Results for 'idea of the self'

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  1. The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe Since the Seventeenth Century.Jerrold Seigel - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is the self? The question has preoccupied people in many times and places, but nowhere more than in the modern West, where it has spawned debates that still resound today. In this 2005 book, Jerrold Seigel provides an original and penetrating narrative of how major Western European thinkers and writers have confronted the self since the time of Descartes, Leibniz, and Locke. From an approach that is at once theoretical and contextual, he examines the way figures in (...)
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  2. Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity.Charles Taylor - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    'Most of us are still groping for answers about what makes life worth living, or what confers meaning on individual lives', writes Charles Taylor in Sources of the Self. 'This is an essentially modern predicament.' Charles Taylor's latest book sets out to define the modern identity by tracing its genesis, analysing the writings of such thinkers as Augustine, Descartes, Montaigne, Luther, and many others. This then serves as a starting point for a renewed understanding of modernity. Taylor argues that (...)
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  3.  14
    The Idea of the Self in the Evolution of Hume’s Account of the Passions.Jane McIntyre - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):171-182.
    Terence Penelhum has written extensively about the role of the idea of the self in Hume's account of the emotional and moral life of persons. Penelhum fails to notice, however, a change that takes place in the way that the idea of the self functions in Hume's account of the passions as that account evolved after the Treatise. This paper charts part of that evolution, and reflects on its significance for Hume's moral psychology.
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  4.  28
    Aristotle's Idea of the Self.Peter Simpson - 2001 - Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (3):309-324.
  5.  25
    The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe Since the Seventeenth Century.Michael W. Tkacz - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (3):682-683.
    Among the striking elements of this description is the way in which Locke’s analogy, so bereft of an outward orientation, is employed to represent the modernist notion of self. This sharp contrast of classical and modern conceptions of the self is alone enough to justify Jerrold Seigel’s comprehensive study. There can be no doubt that something new regarding the concepts of soul, self, and personhood came into prominence with the advent of that Copernican Revolution in philosophy, the (...)
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  6.  17
    The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe Since the Seventeenth Century (Review).Horace L. Fairlamb - 2008 - Symploke 16 (1-2):377-379.
  7. The Idea of the Self: Jerrold Seigel's, The Idea of the Self: Thought and Experience in Western Europe Since the Seventeenth Century.Roger Smith - 2006 - History of the Human Sciences 19 (2):93-100.
  8.  65
    The Very Idea of Computer Self-Knowledge and Self-Deception.Sanford C. Goldberg - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (4):515-529.
    Do computers have beliefs? I argue that anyone who answers in the affirmative holds a view that is incompatible with what I shall call the commonsense approach to the propositional attitudes. My claims shall be two. First,the commonsense view places important constraints on what can be acknowledged as a case of having a belief. Second, computers – at least those for which having a belief would be conceived as having a sentence in a belief box – fail to satisfy some (...)
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  9.  1
    Formation of the "Self-Made-Man" Idea in the Context of the Christian Middle Ages.V. Y. Antonova & O. M. Korkh - 2021 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 19:117-126.
    The purpose of this article is to analyze the variability of the "Self-made-man" idea in the context of the Christian Middle Ages in its primarily historical and philosophical presentation. Research is based on the historical and philosophical analysis of the medieval philosophy presented foremost by the works of Aurelius Augustine, P. Abelard, Thomas Aquinas, and also by the modern researches of this epoch. Theoretical basis. Historical, comparative, and hermeneutic methods became fundamental for this research. Originality. The conducted analysis (...)
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  10.  5
    The Sentimental Clown: The Idea of the Self in T. S. Eliot.Stan Smith - 1973 - New Blackfriars 54 (635):156-164.
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  11.  34
    Sources of the Self.R. A. Sharpe - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):234.
    'Most of us are still groping for answers about what makes life worth living, or what confers meaning on individual lives', writes Charles Taylor in Sources of the Self. 'This is an essentially modern predicament.' Charles Taylor's latest book sets out to define the modern identity by tracing its genesis, analysing the writings of such thinkers as Augustine, Descartes, Montaigne, Luther, and many others. This then serves as a starting point for a renewed understanding of modernity. Taylor argues that (...)
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  12.  16
    Forum: The Idea of the Self.Aaron Garrett - 2006 - Modern Intellectual History 3 (2):299-304.
    The following comments and response were presented at a symposium on Jerrold Seigel's TheIdeaoftheSelf:ThoughtandExperienceinWesternEuropesincetheSeventeenthCentury (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), held at the Center for European Studies, Harvard University, on 14 October 2005. The symposium was organized by David Armitage, Peter Gordon and Judith Surkis and was sponsored by the CES's Colloquia in Intellectual and Cultural History.
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  13.  27
    Forum: The Idea of the Self.Jerrold Seigel - 2006 - Modern Intellectual History 3 (2):333-344.
  14.  2
    Forum: The Idea of the Self.Anthony J. la Vopa - 2006 - Modern Intellectual History 3 (2):305-313.
  15.  6
    Forum: The Idea of the Self.Peter E. Gordon - 2006 - Modern Intellectual History 3 (2):323-331.
  16.  11
    Forum: The Idea of the Self.Judith Surkis - 2006 - Modern Intellectual History 3 (2):315-322.
  17.  44
    On Lao Tzu's Idea of the Self.Kathleen Johnson Wu - 1981 - Zygon 16 (2):165-180.
  18.  13
    The Self in Question: On Jerrold Seigel's the Idea of the Self.Gerald Izenberg - 2005 - Modern Intellectual History 2 (3):387-408.
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  19. There is No Problem of the Self.Eric T. Olson - 1998 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (5-6):645-657.
    Because there is no agreed use of the term 'self', or characteristic features or even paradigm cases of selves, there is no idea of "the self" to figure in philosophical problems. The term leads to troubles otherwise avoidable; and because legitimate discussions under the heading of 'self' are really about other things, it is gratuitous. I propose that we stop speaking of selves.
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  20.  12
    Krishnachandra Bhattacharyya’s Interpolation of Kant’s Idea of the “Self”.Roshni Babu & Pravesh Jung - 2020 - Sophia 60 (2):331-347.
    Krishnachandra's re-articulation of Kant's transcendental system challenges Kant's conceptualization of 'apperceptive self' conceived as a logical function which is as well the precondition of all our knowledge claims. In Kant's framework, though this "unity of consciousness" is projected as a principle, which undertakes a foundational role as 'apperceptive I', it is capacitated with merely a logical function. Krishnachandra disagrees with Kant's reduction of function of the "self" to a logical process. This reduction would render knowledge of the " (...)" to be an inferential knowledge, thus making this derivation analogous to the proofs of the transcendental conditions of understanding and sensibility through the logical process of deductions. Krishnachandra's question is: whether this equation established between logical function of 'apperception' and the "self" will suffice to establish the "certitude" of knowledge claims. This is the first task Krishnachandra addresses in his work, Studies in Kant which is elucidated in the following section of this paper. Further, we will see how Krishnachandra’s exploration into the dynamics of this problem leads him to alternatively foreground the "unity", which is much sought by Kantian scholars, between the theoretical and the practical domains of Reason. (shrink)
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  21.  52
    Foucault on the Care of the Self as an Ethical Project and a Spiritual Goal.Richard White - 2014 - Human Studies 37 (4):489-504.
    In this paper, I examine Foucault’s ideas concerning the care of the self. What exactly is this ideal that Foucault describes in his last two books? Do these books represent a break or a continuation with the earlier writings on knowledge and power? Most important, I consider whether the care of the self could ever be a significant ethical ideal given some of the objections that have been raised against Foucault’s position. I also look at the care of (...)
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  22.  17
    Dimensions of the Self in Emotion and Psychopathology: Consequences for Self-Management in Anxiety and Depression.Gerrit Glas - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (2):143-155.
    Over the last years, self-management has become a central value in the practice of mental health care. Patients are positioned as expertclients who are actively involved in the management of their disease. Some of the ideas that are implied in the concept of self-management may raise important and intriguing questions. For instance, in the context of psychiatry impaired agency and altered self-experience are often part of the psychopathological process itself. The capacity to manage oneself may be impeded (...)
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  23.  2
    Transformation of the Self in the Thought of Schleiermacher.Jacqueline Mariña - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    The work of German theologian Friedrich Schleiermacher has played a key role in the development of Protestant thought. Jacqueline Maria highlights the relation of Schleiermacher's ideas on the moral transformation of the self to other thinkers and current debates in the philosophy of religion.
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  24. The Self-Effacing Functionality of Blame.Matthieu Queloz - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (4):1361-1379.
    This paper puts forward an account of blame combining two ideas that are usually set up against each other: that blame performs an important function, and that blame is justified by the moral reasons making people blameworthy rather than by its functionality. The paper argues that blame could not have developed in a purely instrumental form, and that its functionality itself demands that its functionality be effaced in favour of non-instrumental reasons for blame—its functionality is self-effacing. This notion is (...)
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  25.  76
    The Idea of the Mirror in Dōgen and Nishida.Michel Dalissier - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 99-142.
    The image of the “mirror” (鏡kagami) appears frequently in the philosophical texts of Nishida Kitaro (西田幾多郎1870-1945), where it assumes various functions. Mirror references first occur in meditations on the philosophies of Josiah Royce (1855-1916) and Henri Bergson (1859-1941). The most fascinating evocation here corresponds to the idea of a “self-enlightening mirror”, used to probe the philosophical ground for self-illumination. This idea seems to point back to Buddhist meaning that intervenes in Japanese intellectual history. We take this (...)
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  26.  27
    Conceptions of the Self in Early Childhood: Territorializing Identities.Liselott Borgnon - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (3):264–274.
    This article draws upon the Deleuzian/Guattarian idea of territorializing movements to trouble the notion of the identity of the learning pre‐school child, produced by developmental psychology, as an individual, natural and developing child as well as the more recent image of the child characterised by autonomy and flexible behaviour. Accordingly, a child's apprenticeship of walking is associated here with the movements of a surfer. This association disturbs the orthodox thought of recognition and representation that makes us define, include and (...)
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  27. What is the Role of the Self in Self-Deception?Richard Holton - 2001 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 101 (1):53-69.
    The orthodox answer to my question is this: in a case of self-deception, the self acts to deceive itself. That is, the self is the author of its own deception. I want to explore an opposing idea here: that the self is rather the subject matter of the deception. That is, I want to explore the idea that self-deception is more concerned with the self’s deception about the self, than with the (...)
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  28. Is the Idea of the Good Beyond Being? Plato's "Epekeina Tês Ousias" Revisited.Rafael Ferber & Gregor Damschen - 2015 - In Debra Nails, Harold Tarrant, Mika Kajava & Eero Salmenkivi (eds.), SECOND SAILING: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Wellprint Oy. pp. 197-203.
    The article tries to prove that the famous formula "epekeina tês ousias" has to be understood in the sense of being beyond being and not only in the sense of being beyond essence. We make hereby three points: first, since pure textual exegesis of 509b8–10 seems to lead to endless controversy, a formal proof for the metaontological interpretation could be helpful to settle the issue; we try to give such a proof. Second, we offer a corollary of the formal proof, (...)
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  29.  5
    “I Lost Myself”: A Classical Idea of the Self.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):55-67.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article presents a phenomenological analysis of several Chinese notions of shame—embarrassment, chagrin, shame, and disgrace. It elaborates on their structural connections and related experiences, more particularly concerning interpersonal conditions and emotional or physical reactions. Chen focuses on the notion of moral shame, its connection to the Confucian tradition, and its weakening in the current society, due to ideational and technical circumstances, such as the increased sense of individual self and the booming of internet culture.
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  30.  65
    The Role of the Self in Mindblindness in Autism.Michael V. Lombardo & Simon Baron-Cohen - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):130-140.
    Since its inception the ‘mindblindness’ theory of autism has greatly furthered our understanding of the core social-communication impairments in autism spectrum conditions . However, one of the more subtle issues within the theory that needs to be elaborated is the role of the ‘self’. In this article, we expand on mindblindness in ASC by addressing topics related to the self and its central role in the social world and then review recent research in ASC that has yielded important (...)
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  31.  6
    “I Lost Myself”: A Classical Idea of the Self.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):95-109.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis is a reflection on the notion of “self,” primarily on the basis of a story in the Zhuangzi in which the protagonist claims: “I lost myself.” Chen first reiterates the grammatical differences between the uses of 吾 and 我, and continues with a reflection on their philosophical meaning. He argues that the notion of “wo” is more spatial, connected to the body, and distinguished from others; “wu” is more temporal, related to one’s memory and self-understanding. The (...)
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  32.  21
    Hazlitt on the Future of the Self.Raymond Martin & John Barresi - 1995 - Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (468):61-100.
  33.  17
    “I Lost Myself”: A Classical Idea of the Self.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):68-79.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article analyzes three well-known stories—the child about to fall in a well from Mencius, the butterfly dream in Zhuangzi, and the spear–shield contradiction in Han Feizi —to illustrate a type of philosophical argumentation that the author finds particularly inspiring but little explored in the reading of early Chinese texts. As opposed to the more speculative and abstract mode of philosophizing that has been largely imported from the West and that dominates at philosophy departments, a careful reflection on allegories, (...)
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  34.  9
    Kant, Schiller, and the Idea of a Moral Self.Katerina Deligiorgi - 2020 - Kant-Studien 111 (2):303-322.
    The paper examines Schiller’s argument concerning the subjective experience of adopting a morality based on Kantian principles. On Schiller’s view, such experience must be marked by a continuous struggle to suppress nature, because the moral law is a purely rational and categorically commanding law that addresses beings who are natural as well as rational. Essential for Schiller’s conclusion is the account he has of what it takes to follow the law, that is, the mental states and functions that encapsulate the (...)
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  35. Enacting the Self: Buddhist and Enactivist Approaches to the Emergence of the Self.Matthew MacKenzie - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):75-99.
    In this paper, I take up the problem of the self through bringing together the insights, while correcting some of the shortcomings, of Indo–Tibetan Buddhist and enactivist accounts of the self. I begin with an examination of the Buddhist theory of non-self ( anātman ) and the rigorously reductionist interpretation of this doctrine developed by the Abhidharma school of Buddhism. After discussing some of the fundamental problems for Buddhist reductionism, I turn to the enactive approach to philosophy (...)
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  36.  9
    A Ideia de “Eu” Como Crença Natural/The Idea of the “Self” as Natural Belief.Rômulo Martins Pereira - 2013 - Natureza Humana 15 (2).
    O presente trabalho tem como objetivo fazer uma breve aproximação acerca da investigação empreendida por David Hume sobre a ideia de “eu” ou de “pessoa” e de sua inerente identidade e simplicidade. Essa discussão é posta especificamente na seção “Da identidade pessoal”, no primeiro livro do seu Tratado da natureza humana. Entrementes, para acompanhá-la, é necessário considerar alguns dos pontos desenvolvidos nas seções iniciais, nas quais Hume se dedicou a mapear as principais características de sua teoria a respeito da atividade (...)
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  37. The Chinese Idea of the Second Self.E. T. C. Werner - 1932 - Shanghai, the Shanghai Times.
  38.  47
    Somaesthetics and Care of the Self: The Case of Foucault.Richard Shusterman - 2000 - The Monist 83 (4):530-551.
    Among the many features that made Michel Foucault a remarkable philosopher was a doubly bold initiative: to renew the ancient idea of philosophy as a special way of life, and to insist on its distinctly somatic and aesthetic expression. This paper examines Foucault as an exemplary but problematic pioneer in a field I call somaesthetics, a discipline that puts the body’s experience and artful refashioning back into the heart of philosophy as an art of living. A long dominant Platonist (...)
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  39.  19
    Is Our Idea of the Subjective World an Illusion?Vladislav A. Lektorsky - 2018 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 56 (1):6-17.
    This article analyzes facts related to the development of modern communication and information technologies and cognitive sciences that call into question the traditions of European culture and philosophy in their understanding of subjectivity: the recognition of the role of consciousness in the performance of activity, the notion of the “Self” as the center of consciousness and decision-making authority, the availability of free will, the idea of human autonomy, and the existence of a private world. The author argues for (...)
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  40.  43
    The Disarticulation of the Self in Nietzsche.J. Hillis Miller - 1981 - The Monist 64 (2):247-261.
    The function of Nietzsche in our present intellectual life is a salient example of the continued vitality of the nineteenth-century in the thought of today. In Germany, in France, in Italy, and in the United States new work of editing and commentary has made Nietzsche a current force. The monumental Colli-Montinari edition, which includes many of Nietzsche’s hitherto unpublished notebooks and drafts, is the most conspicuous evidence of this on the textual side. This edition will make available in German, French, (...)
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  41.  18
    Posthuman Perspectivism and Technologies of the Self.Debashish Banerji - 2019 - Sophia 58 (4):737-742.
    Philosophical Posthumanism is a recent area of scholarship which Francesca Ferrando has introduced in her eponymous book. The author situates the subject as one closely related to Critical Posthumanism and Cultural Posthumanism. She also discusses its close relatives such as Transhumanism and its forebears such as Antihumanism and Poststructuralism. The present article is a discussion of Ferrando’s text, tracing its lineages and relating it to the ideas of thinkers such as Frederich Nietzsche, Gilles Deleuze and Sri Aurobindo.
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  42.  10
    The Idea of Nature.R. G. Collingwood - 1945 - Greenwood Press.
    2014 Reprint of 1945 Edition. Full facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. The first part deals with Greek cosmology and is the longest, the most elaborate and, on the whole, the liveliest part of a book which never deviates into dullness. The dominant thought in Greek cosmology, Collingwood holds, was the microcosm-macrocosm analogy, nature being the substance of something ensouled where "soul" meant the self-moving. Part II is "The Renaissance View of Nature ." Collingwood (...)
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  43. Is Cognition an Attribute of the Self or It Rather Belongs to the Body? Some Dialectical Considerations on Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa’s Position Against Nyāya and Vaiśeṣika.Krishna Del Toso - 2011 - Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):48.
    In this article an attempt is made to detect what could have been the dialectical reasons that impelled the Cār-vāka thinker Udbhatabhatta to revise and reformulate the classical materialistic concept of cognition. If indeed according to ancient Cārvākas cognition is an attribute entirely dependent on the physical body, for Udbhatabhatta cognition is an independent principle that, of course, needs the presence of a human body to manifest itself and for this very reason it is said to be a peculiarity of (...)
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  44.  33
    On the Self-Regulation of Behavior.Charles S. Carver - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a thorough overview of a model of human functioning based on the idea that behavior is goal-directed and regulated by feedback control processes. It describes feedback processes and their application to behavior, considers goals and the idea that goals are organized hierarchically, examines affect as deriving from a different kind of feedback process, and analyzes how success expectancies influence whether people keep trying to attain goals or disengage. Later sections consider a series of emerging themes, (...)
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  45.  1
    Amanuja's Idea of the Finite Self[REVIEW]Wm G. Ballantine - 1931 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 41:312.
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  46.  25
    Hazlitt on the Future of the Self.Raymond Martin & John Baressi - 1995 - Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (3).
    William Hazlitt's moment occurred in 1794, when he was sixteen years old. In that moment Hazlitt thought he realized three things: that we are naturally connected to ourselves in the past and present but only imagina-.
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  47.  19
    Zhuangzi’s Idea of “Spirit” : Self, Thinging Things and the Nourishment of Life.Wai Wai Chiu - unknown
  48. Does Religion Affect the Materialism of Consumers? An Empirical Investigation of Buddhist Ethics and the Resistance of the Self.Stefano Pace - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):25-46.
    This paper investigates the effects of Buddhist ethics on consumers’ materialism, that is, the propensity to attach a fundamental role to possessions. The literature shows that religion and religiosity influence various attitudes and behaviors of consumers, including their ethical beliefs and ethical decisions. However, most studies focus on general religiosity rather than on the specific doctrinal ethical tenets of religions. The current research focuses on Buddhism and argues that it can tame materialism directly, similar to other religions, and through the (...)
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  49. The Reappearance of the Self in the Last Philosophy of William James.Milic Capek - 1953 - Philosophical Review 62 (October):526-544.
    The article surveys the development of james' views on the status of the psychological subject (self); the uncertainties and hesitations in james' views are pointed out. But, Contrary to the prevailing view, Upheld especially by john dewey and ralph b perry, James' article "does consciousness exist?" in 1904 does not represent the final stage of his thought. This can be found only in his last book "a pluralistic universe" six years later in which the existence of the "full (...)" is reasserted. James reached this conclusion after the period of intense intellectual struggle which can be traced in the private notes and drafts published by r b perry. The idea of dynamic self was consonant with the process philosophy which james finally adopted. (shrink)
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  50.  20
    Ramanuja’s Idea of the Finite Self.Wm G. Ballantine - 1931 - The Monist 41 (2):312-312.
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