Results for 'honest signals'

999 found
Order:
  1.  22
    The Origins of Prestige Goods as Honest Signals of Skill and Knowledge.Aimée M. Plourde - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (4):374-388.
    This work addresses the emergence of prestige goods, which appear with fully modern Homo sapiens but at different times in different regions. I theorize that such goods came into existence to signal the level of skill held by their owners, in order to gain deference benefits from learning individuals in exchange for access. A game theoretic model demonstrates that a signaling strategy can invade a non-signaling population and can be evolutionarily stable under a set of reasonable parameter values. Increasing competition (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  4
    Between Cheap and Costly Signals: The Evolution of Partially Honest Communication.Kevin J. S. Zollman, Carl T. Bergstrom & Simon M. Huttegger - unknown
    Costly signalling theory has become a common explanation for honest communication when interests conflict. In this paper, we provide an alternative explanation for partially honest communication that does not require significant signal costs. We show that this alternative is at least as plausible as traditional costly signalling, and we suggest a number of experiments that might be used to distinguish the two theories.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  3.  56
    Evolutionary Aesthetics: An Introduction to Key Concepts and Current Issues.Hannes Rusch & Eckart Voland - 2013 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (2):113-133.
    In this article we try to give a philosophically reflected introductory overview of the current theoretical developments in the field of evolutionary aesthetics. Our aim is not completeness. Rather, we try to depict some of the central assumptions and explanatory tools frequently used in evolutionary accounts of human aesthetical preferences and address a number of currently debated, open research questions.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  4.  13
    Male Genital Modification.Raven Rowanchilde - 1996 - Human Nature 7 (2):189-215.
    By modifying the body in meaningful ways, human beings establish their identity and social status. Lip plugs, ear plugs, penis sheaths, cosmetics, ornaments, scarification, body piercings, and genital modifications encode and transmit messages about age, sex, social status, health, and attractiveness from one individual to another. Through sociocultural sexual selection, male genital modification plays an important role as a sociosexual signal in both male competition and female mate choice. The reliability of the signal correlates with the cost of acquiring the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Learning in Lithic Landscapes: A Reconsideration of the Hominid “Toolmaking” Niche.Peter Hiscock - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (1):27-41.
    This article reconsiders the early hominid ‘‘lithic niche’’ by examining the social implications of stone artifact making. I reject the idea that making tools for use is an adequate explanation of the elaborate artifact forms of the Lower Palaeolithic, or a sufficient cause for long-term trends in hominid technology. I then advance an alternative mechanism founded on the claim that competency in making stone artifacts requires extended learning, and that excellence in artifact making is attained only by highly skilled individuals (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  6. Cheap Talk When Interests Conflict.Joan B. Silk & Robert Boyd - unknown
    Most evolutionary analyses of animal communication suggest that low-cost signals can evolve only when both the signaller and the recipient rank outcomes in the same order. When there is a conflict of interest between sender and receiver, honest signals must be costly. However, recent work suggests that low-cost signals can be evolutionarily stable, even when the sender and the receiver rank outcomes in different orders, as long as the interest in achieving coordination is sufficiently great. In (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  7.  35
    Costly Signalling Theories: Beyond the Handicap Principle.Ben Fraser - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):263-278.
    Two recent overviews of costly signalling theory—Maynard-Smith and Harper ( 2003 ) and Searcy and Nowicki ( 2005 )—both refuse to count signals kept honest by punishment of dishonesty, as costly signals, because (1) honest signals must be costly in cases of costly signalling, and (2) punishment of dishonesty itself requires explanation. I argue that both pairs of researchers are mistaken: (2) is not a reason to discount signals kept honest by punishment of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  8.  39
    Why Art Is Not a Spandrel.S. Davies - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (4):333-341.
    If one views humans’ creation and appreciation of art as grounded in our biological nature, it might be tempting to see art as a spandrel, as an adventitious by-product of some adaptation without adaptive significance in itself. Such a position connects art to our evolved human nature yet apparently avoids the demands of demonstrating how art behaviours enhanced the fitness of our ancestors in the Upper Paleolithic. In this paper I explore two arguments that count against the view that art (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9. Cheap Talk When Interests Conflict.Rob Boyd - manuscript
    Most evolutionary analyses of animal communication suggest that low-cost signals can evolve only when both the signaller and the recipient rank outcomes in the same order. When there is a conflict of interest between sender and receiver, honest signals must be costly. However, recent work suggests that low-cost signals can be evolutionarily stable, even when the sender and the receiver rank outcomes in different orders, as long as the interest in achieving coordination is sufficiently great. In (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  80
    Evolutionary Theories of Morality and the Manipulative Use of Signals.Lee Cronk1 - 1994 - Zygon 29 (1):81-101.
    Several attempts have recently been made to explain moral systems and moral sentiments in light of evolutionary biological theory. It may be helpful to modify and extend this project with the help of a theory of communication developed by ethologists. The core of this approach is the idea that signals are best seen as attempts to manipulate others rather than as attempts to inform them. This addition helps to clarify some problematic areas in the evolutionary study of morals, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  11.  83
    Linguistic Intuitions: Error Signals and the Voice of Competence.Steven Gross - forthcoming - In Samuel Schindler, Anna Drożdżowicz & Karen Brøcker (eds.), Linguistic Intuitions. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Linguistic intuitions are a central source of evidence across a variety of linguistic domains. They have also long been a source of controversy. This chapter aims to illuminate the etiology and evidential status of at least some linguistic intuitions by relating them to error signals of the sort posited by accounts of on-line monitoring of speech production and comprehension. The suggestion is framed as a novel reply to Michael Devitt’s claim that linguistic intuitions are theory-laden “central systems” responses, rather (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  61
    Race, IQ, and the Search for Statistical Signals Associated with so-Called “X”-Factors: Environments, Racism, and the “Hereditarian Hypothesis”.Jonathan Michael Kaplan - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (1):1-17.
    Some authors defending the “hereditarian” hypothesis with respect to differences in average IQ scores between populations have argued that the sorts of environmental variation hypothesized by some researchers rejecting the hereditarian position should leave discoverable statistical traces, namely changes in the overall variance of scores or in variance–covariance matrices relating scores to other variables. In this paper, I argue that the claims regarding the discoverability of such statistical signals are broadly mistaken—there is no good reason to suspect that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13.  56
    Modelling and the Fall and Rise of the Handicap Principle.Jonathan Grose - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (5):677-696.
    The story of the fall and rise of Zahavi’s handicap principle is one of a battle between models. Early attempts at formal modeling produced negative results and, unsurprisingly, scepticism about the principle. A major change came in 1990 with Grafen’s production of coherent models of a handicap mechanism of honest signalling. This paper’s first claim is that acceptance of the principle, and its dissemination into other disciplines, has been driven principally by that, and subsequent modeling, rather than by empirical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  14.  89
    Signals That Make a Difference.Brett Calcott, Paul E. Griffiths & Arnaud Pocheville - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axx022.
    Recent work by Brian Skyrms offers a very general way to think about how information flows and evolves in biological networks — from the way monkeys in a troop communicate, to the way cells in a body coordinate their actions. A central feature of his account is a way to formally measure the quantity of information contained in the signals in these networks. In this paper, we argue there is a tension between how Skyrms talks of signalling networks and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  51
    John Maynard Smith’s Notion of Animal Signals.Ulrich E. Stegmann - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (5):1011-1025.
    This paper explores John Maynard Smith’s conceptual work on animal signals. Maynard Smith defined animal signals as traits that (1) change another organism’s behaviour while benefiting the sender, that (2) are evolved for this function, and that (3) have their effects through the evolved response of the receiver. Like many ethologists, Maynard Smith assumed that animal signals convey semantic information. Yet his definition of animal signals remains silent on the nature of semantic information and on the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  16. Superluminal Signals and the Resolution of the Causal Paradox.F. Selleri - 2006 - Foundations of Physics 36 (3):443-463.
    The experimental evidence for electromagnetic signals propagating with superluminal group velocity is recalled. Transformations of space and time depending on a synchronization parameter, e1, indicate the existence of a privileged inertial system. The Lorentz transformations are obtained for a particular e1≠0. No standard experiment on relativity depends on e1, but if accelerations are considered only e1=0 remains possible. The causal paradox generated by superluminal signals (SLS) in the theory of relativity does not exist in the theory with e1=0. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Honest Beliefs, Credible Lies, and Culpable Awareness: Rhetoric, Inequality, and Mens Rea in Sexual Assault.Lucinda Vandervort - 2004 - Osgoode Hall Law Journal 42 (4):625-660.
    The exculpatory rhetorical power of the term “honest belief” continues to invite reliance on the bare credibility of belief in consent to determine culpability in sexual assault. In law, however, only a comprehensive analysis of mens rea, including an examination of the material facts and circumstances of which the accused was aware, demonstrates whether a “belief” in consent was or was not reckless or wilfully blind. An accused's “honest belief” routinely begs this question, leading to a truncated analysis (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Practice, Semiotics, and the Limits of Philosophy.John J. Stuhr - 2005 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (1):73-80.
    This article, with those published here by Robert Innis and Richard Shusterman, is part of a symposium devoted to exploring critically new directions in, and for, pragmatism. Each symposiast takes up this task in the context of new books by the other two. Accordingly, I examine the ways in which _Pragmatism and the Forms of Sense by Innis and _Surface and Depth by Shusterman may advance commitments to pluralism (such that the books that speak to one person may not address (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Great Apes Search for Longer Following Humans’ Ostensive Signals, but Do Not Then Follow Their Gaze.Fumihiro Kano, Richard Moore, Chris Krupenye, Satoshi Hirata, Masaki Tomongaga & Josep Call - 2018 - Animal Cognition 21 (5):715-728.
    The previous studies have shown that human infants and domestic dogs follow the gaze of a human agent only when the agent has addressed them ostensively—e.g., by making eye contact, or calling their name. This evidence is interpreted as showing that they expect ostensive signals to precede referential information. The present study tested chimpanzees, one of the closest relatives to humans, in a series of eye-tracking experiments using an experimental design adapted from these previous studies. In the ostension conditions, (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  39
    Culture and the Evolution of the Human Social Instincts.R. Boyd & P. J. Richerson - unknown
    Human societies are extraordinarily cooperative compared to those of most other animals. In the vast majority of species, individuals live solitary lives, meeting to only to mate and, sometimes, raise their young. In social species, cooperation is limited to relatives and (maybe) small groups of reciprocators. After a brief period of maternal support, individuals acquire virtually all of the food that they eat. There is little division of labor, no trade, and no large scale conflict. Communication is limited to a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  42
    Culture and the Evolution of the Human Social Instincts.Peter Richerson - manuscript
    Human societies are extraordinarily cooperative compared to those of most other animals. In the vast majority of species, individuals live solitary lives, meeting to only to mate and, sometimes, raise their young. In social species, cooperation is limited to relatives and (maybe) small groups of reciprocators. After a brief period of maternal support, individuals acquire virtually all of the food that they eat. There is little division of labor, no trade, and no large scale conflict. Communication is limited to a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  45
    Signals: Evolution, Learning, and Information.Brian Skyrms - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Brian Skyrms offers a fascinating demonstration of how fundamental signals are to our world. He uses various scientific tools to investigate how meaning and communication develop. Signals operate in networks of senders and receivers at all levels of life, transmitting and processing information. That is how humans and animals think and interact.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   97 citations  
  23. Backend Framework and Software Approach to Compute Earthquake Parameters From Signals Recorded by Seismic Instrumentation System.Raman K. Attri - manuscript
    Computation of seismic parameters and its interpretation from the recorded earthquake signal is empowered by digital data acquisition systems. This enables seismologist to automatically compute all the relevant parameters. Futuristic applications require extensive software development to implement seismic prediction and forecasting models. While developing such models, software developer prefer to write their own in-house analysis & modeling software with complete control over the required computations and models. This paper presents simplified mathematical framework of the seismic events and back-end computational software (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  21
    Ghost-in-the-Machine Reveals Human Social Signals for Human–Robot Interaction.Sebastian Loth, Katharina Jettka, Manuel Giuliani & Jan P. de Ruiter - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    We used a new method called “Ghost-in-the-Machine” (GiM) to investigate social interactions with a robotic bartender taking orders for drinks and serving them. Using the GiM paradigm allowed us to identify how human participants recognize the intentions of customers on the basis of the output of the robotic recognizers. Specifically, we measured which recognizer modalities (e.g., speech, the distance to the bar) were relevant at different stages of the interaction. This provided insights into human social behavior necessary for the development (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25.  13
    Effects of the Intensity of Auditory and Visual Ready Signals on Simple Reaction Time.David L. Kohfeld - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (1p1):88.
  26.  9
    Ready Signals and the Effect of Interpolated UCS Presentations in Eyelid Conditioning.Robert H. Dufort & Gregory A. Kimble - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (1):1.
  27.  16
    The Timing of Signals in Skill.R. Conrad - 1956 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (6):365.
  28.  15
    Identification of Posthypnotic Signals and Responses.F. L. Marcuse, A. Hill & M. Keegan - 1945 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (2):163.
  29.  12
    Set to Respond and the Effect of Interrupting Signals Upon Tracking Performance.Stephen Griew - 1959 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (5):333.
  30.  9
    Concept Identification Using Simultaneous Auditory and Visual Signals.Daniel S. Lordahl - 1961 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (3):283.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  11
    Effects of Second Signals Occurring After Response Selection on Responses to First Signals.Louis M. Herman & Barry H. Kantowitz - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (3p1):570.
  32.  11
    Effect of Certain Noises Upon Detection of Visual Signals.William H. Watkins - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (1):72.
  33.  9
    Effects of Second Signals on Response Time to First Signals Under Certainty and Uncertainty.Louis M. Herman - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):106.
  34.  6
    Psychological Refractory Phase and the Functional Significance of Signals.Raymond S. Nickerson - 1967 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (2):303.
  35.  5
    Reaction Time in the Detection of Vibrotactile Signals.George A. Gescheider, John H. Wright & Michael B. Evans - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):501.
  36.  15
    Signals That Make a Difference.Brett Calcott, Arnaud Pocheville & Paul Griffiths - 2020 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (1):233-258.
    Recent work by Brian Skyrms offers a very general way to think about how information flows and evolves in biological networks—from the way monkeys in a troop communicate to the way cells in a body coordinate their actions. A central feature of his account is a way to formally measure the quantity of information contained in the signals in these networks. In this article, we argue there is a tension between how Skyrms talks of signalling networks and his formal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  61
    A Consumer‐Based Teleosemantics for Animal Signals.Ulrich E. Stegmann - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):864-875.
    Ethological theory standardly attributes representational content to animal signals. In this article I first assess whether Ruth Millikan’s teleosemantic theory accounts for the content of animal signals. I conclude that it does not, because many signals do not exhibit the required sort of cooperation between signal‐producing and signal‐consuming devices. It is then argued that Kim Sterelny’s proposal, while not requiring cooperation, sometimes yields the wrong content. Finally, I outline an alternative view, according to which consumers alone are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  38.  34
    Music and Dance as a Coalition Signaling System.Edward H. Hagen & Gregory A. Bryant - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (1):21-51.
    Evidence suggests that humans might have neurological specializations for music processing, but a compelling adaptationist account of music and dance is lacking. The sexual selection hypothesis cannot easily account for the widespread performance of music and dance in groups (especially synchronized performances), and the social bonding hypothesis has severe theoretical difficulties. Humans are unique among the primates in their ability to form cooperative alliances between groups in the absence of consanguineal ties. We propose that this unique form of social organization (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  39.  11
    Schadenfreude and Gluckschmerz Are Emotional Signals of Balance.Niels van de Ven - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):305-306.
    Smith and van Dijk explore the relationship between the emotions schadenfreude and gluckschmerz, and why people experience these emotions. Their perspective is valuable and adds to a better understanding of how people respond to the fortunes of others. In this manuscript I try to further these ideas by arguing that schadenfreude and gluckschmerz are best seen as signals that indicate that a balance in how we would want the world to be is restored or violated.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  41
    Beliefs as Signals: A New Function for Belief.Eric Funkhouser - 2017 - Philosophical Psychology 30 (6):809-831.
    Beliefs serve at least two broad functions. First, they help us navigate the world. Second, they serve as signals to manipulate others. Philosophers and psychologists have focused on the first function while largely overlooking the second. This article advances a conception of signals and makes a prima facie case for a social signaling function for at least some beliefs. Truth and rational support are often irrelevant to the signaling function. If some beliefs evolved for a signaling function, then (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41.  54
    Detecting Honest People’s Lies in Handwriting: The Power of the Ten Commandments and Internalized Ethical Values.Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):389-400.
    Can managers detect honest people’s lies in a handwritten message? In this article, I will briefly discuss graphology and a basic model of interpersonal communication. I will then develop a fundamental theoretical framework of eight principles for detecting lies based on the basic communication model, handwriting analyses, and the following assumptions: For most people, it is easier to tell the truth than to tell lies. This applies to handwritings also. When most honest people lie, they try to hide (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  42.  8
    Signals are minimal causes.Marc Artiga - forthcoming - Synthese:1-19.
    Although the definition of ‘signal’ has been controversial for some time within the life sciences, current approaches seem to be converging toward a common analysis. This powerful framework can satisfactorily accommodate many cases of signaling and captures some of its main features. This paper argues, however, that there is a central feature of signals that so far has been largely overlooked: its special causal role. More precisely, I argue that a distinctive feature of signals is that they are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  8
    Arbitrary Signals and Cognitive Complexity.Ronald J. Planer & David Kalkman - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axz018.
    The arbitrariness of a signal has long been seen as a theoretically important but difficult to pin down notion. In this article, we suggest there are at least two different notions of arbitrariness at play in philosophical and scientific debates concerning the use of arbitrary signals, and work towards improved analyses of both. We then consider how these different types of arbitrariness can co-occur and come apart. Finally, we examine the connections between these two types of arbitrariness and the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  90
    Signals, Evolution and the Explanatory Power of Transient Information.Brian Skyrms - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (3):407-428.
    Pre‐play signals that cost nothing are sometimes thought to be of no significance in interactions which are not games of pure common interest. We investigate the effect of pre‐play signals in an evolutionary setting for Assurance, or Stag Hunt, games and for a Bargaining game. The evolutionary game with signals is found to have dramatically different dynamics from the same game without signals. Signals change stability properties of equilibria in the base game, create new polymorphic (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  45.  27
    Another Kind of 'BOLD Response': Answering Multiple-Choice Questions Via Online Decoded Single-Trial Brain Signals.Bettina Sorger & Audrey Maudoux - unknown
    The term ‘locked-in’ syndrome (LIS) describes a medical condition in which persons concerned are severely paralyzed and at the same time fully conscious and awake. The resulting anarthria makes it impossible for these patients to naturally communicate, which results in diagnostic as well as serious practical and ethical problems. Therefore, developing alternative, muscle-independent communication means is of prime importance. Such communication means can be realized via brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) circumventing the muscular system by using brain signals associated with preserved (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46.  22
    Are Beliefs Signals?Trip Glazer - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (7):1114-1119.
    ABSTRACTEric Funkhouser argues that beliefs can function as social signals. I argue that Funkhouser’s argument for this conclusion rests on a problematic definition of “signal,” and that on standard definitions, the imperceptibility of beliefs disqualifies them from counting as signals. However, I also argue that Funkhouser’s insights about the social functions of beliefs can be true even if his claim that beliefs are signals is false.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  11
    Mind the Gap – Moving Beyond the Dichotomy Between Intentional Gestures and Emotional Facial and Vocal Signals of Nonhuman Primates.Katja Liebal & Linda Oña - 2018 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (1-2):121-135.
    Despite the variety of theories suggesting how human language might have evolved, very few consider the potential role of emotions in such scenarios. The few existing theories jointly highlight that gaining control over the production of emotional communication was crucial for establishing and maintaining larger social groups. This in turn resulted in the development of more complex social emotions and the corresponding sophisticated socio-cognitive skills to understand others’ communicative behavior, providing the grounds for language to emerge. Importantly, these theories propose (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  81
    A Glass Half-Full: Brian Skyrms's Signals.Kim Sterelny - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (1):73-86.
    ExtractBrian Skyrms's Signals has the virtues familiar from his Evolution of the Social Contract and The Stag Hunt. He begins with a very simple model of agents in interaction, and in a series of brief and beautifully clear chapters, this model and its successors are explored, elaborated, connected and illustrated through biological theory and the social sciences. Signals borrows its core model from David Lewis: it is Lewis's signalling game. In this game, two agents interact. One agent can (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49. Color and Figure-Ground: From Signals to Qualia.Birgitta Dresp-Langley & Adam Reeves (eds.) - 2014 - Routledge.
    The laws which predict how the perceptual quality of figure-ground can be extracted from the most elementary visual signals were discovered by the Gestaltists, and form an essential part of their movement (see especially Metzger, 1930, and Wertheimer, 1923 translated and re-edited by Lothar Spillmann, 2009 and 2012, respectively). Distinguishing figure from ground is a prerequisite for perception of both form and space (the relative positions, trajectories, and distances of objects in the visual field. The human brain has an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. What Sensory Signals Are About.C. L. Elder - 1998 - Analysis 58 (4):273-276.
    In ‘Of Sensory Systems and the “Aboutness” of Mental States’, Kathleen Akins (1996) argues against what she calls ‘the traditional view’ about sensory systems, according to which they are detectors of features in the environment outside the organism. As an antidote, she considers the case of thermoreception, a system whose sensors send signals about how things stand with themselves and their immediate dermal surround (a ‘narcissistic’ sensory system); and she closes by suggesting that the signals from many sensory (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 999