Results for 'genetics'

990 found
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  1. Genetics and Philosophy : An Introduction.Paul Griffiths & Karola Stotz - 2013 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    In the past century, nearly all of the biological sciences have been directly affected by discoveries and developments in genetics, a fast-evolving subject with important theoretical dimensions. In this rich and accessible book, Paul Griffiths and Karola Stotz show how the concept of the gene has evolved and diversified across the many fields that make up modern biology. By examining the molecular biology of the 'environment', they situate genetics in the developmental biology of whole organisms, and reveal how (...)
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  2.  6
    Genetics and Reductionism.Sahotra Sarkar - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    With the advent of the Human Genome Project there have been many claims for the genetic origins of complex human behavior including insanity, criminality, and intelligence. But what does it really mean to call something 'genetic'? This is the fundamental question that Sahotra Sarkar's book addresses. The author analyses the nature of reductionism in classical and molecular genetics. He shows that there are two radically different kinds of reductionist explanation: genetic reduction and physical reduction . This important book clarifies (...)
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  3.  16
    From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice.Allen Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Norman Daniels & Daniel Wikler - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book, written by four internationally renowned bioethicists and first published in 2000, was the first systematic treatment of the fundamental ethical issues underlying the application of genetic technologies to human beings. Probing the implications of the remarkable advances in genetics, the authors ask how should these affect our understanding of distributive justice, equality of opportunity, the rights and obligations as parents, the meaning of disability, and the role of the concept of human nature in ethical theory and practice. (...)
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  4.  32
    The Genetics of Language.Lyle Jenkins - 1979 - Linguistics and Philosophy 3 (1):105 - 119.
    Within the context of the study of the genetics of language, Chomskian laws of grammar, such as theStructure-dependence Condition and theA over A Condition, may be usefully regarded to have a status similar to that of Mendelian Laws in classical genetics. In both the case of Chomsky's Laws and Mendel's Laws, formal genetic principles are postulated which abstract away from the physical mechanisms involved and in both cases certain apparent counterexamples mirror a more complex underlying genetic organisation.
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  5.  2
    Genetics and Criminal Behavior.David Wasserman & Robert Wachbroit (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this 2001 volume a group of leading philosophers address some of the basic conceptual, methodological and ethical issues raised by genetic research into criminal behavior. The essays explore the complexities of tracing any genetic influence on criminal, violent or antisocial behavior; the varieties of interpretations to which evidence of such influences is subject; and the relevance of such influences to the moral and legal appraisal of criminal conduct. The distinctive features of this collection are: first, that it advances public (...)
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  6.  45
    Philosophy and Revolutions in Genetics: Deep Science and Deep Technology.Keekok Lee - 2003 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The last century saw two great revolutions in genetics the development of classic Mendelian theory and the discovery and investigation of DNA. Each fundamental scientific discovery in turn generated its own distinctive technology. These two case studies, examined in this text, enable the author to conduct a philosophical exploration of the relationship between fundamental scientific discoveries on the one hand, and the technologies that spring from them on the other. As such it is also an exercise in the philosophy (...)
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  7.  4
    Human Genetics Commission Calls for Tougher Rules on Use and Storage of Genetic Data.Human Genetics Commission - 2003 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 9 (1):3.
  8. Behavior Genetics and Postgenomics.Evan Charney - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):331-358.
    The science of genetics is undergoing a paradigm shift. Recent discoveries, including the activity of retrotransposons, the extent of copy number variations, somatic and chromosomal mosaicism, and the nature of the epigenome as a regulator of DNA expressivity, are challenging a series of dogmas concerning the nature of the genome and the relationship between genotype and phenotype. According to three widely held dogmas, DNA is the unchanging template of heredity, is identical in all the cells and tissues of the (...)
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  9. Genetics and the Law.Aubrey Milunsky, George J. Annas, National Genetics Foundation & American Society of Law and Medicine - 1976 - Plenum Press.
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  10.  5
    Genetics: Clinical Obligations and Public Health Programmes: Healthcare Provider Reasoning About Managing the Incidental Results of Newborn Screening.F. Miller, R. Hayeems, Y. Bombard, J. Little & J. Carroll - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):626-634.
    Background: Expanded newborn screening generates incidental results, notably carrier results. Yet newborn screening programmes typically restrict parental choice regarding receipt of this non-health serving genetic information. Healthcare providers play a key role in educating families or caring for screened infants and have strong beliefs about the management of incidental results. Methods: To inform policy on disclosure of infant sickle cell disorder carrier results, a mixed-methods study of healthcare providers was conducted in Ontario, Canada, to understand attitudes regarding result management using (...)
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  11.  30
    Neuroimaging, Genetics, and Psychopathy: Implications for the Legal System.C. Harenski, Robert D. Hare & Kent A. Kiehl - 2010 - In Luca Malatesti & John McMillan (eds.), Responsibility and Psychopathy: Interfacing Law, Psychiatry and Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa. pp. 125.
  12.  53
    Harming Future Persons: Ethics, Genetics and the Nonidentity Problem.David Wasserman & Melinda Roberts (eds.) - 2009 - Springer.
    This collection of essays investigates the obligations we have in respect of future persons, from our own future offspring to distant future generations.
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  13.  17
    Classical Genetics and the Theory-Net of Genetics.Pablo Lorenzano - 2000 - In Joseph D. Sneed, Wolfgang Balzer & C.-Ulises Moulines (eds.), Structuralist Knowledge Representation: Paradigmatic Examples. Rodopi. pp. 75-251.
    This article presents a reconstruction of the so-called classical, formal or Mendelian genetics, which is intended to be more complete and adequate than existing reconstructions. This reconstruction has been carried out with the instruments, duly modified and extended with respect to the case under consideration, of the structuralist conception of theories. The so-called Mendel’s Laws, as well as linkage genetics and gene mapping are formulated in a precise manner while the global structure of genetics is represented as (...)
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  14.  19
    Frankenstein's Footsteps: Science, Genetics and Popular Culture.Jon Turney - 1998 - Yale University Press.
    Traces the depiction of biological science in mass media and how it has shaped public perceptions.
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  15.  42
    Genetics and Culture: The Geneticization Thesis.Henk A. M. J. ten Have - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):295-304.
    The concept of ‘geneticization’ has been introduced in the scholarly literature to describe the various interlocking and imperceptible mechanisms of interaction between medicine, genetics, society and culture. It is argued that Western culture currently is deeply involved in a process of geneticization. This process implies a redefinition of individuals in terms of DNA codes, a new language to describe and interpret human life and behavior in a genomic vocabulary of codes, blueprints, traits, dispositions, genetic mapping, and a gentechnological approach (...)
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  16. Population Genetics and Sociobiology: Conflicting Views of Evolution.James Schwartz - 2002 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (2):224-240.
    This article explores the tension between the population genetics and sociobiological approaches to the study of evolution. Whereas population geneticists, like Stanford’s Marc Feldman, insist that the genetic complexities of organisms cannot be overlooked, sociobiologists rely on optimization models that are based on the simplest possible genetics.These optimization approaches have their roots in the classical result known as the fundamental theorem of natural selection, formulated by R. A. Fisher in 1930. From the start there was great uncertainty over (...)
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  17.  31
    The New Problem of Genetics: A Response to Gifford. [REVIEW]Kelly C. Smith - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):331-348.
    Recently, Fred Gifford attempted to explicate the meaning of the term genetic as applied to phenotypic traits. He takes as his primary goal the explication of how the term is used and tries to avoid conclusions about how it should be used. He proposes two independent criteria (DF and PI) which together capture much of what biologists mean when they describe traits as genetic. Although Gifford's approach is extremely insightful in many ways, I argue that his analysis is not sufficiently (...)
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  18. From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice.Allen Buchanan, Dan W. Brock, Norman Daniels & Daniel Wikler - 2000 - Philosophy 76 (297):472-475.
    This book, written by four internationally renowned bioethicists and first published in 2000, was the first systematic treatment of the fundamental ethical issues underlying the application of genetic technologies to human beings. Probing the implications of the remarkable advances in genetics, the authors ask how should these affect our understanding of distributive justice, equality of opportunity, the rights and obligations as parents, the meaning of disability, and the role of the concept of human nature in ethical theory and practice. (...)
     
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  19.  88
    Population Genetics.Roberta L. Millstein & Robert A. Skipper - 2006 - In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    Population genetics attempts to measure the influence of the causes of evolution, viz., mutation, migration, natural selection, and random genetic drift, by understanding the way those causes change the genetics of populations. But how does it accomplish this goal? After a short introduction, we begin in section (2) with a brief historical outline of the origins of population genetics. In section (3), we sketch the model theoretic structure of population genetics, providing the flavor of the ways (...)
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  20.  3
    From Genetics to Genomics: Facing the Liability Implications in Clinical Care.Gary Marchant, Mark Barnes, James P. Evans, Bonnie LeRoy & Susan M. Wolf - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):11-43.
    Health care is transitioning from genetics to genomics, in which single-gene testing for diagnosis is being replaced by multi-gene panels, genome-wide sequencing, and other multi-genic tests for disease diagnosis, prediction, prognosis, and treatment. This health care transition is spurring a new set of increased or novel liability risks for health care providers and test laboratories. This article describes this transition in both medical care and liability, and addresses 11 areas of potential increased or novel liability risk, offering recommendations to (...)
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  21.  40
    Genetics and Bioethics: How Our Thinking has Changed Since 1969.LeRoy Walters - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):83-95.
    In 1969, the field of human genetics was in its infancy. Amniocentesis was a new technique for prenatal diagnosis, and a newborn genetic screening program had been established in one state. There were also concerns about the potential hazards of genetic engineering. A research group at the Hastings Center and Paul Ramsey pioneered in the discussion of genetics and bioethics. Two principal techniques have emerged as being of enduring importance: human gene transfer research and genetic testing and screening. (...)
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  22.  58
    Behavioral Genetics and Personality.Robert Plomin & Avshalom Caspi - 1990 - In L. Pervin (ed.), Handbook of Personality: Theory and Research. Guilford Press. pp. 2--251.
  23.  40
    Behavioral Genetics and Development: Historical and Conceptual Causes of Controversy.Paul Griffiths & James Tabery - 2008 - New Ideas in Psychology 26 (3):332-352.
    Traditional, quantitative behavioral geneticists and developmental psychobiologists such as Gilbert Gottlieb have long debated what it would take to create a truly developmental behavioral genetics. These disputes have proven so intractable that disputants have repeatedly suggested that the problem rests on their opponents' conceptual confusion; whilst others have argued that the intractability results from the non-scientific, political motivations of their opponents. The authors provide a different explanation of the intractability of these debates. They show that the disputants have competing (...)
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  24.  93
    Population Genetics and Population Thinking: Mathematics and the Role of the Individual.Margaret Morrison - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1189-1200.
    Ernst Mayr has criticised the methodology of population genetics for being essentialist: interested only in “types” as opposed to individuals. In fact, he goes so far as to claim that “he who does not understand the uniqueness of individuals is unable to understand the working of natural selection” (1982, 47). This is a strong claim indeed especially since many responsible for the development of population genetics (especially Fisher, Haldane, and Wright) were avid Darwinians. In order to unravel this (...)
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  25. Genes and Future People: Philosophical Issues in Human Genetics.Walter Glannon - 2001 - Westview Press.
    Advances in genetic technology in general and medical genetics in particular will enable us to intervene in the process of human biological development which extends from zygotes and embryos to people. This will allow us to control to a great extent the identities and the length and quality of the lives of people who already exist, as well as those we bring into existence in the near and distant future. Genes and Future People explores two general philosophical questions, one (...)
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  26.  7
    Molecular Genetics and the Biological Basis of Color Vision.Maureen Neitz & Jay Neitz - 1998 - In W. Backhaus, R. Kliegl & J. Werner (eds.), Color Vision. Perspectives From Different Disciplines. De Gruyter. pp. 101--119.
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  27.  32
    Populations and Genetics: Legal and Socio-Ethical Perspectives.Bartha Maria Knoppers (ed.) - 2003 - Martinus Nijhoff.
    This book of selected papers covers population research and banking as well as accompanying confidentiality, and governance concerns.
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  28.  26
    New Genetics, New Indentities.Paul Atkinson - 2006 - Routledge.
    New genetic technologies and their applications in biomedicine have important implications for social identities in contemporary societies. In medicine, new genetics is increasingly important for the identification of health and disease, the imputation of personal and familial risk, and the moral status of those identified as having genetic susceptibility for inherited conditions. There are also consequent transformations in national and ethnic collective identity, and the body and its investigation is potentially transformed by the possibilities of genetic investigations and modifications (...)
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  29.  11
    Mendelian Genetics as a Platform for Teaching About Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry: The Value of Textbooks.Megan F. Campanile, Norman G. Lederman & Kostas Kampourakis - 2015 - Science & Education 24 (1-2):205-225.
  30.  2
    How Genetics Might Affect Real Property Rights.Mark A. Rothstein & Laura Rothstein - 2016 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 44 (1):216-221.
    New developments in genetics could affect a variety of real property rights. Mortgage lenders, mortgage insurers, real estate sellers, senior living centers, retirement communities, or other parties in residential real estate transactions begin requiring predictive genetic information as part of the application process. One likely use would be by retirement communities to learn an individual's genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease. The federal Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination based on disability, but it is not clear that it would apply to (...)
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  31. Genetics of Emotional Regulation: The Role of the Serotonin Transporter in Neural Function.Ahmad R. Hariri & Andrew Holmes - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):182-191.
  32.  18
    Ancient Genetics to Ancient Genomics: Celebrity and Credibility in Data-Driven Practice.Elizabeth Jones - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (2):27.
    “Ancient DNA Research” is the practice of extracting, sequencing, and analyzing degraded DNA from dead organisms that are hundreds to thousands of years old. Today, many researchers are interested in adapting state-of-the-art molecular biological techniques and high-throughput sequencing technologies to optimize the recovery of DNA from fossils, then use it for studying evolutionary history. However, the recovery of DNA from fossils has also fueled the idea of resurrecting extinct species, especially as its emergence corresponded with the book and movie Jurassic (...)
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  33.  33
    Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorders.Daniel H. Geschwind - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (9):409.
  34.  45
    From Playfulness and Self-Centredness Via Grand Expectations to Normalisation: A Psychoanalytical Rereading of the History of Molecular Genetics[REVIEW]H. A. E. Zwart - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):775-788.
    In this paper, I will reread the history of molecular genetics from a psychoanalytical angle, analysing it as a case history. Building on the developmental theories of Freud and his followers, I will distinguish four stages, namely: (1) oedipal childhood, notably the epoch of model building (1943–1953); (2) the latency period, with a focus on the development of basic skills (1953–1989); (3) adolescence, exemplified by the Human Genome Project, with its fierce conflicts, great expectations and grandiose claims (1989–2003) and (...)
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  35.  62
    Population Genetics.Samir Okasha - unknown - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  36. Genetics and Reproductive Risk : Can Having Children Be Immoral?Laura M. Purdy - 2010 - In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and Values: Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
  37.  29
    Between Beanbag Genetics and Natural Selection.Raphael Falk - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (3):313-325.
    The encounter between the Darwinian theory of evolution and Mendelism could be resolved only when reductionist tools could be applied to the analysis of complex systems. The instrumental reductionist interpretation of the hereditary basis of continuously varying traits provided mathematical tools which eventually allowed the construction of the Modern Synthesis of the theory of evolution.When genotypic as well as environmental variance allow the isolation of parts of the system, it is possible to apply Mendelian reductionism, that is , to treat (...)
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  38.  40
    Molecular Genetics, Reductionism, and Disease Concepts in Psychiatry.Herbert W. Harris & Kenneth F. Schaffner - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (2):127-153.
    The study of mental illness by the methods of molecular genetics is still in its infancy, but the use of genetic markers in psychiatry may potentially lead to a Virchowian revolution in the conception of mental illness. Genetic markers may define novel clusters of patients having diverse clinical presentations but sharing a common genetic and mechanistic basis. Such clusters may differ radically from the conventional classification schemes of psychiatric illness. However, the reduction of even relatively simple Mendelian phenomena to (...)
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  39.  14
    Quantitative Genetics and Developmental Psychology: Shall the Twain Ever Meet?Joseph K. Kovach - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):28-29.
  40.  30
    Drosophila Genetics: A Reductionist Research Program.Nils Roll-Hansen - 1978 - Journal of the History of Biology 11 (1):159 - 210.
  41.  10
    Developmental Genetics and Traditional Homology.Jessica A. Bolker & Rudolf A. Raff - 1996 - Bioessays 18 (6):489-494.
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  42. What Was Classical Genetics?C. Kenneth Waters - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (4):783-809.
    I present an account of classical genetics to challenge theory-biased approaches in the philosophy of science. Philosophers typically assume that scientific knowledge is ultimately structured by explanatory reasoning and that research programs in well-established sciences are organized around efforts to fill out a central theory and extend its explanatory range. In the case of classical genetics, philosophers assume that the knowledge was structured by T. H. Morgan’s theory of transmission and that research throughout the later 1920s, 30s, and (...)
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  43.  52
    Molecular Genetics.Ken Waters - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  44.  18
    Genetics and Psychiatry: A Proposal for the Application of the Precautionary Principle. [REVIEW]Corinna Porteri - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):391-397.
    The paper suggests an application of the precautionary principle to the use of genetics in psychiatry focusing on scientific uncertainty. Different levels of uncertainty are taken into consideration—from the acknowledgement that the genetic paradigm is only one of the possible ways to explain psychiatric disorders, via the difficulties related to the diagnostic path and genetic methods, to the value of the results of studies carried out in this field. Considering those uncertainties, some measures for the use of genetics (...)
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  45.  29
    Genetics and Personality Affect Visual Perspective in Autobiographical Memory.Cédric Lemogne, Loretxu Bergouignan, Claudette Boni, Philip Gorwood, Antoine Pélissolo & Philippe Fossati - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):823-830.
    Major depression is associated with a decrease of 1st person visual perspective in autobiographical memory, even after full remission. This study aimed to examine visual perspective in healthy never-depressed subjects presenting with either genetic or psychological vulnerability for depression. Sixty healthy participants performed the Autobiographical Memory Test with an assessment of visual perspective. Genetic vulnerability was defined by the presence of at least one S or LG allele of the polymorphism of the serotonin-transporter-linked promoter region . Psychological vulnerability was defined (...)
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  46.  16
    Genetics and the Moral Mission of Health Insurance.Thomas H. Murray - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (6):12-17.
  47.  51
    Human Genetics and Politics as Mutually Beneficial Resources: The Case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics During the Third Reich.Sheila Faith Weiss - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):41-88.
    This essay analyzes one of Germany's former premier research institutions for biomedical research, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA) as a test case for the way in which politics and human heredity served as resources for each other during the Third Reich. Examining the KWIA from this perspective brings us a step closer to answering the questions at the heart of most recent scholarship concerning the biomedical community under the swastika: (1) How do we explain (...)
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  48.  24
    Ontogeny, Genetics, and Evolution: A Perspective From Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience.Annette Karmiloff-Smith - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (1):44-51.
    The study of genetic developmental disorders originally seemed to hold the promise for those of a nativist persuasion of demonstrating pure dissociations between different cognitive functions, as well as the existence of innately specified modules in the brain and the direct mapping of mutated genes to specific cognitive-level outcomes. However, more recent research within a neuroconstructivist perspective has challenged this promise, arguing that earlier researchers lost sight of one fundamental explanatory factor in both the typical and atypical case: the actual (...)
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  49. Genetics and General Cognitive Ability.Robert Plomin & Frank M. Spinath - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):169-176.
  50.  14
    Genetic Determinism in the Genetics Curriculum.Annie Jamieson & Gregory Radick - 2017 - Science & Education 26 (10):1261-1290.
    Twenty-first-century biology rejects genetic determinism, yet an exaggerated view of the power of genes in the making of bodies and minds remains a problem. What accounts for such tenacity? This article reports an exploratory study suggesting that the common reliance on Mendelian examples and concepts at the start of teaching in basic genetics is an eliminable source of support for determinism. Undergraduate students who attended a standard ‘Mendelian approach’ university course in introductory genetics on average showed no change (...)
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