Results for 'global resources dividend'

996 found
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  1. Thomas Pogge’s Global Resources Dividend: A Critique and an Alternative.Tim Hayward - 2005 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 2 (3):317-332.
    Pogge’s proposal for a Global Resources Dividend (GRD) has been criticized because its likely effects would be less predictable than Pogge supposes and could even be counterproductive to the main aim of relieving poverty. The GRD might also achieve little with respect to its secondary aim of promoting environmental protection. This article traces the problems to Pogge’s inadequate conception of natural resources. It proposes instead to conceive of natural resources in terms of ‘ecological space’. Using (...)
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  2.  5
    Whip Cosmopolitanism Into Shape: Assessing Thomas Pogge’s Global Resources Dividend as an Instrument of Global Justice.Regina Queiroz, Gabriele De Angelis & Diogo P. Aurélio - 2010 - In Regina Queiroz, Gabriele De Angelis & Diogo P. Aurélio (eds.), Sovereign Justice: Global Justice in a World of Nations. De Gruyter.
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  3. Taxation and Global Justice: Closing the Gap Between Theory and Practice.Gillian Brock - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):161–184.
    I examine how reforming our international tax regime could be an important vehicle by which we can begin to realize global justice. For instance, eliminating tax havens, tax evasion, and transfer pricing schemes are all important to ensure accountability and to support democracies. I argue that the proposals concerning taxation reform are likely to be more effective in tackling global poverty than Thomas Pogge's global resources dividend because they target some of the central issues more (...)
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  4. Global Taxes on Natural Resources.Paula Casal - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):307-327.
    Thomas Pogge's Global Resources Dividend relies on a flat tax on the use of natural resources to fund the eradication of world poverty. Hillel Steiner's Global Fund taxes the full rental value of owned natural resources and distributes the proceeds equally. The paper compares the Dividend and the Fund and defends the Global Share, a novel proposal that taxes either use or ownership, does so (when possible) progressively, and distributes the revenue according (...)
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  5.  98
    Allowing the Poor to Share the Earth.Thomas W. Pogge - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):335-352.
    Two of the greatest challenges facing humanity are environmental degradation and the persistence of poverty. Both can be met by instituting a Global Resources Dividend (GRD) that would slow pollution and natural-resource depletion while collecting funds to avert poverty worldwide. Unlike Hillel Steiner's Global Fund, which is presented as a fully just regime governing the use of planetary resources, the GRD is meant as merely a modest but widely acceptable and therefore realistic step toward justice. (...)
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  6.  26
    Global Distributive Justice and the Taxation of Natural Resources — Who Should Pick Up the Tab?Dirk Haubrich - 2004 - Contemporary Political Theory 3 (1):48-69.
    Increasingly visible global distributive inequalities and famine pose considerable challenges for policy-makers and political philosophers alike. A recent proposal forwarded by Thomas Pogge has taken on the challenge of outlining a concept of global justice according to which redistribution is not merely predicated on the beneficiaries being in a state of need. The scheme, which he calls the Global Resources Dividend, aims to compensate people who are excluded from the benefits of the common stock of (...)
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  7. Real World Justice.Thomas Pogge - 2005 - Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):29-53.
    Despite a high and growing global average income, billions of human beings are still condemned to lifelong severe poverty with all its attendant evils of low life expectancy, social exclusion, ill health, illiteracy, dependency, and effective enslavement. We citizens of the rich countries are conditioned to think of this problem as an occasion for assistance. Thanks in part to the rationalizations dispensed by our economists, most of us do not realize how deeply we are implicated, through the new (...) economic order our states have imposed, in this ongoing catastrophe. My sketch of how we are so implicated follows the argument of my book, World Poverty and Human Rights, but takes the form of a response to the books critics. (shrink)
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  8.  48
    Periodization and forecast of global dynamics of human resources development.Sergii Sardak & В. Т. Сухотеплий С. Е. Сардак - 2013 - Economic Annals-XXI 1 (3-4):3–6.
    Analyzing and modeling interconnections between crucial factors of human development, rates of growth thereof and elasticity of the growth rates, the authors have defined specific periods of the development and have made a forecast for the dynamics of the human resources development. Those periods have been defined more exactly and arranged as follows: the first one – «Before Christ»; the second one – «Early Medieval» (1–1100 a.d.); the third one – «Advanced Medieval» (1101–1625); the forth one – «Pioneer’s Modernization» (...)
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  9.  58
    Real World Justice. Grounds, Principles, Human Rights, and Social Institutions.Andreas Follesdal & Thomas Pogge (eds.) - 2005 - Springer.
    It helps ordinary citizens evaluate their options and their responsibility for global institutional factors, and it challenges social scientists to address the causes of poverty and hunger that act across borders.The present volume ...
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  10.  70
    Global Regulatory System of Human Resources Development.Sergii Sardak - 2014 - Dissertation, КИЇВСЬКИЙ НАЦІОНАЛЬНИЙ ЕКОНОМІЧНИЙ УНІВЕРСИТЕТ ІМЕНІ ВАДИМА ГЕТЬМАНА
    ANNOTATION Sardak S.E. Global Regulatory System of Human Resources Development. – Manuscript. Thesis for the Doctor of Economic Science academic degree with major in 08.00.02 – World Economy and international economic relations. – SHEE «Kyiv National Economic University named after Vadym Hetman», Kyiv, 2014. The preconditions and factors of the global economic system with the identified relevant subjects areas and mechanisms of regulation instruments have been investigated. The crucial role of humans in the global economic system (...)
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  11.  86
    Assessing Global Poverty and Inequality: Income, Resources, and Capabilities.Ingrid Robeyns - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):30-49.
  12.  3
    A Global Biodiversity Fund to Implement Distributive Justice for Genetic Resources.Anna Deplazes‐Zemp - 2019 - Developing World Bioethics 19 (4):235-244.
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  13.  16
    The Commons, Game Theory, and Aspects of Human Nature That May Allow Conservation of Global Resources.Walter K. Dodds - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (4):411-425.
    Fundamental aspects of human use of the environment can be explained by game theory. Game theory explains aggregate behaviour of the human species driven by perceived costs and benefits. In the 'game' of global environmental protection and conservation, the stakes are the living conditions of all species including the human race, and the playing field is our planet. The question is can we control humanity's hitherto endless appetite for resources before we irreparably harm the global ecosystem and (...)
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  14.  19
    Global Justice, Natural Resources, and Climate Change.Megan Blomfield - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    To address climate change fairly, many conflicting claims over natural resources must be balanced against one another. This has long been obvious in the case of fossil fuels and greenhouse gas sinks including the atmosphere and forests; but it is ever more apparent that responses to climate change also threaten to spur new competition over land and extractive resources. This makes climate change an instance of a broader, more enduring and - for many - all too familiar problem: (...)
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  15. Global Population and Global Justice: Equitable Distribution of Resources Among Countries.Peter G. N. West-Oram & Heather Widdows - 2012 - The Electronic Library of Science.
    Analysing the demands of global justice for the distribution of resources is a complex task and requires consideration of a broad range of issues. Of particular relevance is the effect that different distributions will have on global population growth and individual welfare. Since changes in the consumption and distribution of resources can have major effects on the welfare of the global population, and the rate at which it increases, it is important to establish meaningful principles (...)
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  16. Natural Resources, Territorial Right, and Global Distributive Justice.Margaret Moore - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (1):84-107.
    The current statist order assumes that states have a right to make rules involving the transfer and/or extraction of natural resources within the territory. Cosmopolitan theories of global justice have questioned whether the state is justified in its control over natural resources, typically by pointing out that having resources is a matter of good luck, and this unfairness should be addressed. This paper argues that self-determination does generate a right over resources, which others should not (...)
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  17.  12
    Targeting Rents: Global Taxes on Natural Resources.Magnus Reitberger - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511770713.
    In the debate on global justice, proposals to tax natural resources in order to reduce global poverty and fund other worthwhile objectives have attracted scholarly attention and controversy. In thi...
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  18.  35
    It ' S All for Sale. The Control of Global Resources by Ridgeway James. Durham, Nc. Duke University Press, 2005. 209+Pp'.Richard P. Haynes - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):409-416.
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  19.  34
    Allocating Resources in a Global Community: Commentary on “Parallel Path: Poliovirus Research in the Vaccine Era”.Stephanie J. Bird - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (3):339-339.
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  20.  76
    Global Common Resources and the Just Distribution of Emission Shares.Megan Blomfield - 2013 - Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (3):283-304.
    A currently popular proposal for fairly distributing emission quotas is the equal shares view, which holds that that emission quotas should be distributed to all human beings globally on an equal per capita basis. In this paper I aim to show that a number of arguments in favour of equal shares are based on a misleading analysis of climate change as a global commons problem. I argue that a correct understanding of the way in which climate change results from (...)
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  21. Global Justice Beyond Distribution: Poverty and Natural Resources.Cindy Holder - 2012 - Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (1):33-45.
    Chronic poverty comes in a variety of forms. It is multi-dimensional in its causes and multi-dimensional in its impacts . Although poverty "has an irreducible economic connotation," this connotation "does not necessarily imply the primacy of economic factors" . For example, violent conflict, access to land, and social relations of power are among the most important factors in food security . Integration into global economic markets is as likely to be a source of immiseration and impoverishment as it is (...)
     
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  22.  5
    Distributing Global Health Resources: Contemporary Issues in Political Philosophy.Nicole Hassoun & Anders Herlitz - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (11).
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  23.  27
    The Global Distribution of Health Care Resources.R. Attfield - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (3):153-156.
    The international disparities in health and health-care provision comprise the gravest problem of medical ethics. The implications are explored of three theories of justice: an expanded version of Rawlsian contractarianism, Nozick's historical account, and a consequentialism which prioritizes the satisfaction of basic needs. The second too little satisfies medical needs to be cogent. The third is found to incorporate the strengths of the others, and to uphold fair rules and practices. Like the first, it also involves obligations transcending those to (...)
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  24.  31
    The Mirror of Modernity and Spiritual Resources for the Global Community.Tu Wei-Ming - 1995 - Sophia 34 (1):79-91.
    This is an excerpted version of a plenary address entitled “Beyond the Enlightenment Mentality Humanity and Rightness: Exploring Confucian Democracy”, presented at the 7th East-West Philosophers' Conference held at the East-West Center, Honolulu, January 1995. Published with permission of the author.
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  25.  24
    Multicultural and Global Feminist Philosophies of Science: Resources and Challenges.Sandra Harding - 1996 - In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. pp. 263--287.
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  26.  12
    Global Equality of Resources and the Problem of Valuation.Alexander Brown - 2016 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (5):609-628.
  27.  13
    Human Resources Opportunities to Balance Ethics and Neoclassical Economics in Global Labor Standards.Laura P. Hartman, Bill Shaw & Rodney Stevenson - 2000 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 19 (3):73-116.
  28.  9
    Population Growth, Environmental Resources and the Global Availability of Food.David Pimentel - 1999 - Social Research 66.
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  29. Against ‘Permanent Sovereignty’ Over Natural Resources.Chris Armstrong - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (2):129-151.
    The doctrine of permanent sovereignty over natural resources is a hugely consequential one in the contemporary world, appearing to grant nation-states both jurisdiction-type rights and rights of ownership over the resources to be found in their territories. But the normative justification for that doctrine is far from clear. This article elucidates the best arguments that might be made for permanent sovereignty, including claims from national improvement of or attachment to resources, as well as functionalist claims linking resource (...)
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  30.  53
    Valuing Our Food: Minimizing Waste and Optimizing Resources.Steven M. Finn - 2014 - Zygon 49 (4):992-1008.
    The magnitude of the global food waste problem is staggering, yet it receives little mainstream attention. We waste nearly half of all food produced—more than one billion tons annually—yet nearly one billion global citizens are hungry. Our values are out of balance; we need to properly value our food. Urgent change is needed, beginning with heightened awareness and a sense of responsibility to people and planet. Feeding nine billion people by 2050 is a tremendous challenge, but also a (...)
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  31.  17
    Justice and Natural Resources: An Egalitarian Theory.Chris Armstrong - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Struggles over precious resources such as oil, water, and land are increasingly evident in the contemporary world. States, indigenous groups, and corporations vie to control access to those resources, and the benefits they provide. These conflicts are rapidly spilling over into new arenas, such as the deep oceans and the Polar regions. How should these precious resources be governed, and how should the benefits and burdens they generate be shared? Justice and Natural Resources provides a systematic (...)
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  32.  26
    Eine Globale Rohstoffdividende.Thomas Pogge - 1995 - Analyse & Kritik 17 (2):183-208.
    We live in a world of radical inequality: Hundreds of millions suffer severe, lifelong poverty. Many others are quite well off and affluent enough significally to improve the lives of the global poor. Does this radical inequality constitute an injustice which we are involved? An affirmative answer finds broad support in different strands of the Western moral tradition, which also support the same program of institutional reform. This reform centers around a Global Resources Dividend, or GRD. (...)
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  33.  9
    Beyond the Liberal Peace Project: Toward Peace with Justice.Harry van der Linden - 2001 - Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):419–430.
    Many contemporary liberals adhere to the "liberal peace project" -- that is, the idea that world peace can be realized through the spread of political liberalism, or capitalist democracy. The LPP is based on projecting toward the future the well-documented fact that secure modern democracies have never fought wars with one another. A spirit of optimism prevails among LPP proponents, bolstered by the recent uprise in democracies, and they argue that their cause can be advanced by a liberal foreign policy (...)
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  34.  82
    Global Distributive Justice: An Introduction.Chris Armstrong - 2012 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Global distributive justice is now part of mainstream political debate. It incorporates issues that are now a familiar feature of the political landscape, such as global poverty, trade justice, aid to the developing world and debt cancellation. This is the first textbook to focus exclusively on issues of distributive justice on the global scale. It gives clear and up-to-date accounts of the major theories of global justice and spells out their significance for a series of important (...)
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  35.  25
    Ecology and Revolution: Global Crisis and the Political Challenge.Carl Boggs - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Ecology and Revolution: Global Crisis and the Political Challenge is an in-depth exploration and analysis of the global ecological crisis (going far beyond the issue of global warming) in the larger context of historical conditions and ...
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  36. Justice and Attachment to Natural Resources.Chris Armstrong - 2014 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (1):48-65.
  37. A Critique of the “Common Ownership of the Earth” Thesis.Arash Abizadeh - 2013 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 8 (2):33-40.
    In On Global Justice, Mathias Risse claims that the earth’s original resources are collectively owned by all human beings in common, such that each individual has a moral right to use the original resources necessary for satisfying her basic needs. He also rejects the rival views that original resources are by nature owned by no one, owned by each human in equal shares, or owned and co-managed jointly by all humans. I argue that Risse’s arguments fail (...)
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  38.  35
    Sustainable Aquaculture: Are We Getting There? Ethical Perspectives on Salmon Farming. [REVIEW]Ingrid Olesen, Anne Ingeborg Myhr & G. Kristin Rosendal - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (4):381-408.
    Aquaculture is the fastest growing animal producing sector in the world and is expected to play an important role in global food supply. Along with this growth, concerns have been raised about the environmental effects of escapees and pollution, fish welfare, and consumer health as well as the use of marine resources for producing fish feed. In this paper we present some of the major challenges salmon farming is facing today. We discuss issues of relevance to how to (...)
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  39. A Hegelian Approach to Global Poverty.Lydia L. Moland - 2012 - In Hegel and Global Justice. pp. 131-154.
    According to Thomas Pogge’s theory of human rights, those of us in the developed world have a negative duty to the global poor. In other words, our responsibility to them is not merely to help them but to stop harming them by hoarding natural resources and imposing unfair institutional structures. I argue that Hegel would agree that we have a responsibility to the global poor and that he would also agree with some of Pogge’s institutional diagnosis. Hegel (...)
     
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  40.  5
    Why a Journal on ‘Global Bioethics’?B. Chiarelli - 2014 - Global Bioethics 25 (1):1-2.
    Adaptive success and evolution are determined by how we interact with the natural environment and all other forms of life. Yet in our pursuit to dominate the natural world, we have lost sight of this basic premise and continue to exploit natural resources, to contaminate, to consume more than necessary and to misuse our reproductive capacities. For this reason, global bioethics emerged in the 1980s, a culmination of mental resistance on the part of many observers who sought to (...)
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  41. Corporate Social Responsibility in Global Value Chains: Where Are We Now and Where Are We Going?Peter Lund-Thomsen & Adam Lindgreen - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (1):1-12.
    We outline the drivers, main features, and conceptual underpinnings of the compliance paradigm. We then use a similar structure to investigate the drivers, main features, and conceptual underpinnings of the cooperative paradigm for working with CSR in global value chains. We argue that the measures proposed in the new cooperation paradigm are unlikely to alter power relationships in global value chains and bring about sustained improvements in workers’ conditions in developing country export industries. After that, we provide a (...)
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  42.  59
    The Influence of Global Intellectualization on Human Development.Sergii Sardak & A. Samoilenko S. Sardak - 2019 - Bulletin of the Cherkasy Bohdan Khmelnytsky National University. Economic Sciences, 1:176-182.
    In the context of the global intellectualization, human capital is the determining factor in the innovation development and the international competitiveness of countries. In the XXI century. the leading component of human capital are qualitatively new information, communication and network technologies. Particular importance are education and training, professionalism, high level of human resources management, building up, reproduction and human capital development. These factors are the prerequisite for the growth of the competitive advantages of the country in the conditions (...)
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  43. Prioritarianism for Global Health Investments: Identifying the Worst Off.Daniel Sharp & Joseph Millum - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy:112-132.
    The available resources for global health assistance are far outstripped by need. In the face of such scarcity, many people endorse a principle according to which highest priority should be given to the worst off. However, in order for this prioritarian principle to be useful for allocation decisions, policy-makers need to know what it means to be badly off. In this article, we outline a conception of disadvantage suitable for identifying the worst off for the purpose of making (...)
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  44. Sovereign Wealth Funds and Global Justice.Chris Armstrong - 2013 - Ethics and International Affairs 27 (4):413-428.
    Dozens of countries have established Sovereign Wealth Funds in the last decade or so, in the majority of cases employing those funds to manage the large revenues gained from selling resources such as oil and gas on a tide of rapidly rising commodity prices. These funds have raised a series of ethical questions, including just how the money contained in such funds should eventually be spent. This article engages with that question, and specifically seeks to connect debates on SWFs (...)
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  45. Knowing Their Own Good: Preferences & Liberty in Global Ethics.Lisa L. Fuller - 2011 - In Thom Brooks (ed.), New Waves in Ethics. Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 210--230.
    Citizens of liberal, affluent societies are regularly encouraged to support reforms meant to improve conditions for badly-off people in the developing world. Our economic and political support is solicited for causes such as: banning child labor, implementing universal primary education, closing down sweatshops and brothels, etc. But what if the relevant populations or individuals in the developing world do not support these particular reforms or aid programs? What if they would strongly prefer other reforms and programs, or would rank the (...)
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  46.  59
    The Cosmopolitan Imperative: Global Justice Through Accountable Integration.Luis Cabrera - 2005 - Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):171-199.
    Cosmopolitan political theorists hold that our obligations to distribute resources to others do not halt at state borders, but most do not advocate a restructuring of the global system to achieve their distributive aims. This article argues that promoting democratically accountable economic and political integration between states would be the most effective way to enable cosmopolitan, or routine, tax-financed, trans-state distributions. Movement toward a more integrated global system should encourage the view that larger sets of persons have (...)
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  47.  62
    Three Models of Global Community.Omar Dahbour - 2005 - Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):201-224.
    Debates about global justice tend to assume normative models of global community without justifying them explicitly. These models are divided between those that advocate a borderless world and those that emphasize the self-sufficiency of smaller political communities. In the first case, there are conceptions of a community of trade and a community of law. In the second case, there are ideas of a community of nation-states and of a community of autonomous communities. The nation-state model, however, is not (...)
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  48. Confining Pogge’s Analysis of Global Poverty to Genuinely Negative Duties.Steven Daskal - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):369-391.
    Thomas Pogge has argued that typical citizens of affluent nations participate in an unjust global order that harms the global poor. This supports his conclusion that there are widespread negative institutional duties to reform the global order. I defend Pogge’s negative duty approach, but argue that his formulation of these duties is ambiguous between two possible readings, only one of which is properly confined to genuinely negative duties. I argue that this ambiguity leads him to shift illicitly (...)
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  49.  70
    The Global Fund: A Reply to Casal.Hillel Steiner - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):328-334.
    The Global Fund is a mechanism for the global application of the Left Libertarian conception of distributive justice. As a form of luck egalitarianism, this conception confers upon each person an entitlement to an equal share of all natural resource values, since natural resources - broadly, geographical sites - are objects for the production of which no person is responsible. Owners of these sites, i.e. states, are liable to a 100% Global Fund tax on their unimproved (...)
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  50. Measuring Global Poverty: Toward a Pro-Poor Approach.Scott Wisor - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Global poverty measurement is important. It is used to allocate scarce resources, evaluate progress, and assess existing projects, policies, and institutional designs. But given the diversity of ways in which poverty is conceived, how can we settle on a conception and measure that can be used for interpersonal and inter-temporal global comparison? -/- This book lays out the key contemporary debates in poverty measurement, and provides a new analytical framework for thinking about poverty conception and measurement. Rather (...)
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