Results for 'humanitarian intervention'

999 found
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  1. An Overview of the Issues.Humanitarian Intervention - 1998 - Ethics and International Affairs 12:63-80.
     
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  2. Is armed humanitarian.Intervention to Stop Mass Killing, Morally Obligatory & I. Moral Deliberation - 2001 - Public Affairs Quarterly 15 (3):173.
  3. Humanitarian intervention, consent, and proportionality.Jeff McMahan - 2010 - In N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen & Jeff McMahan (eds.), Ethics and humanity: themes from the philosophy of Jonathan Glover. New York: Oxford University Press.
    However much one may wish for nonviolent solutions to the problems of unjust and unrestrained human violence that Glover explores in Humanity, some of those problems at present require violent responses. One cannot read his account of the Clinton administration’s campaign to sabotage efforts to stop the massacre in Rwanda in 1994 – a campaign motivated by fear that American involvement would cost American lives and therefore votes – without concluding that Glover himself believes that military intervention was morally (...)
     
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  4.  59
    Would Armed Humanitarian Intervention Have Been Justified to Protect the Rohingyas?Benjamin D. King - 2020 - Journal of Military Ethics 19 (4):269-284.
    The mass killings, large-scale gang rape and large-scale expulsion of the Rohingyas from Myanmar constitute one of the most repugnant world events in recent years. This article addresses the question of whether armed humanitarian intervention would have been morally permissible to protect the Rohingyas. It approaches the question from the perspective of the jus ad bellum criteria of just war theory. This approach does not yield a definitive answer because knowing whether certain jus ad bellum conditions might have (...)
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  5.  30
    Alternative agents for humanitarian intervention.Carmen E. Pavel - 2010 - Journal of Global Ethics 6 (3):323-338.
    The use of private security companies by national governments is met with widespread skepticism. Less understood is the role these companies can play in international humanitarian interventions in the service of international organizations. I argue here that despite valid concerns about the use of such private entities, we should nonetheless see them as legitimate participants in efforts to secure human rights protection around the globe. In order to assess their legitimacy, we need to ensure, among other things, that they (...)
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  6. Humanitarian Intervention: An Inquiry Into Law and Morality.Fernando R. Tesón - 2005 - Brill Nijhoff.
    This work offers an analysis of all the legal and moral issues surrounding humanitarian intervention: the deaths of innocent persons and the Doctrine of Double Effect Governmental legitimacy - The Doctrine of Effective Political Control; UN Charter and evaluation of the Nicaragua ruling; The Morality of not intervening; US-led invasion of Iraq; Humanitarian intervention authorised by the UN Security Council - Iraq, Somalia, Haiti, Rwanda, and Bosnia among others highlight NATO's intervention in Kosovo; The Nicaragua (...)
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  7. Humanitarian intervention: Loose ends.Fernando R. Tesón - 2011 - Journal of Military Ethics 10 (3):192-212.
    Abstract The article addresses three aspects of the humanitarian intervention doctrine. It argues, first, that the value of sovereignty rests on the justified social processes of the target state ? the horizontal contract. Foreign interventions, even when otherwise justified, must respect the horizontal contract. In contrast, morally objectionable social processes (such as the subjection of women) are not protected by sovereignty (intervention, of course, may be banned for other reasons). In addition, tyrants have no moral protection against (...)
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  8. Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Who Should Intervene?James Pattison (ed.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    This book considers who should undertake humanitarian intervention in response to an ongoing or impending humanitarian crisis. It develops a normative account of legitimacy to assess not only current interveners, but also the desirability of potential reforms to the mechanisms and agents of humanitarian intervention.
  9. Selective Humanitarian Intervention: Moral Reason and Collective Agents.Jennifer Szende - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (1):63-76.
    This paper examines four interpretations of the observation that humanitarian intervention might be used ‘selectively’ or ‘inconsistently’ in order to elucidate the normative commitments of the deliberative process in international relations. The paper argues that there are several types of concerns that are implicit in the accusation of inconsistency, and only some of them amount to objections to humanitarian intervention as a whole. The paradox of humanitarian intervention is that intervention is prohibited except (...)
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  10.  19
    Justifying Humanitarian Intervention to the People Who Pay For It.Ned Dobos - 2008 - Praxis 1 (1).
    The practice of humanitarian intervention, which involves one state intervening militarily into another state in order to prevent abuses of human rights, raises a plethora of ethical and political issues. How is foreign intervention to be reconciled with state sovereignty? Is intervention a threat to international peace and stability? Are alien values being imposed on the target society? Each of these questions has been thoroughly explored by both philosophers and jurists. But the notion that a state (...)
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  11.  92
    Humanitarian Intervention, Altruism, and the Limits of Casuistry.Richard B. Miller - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (1):3 - 35.
    This essay argues that the ethics of humanitarian intervention cannot be readily subsumed by the ethics of just war without due attention to matters of political and moral motivation. In the modern era, a just war draws directly from self-benefitting motives in wars of self-defense, or indirectly in wars that enforce international law or promote the global common good. Humanitarian interventions, in contrast, are intuitively admirable insofar as they are other-regarding. That difference poses a challenge to the (...)
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  12.  18
    Humanitarian Intervention: Nomos Xlvii.Terry Nardin & Melissa S. Williams (eds.) - 2005 - New York University Press.
    Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia, and Kosovo. All are examples where humanitarian intervention has been called into action. This timely and important new volume explores the legal and moral issues which emerge when a state uses military force in order to protect innocent people from violence perpetrated or permitted by the government of that state. Humanitarian intervention can be seen as a moral duty to protect but it is also subject to misuse as a front for imperialism without (...)
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  13. Humanitarian intervention: An overview of the ethical issues.Michael J. Smith - 1998 - Ethics and International Affairs 12:63–79.
    This essay analyzes the arguments justifying or opposing the notion of humanitarian intervention from realist and liberal perspectives and considers the difficulties of undertaking such interventions effectively and consistently.
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  14.  56
    Truly humanitarian intervention: considering just causes and methods in a feminist cosmopolitan frame.Ann E. Cudd - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (3):359-375.
    In international law, ‘humanitarian intervention’ refers to the use of military force by one nation or group of nations to stop genocide or other gross human rights violations in another sovereign nation. If humanitarian intervention is conceived as military in nature, it makes sense that only the most horrible, massive, and violent violations of human rights can justify intervention. Yet, that leaves many serious evils beyond the scope of legal intervention. In particular, violations of (...)
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  15.  83
    Humanitarian Intervention and the Modern State System.Patrick Emerton & Toby Handfield - 2015 - The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and War.
    This chapter argues that, because humanitarian intervention typically involves the military of one state attempting to overthrow another state ’s government, it gives rise to different moral questions from simple cases of interpersonal defensive violence. State sovereignty not only protects institutions within a society that contribute to the satisfaction of individuals’ interests and that cannot be easily restored once overthrown; it also plays a role in the constitution of those interests, which cannot be assumed to be invariant across (...)
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  16. Humanitarian Intervention: Ethical, Legal and Political Dilemmas.J. L. Holzgrefe & Robert O. Keohane (eds.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    'The genocide in Rwanda showed us how terrible the consequences of inaction can be in the face of mass murder. But the conflict in Kosovo raised equally important questions about the consequences of action without international consensus and clear legal authority. On the one hand, is it legitimate for a regional organization to use force without a UN mandate? On the other, is it permissible to let gross and systematic violations of human rights, with grave humanitarian consequences, continue unchecked?'. (...)
     
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  17.  79
    Humanitarian intervention and international society: Lessons from Africa.James Mayall - 2003 - In Jennifer M. Welsh (ed.), Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press. pp. 120--41.
    After the end of the Cold War, many in the West viewed Africa as a testing ground for the solidarist argument that sovereignty was no longer an absolute principle and that the international community could intervene to protect individual from human rights violations. This argument seems particularly challenging in the African context, given the continental leadership’s historic commitment to territorial integrity and non-intervention. However, as the author shows, African leaders from 1945 to 1990 were largely upholding the pluralist international (...)
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  18. Legitimacy, humanitarian intervention, and international institutions.Miles Kahler - 2011 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (1):20-45.
    The legitimacy of humanitarian intervention has been contested for more than a century, yet pressure for such intervention persists. Normative evolution and institutional design have been closely linked since the first debates over humanitarian intervention more than a century ago. Three norms have competed in shaping state practice and the normative discourse: human rights, peace preservation, and sovereignty. The rebalancing of these norms over time, most recently as the state’s responsibility to protect, has reflected specific (...)
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  19.  65
    Humanitarian Intervention and the Problem of Genocide and Atrocity.Jennifer Kling - 2018 - In Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 327-346.
    We tend to think that mass atrocities and attempted genocides call for humanitarian intervention by other states. (Nonviolent intervention if possible, military intervention if need be.) In this chapter, I discuss these two related claims in turn. What, if anything, justifies humanitarian intervention in certain states by other states? Ought such interventions, if justified, be pacifist in nature, or is it legitimate in some cases to intervene violently? To discuss these questions, I draw primarily (...)
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  20.  65
    Unauthorized humanitarian intervention.Mark S. Stein - 2004 - Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (1):14-38.
    In this essay, I offer a utilitarian perspective on humanitarian intervention. There is no generally accepted precise definition of the term ‘humanitarian intervention’. I will provisionally, and roughly, define humanitarian intervention as the use of force by a state, beyond its own borders, that has as a purpose or an effect the protection of the human rights of noncitizens or the reduction of the suffering of noncitizens.
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  21.  52
    Conclusion: Humanitarian Intervention after 11 September.Jennifer M. Welsh - 2004 - In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press.
    This concluding chapter assesses the debate over humanitarian intervention in the light of the events of September 11, 2001. On the one hand, it can be argued that 9/11 has reversed the momentum behind the norm of ‘sovereignty as responsibility’. In the course of waging the war on terrorism, the powers of sovereign states have been increased and the willingness of Western states to criticize the treatment of civilians within other sovereign jurisdictions appears to have weakened. On the (...)
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  22.  39
    Humanitarian intervention and historical responsibility.Fredrik D. Hjorthen & Göran Duus-Otterström - 2016 - Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):187-203.
    ABSTRACTSome suggest that the duty of humanitarian intervention should be discharged by states that are historically responsible for the occurrence of violence. A fundamental problem with this suggestion is that historically responsible states might be ill-suited to intervene because they are unlikely to enjoy support from the local population. Cécile Fabre has suggested a way around that problem, arguing that responsible states ought to pay for humanitarian interventions even though they ought not to take part in the (...)
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  23. Humanitarian intervention - eight theories.Steven P. Lee - 2010 - Diametros 23:22-43.
    Much has been written about the ethics of humanitarian intervention in the past fifteen years. In this paper I discuss a variety of justifications that have been proposed (in fact, seven theories of justification), finding difficulties with each of them, and then I offer a theory of justification of my own. My approach to justification will differ from most of the earlier accounts in two ways. First, I begin the discussion of justification at a different point. Second, I (...)
     
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  24. Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations.Jennifer M. Welsh (ed.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Should states use military force for humanitarian purposes? Leading scholars and practitioners provide practical and theoretical answers to this burning question, demonstrating why humanitarian intervention continues to be a controversial issue, not only for the UN, but also for Western states and humanitarian organizations.
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  25.  39
    Humanitarian Intervention and a Cosmopolitan UN Force.James Pattison - 2008 - Journal of International Political Theory 4 (1):126-145.
    The current mechanisms and agents of humanitarian intervention are inadequate. As the crisis in Darfur has highlighted, the international community lacks both the willingness to undertake humanitarian intervention and the ability to do so legitimately. This article considers a cosmopolitan solution to these problems: the creation of a standing army for the United Nations. There have been a number of proposals for such a force, including many recently. However, they contain two central flaws: the force proposed (...)
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  26. Deciding humanitarian intervention.Jonathan Moore - 2007 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):169-200.
    "Humanitarian intervention" as used below means action by international actors across national boundaries including the use of military force taken with the objective of relieving severe and widespread human suffering and violation of human rights within states where local authorities are unwilling or unable to do so. This essay will attempt better to understand decisions about humanitarian intervention from the narrow perspective of looking at the proximate considerations attendant to the intervention itself, particularly focusing on (...)
     
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  27. Moralizing humanitarian intervention: why jurying fails and how law can work.Thomas Pogge - 2006 - In Terry Nardin & Melissa Williams (eds.), Humanitarian Intervention. New York University Press. pp. 166.
  28.  14
    Debating Humanitarian Intervention Should We Try to Save Strangers?Bas Van Der Vossen & Fernando R. Tesón - 2017 - New York, US: Oxford University Press.
    "The book offers contrasting views of humanitarian intervention - a war aimed at ending tyranny. Fernando Tesaon.
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  29. Humanitarian Intervention as a Perfect Duty. A Kantian Argument".Carla Bagnoli - 2005 - Nomos 47:117-148.
  30. Humanitarian Intervention and Afghanistan.Simon Chesterman - 2003 - In Jennifer M. Welsh (ed.), Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter argues that humanitarian intervention in Afghanistan provided much needed legitimacy to US military actions which were undertaken for partly humanitarian reasons. Operation Enduring Freedom, like most incidents claimed as humanitarian intervention, displayed a range of intentions — some genuine, some asserted, others claimed after the fact. It showed a recognition on the part of the acting state that such intervention cannot be purely military in character to be effective.
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  31.  50
    Humanitarian intervention and the internal legitimacy problem.Richard Vernon - 2008 - Journal of Global Ethics 4 (1):37 – 49.
    Why should members of societies engaging in humanitarian intervention support the costs of that project? It is sometimes argued that only a theory of natural duty can require their support and that contractualist theories fail because they are exclusionary. This article argues that, on the contrary, natural duty is inadequate as a basis and that contractualism provides a basis for placing support for (justified) interventions among the duties of citizenship. The duty to support intervention is not, therefore, (...)
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  32. From humanitarian intervention to assassination: Human rights and political violence.Andrew Altman & Christopher Heath Wellman - 2008 - Ethics 118 (2):228-257.
  33.  59
    Rebellion, Humanitarian Intervention, and the Prudential Constraints on War.Ned Dobos - 2008 - Journal of Military Ethics 7 (2):102-115.
    Both radical rebellion and humanitarian intervention aim to defend citizens against tyranny and human rights abuses at the hands of their government. The only difference is that rebellion is waged by the oppressed subjects themselves, while humanitarian intervention is carried out by foreigners on their behalf. In this paper, it is argued that the prudential constraints on war (last resort, probability of success, and proportionality) impose tighter restrictions on, or demand more of, humanitarian interveners than (...)
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  34.  17
    Humanitarian Intervention: Moral and Philosophical Issues.Aleksandar Jokic (ed.) - 2003 - Peterborough, CA: Broadview Press.
    International law makes it explicit that states shall not intervene militarily or otherwise in the affairs of other states; it is a central principle of the charter of the United Nations. But international law also provides an exception; when a conflict within a state poses a threat to international peace, military intervention by the UN may be warranted.. The Charter and other UN documents also assert that human rights are to be protected — but in the past the responsibility (...)
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  35.  82
    Humanitarian intervention: Closing the gap between theory and practice.Gillian Brock - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):277–291.
    abstract Apparently, there are some important tensions that must be confronted in grappling with the issue of the permissibility of humanitarian intervention. Notably, there is the tension between respecting sovereignty and responding to the plight of the needy, that is, there is tension between respecting governments’ authority and desire for non‐interference, and respecting the individuals who suffer under their leadership. I argue that these and other tensions should be resolved in favour of protecting the individuals who suffer in (...)
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  36.  11
    Humanitarian Intervention: Moral and Philosophical Issues.Burleigh Wilkins (ed.) - 2003 - Peterborough, CA: Broadview Press.
    International law makes it explicit that states shall not intervene militarily or otherwise in the affairs of other states; it is a central principle of the charter of the United Nations. But international law also provides an exception; when a conflict within a state poses a threat to international peace, military intervention by the UN may be warranted. (Indeed, the UN Charter provides for an international police force, though nothing has ever come of this provision). The Charter and other (...)
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  37.  12
    Humanitarian Intervention and a Cosmopolitan UN Force.James Patton - 2008 - Journal of International Political Theory 4 (1):126-145.
    The current mechanisms and agents of humanitarian intervention are inadequate. As the crisis in Darfur has highlighted, the international community lacks both the willingness to undertake humanitarian intervention and the ability to do so legitimately. This article considers a cosmopolitan solution to these problems: the creation of a standing army for the United Nations. There have been a number of proposals for such a force, including many recently. However, they contain two central flaws: the force proposed (...)
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  38. Humanitarian Intervention as a Duty.Kok-Chor Tan - 2015 - Global Responsibility to Protect 7 (2):121-141.
    Assuming an international commitment to intervene in severe and urgent humanitarian emergencies, as expressed by the doctrine ‘The Responsibility to Protect’, I discuss two objections that the duty to intervene is nonetheless a duty that is easily limited by other moral considerations. One objection is that this duty will exceed the reasonable limits of any obligation given the high personal cost of intervention. The other objection is that any duty to intervene will be an imperfect duty, and therefore (...)
     
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  39.  75
    Just war theory, humanitarian intervention, and the need for a democratic federation.John J. Davenport - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):493-555.
    The primary purpose of government is to secure public goods that cannot be achieved by free markets. The Coordination Principle tells us to consolidate sovereign power in a single institution to overcome collective action problems that otherwise prevent secure provision of the relevant public goods. There are several public goods that require such coordination at the global level, chief among them being basic human rights. The claim that human rights require global coordination is supported in three main steps. First, I (...)
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  40.  53
    Humanitarian Intervention in the Balkans.Nicholas Morris - 2003 - In Jennifer M. Welsh (ed.), Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press.
    Assesses the success of the two humanitarian interventions in the Balkans – Bosnia in 1995 and Kosovo in 1999 – from the perspective of humanitarian organizations. It argues how, ironically, the effectiveness of organizations such as UNHCR can dissuade powerful states from taking the necessary steps to address the root causes of massive human rights violations. Slow and ambiguous action from the international community can raise false expectations on the part of suffering civilians, and embolden those who commit (...)
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  41.  16
    Humanitarian intervention: Which way forward?Richard Caplan - 2000 - Ethics and International Affairs 14:23–38.
    NATO's member states put aside their concerns for national sovereignty in favor of humanitarian considerations, acting without UN authorization. European states are rethinking historic prohibitions against humanitarian intervention after Kosovo.
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  42. Eight Principles for Humanitarian Intervention.Fernando R. Tesón - 2006 - Journal of Military Ethics 5 (2):93-113.
    When is humanitarian intervention legitimate and how should such interventions be conducted? This article sets out eight liberal principles that underlie humanitarian intervention, some of them abstract principles of international ethics and others more concrete principles that apply specifically to humanitarian intervention. It argues that whilst these principles do not determine the legitimacy of particular interventions, they should ?incline? our judgments towards approval or disapproval. The basic principles include the liberal idea that governments are (...)
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  43. Humanitarian intervention: Three ethical positions.Pierre Laberge - 1995 - Ethics and International Affairs 9:15–35.
    LaBerge examines the ethical positions of Rawls, Kant, John Walzer adapted from J. S. Mill, and Canadian philosopher Howard Adelman are, and writes that they constitute "an ethics of human rights, ethics of the right to a historical community, and an ethics of peace.".
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  44.  48
    Humanitarian Intervention after Iraq: Just War and International Law Perspectives.James Turner Johnson - 2006 - Journal of Military Ethics 5 (2):114-127.
  45.  17
    Challenges for Humanitarian Intervention: Ethical Demand and Political Reality.C. A. J. Coady, Ned Dobos & Sagar Sanyal (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Ten new essays critique the practice of armed humanitarian intervention, whereby one state sends its armed forces into another to protect citizens against major human rights abuses. The contributors examine a range of concerns, for instance about potential adverse effects and about ulterior motives.
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  46. Humanitarian intervention : closing the gap between theory and practice.Gillian Brock - 2007 - In David Rodin (ed.), War, torture and terrorism: ethics and war in the 21st century. Oxford: Blackwell.
     
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  47. Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Redefining a Role for “Kind-hearted Gunmen”.Francis Kofi Abiew - 2010 - Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):93-109.
    In the aftermath of the complex humanitarian crises of the 1990s, the concept of the Responsibility to Protect emerged powerfully on the international stage. The report of the International C...
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  48.  45
    Humanitarian Intervention, Nomos 47, Terry Nardin and Melissa S. Williams, eds. , 320 pp., $55 cloth.Mathias Risse - 2006 - Ethics and International Affairs 20 (3):385-388.
  49. Humanitarian Intervention?Gabor Rittersporn - 1999 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1999 (114):179-180.
  50. Humanitarian Intervention.Miroslav Prokopijevic - 2004 - In Georg Meggle (ed.), Ethics of humanitarian interventions. Ontos. pp. 189-204.
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