Results for 'intellectual disability'

989 found
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  1.  22
    2 the limits of the medical model: Historical epidemiology of intellectual disability in the united states Jeffrey P. Brosco.Historical Epidemiology Of Intellectual - 2010 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  2.  35
    Why Intellectual Disability is Not Mere Difference.James B. Gould - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (3):495-509.
    A key question in disability studies, philosophy, and bioethics concerns the relationship between disability and well-being. The mere difference view, endorsed by Elizabeth Barnes, claims that physical and sensory disabilities by themselves do not make a person worse off overall—any negative impacts on welfare are due to social injustice. This article argues that Barnes’s Value Neutral Model does not extend to intellectual disability. Intellectual disability is (1) intrinsically bad—by itself it makes a person worse (...)
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  3.  10
    Intellectual Disability: Ethics, Dehumanization and a New Moral Community.Heather E. Keith - 2013 - J. Wiley. Edited by Kenneth D. Keith.
    Intellectual Disability: Ethics, Dehumanization, and a New Moral Community presents an interdisciplinary exploration of the roots and evolution of the dehumanization of people with intellectual disabilities. Examines the roots of disability ethics from a psychological, philosophical, and educational perspective Presents a coherent, sustained moral perspective in examining the historical dehumanization of people with diminished cognitive abilities Includes a series of narratives and case descriptions to illustrate arguments Reveals the importance of an interdisciplinary understanding of the social (...)
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  4.  18
    Why Intellectual Disability Poses a Challenge to the Received View of Capacity and a Potential Response.Abraham Graber & Andy Kreusel - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (1):117-136.
    While copious quantities of ink have been spilled on the topic of autonomy in the context of health care, little has been written about autonomy in relation to intellectual disability. After presenting the received account of capacity, we argue that it cannot account for the moral permissibility of limiting an individual with intellectual disability’s access to diet soda. In cases of preventative medicine and intellectual disability, the philosophical motivation for the received account of capacity (...)
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  5.  26
    Autism, intellectual disability, and a challenge to our understanding of proxy consent.Abraham Graber - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):229-236.
    This paper focuses on a hypothetical case that represents an intervention request familiar to those who work with individuals with intellectual disability. Stacy has autism and moderate intellectual disability. Her parents have requested treatment for her hand flapping. Stacy is not competent to make her own treatment decisions; proxy consent is required. There are three primary justifications for proxy consent: the right to an open future, substituted judgment, and the best interest standard. The right to an (...)
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  6.  28
    Intellectual disability and mystical unknowing: Contemporary insights from medieval sources.Erinn Staley - 2012 - Modern Theology 28 (3):385-401.
    Intellectual disabilities make people vulnerable to marginalization in churches and social spaces, but theology has not sufficiently attended to the topic and promoted the flourishing of people who have cognitive impairments. This article responds to theology's inadequate attention to intellectual disability and historical resources for reflection on the topic by reading medieval sources with intellectual disability in mind. I argue that Bonaventure's Itinerarium Mentis in Deum provides a model for imagining intellectually disabled and nondisabled people (...)
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  7.  22
    Intellectual Disability, Brain Damage, and Group-to-Individual Inferences.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 2018 - Balkan Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):5-16.
    In this essay, I home in on the difficulties with group-to-individual (G2i) inferences in neuroscience and how they impact the legal system. I briefly outline how cognitive shortcutting can distort legal decisions, and then turn my attention to G2i inferences, with a special focus on issues of intellectual disability and brain damage. I argue that judges and juries are not situated to appreciate the nuances in brain data and that they are required to make clinical decisions without clinical (...)
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  8.  8
    Intellectual Disability, Dehumanization, and the Fate of “the Human”.Licia Carlson - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 3:47-70.
    Dehumanization Studies is a burgeoning field that has much to teach Critical Disability Studies and philosophers of disability. Conversely, a critical disability perspective can inform and challenge theoretical approaches to dehumanization. This paper attempts to forge a conversation between these interdisciplinary areas by exploring the phenomenon of dehumanization in relation to people with intellectual disabilities. It begins with a definition of disability dehumanization, and then explores the ways in which this form of dehumanization functions dynamically (...)
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  9.  28
    Sterilization, Intellectual Disability, and Some Ethical and Methodological Challenges: It Shouldn't be a Secret.Guðrún V. Stefánsdóttir & Eygló Ebba Hreinsdóttir - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):302-308.
    This article discusses the experience of an Icelandic woman with intellectual disabilities who was sterilized and how she has dealt with it. It also reflects on some ethical and methodological issues that arise during inclusive life history research. The article is based on cooperation between two women, Eygló Ebba Hreinsdóttir, who was labelled with intellectual disabilities when she moved to an institution in Iceland in the 1970s, and the researcher Gu?rún V. Stefánsdóttir. Since 2003 we have worked closely (...)
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  10. Intellectual Disability, Choice, and Relational Ethics.Henry Somers-Hall - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):377-380.
    In ‘Liberal individualism and Deleuzean Relationality,’ Clegg, Murphy, and Almack argue that the ability to choose has become something of a dogma in the management of intellectual disability, and one that sits badly with the heterogeneity of those with intellectual disabilities. They argue for a move away from choice as the primary ethical category to an ethics of relationality, following from the work of Deleuze and Guattari, to offer a more nuanced and stable form of care. In (...)
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  11. Metaepistemic Injustice and Intellectual Disability: a Pluralist Account of Epistemic Agency.Amandine Catala - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (5):755-776.
    The literature on epistemic injustice currently displays a logocentric or propositional bias that excludes people with intellectual disabilities from the scope of epistemic agency and the demands of epistemic justice. This paper develops an account of epistemic agency and injustice that is inclusive of both people with and people without intellectual disabilities. I begin by specifying the hitherto undertheorized notion of epistemic agency. I develop a broader, pluralist account of epistemic agency, which relies on a conception of knowledge (...)
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  12.  83
    Philosophers of intellectual disability: A taxonomy.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):552-566.
    This essay explores various roles that philosophers occupy in relation to intellectual disability. In examining how philosophers define their object of inquiry as experts and gatekeepers, it raises critical questions concerning the nature of philosophical discourse about intellectual disability. It then goes on to consider three alternate positions, the advocate or friend, the animal, and the “intellectually disabled,” each of which points to new ways of philosophizing in the face of intellectual disability.
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  13.  43
    The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Indiana University Press.
    In a challenge to current thinking about cognitive impairment, this book explores what it means to treat people with intellectual disabilities in an ethical manner.
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  14. Profound Intellectual Disability and the Bestowment View of Moral Status.Simo Vehmas & Benjamin Curtis - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):505-516.
    This article engages with debates concerning the moral worth of human beings with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMDs). Some argue that those with such disabilities are morally less valuable than so-called normal human beings, whereas others argue that all human beings have equal moral value and so each group of humans ought to be treated with equal concern. We will argue in favor of a reconciliatory view that takes points from opposing camps in the debates about the moral (...)
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  15. Intellectual disability, sensation, and thinking through affect.Anna Hickey-Moody - 2007 - In Anna Hickey-Moody & Peta Malins (eds.), Deleuzian Encounters: Studies in Contemporary Social Issues. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  16.  34
    Empathizing with The Intellectually Disabled.Claudia Passos-Ferreira - 2023 - In Ana Paula Barbosa-Fohrmann & Sandra Caponi (eds.), Latin American Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Bioethics and Disabilities. Springer Nature. pp. 3-16.
    This chapter is devoted to reflecting on the role of empathy in interactions with people with profound intellectual disabilities. We have a duty to respect people with intellectual disabilities. Respect involves identification with a point of view. We owe them an effort at identification with their perspective. However, if intellectually disabled people’s communicative abilities are impaired, our apprehension of their point of view might be limited, reducing our ability to identify with them and respect them. To answer this (...)
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  17.  3
    Philosophers of Intellectual Disability: A Taxonomy.Licia Carlson - 2010 - In Armen T. Marsoobian, Brian J. Huschle, Eric Cavallero, Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 315–329.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Expert or Gatekeeper Family Member or Advocate The Nonhuman Animal The “Intellectually Disabled” References.
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  18.  6
    Intellectual Disabilities Behavior Under the Lens of Embodied Cognition Approaches.J. Walter Tolentino-Castro & Markus Raab - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
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  19.  5
    Unfit and cast aside: portrayals of mothering with intellectual disability in Québec court reports.Laura Pacheco, Rahel More, Marjorie Aunos & Rachelle Rose - 2024 - Critical Discourse Studies 21 (3):322-340.
    Many mothers with intellectual disabilities lose their parental rights due to child welfare (CW) concerns. Despite the growing interdisciplinary scholarship on parenting with intellectual disabilities, there is scant research that has explored the discursive practices embedded within CW or family courts involving mothers with intellectual disabilities. The aim of this study is to explore portrayals of mothering with intellectual disability in CW court reports filed in Québec, Canada. A three-level critical discourse analysis was performed, focusing (...)
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  20.  76
    Philosophical Inclusive Design: Intellectual Disability and the Limits of Individual Autonomy in Moral and Political Theory.Laura Davy - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):132-148.
    Drawing on the built environment concept of “inclusive design” and its emphasis on creating accessible environments for all persons regardless of ability, I suggest that a central task for feminist disability theory is to redesign foundational philosophical concepts to present opportunities rather than barriers to inclusion for people with disability. Accounts of autonomy within liberal philosophy stress self-determination and the dignity of all individual persons, but have excluded people with intellectual disability from moral and political theories (...)
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  21. An Inclusive Account of the Permissibility of Sex: Considering Children, Non-human Animals, and People with Intellectual Disabilities.Adrià Rodríguez Moret - 2024 - Social Theory and Practice 50 (2):307-333.
    A complete theory of the permissibility of sex must not only determine the permissibility of sex between typical adult humans. In addition, it must also adequately take into consideration sex acts involving non-human animals, children, and humans with intellectual disabilities. However, when trying to develop a non-discriminatory account that includes these beings, two worrying problems of animal sex arise. To surpass them, I argue for a reformulation of the standard theory. To produce a truly inclusive account our theory should (...)
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  22.  37
    The Moral Status of Intellectually Disabled Individuals.S. D. Edwards - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (1):29-42.
    The moral status accorded to an individual (or class of individuals) helps to account for the weight of the moral obligations considered due to an individual (or class of individuals). Strong arguments can be given to indicate that the moral status accorded, justly or unjustly, to individuals with intellectual disabilities is less than that accorded to those considered intellectually able. This paper suggests that such a view of the moral status of intellectually disabled individuals derives from individualism. Ontological and (...)
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  23.  17
    Compensation of Intellectual Disability in a Relational Dialogue on Down Syndrome.Fabiola Ribeiro de Souza & Silviane Bonaccorsi Barbato - 2020 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 21 (1):49-68.
    The historical-cultural theory of Intellectual Disability overcompensation/compensation is referenced in several studies, but little empirical evidence is presented to corroborate this thesis. In this work, 13 current studies were analysed about the behavioural profile of people with Down syndrome, a case of neurobiological ID, published in the last 15 years, in order to verify the possibility of dialogue with the theorizing about compensation. Despite contributing to an up to date understanding of DS, the results point to similarities between (...)
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  24.  2
    Persistent Narratives: Intellectual Disability in Canadian Children’s Literature.Kimberlee Collins & Julie McGonegal - 2024 - Studies in Social Justice 18 (1):44-58.
    Canadian children’s literature rarely depicts characters labelled with intellectual disabilities, yet when it does it often remains mired in stereotypes that recycle prevalent myths and misconceptions. Even as more recent literature attempts to push back against such stereotypes, it nevertheless predominantly remains caught in these dangerous representational repertoires. This article offers a brief history of Canadian literary depictions of intellectual disability and a critique of the Canadian publishing spheres. Through a critical analysis of Lorna Schultz Nicholson’s book (...)
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  25.  54
    Are Persons with Profound Intellectual Disabilities Sacramental Icons of Heavenly Life? Aquinas on Impairment.John Berkman - 2013 - Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (1):83-96.
    Although almost completely ignored, Aquinas’s account of persons with severe intellectual disabilities is key to his understanding of human persons and their salvation. Aquinas extensively addresses questions of human impairment, and for Aquinas physical and mental impairment are not nearly as important as moral or spiritual impairment. Contrary to those who focus on Aquinas’s account of rationality and suppose he thinks that a person must exercise rationality in order to be moral and in the image of God, Aquinas’s view (...)
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  26.  26
    Democratic Care and Intellectual Disability: More than Maintenance.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (4):298-313.
    Joan Tronto defines care by three activities: maintaining, continuing, and repairing. These activities give care a maintenance quality, which is problematic given that caring often takes place within contexts of inequality and domination. Empirical research with paid support staff and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) illustrate these problems: care practices tend to reinforce the social exclusion of people with IDD, particularly for people with challenging behavior. Yet, support workers’ care practices can facilitate a better quality of life (...)
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  27.  36
    Considering the boundaries of intellectual disability: Using philosophy of science to make sense of borderline cases.Veerle Garrels - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):6-21.
    Who should be diagnosed with intellectual disability and who should not? For borderline cases, the answer to this question may be as difficult to decide on as determining the borderline between being bald or not. While going bald may be upsetting to some, it is also an inevitable and relatively undramatic course of nature. In contrast, getting a diagnosis of intellectual disability is likely to have more far-reaching consequences. This makes the question of where the cutoff (...)
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  28.  17
    Including adults with intellectual disabilities who lack capacity to consent in research.Julie Calveley - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):558-567.
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 has stipulated that in England and Wales the ethical implications of carrying out research with people who are unable to consent must be considered alongside the ethical implications of excluding them from research altogether. This paper describes the methods that were used to enable people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities, who lacked capacity, to participate in a study that examined their experience of receiving intimate care. The safeguards that were put in place to (...)
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  29.  7
    The Disabled Contract: Severe Intellectual Disability, Justice and Morality.Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    Social contract theories generally predicate the authority of rules that govern society on the idea that these rules are the product of a contractual agreement struck between members of society. These theories embody values, such as equality, reciprocity and rationality, that are highly prized within our culture. Yet a closer inspection reveals that these features exclude other important values, relations and even persons from the realm of contractual morality and justice, especially people with severe intellectual disabilities. Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry explores (...)
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  30. Moral Worth and Severe Intellectual Disability – A Hybrid View.Benjamin L. Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2013 - In Jerome E. Bickenbach, Franziska Felder & Barbara Schmitz (eds.), Disability and the Good Human Life. Cambridge University Press. pp. 19-49.
    Consider: You can save either a human or a normal adult dog from a burning building (with no risk to yourself and at little cost), but not both. However, the human is a human with a severe intellectually disability (or, as we shall say, a “SID”). -/- Which one should you save? There is disagreement in the literature about which this issue. Two opposing camps exist, which we call “the intrinsic property camp ” and “the special relations camp.” Those (...)
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  31.  21
    Irresponsible love: Rethinking intellectual disability, humanity and the church1.Medi Ann Volpe - 2009 - Modern Theology 25 (3):491-501.
    This review essay considers three recent studies at the intersection of theology and intellectual disability. All three authors work out constructive proposals against a background of literature in which Nancy Eiesland and Stanley Hauerwas are central. Each explores the nature of intellectual disability through interdisciplinary study and draws this work into conversation with classical Christian theology. The essay welcomes these three books, and also suggests ways in which their constructive proposals might be strengthened. In particular, their (...)
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  32.  76
    Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability.Andria Bianchi - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:107-121.
    Respect for autonomy grounds common ethical judgments about why people should be allowed to make decisions for themselves. Under this assumption, it is concerning that a number of feminist conceptions of autonomy present challenges for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper explores some of the most philosophically influential feminist accounts of autonomy and demonstrates how these accounts exclude persons with intellectual disabilities. As a possible solution to these accounts, Laura Davy’s inclusive design approach is presented, which is a (...)
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  33.  9
    The Subject of Intellectual Disability: A Reply to Clegg, Murphy, & Almack.Murray K. Simpson - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):373-376.
    As a starting point, Clegg, Murphy, and Almack contend that frameworks of policy fail both to engage with ethical theory and to fit with the complex realities of how services are delivered. Both of these points are well-supported both in their engagement with literature and in the research presented. Their Deleuzoguattarian analysis and Deleuzean ethical alternatives provide fresh and challenging insights. The key question in this rejoinder is whether their critique goes too far, or not far enough. To begin, however, (...)
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  34.  39
    Christian Faith, Intellectual Disability, and the Mere Difference / Bad Difference Debate.James B. Gould - 2018 - Philosophy and Theology 30 (2):447-477.
    The mere difference view, endorsed by some philosophers and Christian scholars, claims that disability by itself does not make a person worse off on balance—any negative impacts on overall welfare are due to social injustice. This article defends the bad difference view—some disability is bad not simply because of social arrangements but because of biological deficits that, by themselves, make a person worse off. It argues that the mere difference view contradicts core doctrines of Christian faith. The analysis (...)
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  35.  15
    Christian Faith, Intellectual Disability, and the Mere Difference / Bad Difference Debate.James B. Gould - 2018 - Philosophy and Theology 30 (2):447-477.
    The mere difference view, endorsed by some philosophers and Christian scholars, claims that disability by itself does not make a person worse off on balance—any negative impacts on overall welfare are due to social injustice. This article defends the bad difference view—some disability is bad not simply because of social arrangements but because of biological deficits that, by themselves, make a person worse off. It argues that the mere difference view contradicts core doctrines of Christian faith. The analysis (...)
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  36.  18
    The Complicated but Plain Relationship of Intellectual Disability and Well-being.James Gould - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 3 (1):37-51.
    The common belief is that disability is bad for the person who is disabled, that it has a negative effect on well-being. Some disability rights activists and philosophers, however, assert that disability has little or no impact on how well a person’s life goes, that it is neutral with respect to flourishing. In recent articles Stephen Campbell and Joseph Stramondo, while rejecting both views, claim that we cannot make any broad generalizations about the effect of disability (...)
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  37.  15
    Reconsidering Intellectual Disability: L’Arche, Medical Ethics, and Christian Friendship . By Jason ReimerGreig. Pp. viii, 296, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Press, 2015, £23.00. [REVIEW]Luke Penkett - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (4):662-662.
  38.  21
    Ethical Management in the Hotel Sector: Creating an Authentic Work Experience for Workers with Intellectual Disabilities.Hannah Meacham, Jillian Cavanagh, Timothy Bartram & Jennifer Laing - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (3):823-835.
    The study examines the employment experience of workers with intellectual disability in the hotel sector in Australia. Through a qualitative case study, we interviewed managers and WWID, and held focus groups with supervisors and colleagues at three hotels. We have used the theoretical framework of corporate social responsibility to investigate HR practices that create an ethical climate which promote authentic work experiences for WWID. The study found that participative work practices provide evidence of how WWID fit in at (...)
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  39.  20
    Justice and Intellectual Disability In A Pandemic.Ryan H. Nelson & Leslie P. Francis - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 30 (3):319-338.
    If the COVID-19 crisis has brought any benefits, one is the increased attention paid to persons with disabilities in the contexts of clinical medicine and public health. There has been a great deal of insightful discussion since the outbreak about controversial disability issues the pandemic has brought to light. For a population often overlooked in both academic circles and the public square, mere visibility is a victory. There are at least two important respects in which the discussion remains underdeveloped, (...)
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  40.  12
    The Disabled Contract: Severe Intellectual Disability, Justice, and Morality, written by Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry.Matthew Palynchuk - 2023 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 20 (3-4):386-389.
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  41.  71
    Psychometric Properties of the Zarit Burden Interview in Informal Caregivers of Persons With Intellectual Disabilities.Alicia Boluarte-Carbajal, Rubí Paredes-Angeles & Arnold Alejandro Tafur-Mendoza - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13:792805.
    Intellectual disability leads to a loss of autonomy and a high level of dependence, requiring support from another person permanently. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate the assessment of caregiver burden in healthcare actions, to avoid putting the health of caregivers and patients at risk. In this sense, the study aimed to analyze the internal structure of the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) in a sample of caregivers of people with intellectual disabilities, to provide convergent and discriminant evidence (...)
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  42.  12
    Citizenship of persons with intellectual disabilities within the frame of inclusive research: A scoping review of studies to inform future research.Anna Chalachanová, Inger Marie Lid & Anita Gjermestad - 2021 - Alter - European Journal of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche Sur le Handicap 15 (2):139-152.
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  43.  14
    Life Stories, Intellectual Disability, Cultural Heritage and Ethics: Dilemmas in Researching and (re) presenting Accounts from the Scottish Highlands.Karrie Marshall & Liz Tilley - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (4):1-10.
  44.  57
    Substitute Decision-Making for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Residential Care: Learning Through Experience.Michael C. Dunn, Isabel C. H. Clare & Anthony J. Holland - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (1):52-64.
    In the UK, current policies and services for people with mental disorders, including those with intellectual disabilities (ID), presume that these men and women can, do, and should, make decisions for themselves. The new Mental Capacity Act (England and Wales) 2005 (MCA) sets this presumption into statute, and codifies how decisions relating to health and welfare should be made for those adults judged unable to make one or more such decisions autonomously. The MCA uses a procedural checklist to guide (...)
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  45.  11
    Ethics in caregiving services for people with serious intellectual disabilities.Begoña Román - 2010 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):121-142.
    This article questions the reason behind ethics in caregiving services for people with serious intellectual disabilities, the reasons changes have taken place in medicine, in the kinds of illnesses, social changes and changes in how hospitality is envisioned, which lead us to reconsider the usual way of doing things, the traditional morals on which their treatment has been based. However, the traditional ways of dealing with those disabled individuals have also become obsolete and are ethically reproachable: based on charity (...)
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  46. Pastoral Care and Intellectual Disability: A Person-Centered Approach.[author unknown] - 2017
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  47.  16
    An exploration of the practice, policy and legislative issues of the specialist area of nursing people with intellectual disability: A scoping review.Kate O'Reilly, Peter Lewis, Michele Wiese, Linda Goddard, Henrietta Trip, Jenny Conder, David Charnock, Zhen Lin, Hayden Jaques & Nathan J. Wilson - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (4):e12258.
    The specialist field of intellectual disability nursing has been subjected to a number of changes since the move towards deinstitutionalisation from the 1970s. Government policies sought to change the nature of the disability workforce from what was labelled as a medicalised approach, towards a more socially oriented model of support. Decades on however, many nurses who specialise in the care of people with intellectual disability are still employed. In Australia, the advent of the National (...) Insurance Scheme offers an apt moment to reflect upon these decades of specialised nursing care as the context of this nursing care will continue to evolve. A review of the published literature was conducted to explore what has shaped the field in the past and how this might inform the future of this speciality area under new policy and service contexts. People with intellectual disability have specific health and support needs that require a specialised workforce. Specialist nurses continue to be needed for people with intellectual disability. (shrink)
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  48.  83
    Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability in advance.Andria Bianchi - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  49. Addressing cognitive vulnerabilities through genome and epigenome editing : techno-legal adaptations for persons with intellectual disabilities.Pin Lean Lau - 2022 - In Santa Slokenberga, Timo Minssen & Ana Nordberg (eds.), Governing, protecting, and regulating the future of genome editing: the significance of ELSPI perspectives. Boston: Brill/Nijhoff.
     
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  50.  41
    Conceptualizing the impact of moral case deliberation: a multiple-case study in a health care institution for people with intellectual disabilities.A. C. Molewijk, J. L. P. van Gurp & J. C. de Snoo-Trimp - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundAs moral case deliberations (MCDs) have increasingly been implemented in health care institutions as a form of ethics support, it is relevant to know whether and how MCDs actually contribute to positive changes in care. Insight is needed on what actually happens in daily care practice following MCD sessions. This study aimed at investigating the impact of MCD and exploring how ‘impact of MCD’ should be conceptualized for future research.MethodsA multiple-case study was conducted in a care organization for people with (...)
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