    Discussing End-of-Life Decisions in a Clinical Ethics Committee: An Interview Study of Norwegian Doctors’ Experience.Marianne K. Bahus & Reidun Førde - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (3):261-272.
    With disagreement, doubts, or ambiguous grounds in end–of-life decisions, doctors are advised to involve a clinical ethics committee. However, little has been published on doctors’ experiences with discussing an end-of-life decision in a CEC. As part of the quality assurance of this work, we wanted to find out if clinicians have benefited from discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs and why. We will disseminate some Norwegian doctors’ experiences when discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs, based on semi-structured interviews (...)
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  26.  6
    How The Fault in Our Stars Illuminates Four Themes of the Adolescent End of Life Narrative.Anna Obergfell Kirkman, Jane A. Hartsock & Alexia M. Torke - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (3):240-246.
    Adolescents who face life-limiting illness have unique developmental features and strong personal preferences around end of life care. Understanding and documenting those preferences can be enhanced by practising narrative medicine. This paper aims to identify a new form of narrative, the Adolescent End of Life Narrative, and recognise four central themes. The Adolescent EOL Narrative can be observed in young adult fiction,The Fault in Our Stars, which elucidates the notion that terminally ill adolescents have authentic preferences about (...)
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  27.  7
    Physicians’ End of Life Discussions with Patients: Is There an Ethical Obligation to Discuss Aid in Dying?Yan Ming Jane Zhou & Wayne Shelton - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (3):227-238.
    Since Oregon implemented its Death with Dignity Act, many additional states have followed suit demonstrating a growing understanding and acceptance of aid in dying processes. Traditionally, the patient has been the one to request and seek this option out. However, as Death with Dignity acts continue to expand, it will impact the role of physicians and bring up questions over whether physicians have the ethical obligation to facilitate a conversation about AID with patients during end of life discussions. Patients (...)
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  28.  3
    Costs and End-of-Life Care in the NICU: Lessons for the MICU?John D. Lantos & William L. Meadow - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):194-200.
    Providing care for a baby born at 24 weeks of gestation in a neonatal intensive care unit is one of the most expensive medical treatments in the United States today. The cost can easily run over $300,000 for one baby. Furthermore, many extremely premature babies who survive are left with chronic diseases or disabilities that require further medical expenses and other specialized services throughout childhood or throughout life. When all these expenditures are totaled up, it can seem that neonatal (...)
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  29.  14
    Costs and End-of-Life Care in the NICU: Lessons for the MICU?John D. Lantos & William L. Meadow - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):194-200.
    Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and medical intensive care units (MICUs) are both very expensive. The cost-effectiveness of NICUs has been extensively evaluated, as has the long-term outcomes of subpopulations of NICU patients. NICU treatment is among the most cost-effective of high-tech interventions. And most patients do well. There are fewer evaluations of cost-effectiveness in the MICU and almost no long-term outcome studies. Policymakers who scrutinize expensive high-tech interventions would do well to study the examples found in the NICU.
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  30.  34
    The Case for Kidney Donation Before End-of-Life Care.Paul E. Morrissey - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):1-8.
    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) is associated with many problems, including ischemic injury, high rates of delayed allograft function, and frequent organ discard. Furthermore, many potential DCD donors fail to progress to asystole in a manner that would enable safe organ transplantation and no organs are recovered. DCD protocols are based upon the principle that the donor must be declared dead prior to organ recovery. A new protocol is proposed whereby after a donor family agrees to withdrawal of life-sustaining (...)
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  31.  10
    Resuscitation Decisions at the End of Life: Medical Views and the Juridification of Practice.Fiona M. A. MacCormick, Charlotte Emmett, Paul Paes & Julian C. Hughes - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (6):376-383.
    BackgroundConcerns about decision making related to resuscitation have led to two important challenges in the courts resulting in new legal precedents for decision-making practice. Systematic research investigating the experiences of doctors involved in decisions about resuscitation in light of the recent changes in law remains lacking.AimTo analyse the practice of resuscitation decision making on hospital wards from the perspectives of doctors.DesignThe data presented in this paper were collected as part of a wider research study of end-of-life care in an (...)
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  32.  85
    Medical Futility at the End of Life: The Perspectives of Intensive Care and Palliative Care Clinicians.Ralf J. Jox, Andreas Schaider, Georg Marckmann & Gian Domenico Borasio - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):540-545.
    Objectives Medical futility at the end of life is a growing challenge to medicine. The goals of the authors were to elucidate how clinicians define futility, when they perceive life-sustaining treatment (LST) to be futile, how they communicate this situation and why LST is sometimes continued despite being recognised as futile. Methods The authors reviewed ethics case consultation protocols and conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 physicians and 11 nurses from adult intensive and palliative care units at a tertiary (...)
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  33.  45
    Challenges in End-of-Life Decisions in the Intensive Care Unit: An Ethical Perspective. [REVIEW]Hanne Irene Jensen, Jette Ammentorp, Helle Johannessen & Helle Ørding - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):93-101.
    When making end-of-life decisions in intensive care units (ICUs), different staff groups have different roles in the decision-making process and may not always assess the situation in the same way. The aim of this study was to examine the challenges Danish nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians experience with end-of-life decisions in ICUs and how these challenges affect the decision-making process. Interviews with nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians were conducted, and data is discussed from an ethical perspective. All three (...)
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  34.  31
    End of Life Decision Making, Policy and the Criminal Justice System: Untrained Carers Assuming Responsibility (UCARes) and Their Uncertain Legal Liabilities.Robin Mackenzie & H. Biggs - 2006 - Genomics, Society and Policy 2 (1):118-128.
    This article will explore some previously unrecognised legal and ethical issues associated with informal care-giving and criminal justice in the context of end of life decision-making. It was prompted by a recent case in Leeds Crown Court, which raises important issues for the people who care for their loved ones at home and for the criminal justice system more generally. Government figures estimate that over 5.2 million Britons are responsible for the care of relatives or loved ones. In order (...)
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  35.  12
    Ethical End-of-Life Palliative Care: Response to Riisfeldt.Heidi Giebel - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):51-52.
    In a recent article, 1 Riisfeldt attempts to show that the principle of double effect is unsound as an ethical principle and problematic in its application to palliative opioid and sedative use in end-of-life care. Specifically, he claims that routine, non-lethal opioid and sedative administration may be “intrinsically bad” by PDE’s standards, continuous deep palliative sedation should be treated as a bad effect akin to death for purposes of PDE, PDE cannot coherently be applied in cases where death “indirectly” (...)
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  36.  37
    Ethical Issues Related to End of Life Treatment in Patients with Advanced Dementia – The Case of Artificial Nutrition and Hydration.Esther-Lee Marcus, Ofra Golan & David Goodman - 2016 - Diametros 50:118-137.
    Patients with advanced dementia suffer from severe cognitive and functional impairment, including eating disorders. The focus of our research is on the issue of life-sustaining treatment, specifically on the social and ethical implications of tube feeding. The treatment decision, based on values of life and dignity, involves sustaining lives that many people consider not worth living. We explore the moral approach to caring for these patients and review the history of the debate on artificial nutrition and hydration showing (...)
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  37.  89
    Euthanasia and End-of-Life Practices in France and Germany. A Comparative Study.Ruth Horn - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):197-209.
    The objective of this paper is to understand from a sociological perspective how the moral question of euthanasia, framed as the “right to die”, emerges and is dealt with in society. It takes France and Germany as case studies, two countries in which euthanasia is prohibited and which have similar legislation on the issue. I presuppose that, and explore how, each society has its own specificities in terms of practical, social and political norms that affect the ways in which they (...)
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  38.  34
    Decisions at the End of Life: Catholic Tradition.G. K. Donovan - 1997 - Christian Bioethics 3 (3):188-203.
    Medical decisions regarding end-of-life care have undergone significant changes in recent decades, driven by changes in both medicine and society. Catholic tradition in medical ethics offers clear guidance in many issues, and a moral framework accessible to those who do not share the same faith as well as to members of its faith community. In some areas, a Catholic perspective can be seen clearly and confidently, such as in teachings on the permissibility of suicide and euthanasia. In others, such (...)
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  39. End-of-Life Decisions and Moral Psychology: Killing, Letting Die, Intention and Foresight. [REVIEW]Charles Douglas - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):337-347.
    In contemplating any life and death moral dilemma, one is often struck by the possible importance of two distinctions; the distinction between killing and “letting die”, and the distinction between an intentional killing and an action aimed at some other outcome that causes death as a foreseen but unintended “side-effect”. Many feel intuitively that these distinctions are morally significant, but attempts to explain why this might be so have been unconvincing. In this paper, I explore the problem from an (...)
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  40.  6
    Psychotherapy at the End of Life.Rebecca M. Saracino, Barry Rosenfeld, William Breitbart & Harvey Max Chochinov - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (12):19-28.
    Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross is credited as one of the first clinicians to formalize recommendations for working with patients with advanced medical illnesses. In her seminal book, On Death and Dying,...
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  41.  8
    Optimal Relief for Pain at the End of Life: A Caregiver’s Tale.David B. Morris - 2018 - Medical Humanities 44 (2):120-124.
    The current opioid crisis—driven partly by medical overprescription and partly by illegal drug abuse—is a significant cultural and professional dilemma in the USA and elsewhere. It has produced a strong reaction in favour of restricting medical use of opioids for pain, especially chronic pain. The author for a quarter century has written about pain from a biocultural perspective, and in this essay—based on his experience as primary caregiver for his late wife—he approaches the question of appropriate opioid use at the (...)
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  42.  8
    Understanding Patient Needs Without Understanding the Patient: The Need for Complementary Use of Professional Interpreters in End-of-Life Care.Demi Krystallidou, Ignaas Devisch, Dominique Van de Velde & Peter Pype - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):477-481.
    High-quality doctor-patient communication in end-of-life care results in better quality of life for patients. In linguistically and culturally diverse societies, language discordant consultations become daily practice, leading to difficulties in eliciting patient preferences toward end-of-life care. Although family members invariably act as informal interpreters, this may cause some ethical dilemmas. We present a case of a palliative patient whose son acted as an interpreter. This case generated a triple- layered ethical dilemma: how to safeguard patient autonomy against (...)
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  43.  31
    End-of-Life Care in The Netherlands and the United States: A Comparison of Values, Justifications, and Practices.Timothy E. Quill & Gerrit Kimsma - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):189-.
    Voluntary active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide remain technically illegal in the Netherlands, but the practices are openly tolerated provided that physicians adhere to carefully constructed guidelines. Harsh criticism of the Dutch practice by authors in the United States and Great Britain has made achieving a balanced understanding of its clinical, moral, and policy implications very difficult. Similar practice patterns probably exist in the United States, but they are conducted in secret because of a more uncertain legal and ethical climate. In (...)
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  44.  69
    Defining End-of-Life Care From Perspectives of Nursing Ethics.S. Izumi, H. Nagae, C. Sakurai & E. Imamura - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (5):608-618.
    Despite increasing interests and urgent needs for quality end-of-life care, there is no exact definition of what is the interval referred to as end of life or what end-of-life care is. The purpose of this article is to report our examination of terms related to end-of-life care and define end-of-life care from nursing ethics perspectives. Current terms related to end-of-life care, such as terminal care, hospice care, and palliative care, are based on a medical (...)
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  45.  32
    Limitation of Treatment at the End of Life: An Empirical-Ethical Analysis Regarding the Practices of Physician Members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine.Jan Schildmann, Julia Hoetzel, Anne Baumann, Christof Mueller-Busch & Jochen Vollmann - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):327-332.
    Objectives To determine the frequencies and types of limitation of medical treatment performed by physician members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine and to analyse the findings with respect to clinical and ethical aspects of end-of-life practices. Design Cross-sectional postal survey. Setting Data collection via the secretary of the German Society for Palliative Medicine using the German language version of the EURELD survey instrument. Subjects All 1645 physician members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine. Main outcome measures (...)
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  46.  13
    A Conscious Choice: Is It Ethical to Aim for Unconsciousness at the End of Life?Antony Takla, Julian Savulescu & Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):284-291.
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  47.  74
    The Proper Telos of Life: Schiller, Kant and Having Autonomy as an End.Katerina Deligiorgi - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):494 - 511.
    Abstract In this paper I set the debate between Kant and Schiller in terms of the role that an ideal of life can play within an autonomist ethic. I begin by examining the critical role Schiller gives to emotions in tackling specific motivational concerns in Kant's ethics. In the Kantian response I offer to these criticisms, I emphasise the role of metaphysics for a proper understanding of Kant's position whilst allowing that with respect to moral psychology, Kant and Schiller (...)
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  48.  33
    The European Biomedical Ethics Practitioner Education Project: An Experiential Approach to Philosophy and Ethics in Health Care Education.Donna Dickenson & Michael J. Parker - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):231-237.
    The European Biomedical Ethics Practitioner Education Project (EBEPE), funded by the BIOMED programme of the European Commission, is a five-nation partnership to produce open learning materials for healthcare ethics education. Papers and case studies from a series of twelve conferences throughout the European Union, reflecting the ‘burning issues’ in the participants' healthcare systems, have been collected by a team based at Imperial College, London, where they are now being edited into a series of seven activity-based workbooks for (...)
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  49.  25
    Socially and Temporally Extended End-of-Life Decision-Making Process for Dementia Patients.Osamu Muramoto - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):339-343.
    There are two contrasting views on the decision-making for life-sustaining treatment in advanced stages of dementia when the patient is deemed incompetent. One is to respect the patient's precedent autonomy by adhering to advance directives or using the substituted judgement standard. The other is to use the best-interests standard, particularly if the current judgement on what is best for the incapacitated patient contradicts the instructions from the patient's precedent autonomy. In this paper, I argue that the protracted clinical course (...)
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  50.  31
    Ethical Obligations and Clinical Goals in End-of-Life Care: Deriving a Quality-of-Life Construct Based on the Islamic Concept of Accountability Before God.Aasim Padela & Afshan Mohiuddin - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (1):3-13.
    End-of-life medical decision making presents a major challenge to patients and physicians alike. In order to determine whether it is ethically justifiable to forgo medical treatment in such scenarios, clinical data must be interpreted alongside patient values, as well as in light of the physician's ethical commitments. Though much has been written about this ethical issue from religious perspectives , little work has been done from an Islamic point of view. To fill the gap in the literature around Islamic (...)
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