Results for 'form of intuition'

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  1. Space as Form of Intuition and as Formal Intuition: On the Note to B160 in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.Christian Onof & Dennis Schulting - 2015 - Philosophical Review 124 (1):1-58.
    In his argument for the possibility of knowledge of spatial objects, in the Transcendental Deduction of the B-version of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant makes a crucial distinction between space as “form of intuition” and space as “formal intuition.” The traditional interpretation regards the distinction between the two notions as reflecting a distinction between indeterminate space and determinations of space by the understanding, respectively. By contrast, a recent influential reading has argued that the two notions can (...)
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    Nursing Intuition: A Valid Form of Knowledge.Catherine Green - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):98-111.
    An understanding of the nature and development of nursing intuition can help nurse educators foster it in young nurses and give clinicians more confidence in this aspect of their knowledge, allowing them to respond with greater assurance to their intuitions. In this paper, accounts from philosophy and neurophysiology are used to argue that intuition, specifically nursing intuition, is a valid form of knowledge. The paper argues that nursing intuition, a kind of practical intuition, is (...)
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  3. The Manifold of Intuition and the Form-Matter Distinction in Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason".Charles Nussbaum - 1988 - Dissertation, Emory University
    Kant is the last classical practitioner of foundationalist epistemology in the Cartesian tradition, a tradition which saw the major problem of the theory of knowledge as one of providing a metaphysical account of the way in which the subjective contents of the individual mind come to have indubitable objective reference. But he is also the inaugurator of a very different approach to epistemology, one that sees methodology or rules of cognitive procedure as fundamental in determining the objectivity of knowledge. An (...)
     
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  4. The Grammar of Aesthetic Intuition: On Ernst Cassirer's Concept of Symbolic Form in the Visual Arts.Peer F. Bundgaard - 2011 - Synthese 179 (1):43 - 57.
    This paper provides a précis of Ernst Cassirer's concept of art as a symbolic form. It does so, though, in a specific respect. It points to the fact that Cassirer's concept of "symbolic form" is two-sided. On the one hand, the concept captures general cultural phenomena that are not only meaningful but also manifest the way man makes sense of the world; thus myth, religion, and art are considered general symbolic forms. On the other hand, it captures the (...)
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  5.  50
    'Form of Intuition' and 'Formal Intuition' in Kant's Theory of Experience and Science.Peter Krausser - 1973 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 4 (3):279-287.
  6. 'Form of Intuition' and 'Formal Intuition' in Kant's Theory of Experience and Science.Peter Krausser - 1973 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 4 (3):279.
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  7.  59
    The Geometry of a Form of Intuition.Arthur Melnick - 1984 - Topoi 3 (2):163-168.
  8. Form of Intuition and Formal Intuition. A Priori and Sensibility in Kant's Philosophy.Anselmo Aportone - 2011 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 66 (3):431-470.
     
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  9. Form of Intuition and Form of Appearance in the First Two Arguments of the Metaphysical Exposition of Space.Hernán Bruno Pringe - 2001 - In Ralph Schumacher, Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Volker Gerhardt (eds.), Kant Und Die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des Ix. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Bd. I: Hauptvorträge. Bd. Ii: Sektionen I-V. Bd. Iii: Sektionen Vi-X: Bd. Iv: Sektionen Xi-Xiv. Bd. V: Sektionen Xv-Xviii. De Gruyter. pp. 205-213.
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  10. Lecture II: The Logical Form of an Intuition.John McDowell - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy 95 (9):451-470.
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  11. Lecture II: The Logical Form of an Intuition.John Mcdowell - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy 95 (9):451-470.
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  12. Intuition, Understanding, and the Human Form of Life.Pirmin Stekeler-Weithofer - 2011 - In Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill. pp. 117--144.
  13.  7
    The Grammar of Aesthetic Intuition: On Ernst Cassirer’s Concept of Symbolic Form in the Visual Arts.Peer F. Bundgaard - 2011 - Synthese 179 (1):43-57.
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  14. Intuition and the Autonomy of Philosophy.George Bealer - 1998 - In Michael DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.), Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and Its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 201-240.
    The phenomenology of a priori intuition is explored at length (where a priori intuition is taken to be not a form of belief but rather a form of seeming, specifically intellectual as opposed to sensory seeming). Various reductive accounts of intuition are criticized, and Humean empiricism (which, unlike radical empiricism, does admit analyticity intuitions as evidence) is shown to be epistemically self-defeating. This paper also recapitulates the defense of the thesis of the Autonomy and Authority (...)
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  15. This Paper's Thesis Ought to Be Unnecessary; It is the Sort of Claim That Only Requires Defense Because of the Assaults on Intuition Raised by Impudent Philosophers. The Point Under Attack, to Whose Defense I Rally, is the Reality of Time. In This Paper I Examine the Argument for the Unreality of Time Raised by JME McTaggart, First in its Classic Form, and Then as John Earman Recasts It in the Context of the General Theory of Relativity (GTR). McTaggart Characterizes Time in Two Ways, One in Terms of the Predicates" Past"," Present" and" Future", and Another in Terms of the Relations" Before"," After", and" Simultaneous". The First Characterization Puts Events in Time in an A-Series; the Second Orders Them as a B-Series. Then McTaggart's Argument Runs as Follows. [REVIEW]Jeff Russell - forthcoming - Philosophy.
     
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  16.  35
    An Active Symbols Theory of Chess Intuition.Alexandre Linhares - 2005 - Minds and Machines 15 (2):131-181.
    The well-known game of chess has traditionally been modeled in artificial intelligence studies by search engines with advanced pruning techniques. The models were thus centered on an inference engine manipulating passive symbols in the form of tokens. It is beyond doubt, however, that human players do not carry out such processes. Instead, chess masters instead carry out perceptual processes, carefully categorizing the chunks perceived in a position and gradually building complex dynamic structures to represent the subtle pressures embedded in (...)
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  17. Intuition, Presentational Phenomenology, and Awareness of Abstract Objects.Elijah Chudnoff - forthcoming - Florida Philosophical Review.
    Intuition has three parts. The first part is about the nature of intuition experiences. I claim that they are like perceptual experiences in possessing presentational phenomenology. Richard Manning challenges how I support this claim. The second part is about the nature of intuitive justification. There I argue for a form of phenomenal dogmatism about intuition: having an intuition as of p prima facie immediately justifies you in believing that p and does so because of its (...)
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  18. The Rational Roles of Intuition.Elijah Chudnoff - 2014 - In Anthony Booth & Darrell Rowbottom (eds.), Intuitions. Oxford University Press.
    NOTE: this is a substantial revision of a previously uploaded draft. Intuitions are often thought of as inputs to theoretical reasoning. For example, you might form a belief by taking an intuition at face value, or you might take your intuitions as starting points in the method of reflective equilibrium. The aim of this paper is to argue that in addition to these roles intuitions also play action-guiding roles. The argument proceeds by reflection on the transmission of justification (...)
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  19. The Completeness of Kant's Metaphysical Exposition of Space.Henny Blomme - 2012 - Kant-Studien 103 (2):139-162.
    In the first edition of his book on the completeness of Kant’s table of judgments, Klaus Reich shortly indicates that the B-version of the metaphysical exposition of space in the Critique of pure reason is structured following the inverse order of the table of categories. In this paper, I develop Reich’s claim and provide further evidence for it. My argumentation is as follows: Through analysis of our actually given representation of space as some kind of object (the formal intuition (...)
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  20. The Problem of Intuition.Steven D. Hales - 2000 - American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2):135-147.
    Traditional philosophy relies heavily on the use of rational intuition to establish theses and conclusions. This essay takes up the matter of intuition and argues for a stunning conclusion: appeal to rational intuition is epistemically justified only if a form of foundationalism is true. This type of foundationalism is the thesis that there is at least one proposition whose justification depends on nothing other than itself. The article also argues that unless we can establish that some (...)
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  21.  55
    Poincaré, Kant, and the Scope of Mathematical Intuition.Terry F. Godlove - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (4):779-801.
    Today it is no news to point out that Kant’s doctrine of space as a form of intuition is motivated by epistemological considerations independent of his commitment to Euclidean geometry. These considerations surface—apparently without his own recognition—in Poincaré’s, Science and Hypothesis, the very work that helped turn analytically-minded philosophers away from the Critique. I argue that we should view Poincaré as refining Kant’s doctrine of space as the form of intuition, even as we see both views (...)
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  22. Poincaré, Kant, and the Scope of Mathematical Intuition. Godlove - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (4):779-801.
    Today it is no news to point out that Kant’s doctrine of space as a form of intuition is motivated by epistemological considerations independent of his commitment to Euclidean geometry. These considerations surface—apparently without his own recognition—in Poincaré’s, Science and Hypothesis, the very work that helped turn analytically-minded philosophers away from the Critique. I argue that we should view Poincaré as refining Kant’s doctrine of space as the form of intuition, even as we see both views (...)
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    Phenomenological Intuition and the Problem of Philosophy as Method and Science: Scheler and Husserl.Eric J. Mohr - 2012 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 16 (2):218-234.
    Scheler subjects Husserl’s categorial intuition to a critique, which calls into question the very methodological procedure of phenomenology. Scheler’s divergence from Husserl with respect to whether sensory or categorial contents furnish the foundation of the act of intuition leads into a more significant divergence with respect to whether phenomenology should, primarily, be considered a form of science to which a specific methodology applies. Philosophical methods, according to Scheler, must presuppose, and not distract from, important preconditions of knowledge (...)
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    Abstraction and Intuition in Peano's Axiomatizations of Geometry.Davide Rizza - 2009 - History and Philosophy of Logic 30 (4):349-368.
    Peano's axiomatizations of geometry are abstract and non-intuitive in character, whereas Peano stresses his appeal to concrete spatial intuition in the choice of the axioms. This poses the problem of understanding the interrelationship between abstraction and intuition in his geometrical works. In this article I argue that axiomatization is, for Peano, a methodology to restructure geometry and isolate its organizing principles. The restructuring produces a more abstract presentation of geometry, which does not contradict its intuitive content but only (...)
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    Kant's A Priori Intuition of Space Independent of Postulates.Edgar J. Valdez - 2012 - Kantian Review 17 (1):135-160.
    Defences of Kant's foundations of geometry fall short if they are unable to equally ground Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Thus, Kant's account must be separated from geometrical postulates. I argue that characterizing space as the form of outer intuition must be independent of postulates. Geometrical postulates are then expressions of particular spatializing activities made possible by the a priori intuition of space. While Amit Hagar contends that this is to speak of noumena, I argue that a Kantian (...)
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  26. Intuition: A Discussion of Recent Philosophical Views.Mark R. Huston - 2004 - Dissertation, Wayne State University
    The use of intuition abounds in modern analytic philosophy. In particular, intuition is considered evidence that is used in the analysis of concepts, often in an attempt to find the individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions of the concept under consideration. Alternatively, intuition is used as evidence that one or more of the proposed necessary conditions is unacceptable, as in Gettier counterexamples to the classical analysis of knowledge. This view of intuition can be thought of as (...)
     
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  27. Syntheticity, Intuition and Symbolic Construction in Kant's Philosophy of Arithmetic.Ofra Rechter - 1997 - Dissertation, Columbia University
    Kant notably holds that arithmetic is synthetic a priori and has to do with the pure intuition of time. This seems to run against our conception of arithmetic as universal and topic neutral. Moreover, trained in the tradition constituting the aftermath of W.V. Quine's attack on the the a priori and on the analytic/synthetic distinction, the modern philosopher of arithmetic is likely to consider Kant's position a nonstarter, and leave settling the question of what Kant's philosophy of arithmetic is (...)
     
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  28. Husserl and Schlick on the Logical Form of Experience.Paul M. Livingston - 2002 - Synthese 132 (3):239-272.
    Over a period of several decades spanning the origin of the Vienna Circle, Schlick repeatedly attacked Husserl''s phenomenological method for its reliance on the ability to intuitively grasp or see essences. Aside from its significance for phenomenologists, the attack illuminates significant and little-explored tensions in the history of analytic philosophy as well. For after coming under the influence of Wittgenstein, Schlick proposed to replace Husserl''s account of the epistemology of propositions describing the overall structure of experience with his own account (...)
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  29. Heidegger on Kant, Time and the 'Form' of Intentionality.Sacha Golob - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):345 - 367.
    Between 1927 and 1936, Martin Heidegger devoted almost one thousand pages of close textual commentary to the philosophy of Immanuel Kant. This article aims to shed new light on the relationship between Kant and Heidegger by providing a fresh analysis of two central texts: Heidegger’s 1927/8 lecture course Phenomenological Interpretation of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and his 1929 monograph Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics. I argue that to make sense of Heidegger’s reading of Kant, one must resolve two (...)
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    Does Knowledge Rest Upon a Form of Life?Andrea Kern - 2015 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 5 (1):13-28.
    _ Source: _Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 13 - 28 Linking the idea of knowledge with the idea of a certain form of life is uncontestedly one of the lessons the later Wittgenstein wanted to teach us. However, what Wittgenstein exactly meant by this is highly contested in the Wittgenstein literature. In this paper, I distinguish two ways of appealing to the idea of a form of life in order to understand knowledge. According to the first way, the (...)
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    A Reconstruction of Contemporary Confucianism as a Form of Knowledge.Xiangjun Li - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):561-571.
    Traditional Confucianism might be likened to a great tree, with various branches and trends of thought emerging from common roots. Continuing with this metaphor, Confucianism as a form of knowledge might be regarded as a main branch, and the resulting form of Confucianism constitutes the main body of Chinese learning. Due to modern society's transformation, Confucianism as a form of knowledge has begun to disappear and the form of Confucianism which has its own discourse system and (...)
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    Flowing Within the Text: A Discussion on He Lin's Explanation of Zhu XI's Method of Intuition.Zhang Xianglong - 2005 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):60-65.
    The author examines He Lin's interpretation of Zhu Xi's method of intuition from a phenomenological-hermeneutical perspective and by exposing Zhu's philosophical presuppositions. In contrast with Lu Xiangshan's intuitive method, Zhu Xi's method of reading classics advocates "emptying your heart and flowing with the text" and, in this spirit, explains the celebrated "exhaustive investigation on the principles of things (ge wu qiong li)." "Text," according to Zhu, is therefore not an object in ordinary sense but a "contextual region" or "sensible (...)
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    Form-of-Life: From Politics to Aesthetics (and Back).Jason E. Smith - 2013 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (44-45).
    This article examines an often-mentioned but largely undeveloped concept in the work of Giorgio Agamben and in particular his Homo Sacer project: form-of-life. What is at stake in this concept is, I attempt to show, a way of thinking “politics” outside of the space of sovereignty. By examining a short text on this notion published just before the opening installment of the Homo Sacer sequence, this article demonstrates the way this early formulation of the concept is indebted to certain (...)
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  34. The Incoherence of Empiricism.George Bealer - 1992 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 66 (1):99-138.
    Radical empiricism is the view that a person's experiences (sensory and introspective), or a person's observations, constitute the person's evidence. This view leads to epistemic self-defeat. There are three arguments, concerning respectively: (1) epistemic starting points; (2) epistemic norms; (3) terms of epistemic appraisal. The source of self-defeat is traced to the fact that empiricism does not count a priori intuition as evidence (where a priori intuition is not a form of belief but rather a form (...)
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  35.  9
    Voice as Form of Life and Life Form.Sandra Laugier - 2015 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 4:63-82.
    This paper studies the concept of form of life as central to ordinary language philosophy : philosophy of our language as spoken ; pronounced by a human voice within a form of life. Such an approach to Wittgenstein’s later philosophy shifts the question of the common use of language – central to Wittgenstein’s Investigations – to the definition of the subject as voice, and to the reinvention of subjectivity in language. The voice is both a subjective and common (...)
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  36. Précis of Intuition.Ole Koksvik - manuscript
    This thesis seeks to advance our understanding of what intuitions are. I argue that there is a class of mental states deserving of the label ‘intuition’, and which is a good candidate for a psychological kind, a kind which cuts the mind at its natural joints. These mental states are experiences of a certain kind. In particular, they are experiences with representational content, and with a certain phenomenal character.
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  37. Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry.Michael R. DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ancients and moderns alike have constructed arguments and assessed theories on the basis of common sense and intuitive judgments. Yet, despite the important role intuitions play in philosophy, there has been little reflection on fundamental questions concerning the sort of data intuitions provide, how they are supposed to lead us to the truth, and why we should treat them as important. In addition, recent psychological research seems to pose serious challenges to traditional intuition-driven philosophical inquiry. Rethinking Intuition brings (...)
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  38.  2
    Reflections On... The “Borders” of Identity and Intuition.Deborah S. Mower - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):147-160.
    Because we automatically categorize individuals into members of in- or outgroups based on their perceived similarity to us, our social identity creates limitations and bias in our thinking. I examine the ways in which banal nationalism, cultural identifications, and group membership influence our thinking, the assumptions we hold, and the intuitions we form. If our goal is to engage in ethics without borders—a laudable goal—then we must uncover the ways in which our thinking is limited and consider strategies to (...)
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  39. Linguistic Intuition and Calibration.Jeffrey Maynes - 2012 - Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (5):443-460.
    Linguists, particularly in the generative tradition, commonly rely upon intuitions about sentences as a key source of evidence for their theories. While widespread, this methodology has also been controversial. In this paper, I develop a positive account of linguistic intuition, and defend its role in linguistic inquiry. Intuitions qualify as evidence as form of linguistic behavior, which, since it is partially caused by linguistic competence (the object of investigation), can be used to study this competence. I defend this (...)
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    Tractarian Form as the Precursor to Forms of Life.Chon Tejedor - 2015 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 4:83-109.
    Interpreters are divided on the question of whether the phrase ‘form of life’ is used univocally in Wittgenstein’s later writings. Some univocal interpreters suggest that, for Wittgenstein, ‘form of life’ captures a uniquely biological notion: the biologically human form of life. Others suggest that it captures a cultural notion: the notion of differently enculturated forms of human life. Non-univocal interpreters, in contrast, argue that Wittgenstein does not use ‘form of life’ univocally, but that he uses it (...)
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  41.  24
    Digestive Enzyme Secretion, Intuition, and the History of Science: Part II. [REVIEW]Lois Isenman - 2009 - Foundations of Science 14 (4):331-349.
    A companion paper explored the role of intuition in the genesis of an alternative theory for the secretion of pancreatic digestive enzymes, looking through the lens of three philosophers/historians of science. Gerald Holton, the last scholar, proposed that scientific imagination is shaped by a number of thematic presuppositions, which function largely below awareness. They come in pairs of opposites that alternately gain cultural preeminence. The current paper examines three thematic presuppositions inherent to both the generally accepted model for digestive (...)
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    Trusting Your Gut, Among Other Things: Digestive Enzyme Secretion, Intuition, and the History of Science. [REVIEW]Lois Isenman - 2009 - Foundations of Science 14 (4):315-329.
    The role of intuition in scientific endeavor is examined through the lens of three philosophers/historians of science—Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn, and Gerald Holton. All three attribute an important role to imagination/intuition in scientific endeavor. As a case study, the article examines the controversy between the generally accepted Vesicular Sequestration/Exocytosis Model of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion and an alternative view called the Equilibrium Model. It highlights the intertwining of intuition and reason in the genesis of the Equilibrium Model (...)
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  43. Adverbs of Action and Logical Form.Kirk Ludwig - 2010 - In Timothy O'Connor & Constantine Sandis (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Action. Blackwell.
    This article discusses the logical form of action sentences with particular attention to the role of adverbial modification, reviewing and extending the event analysis of action sentences.
     
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  44.  4
    Concept Attainment as a Function of Amount and Form of Information.Linda S. Siegel - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (3):464.
  45. Climate Change and the Intuition of Neutrality.Francesco Orsi - 2014 - In Marcello Di Paola & Gianfranco Pellegrino (eds.), Canned Heat. Ethics and Politics of Global Climate Change. Routledge. pp. 160-176.
    The intuition of neutrality, as discussed by John Broome, says that the addition of people does not, by itself, produce or subtract value from the world. Such intuition allows us to disregard the effects of climate change policy onto the size of populations, effectively allowing us to make policy recommendations. Broome has argued that the intuition has to go. Orsi responds by urging a normative (rather than Broome's axiological) interpretation of neutrality in terms of an exclusionary permission (...)
     
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  46. What is the Link Between Aristotle’s Philosophy of Mind, the Iterative Conception of Set, Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorems and God? About the Pleasure and the Difficulties of Interpreting Kurt Gödel’s Philosophical Remarks.Eva-Maria Engelen - forthcoming - In Gabriella Crocco & Eva-Maria Engelen (eds.), Kurt Gödel: Philosopher-Scientist. Presses Universitaires de Provence.
    It is shown in this article in how far one has to have a clear picture of Gödel’s philosophy and scientific thinking at hand (and also the philosophical positions of other philosophers in the history of Western Philosophy) in order to interpret one single Philosophical Remark by Gödel. As a single remark by Gödel (very often) mirrors his whole philosophical thinking, Gödel’s Philosophical Remarks can be seen as a philosophical monadology. This is so for two reasons mainly: Firstly, because it (...)
     
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  47.  34
    Intellectual Intuition and the Philosophy of Nature: An Examination of the Problem.Dalia Nassar - 2013 - In Johannes Haag & Markus Wild (eds.), Übergänge - diskrusiv oder intuitiv. Essays zu Eckart Försters Die 25 Jahre der Philosophie. Klostermann.
    This paper considers one of the most controversial aspects of Friedrich Schelling’s philosophy, his notion of intellectual intuition and its place within his philosophy of nature. I argue that Schelling developed his account of intellectual intuition through an encounter with--and ultimate critique of--Spinoza’s third kind of knowledge. Thus, Schelling’s notion of intuition was not an appropriation of Fichte’s conception of intuition as an act of consciousness. Nonetheless, and in spite of his sympathy with Spinoza, Schelling contended (...)
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    Agreement on Sale of Close Company Shares: Requirements of Form and Significance of Registration.Virginijus Bitė - 2012 - Jurisprudence 19 (2):543-560.
    The form and registration requirements applicable for transfer of close company shares differ in various countries. Discussions on separate related aspects take place in the international business transfer theory and practice. The Lithuanian legal regulation of the said requirements is continually improved, taking into account the experience of other countries and business practice needs. Based on the analysis of the European Union, the Lithuanian and foreign legislation, case law and doctrine, this article is designed for the examination of effectiveness (...)
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  49. Development of Logical Form.Andrej Ule - 1991 - Filozofski Vestnik 12 (1):215-224.
    In this paper, I would like to point out some problems of the presently reigning functional concept of the logical form of sentences, which presents itself as the final answer to the question of true logical form of sentences and, with this, as the basic scheme of logic. I believe that the present conception of the logical form of sentences is a historical result, which in many ways surpasses all former concepts of logical form in the (...)
     
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  50.  33
    When Intuition is Not Enough. Why the Principle of Procreative Beneficence Must Work Much Harder to Justify Its Eugenic Vision.Rebecca Bennett - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (9):447-455.
    The Principle of Procreative Beneficence claims that we have a moral obligation, where choice is possible, to choose to create the best child we can. The existence of this moral obligation has been proposed by John Harris and Julian Savulescu and has proved controversial on many levels, not least that it is eugenics, asking us to produce the best children we can, not for the sake of that child's welfare, but in order to make a better society. These are strong (...)
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