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Helen E. Longino [48]Helen Longino [29]Helen Elizabeth Longino [1]Helene Longino [1]
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Helen Longino
Stanford University
  1. The Fate of Knowledge.Helen Longino - 2002 - Princeton University Press.
    "--Richard Grandy, Rice University "This is the first compelling diagnosis of what has gone awry in the raging 'science wars.
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  2. Science as Social Knowledge: Values and Objectivity in Scientific Inquiry.Helen Longino (ed.) - 1990 - Princeton University Press.
    This is an important book precisely because there is none other quite like it.
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  3.  26
    Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality.Helen E. Longino - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    In Studying Human Behavior, Helen E. Longino enters into the complexities of human behavioral research, a domain still dominated by the age-old debate of “nature versus nurture.” Rather than supporting one side or another or attempting..
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  4. Science as Social Knowledge.Helen Longino - 1992 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (2):283-285.
    In Science as Social Knowledge, Helen Longino offers a contextual analysis of evidential relevance. She claims that this "contextual empiricism" reconciles the objectivity of science with the claim that science is socially constructed. I argue that while her account does offer key insights into the role that values play in science, her claim that science is nonetheless objective is problematic.
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  5.  20
    Science as Social Knowledge.Helen Longino - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (3):194-201.
    In Science as Social Knowledge, Helen Longino offers a contextual analysis of evidential relevance. She claims that this "contextual empiricism" reconciles the objectivity of science with the claim that science is socially constructed. I argue that while her account does offer key insights into the role that values play in science, her claim that science is nonetheless objective is problematic.
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  6.  41
    Scientific Pluralism.Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (eds.) - 2006 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Scientific pluralism is an issue at the forefront of philosophy of science. This landmark work addresses the question, Can pluralism be advanced as a general, philosophical interpretation of science?
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  7. Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Values in Science: Rethinking the Dichotomy.Helen E. Longino - 1996 - In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 39--58.
    Underdetermination arguments support the conclusion that no amount of empirical data can uniquely determine theory choice. The full content of a theory outreaches those elements of it (the observational elements) that can be shown to be true (or in agreement with actual observations).2 A number of strategies have been developed to minimize the threat such arguments pose to our aspirations to scientific knowledge. I want to focus on one such strategy: the invocation of additional criteria drawn from a pool of (...)
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  8. Gender, Politics, and the Theoretical Virtues.Helen E. Longino - 1995 - Synthese 104 (3):383 - 397.
    Traits like simplicity and explanatory power have traditionally been treated as values internal to the sciences, constitutive rather than contextual. As such they are cognitive virtues. This essay contrasts a traditional set of such virtues with a set of alternative virtues drawn from feminist writings about the sciences. In certain theoretical contexts, the only reasons for preferring a traditional or an alternative virtue are socio-political. This undermines the notion that the traditional virtues can be considered purely cognitive.
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  9. The Social Dimensions of Scientific Knowledge.Helen Longino - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  10. Can There Be A Feminist Science?Helen E. Longino - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (3):51 - 64.
    This paper explores a number of recent proposals regarding "feminist science" and rejects a content-based approach in favor of a process-based approach to characterizing feminist science. Philosophy of science can yield models of scientific reasoning that illuminate the interaction between cultural values and ideology and scientific inquiry. While we can use these models to expose masculine and other forms of bias, we can also use them to defend the introduction of assumptions grounded in feminist political values.
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  11. How Values Can Be Good for Science.Helen E. Longino - 2004 - In Peter K. Machamer & Gereon Wolters (eds.), Science, Values, and Objectivity. University of Pittsburgh Press. pp. 127--142.
  12. Theoretical Pluralism and the Scientific Study of Behavior.Helen Longino - 2006 - In Stephen Kellert, Helen Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (eds.), Scientific Pluralism. University of Minnesota Press. pp. 102-31.
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  13. In Search Of Feminist Epistemology.Helen E. Longino - 1994 - The Monist 77 (4):472-485.
    The proposal of anything like a feminist epistemology has, I think, two sources. Feminist scholars have demonstrated how the scientific cards have been stacked against women for centuries. Given that the sciences are taken as the epitome of knowledge and rationality in modern Western societies, the game looks desperate unless some ways of knowing different from those that have validated misogyny and gynephobia can be found. Can we know the world without hating ourselves? This is one of the questions at (...)
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  14. Reply to Philip Kitcher.Helen E. Longino - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (4):573-577.
  15. Science and the Common Good: Thoughts on Philip Kitcher’s Science, Truth, and Democracy.Helen E. Longino - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (4):560-568.
    In Science, Truth, and Democracy, Philip Kitcher develops the notion of well-ordered science: scientific inquiry whose research agenda and applications are subject to public control guided by democratic deliberation. Kitcher's primary departure from his earlier views involves rejecting the idea that there is any single standard of scientific significance. The context-dependence of scientific significance opens up many normative issues to philosophical investigation and to resolution through democratic processes. Although some readers will feel Kitcher has not moved far enough from earlier (...)
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  16. Pornography, Oppression, and Freedom : A Closer Look.Helen E. Longino - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  17. Feminist Epistemology at Hypatia's 25th Anniversary.Helen Longino - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):733-741.
    This essay surveys twenty-five years of feminist epistemology in the pages of Hypatia. Feminist contributions have addressed the affective dimensions of knowledge; the natures of justification, rationality, and the cognitive agent; and the nature of truth. They reflect thinking from both analytic and continental philosophical traditions and offer a rich tapestry of ideas from which to continue challenging tradition and forging analytical tools for the problems ahead.
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  18. Scientific Pluralism, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science (Vol 19).Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (eds.) - 2006 - University of Minnesota Press.
  19.  44
    The Social Life of Scientific Theories: A Case Study From Behavioral Sciences. [REVIEW]Helen E. Longino - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (4):390-400.
    This article reports on the third phase of a comparative epistemological, ontological, and social analysis of a variety of approaches to investigating human behavior. In focusing on the fate of scientific ideas once they leave the context in which they were developed, I hope not only to show that their communication for a broader audience imposes a shape on their interrelations different than they seem to have in the research context, but also to suggest that a study comparing different approaches (...)
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  20. The Pluralist Stance.Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino & C. Kenneth Waters - 2006 - In ¸ Itekellersetal:Sp.
    This essay introduces the volume Scientific Pluralism (Volume 19 of Minnesota Studies in Philosophy of Science). Varieties of recent pluralisms are surveyed, the difference between monism and pluralism vis a vis the sciences is clarified, and the authors’ notion of scientific pluralism is advanced.
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  21.  65
    Norms and Naturalism: Comments on Miriam Solomon's Social Empiricism.Helen E. Longino - 2008 - Perspectives on Science 16 (3):pp. 241-245.
    Miriam Solomon's social empiricism is marked by emphasis on community level rationality in science and the refusal to impose a distinction between the epistemic and the non-epistemic character of factors ("decision vectors") that incline scientists for or against a theory. While she attempts to derive some norms from the analysis of cases, her insistent naturalism undermines her effort to articulate norms for the (appropriate) distribution of decision vectors.
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  22. Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology: Helen E. Longino.Helene Longino - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19–36.
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  23.  14
    Feminist Epistemology as a Local Epistemology.Helen Longino & Kathleen Lennon - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71:19-54.
    Feminist scholars advocate the adoption of distinctive values in research. While this constitutes a coherent alternative to the more frequently cited cognitive or scientific values, they cannot be taken to supplant those more orthodox values. Instead, each set might better be understood as a local epistemology guiding research answerable to different cognitive goals. Feminist scholars advocate the adoption of distinctive values in research. While this constitutes a coherent alternative to the more frequently cited cognitive or scientific values, they cannot be (...)
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  24.  49
    What Do We Measure When We Measure Aggression?Helen E. Longino - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (4):685-704.
    Biological research on aggression is increasingly consulted for possible answers to the social problems of crime and violence. This paper reviews some contrasting approaches to the biological understanding of behavior—behavioral genetic, social-environmental, physiological, developmental—as a prelude to arguing that approaches to aggression are beset by vagueness and imprecision in their definitions and disunity in their measurement strategies. This vagueness and disunity undermines attempts to compare and evaluate the different approaches empirically. Nevertheless, the definitions reveal commitments to particular metaphysical views concerning (...)
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  25. Subjects, Power, and Knowledge.Helen Longino - 2002 - In Janet A. Kourany (ed.), The Gender of Science. Prentice-Hall. pp. 310-21.
     
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  26.  11
    Feminism and Philosophy: Perspectives on Difference and Equality.Helen E. Longino & Moira Gatens - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):405.
    Summarizes author’s contextual empiricism and uses it to analyze the difference between neuro-endocrinological accounts of presumed behavioral sex differences and neuro-selectionist accounts. Contextual empiricism is a philosophical approach that both shows how feminist critique works in the sciences and makes a contribution to general philosophy of science.
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  27.  52
    Comments on Science and Social Responsibility: A Role for Philosophy of Science?Helen E. Longino - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):179.
    Each of the three papers offers a different model for the role philosophers of science might play in consideration of the relations of science to society. These comments address common themes in the three papers, articulate further questions for each, and suggest some historical shifts that require different forms of philosophical engagement now than in the early part of the century.
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  28.  30
    Science, Objectivity, and Feminist Values. [REVIEW]Helen E. Longino - 1988 - Feminist Studies 14 (3):561.
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  29. Beyond “Bad Science‘.Helen Longino - 1983 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 8 (1):7-17.
    It is conventional to treat instances of research where social values have played a role as “bad science.” This article discusses instances of research that meet standards of “good science”, but that are nevertheless inflected by social values and uses these examples to argue that values can enter into research without thereby disqualifying the scientific status of the research. Other categories are needed to accommodate this kind of research.
     
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  30.  15
    I—Helen E. Longino.Helen E. Longino - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):19-35.
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  31. The Fate of Knowledge in Social Theories of Science.Helen Longino - 1994 - In Frederick F. Schmitt (ed.), Socializing Epistemology: The Social Dimensions of Knowledge. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 135--158.
     
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  32.  84
    Evidence and Hypothesis: An Analysis of Evidential Relations.Helen E. Longino - 1979 - Philosophy of Science 46 (1):35-56.
    The subject of this essay is the dependence of evidential relations on background beliefs and assumptions. In Part I, two ways in which the relation between evidence and hypothesis is dependent on such assumptions are discussed and it is shown how in the context of appropriately differing background beliefs what is identifiable as the same state of affairs can be taken as evidence for conflicting hypotheses. The dependence of evidential relations on background beliefs is illustrated by discussions of the Michelson-Morley (...)
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  33.  43
    Pluralism, Social Action and the Causal Space of Human Behavior.James Tabery, Alex Preda & Helen Longino - 2014 - Metascience 23 (3):443-459.
    James Tabery Helen Longino’s Studying Human Behavior is an overdue effort at a nonpartisan evaluation of the many scientific disciplines that study the nature and nurture of human behavior, arguing for the acceptance of the strengths and weaknesses of all approaches. After years of conflict, Longino makes the pluralist case for peaceful coexistence. Her analysis of the approaches raises the following question: how are we to understand the pluralistic relationship among the peacefully coexisting approaches? Longino is ironically rather unpluralistic about (...)
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  34.  66
    Circles of Reason: Some Feminist Reflections on Reason and Rationality.Helen Longino - 2005 - Episteme 2 (1):79-88.
    Rationality and reason are topics so fraught for feminists that any useful reflection on them requires some prior exploration of the difficulties they have caused. One of those difficulties for feminists and, I suspect, for others in the margins of modernity, is the rhetoric of reason – the ways reason is bandied about as a qualification differentially bestowed on different types of person. Rhetorically, it functions in different ways depending on whether it is being denied or affirmed. In this paper, (...)
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  35.  53
    Multiplying Subjects and the Diffusion of Power.Helen E. Longino - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (11):666-674.
  36. Scientific Pluralism. Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Vol. 19.Stephen H. Kellert, Helen E. Longino & C. Kenneth Waters - 2008 - The Pluralist 3 (1):132-137.
  37.  16
    Feminism & Science.Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):618-620.
  38. Navigating the Social Turn in Philosophy of Science.Helen E. Longino - 2009 - Filozofia 64 (4):312-323.
    Over the last three decades the role of social values in science has been the topic issue in the disputes of the philosophers of science against the representatives of science studies. Due to the key status of sciences in developed countries and societies it is necessary, so the author, not only to acknowledge, that cognitive and epistemic practices have their social dimensions, but also to make the practices of the research communities themselves open for critical examination from different perspectives. In (...)
     
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  39.  43
    Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation: Values, Dose-Response Models, Risk Estimates.Helen E. Longino - 1989 - Synthese 81 (3):391 - 404.
    Predictions about the health risks of low level radiation combine two sorts of measures. One estimates the amount and kinds of radiation released into the environment, and the other estimates the adverse health effects. A new field called health physics integrates and applies nuclear physics to cytology to supply both these estimates. It does so by first determining the kinds of effects different types of radiation produce in biological organisms, and second, by monitoring the extent of these effects produced by (...)
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  40. 10. Discussion Note: Distributed Cognition in Epistemic Cultures Discussion Note: Distributed Cognition in Epistemic Cultures (Pp. 637-644). [REVIEW]Noretta Koertge, Philip Kitcher, Helen E. Longino, Eva Jablonka, Sungsu Kim, Branden Fitelson & Gábor Hofer‐Szabó - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (4).
  41.  22
    Inferring.Helen E. Longino - 1978 - Philosophy Research Archives 4:17-26.
    This paper is a discussion of the nature of inferring and focusses on the relation between reasons for belief and causes of belief. Two standard approaches to the analysis of inference, the epistemological and the psychological, are identified and discussed. While both approaches incorporate insights concerning, inference, counterexamples show that neither provides by itself an adequate account. A third account is developed and recommended on the grounds that it encompasses the essential insights of the rejected analyses while being immune to (...)
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  42.  81
    Feminism and Philosophy of Science.Helen E. Longino - 1990 - Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):150-159.
  43.  30
    Interpretation Versus Explanation in the Critique of Science.Helen E. Longino - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (1):113-128.
  44.  65
    Perilous Thoughts: Comment on van Fraassen.Helen Longino - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 143 (1):25-32.
    Bas van Fraassen’s empiricist reading of Perrin’s achievement invites the question: whose doubts about atoms did Perrin put to rest? This comment recontextualizes the argument and applies the notion of empirical grounding to some contemporary work in behavioral biology.
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  45.  8
    Evidence in the Sciences of Behavior.Helen E. Longino - 2005 - In P. Achinstein (ed.), Scientific Evidence: Philosophical Theories & Applications. The Johns Hopkins University Press.
  46.  29
    Philosophy of Science After the Social Turn.Helen Longino - 2006 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 12:167-177.
  47.  51
    Taking Gender Seriously in Philosophy of Science.Helen E. Longino - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:333 - 340.
    Using the author's social analysis of scientific knowledge, two ways of understanding the importance of gender to the philosophy of science are offered. Given a requirement of openness to multiple critical perspectives, the gender, race and class structure of a scientific community are an important ingredient of its epistemic reliability. Secondly, one can ask whether a gender sensitive scientific community might prefer certain evaluative criteria (or virtues of theory or practice) to others. Six such criteria (several of which are at (...)
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  48. Theoretical Pluralism and the Scientific Study of Behavior.Stephen Kellert, Helen Longino & C. Kenneth Waters (eds.) - 2006 - University of Minnesota Press.
  49.  33
    Knowledge, Bodies, and Values: Reproductive Technologies and Their Scientific Context.Helen E. Longino - 1992 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 35 (3-4):323 – 340.
    This essay sets human reproductive technologies in the context of biological research exploiting the discovery of the structure of the DNA molecule in the early 1950s. By setting these technological developments in this research context and then setting the research in the framework of a philosophical analysis of the role of social values in scientific inquiry, it is possible to develop a perspective on these technologies and the aspirations they represent that is relevant to the concerns of their social critics.
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  50.  5
    Who Knows: From Quine to a Feminist Empiricism by Lynn Hankinson Nelson. [REVIEW]Helen Longino - 1992 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 83:179-179.
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