Results for 'homoiosis'

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  1.  1
    Homoiōsis Theōi in Alcinous’ Didascalicus.A. A. Sutiapov - 2020 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 9 (2):115.
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  2. Epicurus as Dues Mortalis: Homoiosis Theoi and Epicurean Self-Cultivation.Michael Erler - 2002 - In Dorothea Frede & Andre Laks (eds.), Traditions of Theology. Brill. pp. 159–81.
     
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  3.  48
    Socrates, the Philosopher in the Theaetetus Digression (172c–177c), and the Ideal of Homoiôsis Theôi.Anna Lännström - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (2):111-130.
    Traditionally, scholars have taken homoiôsis theôi in the Theaetetus digression to require neglect of particulars, but they have noted that although Socrates advocates it, he does not live such a life. To explain the discrepancy, Mahoney and Rue both argue that we need to reinterpret godlikeness to require active engagement in the city. I reject their reinterpretations and I revise the traditional view, arguing that godlikeness is not a single ideal. Instead, I argue, Plato provides several different portraits of godlikeness (...)
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  4. Die Patristische Ethik der [Homoiōsis Theō] Und Die Mimesislehre René Girards : Perspektiven der Aneignung Einer Theologisch-Philosophischen Tradition.Johannes Zachhuber - 2011 - In Hanns Christof Brennecke & J. van Oort (eds.), Ethik Im Antiken Christentum. Peeters.
     
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  5.  33
    Metaphors of Closeness : Reflections on 'Homoiosis Theoi' in Ancient Philosophy and Beyond.Christoph Jedan - 2013 - Numen 60:54-70.
    It is often assumed that a single, diachronically persistent motif of imitating god can be identifijied in Ancient philosophy and early Christianity. The present article takes issue with this assumption and seeks to establish the conceptual framework for a more sophisticated discussion of homoiôsis. The article identifijies eight crucial junctures at which homoiôsis stories can diverge. For all the variance of homoiôsis narratives, the category of imitation of the divine remains a useful analytical tool. The article supports this claim by (...)
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  6.  44
    Una Via Che Conduce Al Divino: La Homoiosis Theo Nella Filosofia di Platone.Salvatore Lavecchia - 2006 - V&P.
  7.  92
    Next to Godliness: Pleasure and Assimilation in God in the Philebus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Apeiron 45 (1):1-31.
    According to Plato's successors, assimilation to god (homoiosis theoi) was the end (telos) of the Platonic system. There is ample evidence to support this claim in dialogues ranging from the Symposium through the Timaeus. However, the Philebus poses a puzzle for this conception of the Platonic telos. On the one hand, Plato states that the gods are beings beyond pleasure while, on the other hand, he argues that the best human life necessarily involves pleasure. In this paper, I argue (...)
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  8. The Ideal of Godlikeness.David Sedley - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 2: Ethics, Politics, Religion, and the Soul. Oxford University Press. pp. 309-328.
  9. After the Ascent: Plato on Becoming Like God.John M. Armstrong - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 26:171-183.
    Plato is associated with the idea that the body holds us back from knowing ultimate reality and so we should try to distance ourselves from its influence. This sentiment appears is several of his dialogues including Theaetetus where the flight from the physical world is compared to becoming like God. In some major dialogues of Plato's later career such as Philebus and Laws, however, the idea of becoming like God takes a different turn. God is an intelligent force that tries (...)
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  10.  3
    Postmodern Aristotle.Alfredo Marcos - 2012 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    The modern world was in part born as a reaction against Aristotelianism. However, the image of Aristotle to which modern philosophers reacted was partial, to say the least. Paradoxical though it may seem, today, more than twenty-three centuries on, we may now be in the most advantageous position for understanding the Stagirite's philosophy and applying it to contemporary problems. The present book contributes to the forming of an idea of Post-modern reason inspired by a constellation of Aristotelian concepts, such as (...)
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  11.  16
    Foucault Among the Stoics: Oikeiosis and Counter-Conduct.James F. Depew - 2016 - Foucault Studies 21:22-51.
    This paper explores the relation of Foucault’s notion of counter-conduct to the Stoic notion of oikeiosis. Initially, oikeisosis is set against Platonic homoiosis, specifically as discussed in the Alcibiades, which provides what Foucault calls the “Platonic model” of conduct. The paper examines what Foucault means by “care of the self” and points to its difference from the Delphic maxim “know yourself” that centered on a principle of homoiosis, or ethical transcendence. Noting how the problematic of care of the (...)
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  12. Fleeing the Divine: Plato's Rejection of the Ahedonic Ideal in the Philebus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - In John Dillon & Brisson Luc (eds.), Plato's Philebus: Selected Papers From the Eighth Symposium Platonicum. pp. 209-214.
    Note: "Next to Godliness" (Apeiron) is an expanded version of this paper. -/- According to Plato's successors, assimilation to god (homoiosis theoi) was the end (telos) of the Platonic system. There is ample evidence to support this claim in dialogues ranging from the Symposium through the Timaeus. However, the Philebus poses a puzzle for this conception of the Platonic telos. On the one hand, Plato states that the gods are beings beyond pleasure while, on the other hand, he argues (...)
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  13.  13
    Plato on Divinization and the Divinity of the Rational Part of the Soul.Justin Keena - 2021 - Plato Journal 21:87-95.
    Three distinct reasons that Plato calls the rational part of the soul “divine” are analyzed: its metaphysical kinship with the Forms, its epistemological ability to know the Forms, and its ethical capacity to live by them. Supposing these three divine aspects of the rational part are unified in the life of each person, they naturally suggest a process of divinization or “becoming like god” according to which a person, by living more virtuously, which requires increasingly better knowledge of the Forms, (...)
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  14.  1
    “El más piadoso de todos los animales”: en torno a las motivaciones religiosas del descenso a la caverna en República.Carlo Jesús Orellano QuiJano - 2020 - Estudios de Filosofía 18:11-36.
    El punto central de análisis del trabajo es la katábasis o descenso del filósofo a la caverna como parte de la alegoría presentada en República VII. Frente a tres interpretaciones alternativas que serán mencionadas, se expondrá una interpretación que, sin entrar en conflicto con las anteriores, podría complementarlas por cuanto toma en cuenta el aspecto religioso inherente a la comprensión platónica de la filosofía: la homoíōsis theōi. Para ello, se analizarán pasajes del diálogo mencionado a la luz de otros provenientes (...)
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