Results for 'healthcare'

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  1.  22
    Healthcare Heroes’: Problems with Media Focus on Heroism From Healthcare Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Caitríona L. Cox - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):510-513.
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, the media have repeatedly praised healthcare workers for their ‘heroic’ work. Although this gratitude is undoubtedly appreciated by many, we must be cautious about overuse of the term ‘hero’ in such discussions. The challenges currently faced by healthcare workers are substantially greater than those encountered in their normal work, and it is understandable that the language of heroism has been evoked to praise them for their actions. Yet such language can have potentially negative consequences. (...)
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  2. Healthcare Consumers’ Sensitivity to Costs: A Reflection on Behavioural Economics From an Emerging Market.Quan-Hoang Vuong, Tung-Manh Ho, Hong-Kong Nguyen & Thu-Trang Vuong - 2018 - Palgrave Communications 4:70.
    Decision-making regarding healthcare expenditure hinges heavily on an individual's health status and the certainty about the future. This study uses data on propensity of general health exam (GHE) spending to show that despite the debate on the necessity of GHE, its objective is clear—to obtain more information and certainty about one’s health so as to minimise future risks. Most studies on this topic, however, focus only on factors associated with GHE uptake and overlook the shifts in behaviours and attitudes (...)
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  3.  28
    What Healthcare Professionals Owe Us: Why Their Duty to Treat During a Pandemic is Contingent on Personal Protective Equipment.Udo Schuklenk - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):432-435.
    Healthcare professionals’ capacity to protect themselves, while caring for infected patients during an infectious disease pandemic, depends on their ability to practise universal precautions. In turn, universal precautions rely on the availability of personal protective equipment. During the SARS-CoV2 outbreak many healthcare workers across the globe have been reluctant to provide patient care because crucial PPE components are in short supply. The lack of such equipment during the pandemic was not a result of careful resource allocation decisions in (...)
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  4. Healthcare Practice, Epistemic Injustice, and Naturalism.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:1-23.
    Ill persons suffer from a variety of epistemically-inflected harms and wrongs. Many of these are interpretable as specific forms of what we dub pathocentric epistemic injustices, these being ones that target and track ill persons. We sketch the general forms of pathocentric testimonial and hermeneutical injustice, each of which are pervasive within the experiences of ill persons during their encounters in healthcare contexts and the social world. What’s epistemically unjust might not be only agents, communities and institutions, but the (...)
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  5.  42
    Training Healthcare Professionals as Moral Case Deliberation Facilitators: Evaluation of a Dutch Training Programme.Mirjam Plantinga, Bert Molewijk, Menno de Bree, Marloes Moraal, Marian Verkerk & Guy A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):630-635.
    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator. In this paper, we present the first results of a study in which we evaluated the programme. We used a mixed methods design. One hundred and twenty trained healthcare professionals and five trainers from 16 training groups working (...)
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  6.  46
    Healthcare Professionals’ and Patients’ Perspectives on Consent to Clinical Genetic Testing: Moving Towards a More Relational Approach.Samuel Gabrielle Natalie, Dheensa Sandi, Farsides Bobbie, Fenwick Angela & Lucassen Anneke - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):47.
    This paper proposes a refocusing of consent for clinical genetic testing, moving away from an emphasis on autonomy and information provision, towards an emphasis on the virtues of healthcare professionals seeking consent, and the relationships they construct with their patients. We draw on focus groups with UK healthcare professionals working in the field of clinical genetics, as well as in-depth interviews with patients who have sought genetic testing in the UK’s National Health Service. We explore two aspects of (...)
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  7.  73
    Public Healthcare Resource Allocation and the Rule of Rescue.R. Cookson, C. McCabe & A. Tsuchiya - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):540-544.
    In healthcare, a tension sometimes arises between the injunction to do as much good as possible with scarce resources and the injunction to rescue identifiable individuals in immediate peril, regardless of cost (the “Rule of Rescue”). This tension can generate serious ethical and political difficulties for public policy makers faced with making explicit decisions about the public funding of controversial health technologies, such as costly new cancer drugs. In this paper we explore the appropriate role of the Rule of (...)
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  8. Dementia, Healthcare Decision Making, and Disability Law.Megan S. Wright - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (S4):25-33.
    Persons with dementia often prefer to participate in decisions about their health care, but may be prevented from doing so because healthcare decision-making law facilitates use of advance directives or surrogate decision makers for persons with decisional impairments such as dementia. Federal and state disability law provide alternative decision-making models that do not prevent persons with mild to moderate dementia from making their own healthcare decisions at the time the decision needs to be made. In order to better (...)
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  9.  41
    Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-Professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions.Catarina Fischer Grönlund, Vera Dahlqvist, Karin Zingmark, Mikael Sandlund & Anna Söderberg - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (4):321-338.
    Several studies show that healthcare professionals need to communicate inter-professionally in order to manage ethical difficulties. A model of clinical ethics support inspired by Habermas’ theory of discourse ethics has been developed by our research group. In this version of CES sessions healthcare professionals meet inter-professionally to communicate and reflect on ethical difficulties in a cooperative manner with the aim of reaching communicative agreement or reflective consensus. In order to understand the course of action during CES, the aim (...)
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  10.  48
    Healthcare Regulation as a Tool for Public Accountability.Rui Nunes, Guilhermina Rego & Cristina Brandão - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):257-264.
    The increasing costs of healthcare delivery led to different political and administrative approaches trying to preserve the core values of the welfare state. This approach has well documented weaknesses namely with regard to healthcare rationing. The objective of this paper is to evaluate if independent healthcare regulation is an important tool with regard to the construction of fair processes for setting limits to healthcare. Methodologically the authors depart from Norman Daniels’ and James Sabin’s theory of accountability (...)
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  11. Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare: A Philosophical Analysis.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):529-540.
    In this paper we argue that ill persons are particularly vulnerable to epistemic injustice in the sense articulated by Fricker. Ill persons are vulnerable to testimonial injustice through the presumptive attribution of characteristics like cognitive unreliability and emotional instability that downgrade the credibility of their testimonies. Ill persons are also vulnerable to hermeneutical injustice because many aspects of the experience of illness are difficult to understand and communicate and this often owes to gaps in collective hermeneutical resources. We then argue (...)
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  12.  7
    The Healthcare Worker at Risk During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Jewish Ethical Perspective.Amy Solnica, Leonid Barski & Alan Jotkowitz - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):441-443.
    The current COVID-19 pandemic has raised many questions and dilemmas for modern day ethicists and healthcare providers. Are physicians, nurses and other healthcare workers morally obligated to put themselves in harm’s way and treat patients during a pandemic, occurring a great risk to themselves, their families and potentially to other patients? The issue was relevant during the 1918 influenza epidemic and more recently severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in 2003. Since the risk to the healthcare workers was (...)
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  13.  12
    Is Healthcare Providers’ Value-Neutrality Depending on How Controversial a Medical Intervention Is? Analysis of 10 More or Less Controversial Interventions.Lynöe Niels, Björk Joar & Juth Niklas - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):117-123.
    BackgroundSwedish healthcare providers are supposed to be value-neutral when making clinical decisions. Recent conducted studies among Swedish physicians have indicated that the proportion of those whose personal values influence decision-making vary depending on the framing and the nature of the issue.ObjectiveTo examine whether the proportions of value-influenced and value-neutral participants vary depending on the extent to which the intervention is considered controversial.MethodsTo discriminate between value-neutral and value-influenced healthcare providers, we have used the same methods in six vignette based (...)
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  14.  19
    What Healthcare Teams Find Ethically Difficult.D. Rasoal, A. Kihlgren, I. James & M. Svantesson - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (8):825-837.
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  15.  17
    Can Healthcare Workers Reasonably Question the Duty to Care Whilst Healthcare Institutions Take a Reactive Approach to Infectious Disease Risks?Michael Millar & Desmond T. S. Hsu - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (1):94-98.
    Healthcare workers carry a substantial risk of harm from infectious disease, particularly, but not exclusively, during outbreaks. More can be done by healthcare institutions to identify risks, quantify the current burden of preventable infectious disease amongst HCWs and identify opportunities for prevention. We suggest that institutional obligations should be clarified with respect to the mitigation of infectious disease risks to staff, and question the duty of HCWs to care while healthcare institutions persist with a reactive rather than (...)
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  16. Justice, Health, and Healthcare.Norman Daniels - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):2 – 16.
    Healthcare (including public health) is special because it protects normal functioning, which in turn protects the range of opportunities open to individuals. I extend this account in two ways. First, since the distribution of goods other than healthcare affect population health and its distribution, I claim that Rawls's principles of justice describe a fair distribution of the social determinants of health, giving a partial account of when health inequalities are unjust. Second, I supplement a principled account of justice (...)
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  17.  14
    Healthcare Access for the Deaf in Singapore: Overcoming Communication Barriers.Hillary Chua - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (4):377-390.
    Good communication between healthcare providers and patients is vital to effective healthcare. In order to understand patients’ complaints, make accurate diagnoses, obtain informed consent and explain treatment regimens, clinicians must communicate well with their patients. This can be challenging when treating patients from unfamiliar cultural backgrounds, such as the Deaf. Not only are they a linguistic and cultural minority, they are also members of the world’s largest and oft-forgotten minority group: the disability community. Under Article 25 of the (...)
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  18.  5
    Healthcare Professionals’ Experience, Training, and Knowledge Regarding Immigration-Related Law Enforcement in Healthcare Facilities: An Online Survey.Jaime La Charite, Derek W. Braverman, Dana Goplerud, Alexandra Norton, Amanda Bertram & Zackary D. Berger - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (1):50-58.
    U.S. immigration policies and enforcement can make immigrants fearful of accessing healthcare. Although current immigration policies restrict enforcement in “sensitive locations” including healthcare facilities, there are reports of enforcement actions in such settings.
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  19.  37
    Just Healthcare? The Moral Failure of Single-Tier Basic Healthcare.John Meadowcroft - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (2):152-168.
    This article sets out the moral failure of single-tier basic healthcare. Single-tier basic healthcare has been advocated on the grounds that the provision of healthcare should be divorced from ability to pay and unequal access to basic healthcare is morally intolerable. However, single-tier basic healthcare encounters a host of catastrophic moral failings. Given the fact of human pluralism it is impossible to objectively define “basic” healthcare. Attempts to provide single-tier healthcare therefore become political (...)
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  20. Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies.K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.) - 2002 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume illustrates the central importance of diversity of human values throughout healthcare. The readings are organized around the main stages of the clinical encounter from the patient's perspective. They run from staying well and 'first contact' through to either recovery or to long-term illness, death and dying.
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  21.  16
    Undergraduate Healthcare Ethics Education, Moral Resilience, and the Role of Ethical Theories.S. Monteverde - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (4):385-401.
  22.  5
    Why Healthcare Workers Should Not Be Prioritized in Ventilator Triage.William Sveen & Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):133-135.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 133-135.
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  23. Healthcare and Complicity in Australian Immigration Detention.Ryan Essex - 2016 - Monash Bioethics Review 34 (2):136-147.
    Australian immigration detention has received persistent criticism since its introduction almost 25 years ago. With the recent introduction of offshore processing, these criticisms have intensified. Riots, violence, self-harm, abuse and devastating mental health outcomes are all now well documented, along with a number of deaths. Clinicians have played a central role working in these environments, faced with the overarching issue of delivering healthcare while facilitating an abusive and harmful system. Since the re-introduction of offshore processing a number of authors (...)
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  24.  19
    Healthcare Provider Moral Distress as a Leadership Challenge.Jennifer Bell & Jonathan M. Breslin - 2008 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 10 (4):94-97.
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  25.  33
    Inhospitable Healthcare Spaces: Why Diversity Training on LGBTQIA Issues Is Not Enough.Megan A. Dean, Elizabeth Victor & Laura Guidry-Grimes - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):557-570.
    In an effort to address healthcare disparities in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer populations, many hospitals and clinics institute diversity training meant to increase providers’ awareness of and sensitivity to this patient population. Despite these efforts, many healthcare spaces remain inhospitable to LGBTQ patients and their loved ones. Even in the absence of overt forms of discrimination, LGBTQ patients report feeling anxious, unwelcome, ashamed, and distrustful in healthcare encounters. We argue that these negative experiences are produced (...)
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  26.  11
    Healthcare Professionals' Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in Paediatric Cancer Care.C. Bartholdson, M. af Sandeberg, K. Lutzen, K. Blomgren & P. Pergert - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
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  27.  32
    Lifeworld-Led Healthcare: Revisiting a Humanising Philosophy That Integrates Emerging Trends. [REVIEW]Les Todres, Kathleen Galvin & Karin Dahlberg - 2006 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (1):53-63.
    In this paper, we describe the value and philosophy of lifeworld-led care. Our purpose is to give a philosophically coherent foundation for lifeworld-led care and its core value as a humanising force that moderates technological progress. We begin by indicating the timeliness of these concerns within the current context of citizen-oriented, participative approaches to healthcare. We believe that this context is in need of a deepening philosophy if it is not to succumb to the discourses of mere consumerism. We (...)
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  28.  1
    The Healthcare Ethics Consultant-Certified Program: Fair, Feasible, and Defensible, But Neither Definitive Nor Finished.Felicia Cohn, Mary Beth Benner, Chris Feudtner & Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (3):1-5.
    Volume 20, Issue 3, March 2020, Page 1-5.
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  29.  54
    Implicit Bias in Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.Chloë FitzGerald & Samia Hurst - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):19.
    Implicit biases involve associations outside conscious awareness that lead to a negative evaluation of a person on the basis of irrelevant characteristics such as race or gender. This review examines the evidence that healthcare professionals display implicit biases towards patients. PubMed, PsychINFO, PsychARTICLE and CINAHL were searched for peer-reviewed articles published between 1st March 2003 and 31st March 2013. Two reviewers assessed the eligibility of the identified papers based on precise content and quality criteria. The references of eligible papers (...)
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  30.  28
    Legitimate Healthcare Limit Setting in a Real-World Setting: Integrating Accountability for Reasonableness and Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis.Kristine Bærøe & Rob Baltussen - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):98-111.
    The overall aim of this article is to discuss the organization of limit setting in healthcare in terms of legitimacy. We argue there is a strong ethical demand that such processes should be arranged to provide adversely affected people well-justified reasons to confer legitimacy to the processes despite favouring a different decision-making outcome. Two increasingly popular approaches, Accountability for Reasonableness (A4R) and Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA), can both be applied to support legitimate decision-making processes. However, the role played by (...)
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  31.  10
    Healthcare, Responsibility and Golden Opportunities.Gabriel De Marco, Thomas Douglas & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3).
    When it comes to determining how healthcare resources should be allocated, there are many factors that could—and perhaps should—be taken into account. One such factor is a patient’s responsibility for his or her illness, or for the behavior that caused it. Policies that take responsibility for the unhealthy lifestyle or its outcomes into account—responsibility-sensitive policies—have faced a series of criticisms. One holds that agents often fail to meet either the control or epistemic conditions on responsibility with regard to their (...)
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  32.  22
    Healthcare, Artificial Intelligence and the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Ethical, Social and Legal Considerations.S. Mahomed - 2018 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 11 (2):93.
  33.  37
    Healthcare Professionals' and Researchers' Understanding of Cancer Genetics Activities: A Qualitative Interview Study.N. Hallowell, S. Cooke, G. Crawford, M. Parker & A. Lucassen - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):113-119.
    Aims: To describe individuals’ perceptions of the activities that take place within the cancer genetics clinic, the relationships between these activities and how these relationships are sustained. Design: Qualitative interview study. Participants: Forty individuals involved in carrying out cancer genetics research in either a clinical (n = 28) or research-only (n = 12) capacity in the UK. Findings: Interviewees perceive research and clinical practice in the subspecialty of cancer genetics as interdependent. The boundary between research and clinical practice is described (...)
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  34.  22
    Responsibility in Healthcare Across Time and Agents.Rebecca C. H. Brown & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):636-644.
    It is unclear whether someone’s responsibility for developing a disease or maintaining his or her health should affect what healthcare he or she receives. While this dispute continues, we suggest that, if responsibility is to play a role in healthcare, the concept must be rethought in order to reflect the sense in which many health-related behaviours occur repeatedly over time and are the product of more than one agent. Most philosophical accounts of responsibility are synchronic and individualistic; we (...)
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  35.  3
    Healthcare Rationing Cutoffs and Sorites Indeterminacy.Philip M. Rosoff - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (4):479-506.
    Rationing is an unavoidable mechanism for reining in healthcare costs. It entails establishing cutoff points that distinguish between what is and is not offered or available to patients. When the resource to be distributed is defined by vague and indeterminate terms such as “beneficial,” “effective,” or even “futile,” the ability to draw meaningful boundary lines that are both ethically and medically sound is problematic. In this article, I draw a parallel between the challenges posed by this problem and the (...)
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  36.  15
    Latin American Healthcare Systems in Times of Pandemic.Sergio G. Litewka & Elizabeth Heitman - 2020 - Developing World Bioethics 20 (2):69-73.
    Developing World Bioethics, Accepted Article.
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  37.  51
    Catholic Healthcare Organizations and How They Can Contribute to Solidarity: A Social-Ethical Account of Catholic Identity.Martien A. M. Pijnenburg, Bert Gordijn, Frans J. H. Vosman & Henk A. M. J. Ten Have - 2010 - Christian Bioethics 16 (3):314-333.
    Solidarity belongs to the basic principles of Catholic Social Teaching (CST) and is part of the ethical repertoire of European moral traditions and European healthcare systems. This paper discusses how leaders of Catholic healthcare organizations (HCOs) can understand their institutional moral responsibility with regard to the preservation of solidarity. In dealing with this question, we make use of Taylor's philosophy of modern culture. We first argue that, just as all HCOs, Catholic ones also can embody and strengthen solidarity (...)
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  38.  23
    A Mobile Revolution for Healthcare? Setting the Agenda for Bioethics.Federica Lucivero & Karin R. Jongsma - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (10):685-689.
    Mobile health is rapidly being implemented and changing our ways of doing, understanding and organising healthcare. mHealth includes wearable devices as well as apps that track fitness, offer wellness programmes or provide tools to manage chronic conditions. According to industry and policy makers, these systems offer efficient and cost-effective solutions for disease prevention and self-management. While this development raises many ethically relevant questions, so far mHealth has received only little attention in medical ethics. This paper provides an overview of (...)
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  39.  19
    Healthcare Research Ethics and Law: Regulation, Review and Responsibility.Hazel Biggs - 2009 - Routledge-Cavendish.
    The book explores and explains the relationship between law and ethics in the context of medically related research in order to provide a practical guide to understanding for members of research ethics committees (RECs), professionals involved with medical research and those with an academic interest in the subject.
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  40.  32
    Prioritising Healthcare Workers for Ebola Treatment: Treating Those at Greatest Risk to Confer Greatest Benefit.Priya Satalkar, Bernice E. Elger & David M. Shaw - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (2):59-67.
    The Ebola epidemic in Western Africa has highlighted issues related to weak health systems, the politics of drug and vaccine development and the need for transparent and ethical criteria for use of scarce local and global resources during public health emergency. In this paper we explore two key themes. First, we argue that independent of any use of experimental drugs or vaccine interventions, simultaneous implementation of proven public health principles, community engagement and culturally sensitive communication are critical as these measures (...)
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  41. Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare Encounters: Evidence From Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.Havi Carel, Charlotte Blease & Keith Geraghty - unknown
    Chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis remains a controversial illness category. This paper surveys the state of knowledge and attitudes about this illness and proposes that epistemic concerns about the testimonial credibility of patients can be articulated using Miranda Fricker’s concept of epistemic injustice. While there is consensus within mainstream medical guidelines that there is no known cause of CFS/ME, there is continued debate about how best to conceive of CFS/ME, including disagreement about how to interpret clinical studies of treatments. (...)
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  42.  10
    Rawlsian Contractualism and Healthcare Allocation: A Response to Torbjörn Tännsjö.Quinn Hiroshi Gibson - 2021 - Diametros 18 (68):9-23.
    The consideration of the problem of healthcare allocation as a special case of distributive justice is especially alluring when we only consider consequentialist theories. I articulate here an alternative Rawlsian non-consequentialist theory which prioritizes the fairness of healthcare allocation procedures rather than directly setting distributive parameters. The theory in question stems from Rawlsian commitments that, it is argued, have a better Rawlsian pedigree than those considered as such by Tännsjö. The alternative framework is worthy of consideration on its (...)
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  43.  12
    Healthcare and the Slippery Slope of State Growth: Lessons From the Past.Alberto Mingardi - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (2):169-189.
    All over Europe, the provision of healthcare services is widely considered a primary duty of the government. Universal access to medical care can be considered a basic ingredient of the so-called “European social model.” But if universal access to medical care is seldom questioned, European governments—faced with expanding costs caused by an increasing demand driven by an aging population and technology-driven improvements—are contemplating the possibility of “rationing”1 treatments, or the possibility of allowing a greater role for private suppliers. If (...)
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  44.  37
    Healthcare Inequality, Cross-Cultural Training, and Bioethics: Principles and Applications.John R. Stone - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (2):216-226.
    To promote so-called cultural competence in work of direct-care providers and other health professionals among diverse peoples, cross-cultural training is now widely advised. However, in ethically assessing aims and content of CCT, and surrounding issues and concerns, what should guide us? And if we can elaborate satisfactory moral touchstones, what do they imply for healthcare professionals, overarching structures, and bioethicists? Building on prior work, this paper tries to help answer these questions.
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  45.  44
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare Provision: A New Dimension.Peter West-Oram & Alena Buyx - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (5):336-343.
    The right to conscientious objection in the provision of healthcare is the subject of a lengthy, heated and controversial debate. Recently, a new dimension was added to this debate by the US Supreme Court's decision in Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby et al. which effectively granted rights to freedom of conscience to private, for-profit corporations. In light of this paradigm shift, we examine one of the most contentious points within this debate, the impact of granting conscience exemptions to healthcare (...)
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  46.  16
    Are Healthcare Professionals Working in Australia's Immigration Detention Centres Condoning Torture?David Isaacs - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (7):413-415.
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  47.  42
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare Provision: A New Dimension.Peter West-Oram & Alena Buyx - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):336-343.
    The right to conscientious objection in the provision of healthcare is the subject of a lengthy, heated and controversial debate. Recently, a new dimension was added to this debate by the US Supreme Court's decision in Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby et al. which effectively granted rights to freedom of conscience to private, for-profit corporations. In light of this paradigm shift, we examine one of the most contentious points within this debate, the impact of granting conscience exemptions to healthcare (...)
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  48.  36
    Ethics of Healthcare Robotics.Bernd Carsten Stahl & Mark Coeckelbergh - 2016 - Robotics And Autonomous Systems 86:152-161.
    How can we best identify, understand, and deal with ethical and societal issues raised by healthcare robotics? This paper argues that next to ethical analysis, classic technology assessment, and philosophical speculation we need forms of reflection, dialogue, and experiment that come, quite literally, much closer to innovation practices and contexts of use. The authors discuss a number of ways how to achieve that. Informed by their experience with “embedded” ethics in technical projects and with various tools and methods of (...)
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  49.  9
    Why Healthcare Workers Ought to Be Prioritized in ASMR During the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic.Mark P. Aulisio & Thomas May - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):125-128.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 125-128.
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  50.  57
    Healthcare Access as a Right, Not a Privilege: A Construct of Western Thought.Thomas J. Papadimos - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:2.
    Over 45 million Americans are uninsured or underinsured. Those living in poverty exhibit the worst health status. Employment, education, income, and race are important factors in a person's ability to acquire healthcare access. Having established that there are people lacking healthcare access due to multi-factorial etiologies, the question arises as to whether the intervention necessary to assist them in obtaining such access should be considered a privilege, or a right. The right to healthcare access is examined from (...)
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