Results for 'indigenous peoples'

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  1.  59
    Indigenous Peoples, Resource Extraction and Sustainable Development: An Ethical Approach.David A. Lertzman & Harrie Vredenburg - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):239-254.
    Resource extraction companies worldwide are involved with Indigenous peoples. Historically these interactions have been antagonistic, yet there is a growing public expectation for improved ethical performance of resource industries to engage with Indigenous peoples. (Crawley and Sinclair, Journal of Business Ethics 45, 361–373 (2003)) proposed an ethical model for human resource practices with Indigenous peoples in Australian mining companies. This paper expands on this work by re-framing the discussion within the context of sustainable development, (...)
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  2. Indigenous Peoples and the Morality of the Human Genome Diversity Project.M. Dodson & R. Williamson - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):204-208.
    In addition to the aim of mapping and sequencing one human's genome, the Human Genome Project also intends to characterise the genetic diversity of the world's peoples. The Human Genome Diversity Project raises political, economic and ethical issues. These intersect clearly when the genomes under study are those of indigenous peoples who are already subject to serious economic, legal and/or social disadvantage and discrimination. The fact that some individuals associated with the project have made dismissive comments about (...)
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  3.  8
    Indigenous Peoples, Consent and Benefit Sharing– Learning Lessons From the San-Hoodia Case.Rachel Wynberg, Doris Schroeder & Roger Chennells (eds.) - 2009 - Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
    Indigenous Peoples, Consent and Benefit Sharing is the first in-depth account of the Hoodia bioprospecting case and use of San traditional knowledge, placing it in the global context of indigenous peoples’ rights, consent and benefit-sharing. It is unique as the first interdisciplinary analysis of consent and benefit sharing in which philosophers apply their minds to questions of justice in the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), lawyers interrogate the use of intellectual property rights to protect traditional knowledge, (...)
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  4. Cosmopolitan Right, Indigenous Peoples, and the Risks of Cultural Interaction.Timothy Waligore - 2009 - Public Reason 1 (1):27-56.
    Kant limits cosmopolitan right to a universal right of hospitality, condemning European imperial practices towards indigenous peoples, while allowing a right to visit foreign countries for the purpose of offering to engage in commerce. I argue that attempts by contemporary theorists such as Jeremy Waldron to expand and update Kant’s juridical category of cosmopolitan right would blunt or erase Kant’s own anti-colonial doctrine. Waldron’s use of Kant’s category of cosmopolitan right to criticize contemporary identity politics relies on premises (...)
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  5. Autonomy of Nations and Indigenous Peoples and the Environmental Release of Genetically Engineered Animals with Gene Drives.Zahra Meghani - 2019 - Global Policy 10 (4):554-568.
    This article contends that the environmental release of genetically engineered (GE) animals with heritable traits that are patented will present a challenge to the efforts of nations and indigenous peoples to engage in self‐determination. The environmental release of such animals has been proposed on the grounds that they could function as public health tools or as solutions to the problem of agricultural insect pests. This article brings into focus two political‐economic‐legal problems that would arise with the environmental release (...)
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  6. Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the ‘Politics of Recognition’ in Canada.Glen S. Coulthard - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):437-460.
    Over the last 30 years, the self-determination efforts and objectives of Indigenous peoples in Canada have increasingly been cast in the language of 'recognition' — recognition of cultural distinctiveness, recognition of an inherent right to self-government, recognition of state treaty obligations, and so on. In addition, the last 15 years have witnessed a proliferation of theoretical work aimed at fleshing out the ethical, legal and political significance of these types of claims. Subsequently, 'recognition' has now come to occupy (...)
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  7.  2
    Valuing Local Knowledge: Indigenous People and Intellectual Property Rights.Doreen Stabinsky & Stephen B. Brush - 1996 - Island Press.
    Experts from around the world examine an innovative proposal to promote both cultural survival and biological conservation: treating cultural and indigenous knowledge as a form of intellectual property. Currently the focus of a heated debate among indigenous peoples, human rights advocates, crop breeders, pharmaceutical companies, conservationists, social scientists, and lawyers, the proposal would allow impoverished people in biologically rich areas to realize an economic return from resources under their care. Monetary compensation could both validate their knowledge and (...)
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  8.  9
    Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights.Don Conway-Long - 2016 - Human Rights Review 17 (1):115-120.
  9. Government Apologies to Indigenous Peoples.Alice MacLachlan - 2013 - In C. Allen Speight & Alice MacLachlan (eds.), Justice, Responsibility and Reconciliation in the Wake of Conflict. Springer. pp. 183-204.
    In this paper, I explore how theorists might navigate a course between the twin dangers of piety and excess cynicism when thinking critically about state apologies, by focusing on two government apologies to indigenous peoples: namely, those made by the Australian and Canadian Prime Ministers in 2008. Both apologies are notable for several reasons: they were both issued by heads of government, and spoken on record within the space of government: the national parliaments of both countries. Furthermore, in (...)
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  10.  85
    Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the |[Lsquo]|Politics of Recognition|[Rsquo]| in Canada.Glen S. Coulthard - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):437.
    Over the last 30 years, the self-determination efforts and objectives of Indigenous peoples in Canada have increasingly been cast in the language of 'recognition' — recognition of cultural distinctiveness, recognition of an inherent right to self-government, recognition of state treaty obligations, and so on. In addition, the last 15 years have witnessed a proliferation of theoretical work aimed at fleshing out the ethical, legal and political significance of these types of claims. Subsequently, 'recognition' has now come to occupy (...)
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  11.  10
    Indigenous Peoples.Vine Deloria - 2005 - In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 552--559.
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  12.  10
    Political Theory and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Duncan Ivison, Paul Patton & Will Sanders (eds.) - 2000 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    This challenging book focuses on the problem of justice for indigenous peoples – in philosophical, legal, cultural and political contexts – and the ways in which this problem poses key questions for political theory. It includes chapters by leading political theorists and indigenous scholars from Australia, Aotearoa/New Zealand, Canada and the United States. One of the strengths of this book is the manner in which it shows how the different historical circumstances of colonisation in these countries raise (...)
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  13.  28
    Indigenous Peoples Tribal Self Government: Legal History and Public Policy Manifestations in Canada, New Zealand and the United States.Michael Lane - unknown
    Contemporary notions of what constitutes tribal self government for Indigenous Peoples in the legal systems of the nation-states Canada, New Zealand and the United States of America have their origins in philosophies and theories developed by European nation-states generally, in relation to their colonial expansion into what is now called the Americas. This thesis examines the nature of these theories, and how they have formed the basis for legal precedent and public policy in the three nation-states. A representative (...)
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  14.  17
    Indigenous Peoples' Participation in Global Conservation: Looking Beyond Headdresses and Face Paint.Nels Paulson, Ann Laudati, Amity Doolittle, Meredith Welch-Devine & Pablo Pena - 2012 - Environmental Values 21 (3):255-276.
    This article explores the meaning of inclusive participation in global conservation decision-making processes. It draws on data collected in collaborative ethnographic research of the latest World Conservation Congress (WCC) held in 2008 in Barcelona, Spain. We argue that despite a discernible shift towards the incorporation of indigenous rights and indigenous peoples' representatives within the conservation equation, many challenges to full participation still exist for both indigenous peoples and other local resource users who may be affected (...)
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  15.  6
    Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change.Chie Sakakibara, Elise Horensky & Sloane Garelick - 2020 - Environmental Philosophy 17 (1):75-92.
    In this essay, we will discuss the lessons that we have learned in a course titled “Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change” regarding Indigenous efforts and epistemologies to cope with stresses and plights induced by global climate change. Primarily informed by humanistic perspectives, we examine how Indigenous peoples, especially those of North America, process climate change through their cultural values and social priorities, with a particular focus on human emotions or feelings associated with their homeland, which (...)
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  16.  2
    Philosophical Ideas in Spiritual Culture of the Indigenous Peoples of North America.S. V. Rudenko & Y. A. Sobolievskyi - 2020 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 18:168-182.
    The purpose of the article is to reveal philosophical ideas in the mythology and folklore of the indigenous peoples of North America. An important question: "Can we assume that the spiritual culture of the American Indians contained philosophical knowledge?" remains relevant today. For example, European philosophy is defined by appeals to philosophers of the past, their texts. The philosophical tradition is characterized by rational argumentation and formulation of philosophical questions that differ from the questions of ordinary language. However, (...)
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  17.  33
    Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc.: An Innovative Voluntary Code of Conduct to Protect Human Rights, Create Employment Opportunities, and Economic Development of the Indigenous People. [REVIEW]S. Prakash Sethi, David B. Lowry, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):1-30.
    Environmental degradation and extractive industry are inextricably linked, and the industry’s adverse impact on air, water, and ground resources has been exacerbated with increased demand for raw materials and their location in some of the more environmentally fragile areas of the world. Historically, companies have managed to control calls for regulation and improved, i.e., more expensive, mining technologies by (a) their importance in economic growth and job creation or (b) through adroit use of their economic power and bargaining leverage against (...)
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  18.  40
    Indigenous Peoples' Intellectual Property.Andrew Hunter - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:97-103.
    The present paper examines conventional wisdom on the subject of the justification of indigenous peoples' intellectual property rights, and offers an alternative approach. The examination is achieved by a critique of two such conventional approaches in terms of the strength of each argument employed, and in terms of the efficacy of each in the roles allotted to them. The first such argument is Stenson and Gray's application of Kymlicka's individualist theory advocating national minority autonomy. The second argument is (...)
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  19.  8
    Indigenous Peoples' Intellectual Property.Andrew Hunter - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:97-103.
    The present paper examines conventional wisdom on the subject of the justification of indigenous peoples' intellectual property rights, and offers an alternative approach. The examination is achieved by a critique of two such conventional approaches in terms of the strength of each argument employed, and in terms of the efficacy of each in the roles allotted to them. The first such argument is Stenson and Gray's application of Kymlicka's individualist theory advocating national minority autonomy. The second argument is (...)
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  20.  18
    Against Self-Isolation as a Human Right of Indigenous Peoples in Latin America.Benjamin Gregg - 2019 - Human Rights Review 20 (3):313-333.
    Advocacy of an indigenous right to isolation in the Latin American context responds to multiple depredations, above all to plundering by extractivists. Two prominent international instruments declare a human right to indigenous self-isolation and articulate a principle of no contact between indigenous peoples and the non-indigenous majority population: Indigenous Peoples in Voluntary Isolation and Initial Contact in the Americas and Guidelines on the Protection of Indigenous Peoples. In analyzing both, I argue (...)
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  21.  9
    Indigenous Peoples, Political Economists and the Tragedy of the Commons.Michel Morin - 2018 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 19 (2):559-586.
    In “The Tragedy of the Commons,” Garrett Hardin implicitly moved from bounded commons — a pasture or a tribe’s territory — to the case of boundless commons — the ocean, the atmosphere and planet Earth. He insisted on the need for imposing limits on the use of these resources, blurring the difference between communal property and open access regimes. The success of his paper is due in great measure to his neglect of economic, scientific, legal and anthropological literature. His main (...)
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  22. Indigenous Peoples and a Deleuzian Theory of Practice.Simone Bignall - 2008 - In Anna Hickey-Moody & Peta Malins (eds.), Deleuzian Encounters: Studies in Contemporary Social Issues. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  23. Indigenous Peoples and Genetic Population Research : Reflections on a Culturally Appropriate Model of Indigenous Participant Consent.Helena Kajlich - 2008 - In Barbara Ann Hocking (ed.), The Nexus of Law and Biology: New Ethical Challenges. Ashgate Pub. Company.
     
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  24. Indigenous People, Indigenous Worship (Thomas Christians).Francis Kanichikattil - 2006 - Journal of Dharma 31 (3):335-347.
     
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  25.  11
    The Impacts of Conservation and Militarization on Indigenous Peoples.Robert K. Hitchcock - 2019 - Human Nature 30 (2):217-241.
    There has been a long-standing debate about the roles of San in the militaries of southern Africa and the prevalence of violence among the Ju/'hoansi and other San people. The evolutionary anthropology and social anthropological debates over the contexts in which violence and warfare occurs among hunters and gatherers are considered, as is the “tribal zone theory” of warfare between states and indigenous people. This paper assesses the issues that arise from these discussions, drawing on data from San in (...)
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  26.  3
    The Rights of Indigenous Peoples Under International Law.James S. Phillips - 2015 - Global Bioethics 26 (2):120-127.
    International law guarantees rights to indigenous peoples regarding traditional lands, knowledge, cultural preservation, and human security. This paper will examine the sources of these rights and legal remedies for violations of law. Protection of indigenous peoples’ cultures and resources contribute to the protection of the global environment.
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  27.  39
    ‘Global Justice’ and the Suppressed Epistemologies of the Indigenous People of Africa.Dennis Masaka - 2017 - Philosophical Papers 46 (1):59-84.
    The position that I seek to defend in this article is that the epistemological hegemony that is presently one of the defining characters of the relationship between Africa and the global North is a form of injustice which makes the talk of ‘global justice’ illusory. In arguing thus, I submit that denying the indigenous people of Africa an epistemology that is comparable to epistemologies from other geopolitical centres translates to questioning their humanity which is a form of injustice. I (...)
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  28. Crime Against Dalits and Indigenous Peoples as an International Human Rights Issue.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2015 - In Proceedings of National Seminar on Human Rights of Marginalised Groups: Understanding and Rethinking Strategies. Patiala: pp. 214-225.
    In India, Dalits faced a centuries-old caste-based discrimination and nowadays indigenous people too are getting a threat from so called developed society. We can define these crimes with the term ‘atrocity’ means an extremely wicked or cruel act, typically one involving physical violence or injury. Caste-related violence has occurred and occurs in India in various forms. Though the Constitution of India has laid down certain safeguards to ensure welfare, protection and development, there is gross violation of their rights such (...)
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  29.  14
    Bridging the Divide Between Genomic Science and Indigenous Peoples.Bette Jacobs, Jason Roffenbender, Jeff Collmann, Kate Cherry, LeManuel Lee Bitsói, Kim Bassett & Charles H. Evans - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):684-696.
    The new science of genomics endeavors to chart the genomes of individuals around the world, with the dual goals of understanding the role genetic factors play in human health and solving problems of disease and disability. From the perspective of indigenous peoples and developing countries, the promises and perils of genomic science appear against a backdrop of global health disparity and political vulnerability. These conditions pose a dilemma for many communities when attempting to decide about participating in genomic (...)
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  30.  21
    Bridging the Divide Between Genomic Science and Indigenous Peoples.Bette Jacobs, Jason Roffenbender, Jeff Collmann, Kate Cherry, LeManuel Lee Bitsói, Kim Bassett & Charles H. Evans - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):684-696.
    The new science of genomics endeavors to chart the genomes of individuals around the world, with the dual goals of understanding the role genetic factors play in human health and solving problems of disease and disability. From the perspective of indigenous peoples and developing countries, the promises and perils of genomic science appear against a backdrop of global health disparity and political vulnerability. These conditions pose a dilemma for many communities when attempting to decide about participating in genomic (...)
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  31.  91
    Can Liberal States Accommodate Indigenous Peoples?Duncan Ivison - 2020 - Cambridge, UK: Polity.
    The original – and often continuing – sin of countries with a settler colonial past is their brutal treatment of indigenous peoples. This challenging legacy continues to confront modern liberal democracies ranging from the USA and Canada to Australia, New Zealand and beyond. Duncan Ivison’s book considers how these states can justly accommodate indigenous populations today. He shows how indigenous movements have gained prominence in the past decade, driving both domestic and international campaigns for change. He (...)
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  32.  1
    Human Security of the Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic. The Sami Case.Agnieszka Szpak - 2017 - International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal 20 (1):75-96.
    For many years, indigenous peoples, their rights, culture and identity have been neglected. This depressing statement also refers to the Sami who reside in the Arctic. This paper presents the understanding of the term “indigenous peoples” and a number of their rights, including the right to selfdetermination. Their implementation is necessary for human security as they empower indigenous peoples to make decisions in matters that affect them. The author examines the concept of human security (...)
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  33.  19
    The Plight of Indigenous Peoples Within the Context of Conflict Mediation, Peace Talks and Human Rights in Mindanao, the Philippines.Sedfrey M. Candelaria - 2018 - Thesis Eleven 145 (1):28-37.
    Republic Act 8371 or the Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Act of 1997 was passed by the Philippine Congress in order to address the concerns of the indigenous communities which had received marginal attention through the past decades. Indigenous communities have also been displaced from their lands due to armed conflicts between government soldiers and secessionist groups, particularly the Moro rebels and the communist-led New Peoples’ Army. The Philippines has been privy to peace initiatives with these two (...)
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  34.  12
    Sovereignty as Trusteeship and Indigenous Peoples.Ian Dahlman & Evan Fox-Decent - 2015 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 16 (2):507-534.
    We explore two special challenges indigenous peoples pose to the idea of sovereigns as trustees for humanity. The first challenge is rooted in a colonial history during which a trusteeship model of sovereignty served as an enabler of paternalistic colonial policies. The challenge is to show that the trusteeship model is not irreparably colonial in nature. The second challenge, which emerges from the first, is to specify the scope and nature of indigenous peoples’ sovereignty within the (...)
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  35.  7
    Blood, Race and Indigenous Peoples in Twentieth Century Extreme Physiology.Vanessa Heggie - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (2):26.
    In the first half of the twentieth century the attention of American and European researchers was drawn to the area of ‘extreme physiology’, partly because of expeditions to the north and south poles, and to high altitude, but also by global conflicts which were fought for the first time with aircraft, and involved conflict in non-temperate zones, deserts, and at the freezing Eastern front. In an attempt to help white Euro-Americans survive in extreme environments, physiologists, anthropologists, and explorers studied (...) people’s bodies, cultures, and technologies. This paper will sketch an outline of the science of white survival in three ‘extreme’ environments: the Antarctic and Arctic; high-altitude; and the Australian desert, with a particular focus on the ways in which indigenous populations were studied, or in some cases ignored, by Western biomedical scientists—despite their crucial and systematic contributions to the success of experiments and expeditions. Particularly focusing on altitude, and on blood in both its symbolic and literal sense, the article shows how assumptions about race, indigeneity, civilisation, and evolution shaped the ways White Westerners understood their own bodies as well as those of the people they encountered in cold, high and hot places on the earth. Despite new discoveries in physiology and evolutionary science, old racialised assumptions were maintained, especially those that figured the temperate body as civilised and the tropical body as primitive; and in at least one case it will be shown that these racialised assumptions significantly altered, if not retarded, the science of respiratory physiology. (shrink)
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  36.  16
    Epistemic Injustice and Indigenous Peoples in the Inter-American Human Rights System.Dina Lupin Townsend & Leo Townsend - 2020 - Social Epistemology 35 (2):147-159.
    In this paper we examine the epistemic treatment of Indigenous peoples by the Inter-American Court and Commission on Human Rights, two institutions that have sought to affirm the rights of Indigeno...
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  37.  11
    Understanding Access to Healthcare Among Indigenous Peoples: A Comparative Analysis of Biomedical and Postcolonial Perspectives.Tara Horrill, Diana E. McMillan, Annette S. H. Schultz & Genevieve Thompson - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (3):e12237.
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  38.  15
    Agency Vulnerability, Participation, and the Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples.Stacy J. Kosko - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (3):293-310.
    Journal of Global Ethics, Volume 9, Issue 3, Page 293-310, December 2013.
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  39.  9
    The Cultural Erosion of Indigenous People in Health Care.Richard Matthews - 2017 - Canadian Medical Association Journal 2 (189).
    The paper describes the unique health ethics challenges of working with Indigenous peoples. It explores the distorting impacts of colonial law and economic policy on clinical ethics decision making and makes some practical recommendations for overcoming or subverting them.
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  40.  47
    Realizing the Social Contract: The Case of Colonialism and Indigenous Peoples.Robert Lee Nichols - 2005 - Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):42-62.
    From 1922 to 1924, the Iroquois Confederacy — a federal union of six aboriginal nations — sought resolution of a dispute between themselves and Canada at the League of Nations. In this paper, the historical events of the 1920s League are employed as a case study to explore the development of the international society of states in the early 20th century as it relates to the indigenous peoples of North America. Specifically, it will be argued that the early (...)
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  41. Privileged Biofuels, Marginalized Indigenous Peoples: The Coevolution of Biofuels Development in the Tropics.Marvin Joseph F. Montefrio - 2012 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 32 (1):41-55.
    Biofuels development has assumed an important role in integrating Indigenous peoples and other marginalized populations in the production of biofuels for global consumption. By combining the theories of commoditization and the environmental sociology of networks and flows, the author analyzed emerging trends and possible changes in institutions and behaviors brought about by the introduction of biofuels as a development option on ancestral lands. Using the Indonesian oil palm and the Philippine Jatropha experiences, the author argues that although there (...)
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  42.  18
    Corporate Ethics and Indigenous People: Finnish Pulp Companies’ Role in the Land Conflicts of Northeastern Brazil.Susanna Myllylä & Tuomo Takala - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:282-288.
    Finland is currently undergoing a fundamental structural transformation in the forestry sector, with factories closing in the Global North and production being shifted to the Global South (see also Carrere & Lohmann 1996; Cossalter & Pye-Smith 2003). This is accompanied by Finnish mass movements protesting unemployment and demanding corporate social responsibility (CSR) from theforest industry. The difficult domestic situation, however, seems to overshadow the circumstances of the new production regions in the South. What do we actually know about the impacts (...)
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  43.  10
    Cultural Remnants of the Indigenous Peoples in the Buddhist Scriptures.Bryan Geoffrey Levman - 2014 - Buddhist Studies Review 30 (2):145-180.
    While the linguistic influence of India’s indigenous languages on the Indo- Aryan language is well understood, the cultural impact of the autochthonous Munda, Dravidian and Tibeto-Burman speaking peoples is much harder to evaluate, due to the lack of indigenous coeval records, and later historicization of the Buddha’s life and teachings. Nevertheless, there are cultural remnants of the indigenous belief systems discoverable in the Buddhist scriptures. In this article we examine 1) The longstanding hostility between the IA (...)
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  44. Humble: Working with Indigenous Peoples and Other Descendent Communities.Be First - 2005 - In Claire Smith & Hans Martin Wobst (eds.), Indigenous Archaeologies: Decolonizing Theory and Practice. Routledge. pp. 301--314.
  45.  36
    Burnt Offerings to Rationality: A Feminist Reading of the Construction of Indigenous Peoples in Enrique Dussel's Theory of Modernity.Lynda Lange - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (3):132 - 145.
    The philosopher Enrique Dussel offers a critical analysis of European construction of indigenous peoples which he calls "transmodern." His theory is especially relevant to feminist and other concerns about the potential disabling effects of postmodern approaches for political action and the development of theory. Dussel divides modernity into two concurrent paradigms. Reflection on them suggests that modernism and postmodernism should not be too strongly distinguished. In conclusion, his approach is compared with that of Mohanty.
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  46.  10
    David Lea , Property Rights, Indigenous People and the Developing World: Issues From Aboriginal Entitlement to Intellectual Ownership . Reviewed By.Thomas W. Simon - 2011 - Philosophy in Review 31 (1):49-53.
  47.  18
    Conquerors and Indigenous Peoples. Geographical Loan Names and Their Importance in the History of South-East Europe in the First Millennium A. D.Klaus-Detlev Grothusen - 1983 - Philosophy and History 16 (2):184-185.
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  48.  15
    Languages of Tribal and Indigenous Peoples of India: The Ethnic Space.Frank J. Korom & Anvita Abbi - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (2):354.
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  49. The Sociology of Indigenous People's Rights.Colin Samson & Damien Short - 2006 - In Lydia Morris (ed.), Rights: Sociological Perspectives. Routledge. pp. 168.
     
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  50.  31
    The Role of Indigenous Peoples in the Environmental Crisis: The Example of the Kayapo of the Brazilian Amazon.Terence Turner - 1993 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 36 (3):526-545.
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