Results for 'humaneness'

58 found
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  1.  69
    Medicine – the Art of Humaneness: On Ethics of Traditional Chinese Medicine.Ren-Zong Qiu - 1988 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (3):277-299.
    This essay discusses the ethics of traditional Chinese medicine. After a brief remark on the history of traditional Chinese medical ethics, the author outlines the Confucian ethics which formed the cultural context in which traditional Chinese medicine was evolving and constituted the core of its ethics. Then he argued that how Chinese physicians applied the principles of Confucian ethics in medicine and prescribed the attitude a physician should take to himself, to patients and to his colleagues. In the last part (...)
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  2.  47
    Reproduction, Familiarity, Love, and Humaneness: How Did Confucius Reveal “Humaneness”? [REVIEW]Hongxing Chen - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):506-522.
    This article draws out the subtle connections among the various sorts of categories— sheng 生 (reproduction), qin 亲 (familiarity), ai 爱 (love), and ren 仁 (humaneness) —focusing on the following: Confucius found the original significance of reproduction to be sympathy between males and females, and upon further study he found it extended to the.affinity of blood relations, namely familiarity. From familiarity he came to understand love that one generates and has for people and things beyond one’s blood relations, in (...)
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  3.  8
    Theories of "Humaneness" in the Spring and Autumn Era and Confucius' Concept of Humaneness.Zhang Hengshou - 1981 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 12 (4):3-36.
    At present one of the important tasks of the scholarly world is to reevaluate objectively the teachings of Confucius. The discussions of Confucius during the 1960s made a certain amount of progress, but a number of problems remain that were not truly debated in accord with the policy of "let a hundred schools contend." At the time, the self-appointed authority on theory, Guan Feng, disseminated a series of arbitrary theories that had a very unhealthy influence. The later movement to criticize (...)
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  4.  27
    An Approach for Harmonizing Engineering and Science Education with Humaneness.Krishnasamy T. Selvan - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):573-577.
    The world is facing an apparently increasing dose of violence. Obviously, there cannot be a simple solution to this complex problem. But at the same time it may be appreciated that, in the interests of humanity, a solution must be pursued in every possible way by everyone. This article is concerned with what one could possibly do at the academic level. Since lack of openness of thought appears to be a fundamental contributor to this unfortunate problem, attempting to cultivate this (...)
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  5. The Origins of Chinese Thoughtyou Wu Dao Li, Shi Li Gui Ren 由巫到禮 釋禮歸仁: From Shamanism to Ritual Regulations and Humaneness.Zehou Li - 2018 - Brill.
    _From Shamanism to Ritual Regulations and Humaneness_ offers an account of the origins and nature of a uniquely Chinese way of thinking that, carried through Confucian tradition, continues to define the character of Chinese culture and society.
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  6. Ancient Legal Thought: Equity, Justice, and Humaneness From Hammurabi and the Pharaohs to Justinian and the Talmud.Larry May - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of what constituted legality and the role of law in ancient societies. Investigating and comparing legal codes and legal thinking of the ancient societies of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, India, the Roman Republic, the Roman Empire and of the ancient Rabbis, this volume examines how people used law to create stable societies. Starting with Hammurabi's Code, this volume also analyzes the law of the pharaohs and the codes of the ancient rabbis and of the Roman Emperor Justinian. (...)
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  7. Aspects of Confucianism a Study of the Relationship Between Rationality and Humaneness.Gregor Paul - 1990
     
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  8. Individual and Collective Contributions Toward Humaneness in Our Time.Van James Patten, George C. Stone & Ge Chen - 1997 - Upa.
    This book offers an examination of volunteerism, philanthropy, and people-centered caring behaviors both individually and collectively. It discusses the positive contributions of individuals and a corporate capitalistic society through a variety of forms which help others meet their social and economic needs.
     
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  9.  15
    Book Reviews : Konrad Lorenz, The Waning of Humaneness, Translated by Robert Warren Kickert. Little, Brown, Boston, 1987. Pp. 256, $17.95. [REVIEW]Theodora J. Kalikow - 1990 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20 (3):403-408.
  10.  88
    Sustainable Agriculture is Humane, Humane Agriculture is Sustainable.Michael C. Appleby - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (3):293-303.
    Procedures that increase the sustainability of agriculture often result in animals being treated more humanely:both livestock in animal and mixed farming and wildlife in arable farming. Equally, procedures ensuring humane treatment of farm animals often increase sustainability, for example in disease control and manure management. This overlap between sustainability and humaneness is not coincidental. Both approaches can be said to be animal centered, to be based on the fact that animal production is primarily a biological process. Proponents of both (...)
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  11.  64
    Building a Sustainable Future for Animal Agriculture: An Environmental Virtue Ethic of Care Approach Within the Philosophy of Technology. [REVIEW]Raymond Anthony - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):123-144.
    Agricultural technologies are non-neutral and ethical challenges are posed by these technologies themselves. The technologies we use or endorse are embedded with values and norms and reflect the shape of our moral character. They can literally make us better or worse consumers and/or people. Looking back, when the world’s developed nations welcomed and steadily embraced industrialization as the dominant paradigm for agriculture a half century or so ago, they inadvertently championed a philosophy of technology that promotes an insular human-centricism, despite (...)
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  12. Reconstructing Modern Ethics: Confucian Care Ethics.Ann A. Pang-White - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):210-227.
    Modern mainstream ethical theories with its overemphasis on autonomy and non-interference have failed to adequately respond to contemporary social problems. A new ethical perspective is very much needed. Thanks to Carol Gilligan's 1982 groundbreaking work, 'In a Different Voice' , we now not only have virtue and communitarian ethicists, but also a group of feminist philosophers, charting a new direction for ethics that tempers modern ethics' obsession with autonomy, contractual rights, and abstract rules. Nel Noddings, in her 'Caring: A Feminine (...)
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  13.  63
    Nietzschean Self-Overcoming.Jonathan Mitchell - 2016 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (3):323-350.
    Nietzsche often writes in praise of self-overcoming. He tells us that his humanity consists in “constant self-overcoming” 1 and that if someone wanted to give a name to his lifelong self-discipline against “Wagnerianism,” Schopenhauer, and “the whole modern ‘humaneness,’” then one might call it self-overcoming. He says that his writings “speak only” of his overcomings, later claiming that “the development of states that are increasingly high, rare, distant, tautly drawn and comprehensive … are dependent on the constant ‘self-overcoming of (...)
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  14.  18
    Elevating Human Being: Towards a New Sort of Naturalism.Irene Liu - 2017 - Philosophy 92 (4):597-622.
    Defended by scholars such as John McDowell and Julia Annas, the naturalism of second nature (NSN) claims that the virtues are part of a rational second nature in- stilled through moral education. While NSN emphasizes that rationality, fully devel- oped, results in autonomy from nature, it is considered a sort of naturalism because the development of rational second nature unfolds through entirely natural processes. Critics object that NSN does not utilize human nature as a standard of evaluation, which is a (...)
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  15. Virtues and Roles in Early Confucian Ethics.Tim Connolly - 2016 - Confluence 4.
    Many passages in early Confucian texts such as the Analects and Mengzi are focused on virtue, recommending qualities like humaneness (ren 仁), righteousness (yi 義), and trustworthiness (xin 信). Still others emphasize roles: what it means to be a good son, a good ruler, a good friend, a good teacher, or a good student. How are these teachings about virtues and roles related? In the past decade there has been a growing debate between two interpretations of early Confucian ethics, (...)
     
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  16.  52
    Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism.Justin Tiwald - 2018 - In Nancy E. Snow (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Virtue. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 171-89.
    In this chapter the author defends the view that the major variants of Confucian ethics qualify as virtue ethics in the respects that matter most, which concern the focus, investigative priority, and explanatory priority of virtue over right action. The chapter also provides short summaries of the central Confucian virtues and then explains how different Confucians have understood the relationship between these and what some regard as the chief or most comprehensive virtue, ren (humaneness or benevolence). Finally, it explicates (...)
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  17.  27
    Is Mencius' Doctrine of 'Commiseration' Tenable?Qingping Liu - 2001 - Asian Philosophy 11 (2):73 – 84.
    Mencius regards the 'heart of commiseration' as the 'beginning of humaneness', so as to set up a universal and sufficient foundation for the Confucian ideal of humane love in the human 'heart-nature'. Through a close and critical analysis of the very text of the Mencius, however, this essay tries to show that if in the light of the fundamental spirit of Confucianism, especially in the light of the principles of 'one root' and 'love with distinctions' advocated by Mencius himself (...)
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  18.  29
    Television News Ethics: A Survey of Television News Directors.Roger Hadley - 1989 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 4 (2):249 – 264.
    This study reports the findings of a survey of television news directors drawn from a Radio?Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) sample. Rationale for the study centers around an apparent trend in television news to extend its ethical boundaries to include high proportions of sensationalism, privacy invasion, deception, unfair reporting, and the like. Five principles of journalism ethics? truth, justice, freedom, humaneness, and stewardship?are used as the framework for discussing results of 34 ethical questions. Results show most news directors clearly (...)
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  19.  45
    The Public Good That Does the Public Good: A New Reading of Mohism.Whalen Lai - 1993 - Asian Philosophy 3 (2):125 – 141.
    Abstract Mohism has long been misrepresented. Mo?tzu is usually called a utilitarian because he preached a universal love that must benefit. Yet Mencius, who pined the Confucian way of virtue (humaneness and righteousness) against Mo?tzu's way of benefit, basically borrowed Mo?tzu's thesis: that the root cause of chaos is this lack of love?except Mencius renamed it the desire for personal benefit. Yet Mo?tzu only championed ?benefit? to head off its opposite, ?harm?, specifically the harm done by Confucians who with (...)
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  20.  21
    Is Mencius' Doctrine of 'Extending Affection' Tenable?Qingping Liu - 2004 - Asian Philosophy 14 (1):79 – 90.
    In his doctrine of 'extending affection' (tui en), Mencius holds that one can transform particular consanguineous affection into universal humane love by the way of 'taking this heart here and applying it to what is over there'. Through a critical analysis of the text of the Mencius, it is attempted to argue that although this doctrine can combine the two mainstays of Confucian thought, i.e., filiality and humaneness, into an integrated unity, it is not tenable within the Confucian framework (...)
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  21.  18
    Dimensions of Contemporary Confucian Cosmopolitanism.Robert Cummings Neville - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):594-613.
    This paper identifies five dimensions of cosmopolitanism, though doubtless there are many more: cosmopolitanism in decision making, engaging others, attaining personal wholeness, the ultimate value-identity of life, and religious sensibility. These are discussed in terms of the Confucian ideas of the “Four Beginnings,” ritual, life as cultivated education, sagehood, public versus private life, Principle, heart-mind, harmony, value, humaneness, “love with differences,” “roots and branches,” and filiality, among others. In all, it presents Confucianism as a living tradition that is facing (...)
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  22.  3
    Confucius and the Four Books for Women (Nü Sishu «女四書»).Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - In Mathew A. Foust and Sor-Hoon Tan (ed.), Feminist Encounters with Confucius. Leiden, NL: Brill. pp. 14-36.
    This work builds on earlier works, which defend Confucianism against charges of sexism and present interpretations of Confucianism compatible with Feminism, but contributors go beyond the much discussed care ethics, and common arguments of how ren (humaneness) can ground an egalitarian humanism that include gender equality. Besides ethics and political philosophy topics, this volume includes discussions in other philosophical areas such as epistemology, metaphysics, and applied philosophy. Through the encounter of Feminism and Confucius’s perspectives, each contributor generates novel answers (...)
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  23.  31
    Human, Non-Human, and Beyond: Cochlear Implants in Socio-Technological Environments.Beate Ochsner, Markus Spöhrer & Robert Stock - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (3):237-250.
    The paper focuses on processes of normalization through which dis/ability is simultaneously produced in specific collectives, networks, and socio-technological systems that enable the construction of such demarcations. Our point of departure is the cochlear implant, a neuroprosthetic device intended to replace and/or augment the function of the damaged inner ear. Unlike hearing aids, which amplify sounds, the CI does the work of damaged hair cells in the inner ear by providing sound signals to the brain. We examine the processes of (...)
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  24.  65
    Neo-Confucian Cosmology, Virtue Ethics, and Environmental Philosophy.Donald N. Blakeley - 2001 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):37-49.
    This paper explores the extent to which the Confucian concept of ren (humaneness) has application in ways that are comparable tocontemporary versions of environmental virtue ethics. I argue that the accounts of self-cultivation that are developed in major texts of the Confucian tradition have important direct implications for environmental thinking that even the Neo-Confucians do not seriously entertain.
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  25. The Role Dilemma in Early Confucianism.John Ramsey - 2013 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (3):376-387.
    Recently, Sean Cordell has raised a problem for Aristotelians who seriously consider social roles: When the demands of the role conflict with the demands of morality, which norms ought one follow? However, this problem, which I call the role dilemma, is not specific to Aristotelians. Classical Confucians face a similar problem. How do Confucians resolve conflicts between the demands of humaneness (ren 仁) and the demands of social roles and the social norms (li 礼) that govern these roles? Confucians (...)
     
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  26.  84
    The Moral Power of Jim: A Mencian Reading of Huckleberry Finn.Jung H. Lee - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (2):101 – 118.
    This paper examines the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in the light of the early Confucian thinker Mencius, arguing in essence that Mencian theories of moral development and self-cultivation can help us to recover the moral significance of Twain's novel. Although 'ethical criticisms' of Huckleberry Finn share a long history, I argue that most interpretations have failed to appreciate the moral significance of Jim, either by focusing on the moral arc of Huck in isolation or by casting Jim in one-dimensional terms (...)
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  27. The Ji Self in Early Chinese Texts.Deborah A. Sommer - 2012 - In Jason Dockstader Hans-Georg Moller & Gunter Wohlfahrt (eds.), Selfhood East and West: De-Constructions of Identity. Traugott Bautz. pp. 17-45.
    The ji 己self is a site, storehouse, or depot of individuated allotment associated with the possession of things and qualities: wholesome and unwholesome desires (yu 欲) and aversions, emotions such as anxiety, and positive values such as humaneness and reverence. Each person's allotment is unique, and its "contents" are collected, measured, reflected on, and then distributed to others. The Analects, Mencius, Xunzi, Daodejing, and Zhuangzi each have their own vision for negotiating the space between self and other. Works as (...)
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  28.  22
    Mengzi’s Externalist Solution to the Role Dilemma.John Ramsey - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (2):188-206.
    The role dilemma raises a problem for role ethic interpretations of Confucianism. The dilemma arises from the conflict between the demands and obligations of Humaneness and the demands and obligations of roles one occupies. Favoring the demands of Humaneness undermines a role ethic because roles and role-obligations no longer ground the ethic. However, favoring social role-obligations permits immoral and unjust role-obligations and allows for uncharitable readings of Confucianism.This paper examines how Mengzi resolves the dilemma. I argue that Mengzi’s (...)
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  29.  73
    Biomedical Ethics: Muslim Perspectives on Genetic Modification.Fatima Agha Al-Hayani - 2007 - Zygon 42 (1):153-162.
    Technology pertaining to genetically modified foods has created an abundance of food and various methods to protect new products and enhance productivity. However, many scientists, economists, and humanitarians have been critical of the application of these discoveries. They are apprehensive about a profit-driven mentality that, to them, seems to propel the innovators rather than a poverty-elimination mentality that should be behind such innovations. The objectives should be to afford the most benefit to those in need and to prevent hunger around (...)
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  30.  26
    Ren-Li, Reciprocity, Judgment, and the Question of Openness to the Other in the Confucian Lunyu.Meiyao Wu - 2013 - Journal of Moral Education 42 (4):430-442.
    Here the author takes ren-humanity to be, as Confucius says, an underlying, ineffable, potentially universal human quality, and draws a distinction between three different types of moral capacity in the Lunyu: the man of ren?s capacity for li-proper interactions, his capacity for total reciprocity with another, and his capacity to make moral discriminations. The nature of these moral judgments is then discussed in relation to the praxis of entering into shu-reciprocity with another and that of recognizing others? actions as being (...)
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  31.  54
    Spiritual Development: Han F. De Wit's and Stanislav Grof's Differing Approaches.K. Helmut Reich - 2001 - Zygon 36 (3):509-520.
    For both Han F. de Wit and Stanislav Grof, spirituality constitutes an essential part of humaneness; a life built on materialism is deemed an impoverished life. For de Wit, spirituality yields courage, compassion, joy, clarity of mind, and consequently wisdom. For Grof, personal spiritual experiences gained during altered states of consciousness are of central interest. After defining spirituality, these views, built on long‐term personal experiences of the authors and those of others, are explicated in detail. Both authors describe their (...)
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  32.  37
    Ethical Issues in Whale and Small Cetacean Management.James E. Scarff - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (3):241-279.
    Three main ethical issues involved in the management of whales and small cetaceans are examined: ethical values concerning extinction and their implications for consumptive management regimes, the humaneness of current and feasible future harvesting techniques, and the ethical propriety of killing cetaceans for various uses. I argue that objections to human-caused extinction are primarily ethical, and that the ethical discussion must be expanded to include greater consideration of acceptable risks and problems associated with extinction due to human-caused genetic selection. (...)
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  33.  69
    The Idea of Humanity in the Context of Contemporary Ethics.V. Gluchman - 2005 - Filozofia 60 (7):512-531.
    The humanity is examined on two levels: first as a natural biological quality having a moral dimension and a moral impact, and then as a moral quality, which is a specific human product and a result of cultural evolution, i.e. of human moral deve-lopment. According to the forms of the realized humanity the author differentiates between active and passive forms of humanity; the active humanity is further divided into a positive and a negative ones.
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  34. The Place of Humanity in the Ethics of Social Consequences.V. Gluchman - 2005 - Filozofia 60 (8):613-623.
    In the author’s view the humanity has its place in the ethics of social consequences : its implementation leads directly to positive social consequences, i.e. the main evaluation criteria in this conception. However, in applying the principle of humanity one has to see humanity as the protection of sustainable life according to the degree, to which an individual human life meets at least minimal qualitative standards of human life. The resulting idea is that a person living only on the biological (...)
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  35.  20
    Comments on 'on “Bettering Humanity” in Science and Engineering Education'.Selvan T. Krishnasamy - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):291-293.
    The object of this communication is to reflect on the recent article by James Stieb in relation to an earlier article by Selvan.
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  36.  30
    Autonomy, Humane Medicine, and Research Ethics: An East Asian Perspective.David K. Chan - 2004 - In Michael C. Brannigan (ed.), Cross-Cultural Biotechnology. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 127-137.
    In Chinese Confucian medical ethics, the principle of autonomy has not been recognized. Instead, the basic values of medical practice are compassion and humaneness. Patient autonomy however lies at the foundation of Western medical ethics in general and research ethics in particular. In the modern world of biotechnology, what happens when medical research is carried out in an East Asian society? Should the society adopt principles of Western medical ethics? Or can resources to ensure ethical research be found in (...)
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  37. A Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student of the Common Laws of England.Joseph Cropsey (ed.) - 1971 - University of Chicago Press.
    This little-known late writing of Hobbes reveals an unexplored dimension of his famous doctrine of sovereignty. The essay was first published posthumously in 1681, and from 1840 to 1971 only a generally unreliable edition has been in print. This edition provides the first dependable and easily accessible text of Hobbes's _Dialogue._ In the _Dialogue,_ Hobbes sets forth his mature reflections of the relation between reason and law, reflections more "liberal" than those found in _Leviathan_ and his other well-known writings. Hobbes (...)
     
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  38.  6
    Putting the Way Into Effect : Inward and Outward Concerns in Classical Confucianism.Benjamin Huff - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):418-448.
    Classical Confucian thought is deeply concerned, on the one hand, with individual moral self-cultivation and, on the other, with the widespread establishment of a moral social order. These twin aspirations find expression in the legends of Yao, Shun, King Wen, and other sage-kings who achieved perfection in both realms. Yet a serious tension arises, because despite Confucius’s and Mencius’s moral purity and devotion, their political impact is marginal. They consistently teach that humaneness and rightness will transform the world, and (...)
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  39. Tu Weiming (1940- ).Andrew T. W. Hung - 2016 - The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Tu Weiming (pinyin: Du Weiming) is one of the most famous Chinese Confucian thinkers of the 20th and 21st centuries. As a prominent member of the third generation of “New Confucians,” Tu stressed the significance of religiosity within Confucianism. Inspired by his teacher Mou Zongsan as well as his decades of study and teaching at Princeton University, the University of California, and Harvard University, Tu aimed to renovate and enhance Confucianism through an encounter with Western (in particular American) social theory (...)
     
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  40.  10
    Reverence and Cheng-Zhu Ecology.Barry Keenan - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (2):187-201.
    The Cheng-Zhu 程朱 school of Confucianism congealed from the larger Learning of the Way school in the 11th and 12th centuries. In contrast to Buddhist conceptions of human nature, Cheng-Zhu advocates claimed an understanding that gave a significant role to the natural world. Addressing the ecology of the human organism in its relationship with the natural environment revealed a complex moral psychology that characterized human beings. Self-cultivation was indispensable for connecting to our inborn nature that revealed no separation between ourselves (...)
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  41.  35
    On the threshold of technological singularity: Human readiness to the new stage of evolution.М. L. Lazareva - 2018 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 14:119-131.
    Purpose. The study is aimed at a philosophical analysis of the state of humanity’s readiness for technological singularity, the definition of the concept of postbiology and the investigation of ways to bring the population to a new, qualitatively higher level of existence. Theoretical basis. The author analyzes the level of public consciousness and the features of its cooperation with technological world. Due to the inability of most modern people to cope with changes effectively, the author questions humanity’s readiness for the (...)
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  42.  46
    Ethical Pluralism and the Appeal to Human Nature.Irene Liu - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):1103-1119.
    Ethical pluralists hold that moral values and systems are irreducibly diverse and incommensurable according to a common scale. One criticism of the view is that accepting such incommensurability renders them unable to criticize values, practices, institutions, and so forth that are genuinely bad. This paper considers two ways that pluralists have appealed to human nature to answer this criticism. One way appeals to nature to ground a positive conception of human flourishing, whereas the other appeals to nature as a source (...)
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  43.  15
    Rethinking Mozi’s Jian’ai: The Rule to Care.Youngsun Back - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (4):531-553.
    Mozi’s 墨子 doctrine of impartial care has been interpreted predominantly through the lens of Mengzi 孟子, that is, as “love without distinctions” versus “love with distinctions.” However, I think Mengzi saw only half of the picture, as his focus was exclusively on the difference between Confucianism and Mohism in regard to the scope, intensity, and sequence of love. In this essay, I argue that Mozi’s impartial care is also characteristically different in kind from the Confucian notion of humaneness. My (...)
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  44.  3
    Rethinking Mozi’s Jian’ai : The Rule to Care.Youngsun Back - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (4):531-553.
    Mozi’s 墨子 doctrine of impartial care has been interpreted predominantly through the lens of Mengzi 孟子, that is, as “love without distinctions” versus “love with distinctions.” However, I think Mengzi saw only half of the picture, as his focus was exclusively on the difference between Confucianism and Mohism in regard to the scope, intensity, and sequence of love. In this essay, I argue that Mozi’s impartial care is also characteristically different in kind from the Confucian notion of humaneness. My (...)
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  45. Mencius.Irene Bloom (ed.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Known throughout East Asia as Mengzi, or "Master Meng," Mencius was a Chinese philosopher of the late Zhou dynasty, an instrumental figure in the spread of the Confucian tradition, and a brilliant illuminator of its ideas. Mencius was active during the Warring States Period, in which competing powers sought to control the declining Zhou empire. Like Confucius, Mencius journeyed to one feudal court after another, searching for a proper lord who could put his teachings into practice. Only a leader who (...)
     
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  46. Mencius.Irene Bloom (ed.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Known throughout East Asia as Mengzi, or "Master Meng," Mencius was a Chinese philosopher of the late Zhou dynasty, an instrumental figure in the spread of the Confucian tradition, and a brilliant illuminator of its ideas. Mencius was active during the Warring States Period, in which competing powers sought to control the declining Zhou empire. Like Confucius, Mencius journeyed to one feudal court after another, searching for a proper lord who could put his teachings into practice. Only a leader who (...)
     
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  47.  5
    Cohen, Herman and Mozart, Wa.William Kluback - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):28-42.
    Music, art, and poetry were profound forces in Hermann Cohen’s thought. If we attempt to comprehend this philosopher, whose name is synonymous with the School of Marburg, that small charming town in Hesse from which Kant’s works and influence spread abroad like the magic of an irresistible melody, then we are forced to appreciate those lovers of music and art that brought him the friendship of the violinist Joseph Joachim, the admiration of painters such as Max Liebermann, Lenid Pasternak, the (...)
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  48.  21
    Hermann Cohen and W.A. Mozart.William Kluback - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):28-42.
    Music, art, and poetry were profound forces in Hermann Cohen’s thought. If we attempt to comprehend this philosopher, whose name is synonymous with the School of Marburg, that small charming town in Hesse from which Kant’s works and influence spread abroad like the magic of an irresistible melody, then we are forced to appreciate those lovers of music and art that brought him the friendship of the violinist Joseph Joachim, the admiration of painters such as Max Liebermann, Lenid Pasternak, the (...)
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    Daoist Ci, Feminist Ethics of Care, and the Dilemma of Nature.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):275-294.
    In recent discussion on comparative ethics, extensive scholarship has been devoted to a comparative study of Confucian ren 仁 (often translated as humaneness or benevolence) and feminist ethics of care, while such cross‐cultural study on the Daoist concept of ci 慈 (customarily translated as compassion) and its intersection with care ethics has been lacking. This paper explores the reasons and concludes that Daoists do care. However, their conception of care goes beyond the Confucian ren and pure care ethics or (...)
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    Mengzi’s Moral Psychology, Part 2: The Cultivation Analogy.John Ramsey - 2018 - 1000-Word Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology.
    We explore the central analogy behind Mengzi’s view of ethical cultivation. -/- Philosophers sometimes ask what makes a person’s life worthwhile or what conditions make for a good life. Mengzi’s answer involves cultivating our innate moral senses into fully ripened virtues of ren (humaneness), yi (rightness), li (propriety), and zhi (wisdom). This cultivation neither is individualistic nor can it happen in isolation: it requires a lifetime of meaningful interactions with other people. In short, one’s ethical cultivation is interdependent with (...)
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