Results for 'immigration'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  31
    From Stance to Style.Immigrant Youth Slang - forthcoming - Stance: Sociolinguistic Perspectives.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. " Birth rise in asia slows aid plan.Immigration Bill - 1963 - The Eugenics Review 54:51.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. GRESHS, ENS Libreville.Quelle Politique de Lutte Contre & En Afrique Au L'immigration Clandestine - 2002 - Humanitas 1:129.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Immigration Enforcement and Fairness to Would-Be Immigrants.Hrishikesh Joshi - 2018 - In Boonin David (ed.), Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Palgrave.
    This chapter argues that governments have a duty to take reasonably effective and humane steps to minimize the occurrence of unauthorized migration and stay. While the effects of unauthorized migration on a country’s citizens and institutions have been vigorously debated, the literature has largely ignored duties of fairness to would-be immigrants. It is argued here that failing to take reasonable steps to prevent unauthorized migration and stay is deeply unfair to would-be immigrants who are not in a position to bypass (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Immigration as a human right.Kieran Oberman - 2016 - In Sarah Fine & Lea Ypi (eds.), Migration in Political Theory: The Ethics of Movement and Membership. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 32-56.
    This chapter argues that people have a human right to immigrate to other states. People have essential interests in being able to make important personal decisions and engage in politics without state restrictions on the options available to them. It is these interests that other human rights, such as the human rights to internal freedom of movement, expression and association, protect. The human right to immigrate is not absolute. Like other human freedom rights , it can be restricted in certain (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  6. Immigration and self-determination.Bas van der Vossen - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (3):270-290.
    This article asks whether states have a right to close their borders because of their right to self-determination, as proposed recently by Christopher Wellman, Michael Walzer, and others. It asks the fundamental question whether self-determination can, in even its most unrestricted form, support the exclusion of immigrants. I argue that the answer is no. To show this, I construct three different ways in which one might use the idea of self-determination to justify immigration restrictions and show that each of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  7. Immigration: The Case for Limits.David Miller - 2005 - In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 193-206.
    This article by David Miller is widely considered a standard defense of the (once) conventional view on immigration restrictionism, namely that (liberal) states generally have free authority to restrict immigration, save for a few exceptions.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   93 citations  
  8.  87
    On Immigration and Refugees.Michael Dummett - 2001 - Routledge.
    Michael Dummett, philosopher and social critic, is also one of the sharpest and most prominent commentators and campaigners for the fair treatment of immigrants and refugees in Britain and Europe. This book insightfully draws together his thoughts on this major issue for the first time. Exploring the confused and often highly unjust thinking about immigration, Dummett then carefully questions the principles and justifications governing state policies, pointing out that they often conflict with the rights of refugees as laid down (...)
  9.  41
    Immigration and the Constraints of Justice: Between Open Borders and Absolute Sovereignty.Ryan Pevnick - 2011 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores the constraints which justice imposes on immigration policy. Like liberal nationalists, Ryan Pevnick argues that citizens have special claims to the institutions of their states. However, the source of these special claims is located in the citizenry's ownership of state institutions rather than in a shared national identity. Citizens contribute to the construction and maintenance of institutions, and as a result they have special claims to these institutions and a limited right to exclude outsiders. Pevnick shows (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  10.  84
    Immigrants and the Right to Stay.Joseph H. Carens - 2010 - MIT Press.
    Suggests that illegal immigrants should be offered a path to citizenship.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  11. Latino Immigration and Social Change in the United States: Toward an Ethical Immigration Policy.Ian Davies - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S2):377 - 391.
    Approximately 47 million Latinos currently live in the United States, and nearly 25 percent of them are undocumented. The USA is a very different country from just a generation ago – culturally, socially, and demographically. Its presumed core values have been transformed largely by the changes wrought by immigration and ethnicity. A multicultural society has, in 2008, elected a multicultural president. This article examines immigration discourse, framed in terms of fear and security, and the evolution of the US (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  12.  55
    Legitimizing Immigration Control: A Discourse-Historical Analysis.Ruth Wodak & Theo van Leeuwen - 1999 - Discourse Studies 1 (1):83-118.
    Austrian immigration authorities frequently reject the family reunion applications of immigrant workers. They justify their decisions not only on legal grounds but also on the basis of their own often prejudiced judgements of the applicants' ability to `integrate' into Austrian society. A discourse-historical method is combined with systemic-functionally oriented methods of text analysis to study the official letters which notify immigrant workers of the rejection of their family reunion applications. The systemic-functionally oriented methods are used in a detailed analysis (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  13. Immigrant Selection, Health Requirements, and Disability Discrimination.Douglas MacKay - 2018 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 14 (1).
    Australia, Canada, and New Zealand currently apply health requirements to prospective immigrants, denying residency to those with health conditions that are likely to impose an “excessive demand” on their publicly funded health and social service programs. In this paper, I investigate the charge that such policies are wrongfully discriminatory against persons with disabilities. I first provide a freedom-based account of the wrongness of discrimination according to which discrimination is wrong when and because it involves disadvantaging people in the exercise of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14. Immigration, Global Poverty and the Right to Stay.Kieran Oberman - 2011 - Political Studies 59 (2):253-268.
    This article questions the use of immigration as a tool to counter global poverty. It argues that poor people have a human right to stay in their home state, which entitles them to receive development assistance without the necessity of migrating abroad. The article thus rejects a popular view in the philosophical literature on immigration which holds that rich states are free to choose between assisting poor people in their home states and admitting them as immigrants when fulfilling (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  15. Immigration.Hrishikesh Joshi - 2022 - In Matt Zwolinski & Benjamin Ferguson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Libertarianism. Routledge.
    Within the immigration debate, libertarians have typically come down in favor of open borders by defending two main ideas: i) individuals have a right to free movement; and ii) immigration restrictions are economically inefficient, so that lifting them can make everyone better off. This entry describes the rationale for open borders from a libertarian perspective (in part by analogy to the debate around minimum wage laws). Three main objections within the immigration literature are then discussed: i) the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Immigration Enforcement and Domination: An Indirect Argument for Much More Open Borders.Alex Sager - 2016 - Political Research Quarterly 1 (1):1-13.
    Normative reflection on the ethics of migration has tended to remain at the level of abstract principle with limited attention to the practice of immigration administration and enforcement. This paper explores the implications of this practice for an ethics of immigration with particular attention to the problem of bureaucratic domination. I contend that migration administration and enforcement cannot overcome bureaucratic domination because of the inherent vulnerability of migrant populations and the transnational enforcement of border controls by multiple public (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  17. Illiberal Immigrants and Liberalism's Commitment to its Own Demise.Daniel Weltman - 2020 - Public Affairs Quarterly 34 (3):271-297.
    Can a liberal state exclude illiberal immigrants in order to preserve its liberal status? Hrishikesh Joshi has argued that liberalism cannot require a commitment to open borders because this would entail that liberalism is committed to its own demise in circumstances in which many illiberal immigrants aim to immigrate into a liberal society. I argue that liberalism is committed to its own demise in certain circumstances, but that this is not as bad as it may appear. Liberalism’s commitment to its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Immigration, Association, and the Family.Matthew Lister - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (6):717-745.
    In this paper I provide a philosophical analysis of family-based immigration. This type of immigration is of great importance, yet has received relatively little attention from philosophers and others doing normative work on immigration. As family-based immigration poses significant challenges for those seeking a comprehensive normative account of the limits of discretion that states should have in setting their own immigration policies, it is a topic that must be dealt with if we are to have (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  19. Experimental immigration ethics.Mollie Gerver, Dominik Duell & Patrick Lown - 2023 - In Matthew Lindauer, James R. Beebe & Justin Sytsma (eds.), Advances in Experimental Political Philosophy. New York: Bloomsbury.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  44
    Immigration Controls: Why the Self‐Determination Argument Is Self‐Defeating.Maxime Lepoutre - 2016 - Journal of Social Philosophy 47 (3):309-331.
    In philosophical debates about immigration, one of the most prominent arguments asserts that a state’s citizenry has a right to unilaterally control its territorial borders by virtue of its right to self-determination. This is the self-determination argument. The present article demonstrates that this argument is internally undermined by the Coercion Principle, according to which all persons subjected to coercive political power are entitled to an equal say in exercising that power. First, whichever way the self-determination argument identifies the relevant (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Immigrant Admissions and Global Relations of Harm.Shelley Wilcox - 2007 - Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (2):274–291.
    This paper raises two objections to the freedom of movement argument from the perspective of nonideal philosophy: the argument cannot provide a means for establishing admissions priorities when all prospective immigrants cannot be admitted and it ignores alternative grounds for moral claims to admission in the context of histories of injustice. I develop an alternative admissions-guiding principle that assigns strong moral claims to admission to certain prospective immigrants based on a global extension of the no-harm principle. It claims that a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  22. Immigration Policy and Identification Across Borders.Matthew Lindauer - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 12 (3):280-303.
    According to the traditional state sovereignty view in the ethics of immigration literature, societies have a great deal of latitude in determining and implementing their immigration policies. This view is typically defended by appealing to the rights of members of societies, for instance to political self-determination. Opponents of the view have often criticized its partiality to members, arguing that nonmembers can also make stringent demands on societies to be admitted and given the same treatment in matters of (...) policy as other nonmembers. In this paper, I take a different approach to responding to the state sovereignty view. I argue that even if we grant the premise that the rights of members generally trump the rights of nonmembers in matters of immigration policy, societies are greatly constrained in setting their immigration policies by considerations of domestic justice. The considerations that I focus on involve relationships between members and nonmembers that hold due to a shared quality or set of qualities on the basis of which members identify with nonmembers. The argument appeals to premises and principles that defenders of the state sovereignty view are committed to but concludes that this view cannot serve as a satisfactory framework for the normative assessment of immigration policies. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  23.  25
    Immigration, Imagined Communities, and Collective Memories of Asian American Experiences: A Content Analysis of Asian American Experiences in Virginia U.S. History Textbooks.Yonghee Suh, Sohyun An & Danielle Forest - 2015 - Journal of Social Studies Research 39 (1):39-51.
    This study explores how Asian American experiences are depicted in four high school U.S. history textbooks and four middle school U.S. history textbooks used in Virginia. The analytic framework was developed from the scholarship of collective memories and histories of immigration in Asian American studies. Content analysis of the textbooks suggests the overall narrative of Asian American history in U.S. history textbooks aligns with the grand narrative of American history, that is, the “story of progress.” This major storyline of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24. Immigration, interpersonal trust and national culture.Lubomira V. Radoilska - 2014 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):111-128.
    This article offers a critical analysis of David Miller’s proposal that liberal immigration policies should be conceptualized in terms of a quasi-contract between receiving nations and immigrant groups, designed to ensure both that cultural diversity does not undermine trust among citizens and that immigrants are treated fairly. This proposal fails to address sufficiently two related concerns. Firstly, an open-ended, quasi-contractual requirement for cultural integration leaves immigrant groups exposed to arbitrary critique as insufficiently integrated and unworthy of trust as citizens. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Immigration Justice.Peter W. Higgins - 2013 - Edinburgh University Press.
    By what moral standards must nation-states select immigration policies? A central contention of Immigration Justice is that the justice of an immigration policy can be ascertained only through consideration of the pervasive, systematic, and unjust inequalities engendered by the institutions that constitute our social world. Immigration policies affect people primarily as members of social groups demarcated from each other by members’ gender, race, and class. For this reason, this book argues that states’ selection of immigration (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26. Immigrant Workers, Animals, and Sovereignty in the Slaughterhouse.Paul Apostolidis - 2016 - In Judith Grant & Vincent Jungkunz (eds.), Political theory and the animal/human relationship. Albany: State University of New York Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Why Immigration Controls Are Not Coercive: A Reply to Arash Abizadeh.David Miller - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (1):111-120.
    Abizadeh has argued that because border controls coerce would-be immigrants and invade their autonomy, they are entitled to participate in the democratic institutions that impose those controls. In reply, the author distinguishes between coercion and prevention, shows that prevention need not undermine autonomy, and concludes that although border controls may restrict freedom, they do not give rise to democratic entitlements.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  28.  9
    Immigration.Michael Blake - 2005 - In R. G. Frey & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.), A Companion to Applied Ethics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 224–237.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Political Equality and Moral Equality Cosmopolitanism and Open Borders Partiality and Restrictions on Immigration Conclusion.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  29.  81
    Enforcing immigration law.Matthew Lister - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (3):e12653.
    Over the last few years, an increasingly sophisticated literature devoted to normative questions arising out of the enforcement of immigration law had developed. In this essay, I consider what sorts of constraints considerations of justice and legitimacy may place on the enforcement of immigration law, even if we assume that states have significant discretion in setting their own immigration policies, and that open borders are not required by justice. I consider constraints placed on state or national governments, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. Immigration and Freedom of Association.Christopher Heath Wellman - 2008 - Ethics 119 (1):109-141.
  31. Immigration, Self-Determination and the Brain Drain.Luara Ferracioli - 2015 - Review of International Studies 41 (1):99-115.
    This article focuses on two questions regarding the movement of persons across international borders: (1) do states have a right to unilaterally control their borders; and (2) if they do, are migration arrangements simply immune to moral considerations? Unlike open borders theorists, I answer the first question in the affirmative. However, I answer the second question in the negative. More specifically, I argue that states have a negative duty to exclude prospective immigrants whose departure could be expected to contribute to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32. Immigration, Association, and Antidiscrimination.Michael Blake - 2012 - Ethics 122 (4):748-762.
  33. Mexican Immigration Scenarios based on the South African Experience of ending Apartheid.Kim Diaz & Edward Murguia - 2008 - Societies Without Borders 3 (2):209-227.
    How can we ameliorate the current immigration policies toward Mexican people immigrating to the United States? This study re-examines how the development of scenarios assisted South Africa to dismantle apartheid without engaging in a bloody civil war. Following the scenario approach, we articulate positions taken by different interest groups involved in the debate concerning immigration from Mexico. Next, we formulate a set of scenarios which are evaluated as to how well each contributes to the well-being of the populace (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  15
    Immigration and Collective Property.Stephen Kershnar - 2022 - Analítica 2:12-41.
    The notion that immigrants have a right to immigrate to the U.S. appears to conflict with the government’s or citizens’ property rights. Michael Huemer has given one of the most interesting and provocative arguments on immigration in years. It turns the dominant view on its head. Unfortunately, the argument fails. U.S. citizens own land, individually, collectively, and via their government. For immigrants to gain a right to enter on it, Huemer must think that the landowners have lost their rights (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Immigrants at the Gates. The Dilemmas of Migration Policy from an Individualist Perspective.Katarzyna Haremska - 2019 - In Dorota Probucka (ed.), Contemporary moral dilemmas. Berlin: Peter Lang.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Immigration and the Right to Health Care.Manning Rita - 2014 - In Gordon Teays (ed.), Global Bioethics and Human Rights. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 131-147.
    There are now over 1.1 million people overseen by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), with about 33,000 detained in jails and federal detention centers around the country at any particular time. The average detention time is two months, but some are detained for much longer periods. Since its inception, one hundred and twenty one deaths and countless cases of medical neglect have occurred. Given its secrecy, and lack of accountability and oversight, it is not clear how many of these (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Immigration.Michael Blake - 2005 - In Christopher Wellman (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Applied Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 224-237.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  38. Immigration.Sir Michael Dummett - 2004 - Res Publica 10 (2):115-122.
    It is not a fundamental human right to live wherever one would most like to be. We have to ask when a state should admit people not its citizens wishing to enter and settle within its territory. To exclude someone from entry to a country where he wishes to settle infringes his liberty. When anybody's liberty is infringed or curtailed the onus of proof lies upon those who claim a right to infringe or curtail it, other things being equal. This (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39. Immigration and Libertarianism: Open Borders versus Directionalism.J. C. Lester - 2021 - MEST Journal 9 (2).
    To explain the correct libertarian approach to immigration, a thought-experiment posits a minimal-state libertarian UK and then the introduction of several relevant anti-libertarian policies with their increasingly disastrous effects. It is argued that the reverse of these imagined policies, as far as is politically possible, must be the correct way forward. This framing is intended to counter the tendency for many articles to misapply libertarian principles to the current messy situation on the mistaken assumption that a state need only (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  7
    Immigration Law, Public Health, and the Future of Public Charge Policymaking.C. Joseph Ross Daval - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (2):336-338.
    U.S. immigration law has excluded noncitizens likely to become a “public charge” since 1882. When the Trump administration proposed a new Rule expanding the interpretation of that exclusion in 2018, over 55,000 people wrote public comments. These comments, overwhelmingly opposed to the change, are the subject of Rachel Fabi and Lauren Zahn’s insightful article in this issue of The Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics. The themes they identify resonate with the history of the public charge exclusion, which has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Debating the Ethics of Immigration: Is There a Right to Exclude?Christopher Heath Wellman & Phillip Cole - 2011 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    Do states have the right to prevent potential immigrants from crossing their borders, or should people have the freedom to migrate and settle wherever they wish? Christopher Heath Wellman and Phillip Cole develop and defend opposing answers to this timely and important question.
  42.  86
    Discretionary Immigration.Michael Blake - 2002 - Philosophical Topics 30 (2):251-273.
  43. Fertility, immigration, and the fight against climate change.Jake Earl, Colin Hickey & Travis N. Rieder - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (8):582-589.
    Several philosophers have recently argued that policies aimed at reducing human fertility are a practical and morally justifiable way to mitigate the risk of dangerous climate change. There is a powerful objection to such “population engineering” proposals: even if drastic fertility reductions are needed to prevent dangerous climate change, implementing those reductions would wreak havoc on the global economy, which would seriously undermine international antipoverty efforts. In this article, we articulate this economic objection to population engineering and show how it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  44. Immigration and Discrimination.Sarah Fine - forthcoming - In Sarah Fine & Lea Ypi (eds.), Migration in Political Theory: The Ethics of Movement and Membership. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45. Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2012 - Radical Philosophy Review 15 (2):359-364.
    In her book, The Ethics and Mores of Race, Naomi Zack offers her readers a critical and historical examination of philosophical ethics. This comprehensive and illuminating examination of philosophical ethics concludes by yielding twelve requirements for an ethics of race. While these twelve requirements are not in-themselves an ethics of race, the hope is that these requirements will be sufficient to finally allow us to explicitly engage in ethical treatments of race. My view is that Zack’s argument is basically on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  20
    Do Immigrants Affect Economic Institutions? Evidence from the American States.Alex Nowrasteh, Michael Howard & Andrew C. Forrester - 2023 - Public Affairs Quarterly 37 (3):269-283.
    Standard economic models predict large economic gains from liberalized immigration. However, those models assume that immigrants would have no effect on the causes of economic prosperity in destination countries. Immigrants could reduce the quality of economic institutions in destination countries, thus undermining the economic gains from liberalized immigration. This paper uses an epidemiological model to investigate how heterogeneously distributed immigrants affected the economic institutions of American states over the 1980–2010 period under the assumption that institutions are highly responsive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  8
    Everyday immigration ethics: Colombia, Venezuela and the case for vernacular response.Dan Bulley - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
    In the last decade, Venezuelans have faced a range of challenges such that by 2023, nearly 7.2 million have fled, the vast majority hosted within the region. One country particularly stands out: Colombia has accepted over 2.5 million. Colombia’s behaviour does not appear motivated by legal obligations or universal ethical principles; it is hard to make sense of in terms of international ethical and political theory. Rather, Colombian state and society make reference to mundane, localised concepts of friendship, fraternity and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Immigration, Jurisdiction, and Exclusion.Michael Blake - 2013 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (2):103-130.
  49.  41
    Immigration and Refugee Crises in Fourth-Century Greece: An Athenian Perspective.Lene Rubinstein - 2018 - The European Legacy 23 (1-2):5-24.
    The fourth-century B.C. was a period during which a large number of Greek cities were affected by civil wars, military conquests, and destruction, with the displacement of large numbers of men, women and children as a result. This has implications for the modern debate on Athenian attitudes to immigration, which normally focuses on just two groups of free non-citizens: adult, able-bodied men who moved to Athens voluntarily to take advantage of the city’s economic opportunities and on the free non-citizen (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Immigration, nationalism, and human rights.John Exdell - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (1):131-146.
    Abstract: Michael Walzer and David Miller defend the authority of democratic states to determine who will be allowed entry and membership. In support of this view they have claimed that the domestic solidarity necessary for social justice is threatened by the unregulated influx of outsiders. This empirical thesis proves to be false when applied to the United States, where heavy Latino and Latina immigration is more likely to increase civic solidarity than to diminish it. Seen in this light, the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000