Results for 'historical injustice'

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  1.  3
    Historical Injustice.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2012 - In David Estlund (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa. pp. 319.
  2.  14
    Why Historical Injustice Must Be Taught in Schools.Juan Espindola - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):95-106.
    In societies that have failed to confront past injustice, the most common justifications for the inclusion of history education within the school curriculum invoke the idea that those who cannot learn from the past are doomed to repeat it; or they appeal to goals such as reconciliation, or to the importance of recognizing and morally redressing the harm done to victims. These justifications are all sound and important. However, they must be supplemented with a justification of a different kind, (...)
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  3.  20
    Just Pretending: Political Apologies for Historical Injustice and Vice's Tribute to Virtue.Mathias Thaler - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):259-278.
    Should we be concerned with, or alarmed or outraged by, the insincerity and hypocrisy of politicians who apologize for historical injustice? This paper argues that the correct reply to this question is: sometimes, but not always. In order to establish what types of insincerity must be avoided, Judith Shklar?s hierarchy of ordinary vices is critically revisited. Against Shklar?s overly benign account of hypocrisy, the paper then tries to demonstrate that only institutional and harmful forms of hypocrisy must be (...)
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  4.  13
    Historical Injustice.Duncan Ivison - 2009 - In John S. Dryzek, Bonnie Honig & Anne Phillips (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Theory. Oxford University Press.
    This article examines the concept of historical injustice in the context of contemporary political theory. It examines the moral consequences of historical injustice for the descendants of both the perpetrators and the victims and outlines the six questions that any plausible defence of the idea of making reparations for past injustices must deal with. It suggests that taking historical injustice seriously is compatible with moral cosmopolitanism and it also helps with the understanding the nature (...)
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  5. Taking Responsibility for the Past: Reparation and Historical Injustice.Janna Thompson - unknown
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  6.  4
    Recognizing Historical Injustice Through Photography: Mexico 1968.A. Noble - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (7-8):184-213.
    This article explores the role of photography in the global work of justice by way of a case study. It focuses on the publication, in December 2001, of a set of photographs by the Mexican newsweekly Proceso, depicting events that occurred in Mexico City on 2 October 1968. Taken at the culmination of a summer of student activism, when the military opened fire on student demonstrators and bystanders, the published photographs showed previously hidden scenes of detention and torture. Locating the (...)
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  7. From Historical to Enduring Injustice.J. Spinner-Halev - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (5):574-597.
    Advocates of remedying historical injustices urge political communities to take responsibility for their past, but their arguments are ambiguous about whether all past injustices need remedy, or just those regarding groups that suffer from current injustice. This ambiguity leaves unanswered the challenge of critics who argue that contemporary injustices matter, not those in the past. I argue instead for a focus on injustices that have roots in the past, and continue to the present day, what I call enduring (...)
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  8. Historical Injustice and Reparation: Justifying Claims of Descendants.Janna Thompson - 2001 - Ethics 112 (1):114-135.
  9.  43
    Affirmative Action, Historical Injustice, and the Concept of Beneficiaries.Kasper Lippert‐Rasmussen - 2016 - Journal of Political Philosophy 24 (4).
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  10. Janna Thompson, Taking Responsibility for the Past: Reparation and Historical Injustice Reviewed By.J. Angelo Corlett - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23 (4):291-293.
     
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  11.  85
    Time, Presence, and Historical Injustice.Berber Bevernage - 2008 - History and Theory 47 (2):149–167.
    The relationship between history and justice traditionally has been dominated by the idea of the past as distant or absent . This ambiguous ontological status makes it very difficult to situate the often-felt “duty to remember” or obligation to “do justice to the past” in that past itself, and this has led philosophers from Friedrich Nietzsche to Keith Jenkins to plead against an “obsession” with history in favor of an ethics aimed at the present. History’s ability to contribute to the (...)
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  12.  1
    Territory, Rights, and Historical Injustice.Bufacchi Vittorio - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues – Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  13.  22
    Political Community and Historical Injustice.Duncan Ivison - 2000 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (3):360 – 373.
  14.  2
    Affirmative Action, Historical Injustice, and the Concept of Beneficiaries.Kasper Lippert‐Rasmussen - 2017 - Journal of Political Philosophy 25 (1):72-90.
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  15.  6
    Rectifying Historical Injustice: Principles of Compensation and Restitution Between Nations.Göran Collste - 2012 - Ethical Perspectives 19 (1):167-169.
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  16.  3
    10 Historical Injustice in Psychiatry with Examples From Nazi Germany and Others–Ethical Lessons for the Modern Professional.Rael Strous - 2011 - In Thomas W. Kallert, Juan E. Mezzich & John Monahan (eds.), Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry: Clinical, Legal and Ethical Aspects. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 161.
  17. Territory, Rights, and Historical Injustice.Pellegrino Gianfranco - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues – Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  18.  9
    Benefiting From Unjust Acts and Benefiting From Injustice: Historical Emissions and the Beneficiary Pays Principle.Brian Berkey - 2017 - In Climate Justice and Historical Emissions. pp. 123-140.
    It is commonly believed that the history of behavior that has contributed to the threat of climate change bears in a significant way on the obligations of current people. In particular, a number of philosophers have defended the Beneficiary Pays Principle, according to which those who have benefited from unjust emitting activity have a special obligation to bear costs of mitigation and adaptation. I claim that versions of the BPP that have been defended by others share a common problematic feature. (...)
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  19.  37
    On Compensation and Return: Can The 'Continuing Injustice Argument' for Compensating for Historical Injustices Justify Compensation for Such Injustices or the Return of Property?Nahshon Perez - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):151-168.
    This paper offers a critique of recent attempts, by George Sher and others to justify compensation to be paid to descendants of deceased victims of past wrongs. This recent attempt is important as it endeavours to avoid some well-known critiques of previous attempts, such as the non-identity problem. Furthermore, this new attempt is grounded in individual rights, without invoking a more controversial collectivist assumption. The first step in this critique is to differentiate between compensation and restitution. Once this important distinction (...)
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  20.  29
    Colonialism as Structural Injustice: Historical Responsibility and Contemporary Redress.Catherine Lu - 2011 - Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):261-281.
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  21.  40
    Colonialism as Structural Injustice: Historical Responsibility and Contemporary Redress.L. U. Catherine - 2011 - Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):261-281.
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  22. The Structural Diversity of Historical Injustices.Jeppe von Platz & David A. Reidy - 2006 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):360–376.
    Driven by a sharp increase in claims for reparations, reparative justice has become a topic of academic debate. To some extent this debate has been marred by a failure to realize the complexity of reparative justice. In this essay we try to amend this shortcoming. We do this by developing a taxonomy of different kinds of wrongs that can underwrite claims to reparations. We identify four kinds of wrongs: entitlement violations, unjust exclusions from an otherwise acceptable system of entitlements, and (...)
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  23.  13
    The Problem of Historical Rectification for Rawlsian Theory.Juan Espindola & Moises Vaca - 2014 - Res Publica 20 (3):227-243.
    In this paper we claim that Rawls’s theory is compatible with the absence of rectification of extremely important historical injustices within a given society. We hold that adding a new principle to justice-as-fairness may amend this problem. There are four possible objections to our claim: First, that historical rectification is not required by justice. Second, that, even when historical rectification is a matter of justice, it is not a matter of distributive justice, so that Rawls’s theory is (...)
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  24.  14
    Enduring Injustice.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Radical injustice; 2. Which injustices? What groups?; 3. Enduring injustice; 4. Apology and acknowledgement; 5. Legitimacy and the cast of history; 6. Elusive justice; 7. A chastened liberalism.
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  25.  64
    Reconciling Historical Injustices: Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation. [REVIEW]Bashir Bashir - 2012 - Res Publica 18 (2):127-143.
    Deliberative democracy is often celebrated and endorsed because of its promise to include, empower, and emancipate otherwise oppressed and excluded social groups through securing their voice and granting them impact in reasoned public deliberation. This article explores the ability of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy to accommodate the demands of historically excluded social groups in democratic plural societies. It argues that the inclusive, transformative, and empowering potential of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy falters when confronted with particular types of (...) injustices. It falters because it pays little attention to the historical dimension of injustices and the demands to which it gives rise. The historical dimension of longstanding injustices, it is argued, gives rise to a set of distinctive demands, such as collective memory of exclusion, acknowledgement of historical injustices, taking responsibility, and offering apology and reparations for causing these injustices, which go beyond the type of democratic inclusion that is often offered by deliberative democracy. Yet, the solution is not to abandon the model of deliberative democracy. Quite the contrary, it remains a valuable basis for forward-looking political decision making. The article concludes that in order to achieve inclusive, empowering and transformative deliberation in consolidated democracies that have experienced historical injustices, the politics of reconciliation is indispensable. (shrink)
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  26. Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation.Duncan Ivison - unknown
    The problem of historical injustice presents a deep challenge to the aspirations of deliberative democrats, especially to those “deliberative activists” who seek to advance deliberation in deeply unjust circumstances (Fung 2005, 399). But the debate over historical injustice can itself benefi t from taking a “democratic turn.” Much of the literature is dominated by arguments over historical entitlement theories of justice or by a legalistic focus on the possibilities for compensation and reparation.1 That much of (...)
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  27.  8
    Historical Memory as Forward‐ and Backward‐Looking Collective Responsibility.Linda Radzik - 2014 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 38 (1):26-39.
    Do future generations of a wrongdoing group have a responsibility to preserve the memory of the past? If so, what manner of responsibility is it? In this essay, I critically examine the categories of forward-looking and backward-looking collective responsibility to see what they might offer to this discussion. I argue that these concepts of responsibility are ambiguous in ways that threaten to prevent important questions from being raised. I draw my examples from contemporary German practices of preserving the memory of (...)
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  28.  96
    Historical Emissions and Free-Riding.Axel Gosseries - 2004 - Ethical Perspectives 11 (1):36-60.
    Should the current members of a community compensate the victims of their ancestor’s emissions of greenhouse gases? I argue that the previous generation of polluters may not have been morally responsible for the harms they caused.I also accept the view that the polluters’ descendants cannot be morally responsible for their ancestor’s harmful emissions. However, I show that, while granting this, a suitably defined notion of moral free-riding may still account for the moral obligation of the polluters’ descendants to compensate the (...)
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  29.  5
    Structural Injustice and the Place of Attachment.Lea Ypi - 2017 - Journal of Practical Ethics 5 (1):1-21.
    Reflection on the historical injustice suffered by many formerly colonized groups has left us with a peculiar account of their claims to material objects. One important upshot of that account, relevant to present day justice, is that many people seem to think that members of indigenous groups have special claims to the use of particular external objects by virtue of their attachment to them. In the first part of this paper I argue against that attachment-based claim. In the (...)
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  30.  18
    Historical Use of the Climate Sink.Megan Blomfield - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (1):67-81.
    In this paper I discuss a popular position in the climate justice literature concerning historical accountability for climate change. According to this view, historical high-emitters of greenhouse gases—or currently existing individuals that are appropriately related to them—are in possession of some form of emission debt, owed to certain of those who are now burdened by climate change. It is frequently claimed that such debts were originally incurred by historical emissions that violated a principle of fair shares for (...)
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  31.  63
    Epistemic Injustice and Epistemic Redlining.Michael D. Doan - 2017 - Ethics and Social Welfare 11 (2).
    The practice of Emergency Management in Michigan raises anew the question of whose knowledge matters to whom and for what reasons, against the background of what projects, challenges, and systemic imperatives. In this paper, I offer a historical overview of state intervention laws across the United States, focusing specifically on Michigan’s Emergency Manager laws. I draw on recent analyses of these laws to develop an account of a phenomenon that I call epistemic redlining, which, I suggest, is a form (...)
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  32.  64
    Rectifying International Injustice: Principles of Compensation and Restitution Between Nations.Daniel Butt - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    The history of international relations is characterized by widespread injustice. What implications does this have for those living in the present? Should contemporary states pay reparations to the descendants of the victims of historic wrongdoing? Many writers have dismissed the moral urgency of rectificatory justice in a domestic context, as a result of their forward-looking accounts of distributive justice. Rectifying International Injustice argues that historical international injustice raises a series of distinct theoretical problems, as a result (...)
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  33. Is Judicial Review Undemocratic?Annabelle Lever - 2009 - Perspectives on Politics 7 (4):897-915.
    This paper examines Jeremy Waldron’s ‘core case’ against judicial review. Waldron’s arguments, it shows, exaggerate the importance of voting to our judgements about the legitimacy and democratic credentials of a society and its government. Moreover, Waldron is insufficiently sensitive to the ways that judicial review can provide a legitimate avenue of political activity for those seeking to rectify historic injustice. While judicial review is not necessary for democratic government, the paper concludes that Waldron is wrong to believe that it (...)
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  34. Liberal Lustration.Yvonne Chiu - 2011 - Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (4):440-464.
    After a regime-changing war, a state often engages in lustration—condemnation and punishment of dangerous, corrupt, or culpable remnants of the previous system—e.g., de-Nazification or the more recent de-Ba’athification in Iraq. This common practice poses an important moral dilemma for liberals because even thoughtful and nuanced lustration involves condemning groups of people, instead of treating each case individually. It also raises important questions about collective agency, group treatment, and rectifying historical injustices. Liberals often oppose lustration because it denies moral individualism (...)
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  35.  15
    Moral Error, Power, and Insult.B. A. Hendrix - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (5):550-573.
    Defenders of Aboriginal rights such as James Tully have argued that members of majority populations should allow Aboriginal peoples to argue within their own preferred intellectual frameworks in seeking common moral ground. But how should non-Aboriginal academics react to claims that seem insufficiently critical or even incoherent? This essay argues that there are two reasons to be especially wary of attacking such errors given the historical injustices perpetrated by settler states against Aboriginal peoples. First, attempts to root out error (...)
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  36.  7
    Reparations for Recent Historical Injustices. The Case of Romanian Communism.Horatiu Traian Crisan - 2016 - Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (2):151-162.
    The debate concerning the legitimacy of awarding reparations for historical injustices focuses on the issue of finding a proper moral justification for granting reparations to the descendants of the victims of injustices which took place in the remote past. Regarding the case of Romanian communism as a more recent injustice, and analyzing the moral problems entailed by this historical lapse, within this paper I argue that overcoming such a legacy cannot be carried out, as in the case (...)
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  37.  5
    Context, Equality, and Aboriginal Compensation Claims.B. A. Hendrix - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (04):669-688.
    Jeremy Waldron argues that the historical ownership rights of Aboriginal peoples can be superseded, yet acknowledges that programs of historically grounded compensation are justifiable in the absence of widespread redistribution. This article argues that existing states lack social justice programs of the requisite kind, and that they will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Moreover, even the best-designed programs will be far more ambiguous than Waldron encourages us to recognize, given the unavoidability of inheritance-based inequalities. The article (...)
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  38.  42
    Climate Justice and Historical Emissions.Lukas Meyer & Dominic Roser - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):229-253.
    Climate change can be interpreted as a unique case of historical injustice involving issues of both intergenerational and global justice. We split the issue into two separate questions. First, how should emission rights be distributed? Second, who should come up for the costs of coping with climate change? We regard the first question as being an issue of pure distributive justice and argue on prioritarian grounds that the developing world should receive higher per capita emission rights than the (...)
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  39.  37
    Justification of Galston's Liberal Pluralism.Azam Golam - 2016 - Springerplus. 2016; 5 (1):1219.
    Liberal multicultural theories developed in late twenty-first century aims to ensure the rights of the minorities, social justice and harmony in liberal societies. Will Kymlicka is the leading philosopher in this field. He advocates minority rights, their autonomy and the way minority groups can be accommodated in a liberal society with their distinct cultural identity. Besides him, there are other political theorists on the track and Galston is one of them. He disagrees with Kymlicka on some crucial points, particularly regarding (...)
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  40. Environmental Degradation, Reparations, and the Moral Significance of History.Simon Caney - 2006 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):464–482.
  41. Government Apologies to Indigenous Peoples.Alice MacLachlan - 2013 - In C. Allen Speight & Alice MacLachlan (eds.), Justice, Responsibility and Reconciliation in the Wake of Conflict. Springer. pp. 183-204.
    In this paper, I explore how theorists might navigate a course between the twin dangers of piety and excess cynicism when thinking critically about state apologies, by focusing on two government apologies to indigenous peoples: namely, those made by the Australian and Canadian Prime Ministers in 2008. Both apologies are notable for several reasons: they were both issued by heads of government, and spoken on record within the space of government: the national parliaments of both countries. Furthermore, in each case, (...)
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  42. Distributing States' Duties.Stephanie Collins - 2015 - Journal of Political Philosophy 23 (3):344-366.
    In order for states to fulfil (many of) their moral obligations, costs must be passed to individuals. This paper asks how these costs should be distributed. I advocate the common-sense answer: the distribution of costs should, insofar as possible, track the reasons behind the state’s duty. This answer faces a number of problems, which I attempt to solve.
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  43.  40
    When the State Says “Sorry”: State Apologies as Exemplary Political Judgments.Mihaela Mihai - 2013 - Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (2):200-220.
    This paper aims to offer an account of state apologies that discloses their potential function as catalysing political acts within broader processes of democratic change. While lots of ink has been spilled on analysing the relationship between apologies and processes of recognising the victims and their descendants, more needs to be said about how apologies can challenge the presence of self-congratulatory, distorted visions of history within the public sphere of liberal democracies. My account will be delineated through a critical engagement (...)
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  44.  11
    How Not to Argue About Immigration.Corlett Angelo & Unger Kimberly - 2013 - Filozofija I Društvo 24 (2):277-288.
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  45.  89
    The Relevance of Credibility Excess in a Proportional View of Epistemic Injustice: Differential Epistemic Authority and the Social Imaginary.José Medina - 2011 - Social Epistemology 25 (1):15-35.
    This paper defends a contextualist approach to epistemic injustice according to which instances of such injustice should be looked at as temporally extended phenomena (having developmental and historical trajectories) and socially extended phenomena (being rooted in patterns of social relations). Within this contextualist framework, credibility excesses appear as a form of undeserved epistemic privilege that is crucially relevant for matters of testimonial justice. While drawing on Miranda Fricker's proportional view of epistemic justice, I take issue with its (...)
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  46.  28
    The Idea of Defense in Historical and Contemporary Thinking About Just War.James Turner Johnson - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (4):543-556.
    What is, or should be, the role of defense in thinking about the justification of use of armed force? Contemporary just war thinking prioritizes defense as the principal, and perhaps the only, just cause for resorting to armed force. By contrast, classic just war tradition, while recognizing defense as justification for use of force by private persons, did not reason from self-defense to the justification of the use of force on behalf of the political community, but instead rendered the idea (...)
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  47.  3
    Fine-Tuning the Ontology of Patriarchy A New Approach to Explaining and Responding to a Persisting Social Injustice.Lantz Fleming Miller - 2015 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 41 (9):885-906.
    After years of activism and scholarship concerning patriarchal social structures, many contemporary societies have made substantial progress in women’s rights. The shortfall, and the work ahead, is well known. Even in societies where the most progress has been achieved, males continue to dominate at key levels of power. Yet, essentialism appears to be widely, although not yet entirely, discounted. In helping to illuminate the social ontology of patriarchy and thereby helping to defuse its injustice, scholars have made proposals of (...)
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  48.  41
    Historical Rights and Fair Shares.A. John Simmons - 1995 - Law and Philosophy 14 (2):149 - 184.
    My aim of this paper is to clarify, and in a certain very limited way to defend, historical theories of property rights (and their associated theories of social or distributive justice). It is important, I think, to better understand historical rights for several reasons: first, because of the extent to which historical theories capture commonsense, unphilosophical views about property and justice; then, because historical theories have fallen out of philosophical fashion, and are consequently not much scrutinized (...)
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  49.  11
    Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s Overcoming Personal, Political and Historical Amnesia Through Literary-Aesthetic Anamnesis.Brendan Purcell - 2010 - History of Communism in Europe 1:35-47.
    Very few writers have had such an impact on their culture as Alexander Solzhenitsyn on Soviet society in the ‘60s and ‘70s Recently published documents from the KGB archives show the problem he posed to the Soviet leadership—not because he was the only one to point out the massive falsehood and injustice of Soviet society but primarily due to the scathing power of his artistic diagnosis. Many of Solzhenitsyn’s writings in fictional, autobiographical, and publicistic genres can helpfully be understood (...)
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  50.  24
    Rawls, Self-Respect, and Assurance How Past Injustice Changes What Publicly Counts as Justice.Timothy Waligore - 2016 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (1):42-66.
    This article adapts John Rawls’s writings, arguing that past injustice can change what we ought to publicly affirm as the standard of justice today. My approach differs from forward-looking approaches based on alleviating prospective disadvantage and backward-looking historical entitlement approaches. In different contexts, Rawls’s own concern for the ‘social bases of self-respect’ and equal citizenship may require public endorsement of different principles or specifications of the standard of justice. Rawls’s difference principle focuses on the least advantaged socioeconomic group. (...)
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