Results for 'indigenous'

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  1. Indigenous and Scientific Kinds.David Ludwig - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (1).
    The aim of this article is to discuss the relation between indigenous and scientific kinds on the basis of contemporary ethnobiological research. I argue that ethnobiological accounts of taxonomic convergence-divergence patters challenge common philosophical models of the relation between folk concepts and natural kinds. Furthermore, I outline a positive model of taxonomic convergence-divergence patterns that is based on Slater's [2014] notion of “stable property clusters” and Franklin-Hall's [2014] discussion of natural kinds as “categorical bottlenecks.” Finally, I argue that this (...)
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  2.  14
    Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Renewal and U.S. Settler Colonialism.Kyle Powys Whyte - 2016 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. London: Routledge. pp. 354-365.
    Indigenous peoples often embrace different versions of the concept of food sovereignty. Yet some of these concepts are seemingly based on impossible ideals of food self-sufficiency. I will suggest in this essay that for at least some North American Indigenous peoples, food sovereignty movements are not based on such ideals, even though they invoke concepts of cultural revitalization and political sovereignty. Instead, food sovereignty is a strategy of Indigenous resurgence that negotiates structures of settler colonialism that erase (...)
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  3.  87
    Indigenous Characteristics of Chinese Corporate Social Responsibility Conceptual Paradigm.Shangkun Xu & Rudai Yang - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (2):321-333.
    The purpose of this study is to identify China’s indigenous conceptual dimensions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and to increase the knowledge and comprehension about CSR in specific context. We conducted an inductive analysis of CSR in China based on an open-ended survey of 630 CEOs and business owners in 12 provinces (municipalities) in China. In the survey, we collected CSR sample responses. After examining the qualitative data, we identified nine dimensions of CSR, among which six dimensions are similar (...)
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  4.  18
    Indigenous Sustainable Wisdom: First-Nation Know-How for Global Flourishing.Darcia Narvaez, Four Arrows, Eugene Halton, Brian Collier & Georges Enderle - 2019 - Peter Lang.
    Indigenous Sustainable Wisdom: First Nation Know-How for Global Flourishing’s contributors describe ways of being that reflect a worldview that has guided humanity for 99% of human history; they describe the practical traditional wisdom stemming from Nature-based relational cultures that were or are guided by this worldview. Such cultures did not cause the kinds of anti-Nature and de-humanizing or inequitable policies and practices that now pervade our world. Far from romanticizing Indigenous histories, Indigenous Sustainable Wisdom offers facts about (...)
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  5.  10
    Why Indigenous Land Rights Have Not Been Superseded – a Critical Application of Waldron’s Theory of Supersession.Kerstin Reibold - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-16.
    Jeremy Waldron introduced the notion of rights supersession into the philosophical discussion about restitutive justice in cases of historic injustices. He refers to land claims by indigenous peoples as a real-world example and as an application of his theory of rights supersession. He implies that the changes that have taken place in settler states since the first years of colonialism are the kind of changes that lead to a supersession of land rights. The article proposes to unbundle property rights (...)
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  6.  58
    Indigenous Peoples, Resource Extraction and Sustainable Development: An Ethical Approach.David A. Lertzman & Harrie Vredenburg - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):239-254.
    Resource extraction companies worldwide are involved with Indigenous peoples. Historically these interactions have been antagonistic, yet there is a growing public expectation for improved ethical performance of resource industries to engage with Indigenous peoples. (Crawley and Sinclair, Journal of Business Ethics 45, 361–373 (2003)) proposed an ethical model for human resource practices with Indigenous peoples in Australian mining companies. This paper expands on this work by re-framing the discussion within the context of sustainable development, extending it to (...)
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  7. Overlapping Ontologies and Indigenous Knowledge. From Integration to Ontological Self-­Determination.David Ludwig - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 59:36-45.
    Current controversies about knowledge integration reflect conflicting ideas of what it means to “take Indigenous knowledge seriously”. While there is increased interest in integrating Indigenous and Western scientific knowledge in various disciplines such as anthropology and ethnobiology, integration projects are often accused of recognizing Indigenous knowledge only insofar as it is useful for Western scientists. The aim of this article is to use tools from philosophy of science to develop a model of both successful integration and integration (...)
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  8.  23
    Through Indigenous Lenses: Cross—Sector Collaborations with Fringe Stakeholders. [REVIEW]Matthew Murphy & Daniel Arenas - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):103 - 121.
    This article argues that considering cross-sector collaborations through the lens of indigenous-corporate engagements yields a more comprehensive understanding of the range of cross-sector engagement types, emphasizes the importance of cross-cultural bridge building which has received little attention in the literature (Selsky and Parker, J Manag 31(6):849-873, 2005), and highlights the potential for innovation via collaborations with fringe stakeholders. The study offers a more overarching typology of cross-sector collaborations and, building on an ethical approach to sustainable development with indigenous (...)
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  9.  40
    Indigenous Human Resource Practices in Australian Mining Companies: Towards an Ethical Model. [REVIEW]Amanda Crawley & Amanda Sinclair - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (4):361 - 373.
    Mining companies in Australia are increasingly required to interact with Indigenous groups as stakeholders following Native Title legislation in the early 1990s. A study of five mining companies in Australia reveals that they now undertake a range of programs involving Indigenous communities, to assist with access to land, and to enhance their public profile. However, most of these initiatives emanate from carefully quarantined sections of mining companies. Drawing upon cross-cultural and diversity research in particular, this paper contends that (...)
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  10.  54
    Indigenous Rights, Global Governance, and State Sovereignty.William H. Meyer - 2012 - Human Rights Review 13 (3):327-347.
    This article discusses indigenous rights within the context of global governance. I begin by defining the terms “global governance” and “indigenous peoples” and summarizing the rights that are most important to indigenous peoples. The bulk of this article studies the global governance of indigenous rights in three areas. The first example is the creation of the 2007 UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. A second example involves violations of indigenous rights brought before (...)
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  11. Indigenous Peoples and the Morality of the Human Genome Diversity Project.M. Dodson & R. Williamson - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):204-208.
    In addition to the aim of mapping and sequencing one human's genome, the Human Genome Project also intends to characterise the genetic diversity of the world's peoples. The Human Genome Diversity Project raises political, economic and ethical issues. These intersect clearly when the genomes under study are those of indigenous peoples who are already subject to serious economic, legal and/or social disadvantage and discrimination. The fact that some individuals associated with the project have made dismissive comments about indigenous (...)
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  12.  25
    Indigenous Psychology: Grounding Science in Culture, Why and How?Louise Sundararajan - 2015 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 45 (1):64-81.
    My agenda is to ground psychological science in culture by using complex rather than overly simple models of culture and using indigenous categories as criteria of a translation test to determine the adequacy of scientific models of culture. I first explore the compatibility between Chinese indigenous categories and complex models of culture, by casting in the theoretical framework of symmetry and symmetry breaking a series of translations performed on Fiske's relational models theory. Next, I show how the dimensional (...)
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  13.  37
    Globalizing Indigenous Psychology: An East Asian Form of Hierarchical Relationalism with Worldwide Implications.James Liu - 2015 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 45 (1):82-94.
    Globalization has changed almost every facet of life for people around the world, and today the flow of influence is no longer uni-directional. It is argued that East Asian societies are anchored in an indigenous form of hierarchical relationalism where social structure is produced by relational obligations of an ethical and normative nature that have slowed its traditional culture “melting into air” as prophesied by Marx. The successfully modernization of East Asia has involved hybridization, compartmentalization, and sequencing of traditional (...)
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  14.  31
    Non-Indigenous Species and Ecological Explanation.Kristin Shrader-Frechette - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):507-519.
    Within the last 20 years, the US has mounted amassive campaign against invasions bynon-indigenous species (NIS) such as zebramussels, kudzu, water hyacinths, and brown treesnakes. NIS have disrupted native ecosystemsand caused hundreds of billions of dollars ofannual damage. Many in the scientificcommunity say the problem of NIS is primarilypolitical and economic: getting governments toregulate powerful vested interests thatintroduce species through such vehicles asships' ballast water. This paper argues that,although politics and economics play a role,the problem is primarily one of (...)
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  15.  13
    Indigenous Populations in Mexico: Medical Anthropology in the Work of Ruben Lisker in the 1960s.Edna Suárez-Díaz - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 47:108-117.
  16.  62
    Discovering Indigenous Science: Implications for Science Education.Gloria Snively & John Corsiglia - 2001 - Science Education 85 (1):6-34.
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  17.  21
    Indigenous Insights Into Ethical Leadership: A Study of Māori Leaders.Jarrod Haar, Maree Roche & David Brougham - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):621-640.
    The need for ethical leadership in navigating today’s complex, global and competitive organisations has been established. While research has confirmed the importance of ethical leaders in promoting positive organisational and employee outcomes, scant research has examined the antecedents of ethical leadership. Furthermore, there has been a call for further examination of leadership models, particularly indigenous leadership models. Responding to these issues, this study suggests Māori leaders’ values add insights into enhancing ethical leadership. Three studies confirm the role of Māori (...)
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  18.  6
    Through Indigenous Lenses: Cross-Sector Collaborations with Fringe Stakeholders.Matthew Murphy & Daniel Arenas - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S1):103-121.
    This article argues that considering cross-sector collaborations through the lens of indigenous-corporate engagements yields a more comprehensive understanding of the range of cross-sector engagement types, emphasizes the importance of cross-cultural bridge building which has received little attention in the literature :849–873, 2005), and highlights the potential for innovation via collaborations with fringe stakeholders. The study offers a more overarching typology of cross-sector collaborations and, building on an ethical approach to sustainable development with indigenous peoples, proposes a theoretical framework (...)
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  19.  43
    Indigenous Women, Climate Change Impacts, and Collective Action.Kyle Powys Whyte - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):599-616.
    Indigenous peoples must adapt to current and coming climate-induced environmental changes like sea-level rise, glacier retreat, and shifts in the ranges of important species. For some indigenous peoples, such changes can disrupt the continuance of the systems of responsibilities that their communities rely on self-consciously for living lives closely connected to the earth. Within this domain of indigeneity, some indigenous women take seriously the responsibilities that they may perceive they have as members of their communities. For the (...)
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  20.  22
    Indigenous Health Care, Bioethics and the Influence of Place.Andrew Crowden - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (5):56-58.
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  21. Cosmopolitan Right, Indigenous Peoples, and the Risks of Cultural Interaction.Timothy Waligore - 2009 - Public Reason 1 (1):27-56.
    Kant limits cosmopolitan right to a universal right of hospitality, condemning European imperial practices towards indigenous peoples, while allowing a right to visit foreign countries for the purpose of offering to engage in commerce. I argue that attempts by contemporary theorists such as Jeremy Waldron to expand and update Kant’s juridical category of cosmopolitan right would blunt or erase Kant’s own anti-colonial doctrine. Waldron’s use of Kant’s category of cosmopolitan right to criticize contemporary identity politics relies on premises that (...)
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  22.  22
    The Indigenous Knowledge of Ecological Processes Among Peasants in the People's Republic of China.Paul M. Chandler - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):59-66.
    A decision-tree model of an indigenous forest management system centered around shamu (Cunninghamia lanceolata),an important timber species in China, was constructed from extensive interviews with peasants in two villages in Fujian Province, China. From this model additional interviews were conducted to elicit from these peasants their reasons for selecting among decision alternatives. Those reasons that were of an ecological nature were discussed in detail with the peasants to elicit indigenous interpretations of ecological processes in order to test an (...)
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  23.  32
    Eliciting Indigenous Knowledge on Tree Fodder Among Maasai Pastoralists Via a Multi-Method Sequencing Approach.Evelyne Kiptot - 2007 - Agriculture and Human Values 24 (2):231-243.
    Although the potential of indigenous knowledge in sustainable natural resource management has been recognized, methods of gathering and utilizing it effectively are still being developed and tested. This paper focuses on various methods used in gathering knowledge on the use and management of tree fodder resources among the Maasai community of Kenya. The methods used were (1) a household survey to collect socio-economic data and identify key topics and informants for the subsequent knowledge elicitation phase; (2) semi-structured interviews using (...)
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  24.  14
    Whither Indigenous Psychology?Louise Sundararajan - 2019 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 39 (2):81-89.
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  25.  9
    Indigenous Ecological Knowledge and Modern Western Ecological Knowledge: Complementary, Not Contradictory.Jacinta Mwende Maweu - 2011 - Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 3 (2):35-47.
    Indigenous knowledge is often dismissed as ‘traditional and outdated’, and hence irrelevant to modern ecological assessment. This theoretical paper critically examines the arguments advanced to elevate modern western ecological knowledge over indigenous ecological knowledge, as well as the sources and uses of indigenous ecological knowledge. The central argument of the paper is that although the two systems are conceptually different, it would be fallacious to regard one as superior to the other merely because they are premised on (...)
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  26.  18
    Indigenous Psychology: Going Nowhere Slowly?Wahbie Long - 2019 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 39 (2):115-119.
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  27.  2
    Indigenous Women’s Political Participation: Gendered Labor and Collective Rights Paradigms in Mexico.Holly Worthen - 2015 - Gender and Society 29 (6):914-936.
    In Latin America, rights to local political participation in many indigenous communities are not simply granted, but rather “earned” through acts of labor for the community. This is the case in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, where almost three-fourths of municipalities elect municipal authorities through custom and tradition rather than secret ballot and universal suffrage. The alarmingly low rate of women’s formal participation in these municipalities has garnered attention from policymakers, provoking a series of legislative reforms designed to increase (...)
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  28.  35
    Indigenous Ecological Knowledge Systems and Development.Ellen Woodley - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):173-178.
    This paper reviews a selection of the literature that focuses on indigenous ecological knowledge systems and the accompanying cosmology and myth. Traditional ecological knowledge may not be obvious to the western trained scientist or the development worker since it may be disguised in the form of cosmology and ritual. The paper argues that the development process must be based on an understanding of traditional ecological knowledge if projects are to be sustainable both environmentally and sociologically.
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  29.  7
    Indigenous Peoples, Consent and Benefit Sharing– Learning Lessons From the San-Hoodia Case.Rachel Wynberg, Doris Schroeder & Roger Chennells (eds.) - 2009 - Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
    Indigenous Peoples, Consent and Benefit Sharing is the first in-depth account of the Hoodia bioprospecting case and use of San traditional knowledge, placing it in the global context of indigenous peoples’ rights, consent and benefit-sharing. It is unique as the first interdisciplinary analysis of consent and benefit sharing in which philosophers apply their minds to questions of justice in the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), lawyers interrogate the use of intellectual property rights to protect traditional knowledge, environmental scientists (...)
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  30.  26
    The Indigenous Community as “Living Organism”: José Carlos Mariátegui, Romantic Marxism, and Extractive Capitalism in the Andes.Jeffery R. Webber - 2015 - Theory and Society 44 (6):575-598.
  31.  19
    Indigenous Agricultural Knowledge Systems, Human Interests, and Critical Analysis: Reflections on Farmer Organization in Ecuador. [REVIEW]Anthony Bebbington - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):14-24.
    Indigenous agricultural knowledge (IAK) can be analyzed for its technical role in food production strategies, and for its role as cultural knowledge producing and reproducing mutual understanding and identity among the members of a farming group. IAK can also be approached from the perspective of critical theory, analyzing the relationship between knowledge and relations of power, with the goal of liberating indigenous farmers from forms of domination. The paper considers relationships between the different aspects of IAK, using examples (...)
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  32.  3
    The Indigenous Rights State.Benjamin Gregg - 2020 - Ratio Juris 33 (1):98-116.
  33.  22
    Exploding Individuals: Engaging Indigenous Logic and Decolonizing Science.Rebekah Sinclair - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):58-74.
    Despite emerging attention to Indigenous philosophies both within and outside of feminism, Indigenous logics remain relatively underexplored and underappreciated. By amplifying the voices of recent Indigenous philosophies and literatures, I seek to demonstrate that Indigenous logic is a crucial aspect of Indigenous resurgence as well as political and ethical resistance. Indigenous philosophies provide alternatives to the colonial, masculinist tendencies of classical logic in the form of paraconsistent—many-valued—logics. Specifically, when Indigenous logics embrace the possibility (...)
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  34.  24
    Research Methods in Indigenous Contexts.Arnold Groh - 2018 - New York, USA: Springer.
    This forward-looking resource offers readers a modern contextual framework for conducting social science research with indigenous peoples. Foundational chapters summarize current UN-based standards for indigenous rights and autonomy, with their implications for research practice. Coverage goes on to detail minimally-invasive data-gathering methods, survey current training and competency issues, and consider the scientist’s role in research, particularly as a product of his/her own cultural background. From these guidelines and findings, students and professionals have a robust base for carrying out (...)
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  35.  10
    Indigenous Political Difference, Colonial Perspectives and the Challenge of Diplomatic Relations: Toward a Decolonial Diplomacy in Multicultural Educational Theory.Troy A. Richardson - 2012 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 48 (5):465-484.
    This article considers how diplomacy can be refined and amplified within the field of multicultural education. Focusing on Native American peoples in particular, I argue that the multiculturalist emphasis on cultural diplomacy overlooks the political difference of First Nations peoples. In contrast to a multiculturalist cultural diplomacy, the article develops diplomacy according to a decolonial framework that seeks to dismantle colonial perspectives of Native American political difference. Drawing upon theorists and historians of diplomacy, as well as Indigenous and decolonial (...)
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  36. Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the ‘Politics of Recognition’ in Canada.Glen S. Coulthard - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):437-460.
    Over the last 30 years, the self-determination efforts and objectives of Indigenous peoples in Canada have increasingly been cast in the language of 'recognition' — recognition of cultural distinctiveness, recognition of an inherent right to self-government, recognition of state treaty obligations, and so on. In addition, the last 15 years have witnessed a proliferation of theoretical work aimed at fleshing out the ethical, legal and political significance of these types of claims. Subsequently, 'recognition' has now come to occupy a (...)
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  37.  32
    Indigenous Soil and Water Management in Senegambian Rice Farming Systems.Judith Carney - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):37-48.
    Considerable attention has focussed on the potential of indigenous agricultural knowledge for sustainable development. Drawing upon fieldwork on the soil and water management principles of rice farming systems in Senegambia, this paper examines the potential of the traditional system for a sustainable food security strategy. Problems with pumpirrigation are reviewed as well as previous efforts in swamp rice development. It is argued that sustainability depends on more than ecological factors and in particular, requires sensitivity to socio-economic parameters such as (...)
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  38.  7
    Indigenous Worlds Meet Post (?) Modern Evolutionary–Ecological Environmental Ethics.L. Hester, D. McPherson, A. Booth & J. Cheney - 2000 - Environmental Ethics 22 (3):273-290.
    We assess J. Baird Callicott’s attempt in Earth’s Insights to reconcile his land ethic with the “environmental ethics” of indigenous peoples. We critique the rejection of ethical pluralism that informs this attempted rapprochement. We also assess Callicott’s strategy of grounding his land ethic in a postmodern scientific world view by contrasting it with the roles of “respect” and narrative in indigenous “ethics.”.
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  39.  34
    The Indigenous World or Many Indigenous Worlds?J. Baird Callicott - 2000 - Environmental Ethics 22 (3):291-310.
    Earth’s Insights is about more than indigenous North American environmental attitudes and values. The conclusions of Hester, McPherson, Booth, and Cheney about universal indigenous environmental attitudes and values, although pronounced with papal infallibility, are based on no evidence. The unstated authority of their pronouncements seems to be the indigenous identity of two of the authors. Two other self-identified indigenous authors, V. F. Cordova and Sandy Marie Anglás Grande, argue explicitly that indigenous identity is sufficient authority (...)
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  40.  1
    Towards Indigenous Feminist Theorizing in the Caribbean.Patricia Mohammed - 1998 - Feminist Review 59 (1):6-33.
    This attempt to develop an indigenous reading of feminism as both activism and discourse in the Caribbean is informed by my own preoccupation with the limits of contemporary postmodern feminist theorizing in terms of its accessibility, as well as application to understanding the specificity of a region. I, for instance, cannot speak for or in the manner of a white middle-class academic in Britain, or a black North American feminist, as much as we share similarities which go beyond the (...)
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  41.  15
    Indigenous Knowledge Systems, the Cognitive Revolution, and Agricultural Decision Making.Christina H. Gladwin - 1989 - Agriculture and Human Values 6 (3):32-41.
    Increasingly, it is accepted wisdom for agricultural scientists to get feedback from indigenous peoples—peasants—about new improved seeds and biotechnologies before their official release from the experiment station. What is not yet accepted wisdom is the importance of cognitive science to research on farmer decision making, especially of the type “Why don't they adopt.” In this paper, the impact of the cognitive revolution on models of farmer decision making is described, and decision making models before and after the cognitive revolution (...)
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  42.  17
    Local is Not Fair: Indigenous Peasant Farmer Preference for Export Markets.Rachel Soper - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (3):537-548.
    The food sovereignty movement calls for a reversal of the neoliberal globalization of food, toward an alternative development model that supports peasant production for local consumption. The movement holds an ambiguous stance on peasant production for export markets, and clearly prioritizes localized trade. Food sovereignty discourse often simplifies and romanticizes the peasantry—overlooking agrarian class categories and ignoring the interests of export-oriented peasants. Drawing on 8 months of participant observation in the Andean countryside and 85 interviews with indigenous peasant farmers, (...)
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  43.  67
    Indigenous Lifeways and Knowing the World.John Grim - 2006 - In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 87--107.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712110; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 87-107.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 104-107.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  44.  12
    Using Indigenous Australian Drama to Break Cultural Barriers in Healthcare Relationships.K. Matharu - 2009 - Medical Humanities 35 (1):47-53.
    Since colonisation, the marginalisation of Indigenous Australians has adversely affected their language, culture and health. Mainstream society has failed to address social differences and establish culturally-appropriate health programmes for these groups. This paper extracts important humanistic themes within the context of health from four Indigenous Australian plays written during a period of social unrest in response to past oppression: (1) The dreamers, by Jack David; (2) Murras, by Eva Johnson; (3) Coordah, by Richard Walley; and (4) The keepers, (...)
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  45.  83
    Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the |[Lsquo]|Politics of Recognition|[Rsquo]| in Canada.Glen S. Coulthard - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):437.
    Over the last 30 years, the self-determination efforts and objectives of Indigenous peoples in Canada have increasingly been cast in the language of 'recognition' — recognition of cultural distinctiveness, recognition of an inherent right to self-government, recognition of state treaty obligations, and so on. In addition, the last 15 years have witnessed a proliferation of theoretical work aimed at fleshing out the ethical, legal and political significance of these types of claims. Subsequently, 'recognition' has now come to occupy a (...)
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  46.  35
    The Rehabilitation of Indigenous Environmental Ethics in Africa.Workineh Kelbessa - 2005 - Diogenes 52 (3):17-34.
    This article explores the rehabilitation of the ethical dimension of human interactions with nature, using cross-cultural perspectives in Africa. Cross-cultural comparison of indigenous concepts of the relationship between people and nature with contemporary environmental and scientific issues facilitate the rehabilitation, renewal and validation of indigenous environmental ethics. Although increasing attention is being given to the environmental concerns of non-western traditions, most of the related research has centered on Asia, Native American Indians and Australian Aborigines with little attention being (...)
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  47. Consultation, Consent, and the Silencing of Indigenous Communities.Leo Townsend & Dina Lupin Townsend - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (5):781-798.
    Over the past few decades, Indigenous communities have successfully campaigned for greater inclusion in decision-making processes that directly affect their lands and livelihoods. As a result, two important participatory rights for Indigenous peoples have now been widely recognized: the right to consultation and the right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC). Although these participatory rights are meant to empower the speech of these communities—to give them a proper say in the decisions that most affect them—we argue that (...)
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  48.  15
    Indigenous Spiritual Concerns and the Secular State: Some New Zealand Developments.Rex Ahdar - 2003 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 23 (4):611-637.
    This article explores the recurrent global claim by indigenous peoples for their spiritual concerns to be taken seriously and given appropriate effect in public policy. The secular liberal state's commitment to ideals of religious neutrality and equal treatment of all faiths and none is clearly tested to the degree it privileges traditional indigenous religion in the name of fostering indigenous culture. This dilemma has been acutely raised in New Zealand where Maori metaphysical concerns—the appeasement of taniwha (spiritual (...)
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  49.  15
    A Case for Organic Indigenous Christianity: African Ethiopia as Derivate From Jewish Christianity.Rugare Rukuni & Erna Oliver - 2019 - HTS Theological Studies 75 (1).
    From its inception to the 4th century CE, Christianity experienced a formative process composite of three catalytic phases characterised by distinctive events. From the aforementioned era emerged an orthodoxy fostered by an imperial-ecclesiastical link. There appears to have been a parallel story with regard to certain elements of African Christianity, in particular, Ethiopian Christianity. What can be made of the gap regarding Jewish Christianity combined with the absence of African Christianity from Bauer’s modular theory on heresy and orthodoxy in the (...)
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  50.  38
    Ethics in Indigenous Research – Connecting with Community.Terry Dunbar & Margaret Scrimgeour - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (3):179-185.
    The challenge for those responsible for funding, brokering and assessing the merit of proposed Indigenous research is to identify and then work co-operatively with appropriate representatives of Indigenous interests in order to increase the flow of benefits from research to Indigenous peoples. Experience in Australia has shown that this is not a straightforward process. In this paper we indicate some reasons why it is important for the research community to broker research with representative Indigenous organisations and (...)
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