Results for 'high utilizer of medical care'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  6
    Review of David Alfandre, Ed., Against-Medical-Advice Discharges From the Hospital: Optimizing Prevention and Management to Promote High Quality, Patient-Centered Care[REVIEW]Haavi Morreim - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (1):W1-W4.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  10
    The Structure of the Situation: A Narrative on High-Intensity Medical Care.Michael Rowe - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (6):37-44.
  3.  40
    Is There Any Ideal of 'High Quality Care' Opposing 'Low Quality Care'? A Deconstructionist Reading.Stephen Buetow & Peter Adams - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (2):123-132.
    The expressions ‘high quality care’ and ‘low quality care’ are cognitive and linguistic artefacts that help to structure people’s lives and thinking; for example, moves are now afoot internationally to pay bonuses to health professionals for delivering high quality care. United States programmes, most conspicuously, are assuming that high quality care can be validly distinguished from low quality care, and incentivised through bonuses. This distinction is always at least implicit, for high (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  36
    Where Should We Draw the Line Between Quality of Care and Other Ethical Concerns Related to Medical Registries and Biobanks?Mats Hansson - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):313-323.
    Together with large biobanks of human samples, medical registries with aggregated data from many clinical centers are vital parts of an infrastructure for maintaining high standards of quality with regard to medical diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development in personalized medicine and pharmaco-genomics only underscores the future need for these infrastructures. However, registries and biobanks have been criticized as constituting great risks to individual privacy. In this article, I suggest that quality with regard to diagnosis and treatment (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  15
    Consultation Behaviour of Doctor‐Shopping Patients and Factors That Reduce Shopping.Yoshiyuki Ohira, Masatomi Ikusaka, Kazutaka Noda, Tomoko Tsukamoto, Toshihiko Takada, Masahito Miyahara, Hiraku Funakoshi, Ayako Basugi, Katsunori Keira & Takanori Uehara - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):433-440.
  6.  21
    Scientism in Medical Education and the Improvement of Medical Care: Opioids, Competencies, and Social Accountability.Lynette Reid - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):155-170.
    Scientism in medical education distracts educators from focusing on the content of learning; it focuses attention instead on individual achievement and validity in its measurement. I analyze the specific form that scientism takes in medicine and in medical education. The competencies movement attempts to challenge old “scientistic” views of the role of physicians, but in the end it has invited medical educators to focus on validity in the measurement of individual performance for attitudes and skills that medicine (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  15
    Trouble in the Gap: A Bioethical and Sociological Analysis of Informed Consent for High-Risk Medical Procedures. [REVIEW]Christopher F. C. Jordens, Kathleen Montgomery & Rowena Forsyth - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):67-77.
    Concerns are frequently raised about the extent to which formal consent procedures actually lead to “informed” consent. As part of a study of consent to high-risk medical procedures, we analyzed in-depth interviews with 16 health care professionals working in bone-marrow transplantation in Sydney, Australia. We find that these professionals recognize and act on their responsibility to inform and educate patients and that they expect patients to reciprocate these efforts by demonstrably engaging in the education process. This expectation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  62
    Medical Custom and Medical Ethics: Rethinking the Standard of Care.Ben A. Rich - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (1):27-39.
    In the regime of Anglo-American tort law, every person has a responsibility to comport him- or herself with “due care” in going about day-to-day activities so as not to imperil the health, safety, or general welfare of others. The gold standard for determining what constitutes due care in any particular situation is what a reasonable person, similarly situated, would do. Determinations of due care are necessarily fact specific. Nevertheless, the general objective is to strike an appropriate balance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  18
    Ethics and End of Life Care: The Liverpool Care Pathway and the Neuberger Review.Anthony Wrigley - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):639-643.
    The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying has recently been the topic of substantial media interest and also been subject to the independent Neuberger Review. This review has identified clear failings in some areas of care and recommended the Liverpool Care Pathway be phased out. I argue that while the evidence gathered of poor incidences of practice by the Review is of genuine concern for end of life care, the inferences drawn from this evidence are inconsistent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  10.  25
    Medical Advances Reduce Risk of Behaviours Related to High Sociosexuality.Valerie J. Grant - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):286-287.
    Although statistically significant correlations have been found among political, economic, and social indices, on the one hand, and measures of sociosexuality, on the other, it is likely that these correlations are second-order effects. Underpinning the reproductive freedom associated with higher sociosexuality are factors more closely related to biology, namely, easy access to safe, effective contraception and reproductive medical care.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  42
    Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics.A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12.  33
    The Clash of Medical Civilizations: Experiencing “Primary Care” in a Neoliberal Culture. [REVIEW]Brian McKenna - 2012 - Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):255-272.
    An anthropologist describes how he found himself at the vortex of a “clash of medical civilizations:” neoliberalism and the international primary health care movement. His involvement in a $6 million social change initiative in medical education became a basis to unlock the hidden tensions, contradictions and movements within the “primary care” phenomenon. The essay is structured on five ethnographic stories, situated on a continuum from “natural” species-level primary care to “unnatural” neoliberal primary care. Food (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Medical Costs, Moral Choices a Philosophy of Health Care Economics in America.Paul T. Menzel - 1983
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14.  13
    Bringing the Hospital Home: Ethical and Social Implications of High-Tech Home Care.G. Lennox - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):367-368.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  8
    Care and Justice Arguments in the Ethical Reasoning of Medical Students.Christina Sommer, Margarete Boos, Elisabeth Conradi, Nikola Biller-Adorno & Claudia Wiesemann - 2011 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 2 (2):9.
    <b>Objectives:</b> To gather empirical data on how gender and educational level influence bioethical reasoning among medical students by analyzing their use of care versus justice arguments for reconciling a bioethical dilemma. <b>Setting:</b> University Departments of Medical Ethics, Social and Communication Psychology in Germany. Participants: First and fifth year medical students. Design and method: Multidisciplinary, empirical, 2-segment study of ethics in action: In intrapersonal Segment 1, the students were presented with a bioethical dilemma and then administered a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16.  28
    Conference Report Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Philosophy of Medicine: Medical Knowledge, Medical Duties.Emma C. Bullock & Elselijn Kingma - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):994-1001.
    On 27 September 2013, the Centre for the Humanities and Health (CHH) at King's College London hosted a 1-day workshop on ‘Medical knowledge, Medical Duties’. This workshop was the fifth in a series of five workshops whose aim is to provide a new model for high-quality, open interdisciplinary engagement between medical professionals and philosophers. This report identifies the key points of discussion raised throughout the day and the methodology employed.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  62
    Direct Medical Costs of Care for Chinese Patients with Colorectal Neoplasia: A Health Care Service Provider Perspective.Carlos K. H. Wong, Cindy L. K. Lam, Jensen T. C. Poon, Sarah M. McGhee, Wai‐Lun Law, Dora L. W. Kwong, Janice Tsang & Pierre Chan - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (6):1203-1210.
  18.  26
    Purchasing and Marketing of Social and Environmental Sustainability for High-Tech Medical Equipment.Adam Lindgreen, Michael Antioco, David Harness & Remi van der Sloot - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):445 - 462.
    As the functional capabilities of high-tech medical products converge, supplying organizations seek new opportunities to differentiate their offerings. Embracing product sustainability-related differentiators provides just such an opportunity. This study examines the challenge organizations face when attempting to understand how customers perceive environmental and social dimensions of sustainability by exploring and defining both dimensions on the basis of a review of extant literature and focus group research with a leading supplier of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning equipment. The study (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  19.  26
    A Tale of Two Deficits: Causality and Care in Medical AI.Melvin Chen - forthcoming - Philosophy and Technology.
    In this paper, two central questions will be addressed: ought we to implement medical AI technology in the medical domain? If yes, how ought we to implement this technology? I will critically engage with three options that exist with respect to these central questions: the Neo-Luddite option, the Assistive option, and the Substitutive option. I will first address key objections on behalf of the Neo-Luddite option: the Objection from Bias, the Objection from Artificial Autonomy, the Objection from Status (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  17
    The Re-Contextualization of the Patient: What Home Health Care Can Teach Us About Medical Decision-Making.Erica K. Salter - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (2):143-156.
    This article examines the role of context in the development and deployment of standards of medical decision-making. First, it demonstrates that bioethics, and our dominant standards of medical decision-making, developed out of a specific historical and philosophical environment that prioritized technology over the person, standardization over particularity, individuality over relationship and rationality over other forms of knowing. These forces de-contextualize the patient and encourage decision-making that conforms to the unnatural and contrived environment of the hospital. The article then (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  53
    Mutual Humanization: A Visual Exploration of Relationships in Medical Care[REVIEW]Catherine Phillips - 2012 - Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):109-116.
    In this article, I explore the work of the artist Robert Pope (b.1957- d.1992) who published a series of paintings and drawings which documented his decade-long experience with Hodgkin's lymphoma. More widely, Pope was interested in ‘the culture’ of cancer within hospitals and the relationships embedded in experiences of illness and care. Pope published a book that contains much of this work— Illness and Healing: Images of Cancer (1991). Many of the original artworks have been toured throughout Canada and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  9
    Ethics of Medical Care and Clinical Research: A Qualitative Study of Principal Investigators in Biomedical HIV Prevention Research.B. G. Haire - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):231-235.
    In clinical research there is a tension between the role of a doctor, who must serve the best interests of the patient, and the role of the researcher, who must produce knowledge that may not have any immediate benefits for the research participant. This tension is exacerbated in HIV research in low and middle income countries, which frequently uncovers comorbidities other than the condition under study. Some bioethicists argue that as the goals of medicine and those of research are distinct, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23.  28
    Dutch Criteria of Due Care for Physician-Assisted Dying in Medical Practice: A Physician Perspective.H. M. Buiting, J. K. M. Gevers, J. A. C. Rietjens, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, P. J. van Der Maas, A. van Der Heide & J. J. M. van Delden - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e12-e12.
    Introduction: The Dutch Euthanasia Act states that euthanasia is not punishable if the attending physician acts in accordance with the statutory due care criteria. These criteria hold that: there should be a voluntary and well-considered request, the patient’s suffering should be unbearable and hopeless, the patient should be informed about their situation, there are no reasonable alternatives, an independent physician should be consulted, and the method should be medically and technically appropriate. This study investigates whether physicians experience problems with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  24.  5
    Evaluation of Resource Allocation and Supply–Demand Balance in Clinical Practice with High‐Cost Technologies.Tetsuya Otsubo, Yuichi Imanaka, Jason Lee & Kenshi Hayashida - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (6):1114-1121.
    Japan has one of the highest numbers of high-cost medical devices installed relative to its population. While evaluations of the distribution of these devices traditionally involve simple population-based assessments, an indicator that includes the demand of these devices would more accurately reflect the situation. The purpose of this study was to develop an indicator of the supply–demand balance of such devices, using examples of magnetic resonance imaging scanners (MRI) and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripters (ESWL), and to investigate the relationship (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  17
    Public Attitudes Towards the Use of Primary Care Patient Record Data in Medical Research Without Consent: A Qualitative Study.M. R. Robling - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):104-109.
    Objectives: Recent legislative changes within the United Kingdom have stimulated professional debate about access to patient data within research. However, there is currently little awareness of public views about such research. The authors sought to explore attitudes of the public, and their lay representatives, towards the use of primary care medical record data for research when patient consent was not being sought.Methods: 49 members of the public and four non-medical members of local community health councils in South (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  26.  92
    Marginally Effective Medical Care: Ethical Analysis of Issues in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).M. Hilberman, J. Kutner, D. Parsons & D. J. Murphy - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):361-367.
    Outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remain distressingly poor. Overuse of CPR is attributable to unrealistic expectations, unintended consequences of existing policies and failure to honour patient refusal of CPR. We analyzed the CPR outcomes literature using the bioethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice and developed a proposal for selective use of CPR. Beneficence supports use of CPR when most effective. Non-maleficence argues against performing CPR when the outcomes are harmful or usage inappropriate. Additionally, policies which usurp good clinical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  27.  75
    Medical Futility at the End of Life: The Perspectives of Intensive Care and Palliative Care Clinicians.R. J. Jox, A. Schaider, G. Marckmann & G. D. Borasio - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):540-545.
    Objectives Medical futility at the end of life is a growing challenge to medicine. The goals of the authors were to elucidate how clinicians define futility, when they perceive life-sustaining treatment (LST) to be futile, how they communicate this situation and why LST is sometimes continued despite being recognised as futile. Methods The authors reviewed ethics case consultation protocols and conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 physicians and 11 nurses from adult intensive and palliative care units at a tertiary (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  28.  26
    The Challenges and Ethical Dilemmas of a Military Medical Officer Serving with a Peacekeeping Operation in Regard to the Medical Care of the Local Population.J. Tobin - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (10):571-574.
    Medical Officers serving with their national contingents in peacekeeping operations are faced with difficult ethical decisions in regard to their obligations to the local civilian population. Such populations may be under-resourced in regard to medical care, and vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. Though the medical officer may support the local medical services, he/she should never undermine these resources. Adopting a human rights approach and observing the requirements of ethical medicine, aids the doctor in prioritising his/her (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29.  27
    Rationing of Expensive Medical Care in a Transition Country—Nihil Novum?E. Krizova - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):308-312.
    This article focuses on rationing of expensive medical care in the Czech Republic. It distinguishes between political and clinical decision levels and reviews the debate in the Western literature on explicit and implicit rules. The contemporary situation of the Czech health care system is considered from this perspective. Rationing reoccurred in the mid 90s after the shift in health care financing from fee-for-service to prospective budgets. The lack of explicit rules is obvious. Implicit forms of rationing, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  19
    Response to Ronald M Perkin and David B Resnik: The Agony of Trying to Match Sanctity of Life and Patient-Centred Medical Care.H. Kuhse - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (4):270-272.
    Perkin and Resnik advocate the use of muscle relaxants to prevent the “agony of agonal respiration” arguing that this is compatible with the principle of double effect. The proposed regime will kill patients as certainly as smothering them would. This may lead some people to reject the argument as an abuse of the principle of double effect. I take a different view. In the absence of an adequate theory of intention, the principle of double effect cannot distinguish between the intentional (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  15
    Moral Dilemmas Faced by Hospitals in Time of War: The Rambam Medical Center During the Second Lebanon War. [REVIEW]Yaron Bar-El, Shimon Reisner & Rafael Beyar - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):155-160.
    Rambam Medical Center, the only tertiary care center and largest hospital in northern Israel, was subjected to continuous rocket attacks in 2006. This extreme situation posed serious and unprecedented ethical dilemmas to the hospital management. An ambiguous situation arose that required routine patient care in a tertiary modern hospital together with implementation of emergency measures while under direct fire. The physicians responsible for hospital management at that time share some of the moral dilemmas faced, the policy they (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  16
    Integrated Delivery of Primary Health Care for Humans and Animals.Calvin W. Schwabe - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):121-125.
    Partially because of the high cost of developing and maintaining cold chains, systems needed to keep heat-labile vaccines under adequate refrigeration from their points of manufacture to their administration in the field, the Joint WHO/FAO Expert Committee on Zoonoses (i.e., the approximately four fifths of all described human infections that people share with other vertebrate animals) recommended in 1982 operation of common cold chains by health and veterinary services in rural areas. Following this recommendation, a 1984 pilot level initiative (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  28
    Medical Malpractice and the Legal Standard of Care.Gary E. Jones - 1989 - Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (1):45-54.
    In this essay, I examine the relationship between lawsuits for medical malpractice and the legal standard of care. I suggest that there is an insidious, dynamic relationship between physicians' reactions to the recent increase in malpractice litigation and an artificial elevation of the legal standard of care. Since, that is, the legal standard for proper medical care is based upon the community standard of care rather than the reasonable person standard, to the extent that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  2
    What is the Role of the Arts in Medical Education and Patient Care? A Survey-based Qualitative Study.Susan E. Pories, Sorbarikor Piawah, Gregory A. Abel, Samyukta Mullangi, Jennifer Doyle & Joel T. Katz - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (4):431-445.
    To inform medical education reform efforts, we systematically collected information on the level of arts and humanities engagement in our medical school community. Attitudes regarding incorporating arts and humanities-based teaching methods into medical education and patient care were also assessed. An IRB-approved survey was electronically distributed to all faculty, residents, fellows, and students at our medical school. Questions focused on personal practice of the arts and/or humanities, as well as perceptions of, and experience with formally (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  55
    The Baby K Case: A Search for the Elusive Standard of Medical Care.Lawrence J. Schneiderman & Sharyn Manning - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):9-18.
    An anencephalic infant, who came to be known as Baby K, was born at Fairfax Hospial in Falls Church, Virginia, on October 13, 1992. From, the moment of birth and repeatedly thereafter, the baby's mother insisted that aggressive measures be pursued, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation and ventilator support, to keep the baby alive as long as possible. The physicians complied. However, following the baby's second admission for respiratory failure, the hospital sought declaratory relief from the court permitting it to forgo emergency (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  37
    The Economic Attributes of Medical Care: Implications for Rationing Choices in the United States and United Kingdom.Dwayne A. Banks - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (4):546.
    The healthcare systems of the United States and United Kingdom are vastly different. The former relies primarily on private sector incentives and market forces to allocate medical care services, while the latter is a centrally planned system funded almost entirely by the public sector. Therefore, each nation represents divergent views on the relative efficacy of the market or government in achieving social objectives in the area of medical care policy. Since its inception in 1948, the National (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  1
    Medical Error in the Care of the Unrepresented: Disclosure and Apology for a Vulnerable Patient Population.Arjun S. Byju & Kajsa Mayo - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):821-823.
    Defined as patients who ‘lack decision-making capacity and a surrogate decision-maker’, the unrepresented present a major quandary to clinicians and ethicists, especially in handling errors made in their care. A novel concern presented in the care of the unrepresented is how to address an error when there is seemingly no one to whom it can be disclosed. Given that the number of unrepresented Americans is expected to rise in the coming decades, and some fraction of them will experience (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  30
    Medical Chaperoning at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Saudi Arabia: Survey of Physicians.E. A. Al-Gaai & M. M. Hammami - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):729-732.
    Background: Medical chaperones (MC) are underutilised. The influence of Islamic culture on the use of MC is not known. Aim: To examine physicians’ use and perception of MC in Islamic culture. Setting: A major tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia. Methods: 315 self-administered questionnaires were distributed to attendees of grand rounds of 13 departments. Results: 186 (59%) questionnaires were completed. 64.5% of the respondents were 30–49 years old, 75.8% were men and 31.2% were in training; 79% had a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Finding Your Way: Through the Maze of Medical Ethics in Modern Health Care.Katrina A. Bramstedt - 2011 - Hilton.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Chapter 1: The basics of ethical decision-making Chapter 2: Hospital ethics committees and clinical ethicists Chapter 3: The settings of health care ethical dilemmas Chapter 4: Advance directives Chapter 5: Do Not Resuscitate orders and "Code Blue" Chapter 6: Non-beneficial medical interventions Chapter 7: Quality of life and treatment burdens Chapter 8: Patient privacy and confidentiality Chapter 9: Refusing medical treatment Chapter 10: Health care at the end of life Chapter 11: (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  25
    Justice and the Moral Acceptability of Rationing Medical Care: The Oregon Experiment.R. M. Nelson & T. Drought - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (1):97-117.
    The Oregon Basic Health Services Act of 1989 seeks to establish universal access to basic medical care for all currently uninsured Oregon residents. To control the increasing cost of medical care, the Oregon plan will restrict funding according to a priority list of medical interventions. The basic level of medical care provided to residents with incomes below the federal poverty line will vary according to the funds made available by the Oregon legislature. A (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41.  20
    Medical Care During War: A Remainder and Prospect of Peace.Daniel Messelken - 2017 - In Florian Demont-Biaggi (ed.), The Nature of Peace and the Morality of Armed Conflict. London, U.K.: Springer International Publishing. pp. 293-321.
    Ideally, the principles of medical care remain unaltered during armed conflict and can be interpreted as a remnant of peace during war. Healthcare providers also support future peace by not discriminating according to the conflict roles between enemy and friend or fighter and civilian, but by respecting everybody, in a non-conflict logic, as human beings. The antithetical view identifies medical care for wounded soldiers as a contribution to a threat. This chapter rejects such an interpretation, which (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  20
    Palliative Care Versus Euthanasia. The German Position: The German General Medical Council's Principles for Medical Care of the Terminally Ill.Stephan W. Sahm - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):195 – 219.
    In September 1998 the Bundesrztekammer, i.e., the German Medical Association, published new principles concerning terminal medical care. Even before publication, a draft of these principles was very controversial, and prompted intense public debate in the mass media. Despite some of the critics' suspicions that the principles prepared the way for liberalization of active euthanasia, euthanasia is unequivocally rejected in the principles. Physician-assisted suicide is considered to violate professional medical rules. In leaving aside some of the notions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43.  6
    Care for the Root Cause of Medical Errors.Raymond J. Higbea & Alyssa Luboff - 2018 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (2):155-165.
    In the mid-nineteenth century, healthcare delivery began transitioning from an individual, private payment model to a third-party payment model, dominated by the insurance industry. During the same time, productivity shifted from a transformational model, centered on the provider-patient relationship, to a transactional model, based on the distribution of services. The emergence of medical insurance and other third-party payers removed providers and patients from discussions about treatment plans, payment, and risk. This resulted in a weakening, if not fracturing, of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  41
    A Comparative Case Study of American and Japanese Medical Care of a Terminally Ill Patient.Hisako Inaba - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 5:19-31.
    How is a terminally ill patient treated by the surrounding people in the U.S. and Japan? How does a terminally ill patient decide on his or her own treatment? These questions will be examined in a study of intensive medical care, received by a terminally ill Japanese cancer patient in the U.S. and Japan. This casereflects the participant observation by a Japanese anthropologist for about 8 years in the United States and Japan on one patient who was hospitalized (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  24
    From Medical Rationing to Rationalizing the Use of Human Resources for Aids Care and Treatment in Africa: A Case for Task Shifting.Jessica Price & Agnes Binagwaho - 2010 - Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):99-103.
    With a global commitment to scaling up AIDS care and treatment in resource-poor settings for some of the most HIV-affected countries in Africa, availability of antiretroviral treatment is no longer the principal obstacle to expanding access to treatment. A shortage of trained healthcare personnel to initiate treatment and manage patients represents a more challenging barrier to offering life-saving treatment to all patients in need. Physician-centered treatment policies accentuate this challenge. Despite evidence that task shifting for nurse-centered AIDS patient (...) is effective and can alleviate severe physician shortages that currently obstruct treatment scale-up, political commitment and policy action to support task shifting models of care has been slow to absent. In this paper we review the evidence in support of task shifting for AIDS treatment in Africa and argue that continued policy inaction amounts to unwarranted healthcare rationing and as such is ethically untenable. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46.  37
    Inequity in Health Care Delivery in India: The Problem of Rural Medical Practitioners. [REVIEW]Rashmi Kumar, Vijay Jaiswal, Sandeep Tripathi, Akshay Kumar & M. Z. Idris - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (3):223-233.
    A considerable section of the population in India accesses the services of individual private medical practitioners (PMPs) for primary level care. In rural areas, these providers include MBBS doctors, practitioners of alternative systems of medicine, herbalists, indigenous and folk practitioners, compounders and others. This paper describes the profile, knowledge and some practices of the rural doctor in India and then discusses the reasons for lack of equity in health care access in rural areas and possible solutions to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  7
    Stoicism, the Physician, and Care of Medical Outliers.Thomas J. Papadimos - 2004 - BMC Medical Ethics 5 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundMedical outliers present a medical, psychological, social, and economic challenge to the physicians who care for them. The determinism of Stoic thought is explored as an intellectual basis for the pursuit of a correct mental attitude that will provide aid and comfort to physicians who care for medical outliers, thus fostering continued physician engagement in their care.DiscussionThe Stoic topics of good, the preferable, the morally indifferent, living consistently, and appropriate actions are reviewed. Furthermore, Zeno's cardinal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  5
    The Corporate Transformation of Medical Specialty Care: The Exemplary Case of Neonatology.Eleanor D. Kinney - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):790-802.
    The key to wealth in health care is the physician, who certifies to third-party payers that health care items and services are necessary for patient care. To compete more effectively for this wealth, physician specialists are organizing their practices into for-profit corporations and employing other physicians. Focusing on neonatology, this article describes the prevailing business model of these for-profit medical groups as controlling employed physicians through restrictive employment contract provisions, e.g., non-compete and mandatory arbitration clauses. With (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Moral Entanglements: The Ancillary-Care Obligations of Medical Researchers.Henry S. Richardson - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    The philosopher Henry Richardson's short book is a defense of a position on a neglected topic in medical research ethics. Clinical research ethics has been a longstanding area of study, dating back to the aftermath of the Nazi death-camp doctors and the Tuskegee syphilis study. Most ethical regulations and institutions have developed in response to those past abuses, including the stress on obtaining informed consent from the subject. Richardson points out that that these ethical regulations do not address one (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50.  3
    Humanism Influencing the Organization of the Health Care System and the Ethics of Medical Relations in the Society of Bosnia-Herzegovina.Ante Kvesić, Kristina Galić & Mladenka Vukojević - 2019 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 14 (1):1-6.
    Every successful health care system should be based on some general humanistic ideals. However, the nationally organized health care systems of most European countries usually suffer from a deficiency in common ethical values based on universal human principles. When transitional societies, such as that of Bosnia-Herzegovina are concerned, health care organizational models are even more dysfunctional. The sources of a dysfunction in medical care system of Bosnia-Herzegovina are manifold and mutually controversial, including a lack of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000