Results for 'intellectual disability'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  18
    Autism, Intellectual Disability, and a Challenge to Our Understanding of Proxy Consent.Abraham Graber - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):229-236.
    This paper focuses on a hypothetical case that represents an intervention request familiar to those who work with individuals with intellectual disability. Stacy has autism and moderate intellectual disability. Her parents have requested treatment for her hand flapping. Stacy is not competent to make her own treatment decisions; proxy consent is required. There are three primary justifications for proxy consent: the right to an open future, substituted judgment, and the best interest standard. The right to an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  29
    The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Indiana University Press.
    In a challenge to current thinking about cognitive impairment, this book explores what it means to treat people with intellectual disabilities in an ethical manner.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  3.  11
    Intellectual Disability, Brain Damage, and Group-to-Individual Inferences.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 2018 - Balkan Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):5-16.
    In this essay, I home in on the difficulties with group-to-individual inferences in neuroscience and how they impact the legal system. I briefly outline how cognitive shortcutting can distort legal decisions, and then turn my attention to G2i inferences, with a special focus on issues of intellectual disability and brain damage. I argue that judges and juries are not situated to appreciate the nuances in brain data and that they are required to make clinical decisions without clinical training. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  31
    Metaepistemic Injustice and Intellectual Disability: A Pluralist Account of Epistemic Agency.Amandine Catala - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (5):755-776.
    The literature on epistemic injustice currently displays a logocentric or propositional bias that excludes people with intellectual disabilities from the scope of epistemic agency and the demands of epistemic justice. This paper develops an account of epistemic agency and injustice that is inclusive of both people with and people without intellectual disabilities. I begin by specifying the hitherto undertheorized notion of epistemic agency. I develop a broader, pluralist account of epistemic agency, which relies on a conception of knowledge (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  22
    Sterilization, Intellectual Disability, and Some Ethical and Methodological Challenges: It Shouldn't Be a Secret.Guðrún V. Stefánsdóttir & Eygló Ebba Hreinsdóttir - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):302-308.
    This article discusses the experience of an Icelandic woman with intellectual disabilities who was sterilized and how she has dealt with it. It also reflects on some ethical and methodological issues that arise during inclusive life history research. The article is based on cooperation between two women, Eygló Ebba Hreinsdóttir, who was labelled with intellectual disabilities when she moved to an institution in Iceland in the 1970s, and the researcher Gu?rún V. Stefánsdóttir. Since 2003 we have worked closely (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  50
    Philosophical Inclusive Design: Intellectual Disability and the Limits of Individual Autonomy in Moral and Political Theory.Laura Davy - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):132-148.
    Drawing on the built environment concept of “inclusive design” and its emphasis on creating accessible environments for all persons regardless of ability, I suggest that a central task for feminist disability theory is to redesign foundational philosophical concepts to present opportunities rather than barriers to inclusion for people with disability. Accounts of autonomy within liberal philosophy stress self-determination and the dignity of all individual persons, but have excluded people with intellectual disability from moral and political theories (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7. Intellectual Disability, Sensation, and Thinking Through Affect.Anna Hickey-Moody - 2008 - In Anna Hickey-Moody & Peta Malins (eds.), Deleuzian Encounters: Studies in Contemporary Social Issues. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  65
    Philosophers of Intellectual Disability: A Taxonomy.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):552-566.
  9.  56
    Moral Worth and Severe Intellectual Disability – A Hybrid View.Benjamin L. Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2013 - In Jerome E. Bickenbach, Franziska Felder & Barbara Schmitz (eds.), Disability and the Good Human Life. Cambridge University Press. pp. 19-49.
    Consider: You can save either a human or a normal adult dog from a burning building (with no risk to yourself and at little cost), but not both. However, the human is a human with a severe intellectually disability (or, as we shall say, a “SID”). -/- Which one should you save? There is disagreement in the literature about which this issue. Two opposing camps exist, which we call “the intrinsic property camp ” and “the special relations camp.” Those (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  46
    Are Persons with Profound Intellectual Disabilities Sacramental Icons of Heavenly Life? Aquinas on Impairment.John Berkman - 2013 - Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (1):83-96.
    Although almost completely ignored, Aquinas’s account of persons with severe intellectual disabilities is key to his understanding of human persons and their salvation. Aquinas extensively addresses questions of human impairment, and for Aquinas physical and mental impairment are not nearly as important as moral or spiritual impairment. Contrary to those who focus on Aquinas’s account of rationality and suppose he thinks that a person must exercise rationality in order to be moral and in the image of God, Aquinas’s view (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  25
    The Moral Status of Intellectually Disabled Individuals.S. D. Edwards - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (1):29-42.
    The moral status accorded to an individual (or class of individuals) helps to account for the weight of the moral obligations considered due to an individual (or class of individuals). Strong arguments can be given to indicate that the moral status accorded, justly or unjustly, to individuals with intellectual disabilities is less than that accorded to those considered intellectually able. This paper suggests that such a view of the moral status of intellectually disabled individuals derives from individualism. Ontological and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Assistive Technology, Telecare and People with Intellectual Disabilities: Ethical Considerations.J. Perry, S. Beyer & S. Holm - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):81-86.
    Increasingly, commissioners and providers of services for people with intellectual disabilities are turning to assistive technology and telecare as a potential solution to the problem of the increased demand for services, brought about by an expanding population of people with intellectual disabilities in the context of relatively static or diminishing resources. While there are numerous potential benefits of assistive technology and telecare, both for service providers and service users, there are also a number of ethical issues. The aim (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  13.  19
    Irresponsible Love: Rethinking Intellectual Disability, Humanity and the Church1.Medi Ann Volpe - 2009 - Modern Theology 25 (3):491-501.
    This review essay considers three recent studies at the intersection of theology and intellectual disability. All three authors work out constructive proposals against a background of literature in which Nancy Eiesland and Stanley Hauerwas are central. Each explores the nature of intellectual disability through interdisciplinary study and draws this work into conversation with classical Christian theology. The essay welcomes these three books, and also suggests ways in which their constructive proposals might be strengthened. In particular, their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Intellectual Disability: Ethics, Dehumanization and a New Moral Community.Heather E. Keith - 2013 - J. Wiley.
    Intellectual Disability: Ethics, Dehumanization, and a New Moral Community presents an interdisciplinary exploration of the roots and evolution of the dehumanization of people with intellectual disabilities. Examines the roots of disability ethics from a psychological, philosophical, and educational perspective Presents a coherent, sustained moral perspective in examining the historical dehumanization of people with diminished cognitive abilities Includes a series of narratives and case descriptions to illustrate arguments Reveals the importance of an interdisciplinary understanding of the social (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  55
    Is It in the Best Interests of an Intellectually Disabled Infant to Die?D. Wilkinson - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):454-459.
    One of the most contentious ethical issues in the neonatal intensive care unit is the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment from infants who may otherwise survive. In practice, one of the most important factors influencing this decision is the prediction that the infant will be severely intellectually disabled. Most professional guidelines suggest that decisions should be made on the basis of the best interests of the infant. It is, however, not clear how intellectual disability affects those interests. Why should (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  16.  96
    A Moorean Argument for the Full Moral Status of Those with Profound Intellectual Disability.Benjamin Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):41-45.
    This paper is about the moral status of those human beings with profound intellectual disabilities (PIDs). We hold the common sense view that they have equal status to ‘normal’ human beings, and a higher status than any non-human animal. We start with an admission, however: we don’t know how to give a fully satisfying theoretical account of the grounds of moral status that explains this view. And in fact, not only do we not know how to give such an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  49
    Substitute Decision-Making for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Residential Care: Learning Through Experience.Michael C. Dunn, Isabel C. H. Clare & Anthony J. Holland - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (1):52-64.
    In the UK, current policies and services for people with mental disorders, including those with intellectual disabilities (ID), presume that these men and women can, do, and should, make decisions for themselves. The new Mental Capacity Act (England and Wales) 2005 (MCA) sets this presumption into statute, and codifies how decisions relating to health and welfare should be made for those adults judged unable to make one or more such decisions autonomously. The MCA uses a procedural checklist to guide (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18.  16
    Intellectual Disability and Mystical Unknowing: Contemporary Insights From Medieval Sources.Erinn Staley - 2012 - Modern Theology 28 (3):385-401.
    Intellectual disabilities make people vulnerable to marginalization in churches and social spaces, but theology has not sufficiently attended to the topic and promoted the flourishing of people who have cognitive impairments. This article responds to theology's inadequate attention to intellectual disability and historical resources for reflection on the topic by reading medieval sources with intellectual disability in mind. I argue that Bonaventure's Itinerarium Mentis in Deum provides a model for imagining intellectually disabled and nondisabled people (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  26
    Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide for People with an Intellectual Disability and/or Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Examination of Nine Relevant Euthanasia Cases in the Netherlands.Irene Tuffrey-Wijne, Leopold Curfs, Ilora Finlay & Sheila Hollins - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):17.
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have been legally possible in the Netherlands since 2001, provided that statutory due care criteria are met, including: voluntary and well-considered request; unbearable suffering without prospect of improvement; informing the patient; lack of a reasonable alternative; independent second physician’s opinion. ‘Unbearable suffering’ must have a medical basis, either somatic or psychiatric, but there is no requirement of limited life expectancy. All EAS cases must be reported and are scrutinised by regional review committees. The purpose of this (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  2
    Intellectual Disability, Sexual Assault, and Empowerment.Virginia L. Warren - 2019 - In Wanda Teays (ed.), Analyzing Violence Against Women. Springer. pp. 51-61.
    Girls and women with intellectual disabilities, such as Down syndrome, have a shockingly high rate of rape and sexual assault—12 times the rate of persons without disabilities. The perpetrators are often caretakers, who repeatedly violate them. Empowerment is a better framework than autonomy to address this crisis. A conception of autonomy common in healthcare is individualistic and stresses rationality. It may disempower those deemed not competent to make autonomous decisions. By contrast, empowerment calls for changes that are nuanced, political, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  16
    Intellectual Disability, Choice, and Relational Ethics.Henry Somers-Hall - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):377-380.
    In ‘Liberal individualism and Deleuzean Relationality,’ Clegg, Murphy, and Almack argue that the ability to choose has become something of a dogma in the management of intellectual disability, and one that sits badly with the heterogeneity of those with intellectual disabilities. They argue for a move away from choice as the primary ethical category to an ethics of relationality, following from the work of Deleuze and Guattari, to offer a more nuanced and stable form of care. In (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Profound Intellectual Disability and the Bestowment View of Moral Status.Simo Vehmas & Benjamin Curtis - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):505-516.
    This article engages with debates concerning the moral worth of human beings with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMDs). Some argue that those with such disabilities are morally less valuable than so-called normal human beings, whereas others argue that all human beings have equal moral value and so each group of humans ought to be treated with equal concern. We will argue in favor of a reconciliatory view that takes points from opposing camps in the debates about the moral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  19
    Privacy Challenges in Smart Homes for People with Dementia and People with Intellectual Disabilities.Fiachra O’Brolcháin & Bert Gordijn - 2019 - Ethics and Information Technology 21 (3):253-265.
    The aim of this paper is to analyse the ethical issues relating to privacy that arise in smart homes designed for people with dementia and for people with intellectual disabilities. We outline five different conceptual perspectives on privacy and detail the ways in which smart home technologies may violate residents’ privacy. We specify these privacy threats in a number of areas and under a variety of conceptions of privacy. Furthermore, we illustrate that informed consent may not provide a solution (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  57
    Supported Decision‐Making and Personal Autonomy for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Nandini Devi - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):792-806.
    Making decisions is an important component of everyday living, and issues surrounding autonomy and self-determination are crucial for persons with intellectual disabilities. Article 12 (Equal Recognition before the Law) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities addresses this issue of decision-making for persons with disabilities: the recognition of legal capacity. Legal capacity means recognizing the right to make decisions for oneself. Article 12 is also moving in the direction of supported decision-making, as an alternative to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25.  24
    Supported Decision-Making and Personal Autonomy for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Nandini Devi - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):792-806.
    Making decisions is an important component of everyday living, and issues surrounding autonomy and self-determination are crucial for persons with intellectual disabilities. Adults with intellectual disabilities are characterized by the limitations in their intellectual functioning and in their adaptive behavior, which compromises three skill types, and this starts before the age of 18. Though persons with intellectual disabilities are characterized by having these limitations, they are thought to face significant decisionmaking challenges due to their disability. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26.  10
    Ethical Management in the Hotel Sector: Creating an Authentic Work Experience for Workers with Intellectual Disabilities.Hannah Meacham, Jillian Cavanagh, Timothy Bartram & Jennifer Laing - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (3):823-835.
    The study examines the employment experience of workers with intellectual disability in the hotel sector in Australia. Through a qualitative case study, we interviewed managers and WWID, and held focus groups with supervisors and colleagues at three hotels. We have used the theoretical framework of corporate social responsibility to investigate HR practices that create an ethical climate which promote authentic work experiences for WWID. The study found that participative work practices provide evidence of how WWID fit in at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  9
    A Case for Greater Risk Tolerance in Internet Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Comment on Chalghoumi Et Al.David Wasserman - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):223-226.
    This comment argues for increased tolerance of privacy risks in the Internet activity of adults with intellectual disabilities. Excessive caution about such risks denies those individuals not only the great benefits of Internet use but also the difficult but valuable experiences of loss, disappointment, and hurt associated with those risks. A level of risk-aversion appropriate for small children will be disrespectful for adults with intellectual disabilities. To the extent that additional safeguards are justified, they are better achieved through (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  11
    Reconsidering Intellectual Disability: L’Arche, Medical Ethics, and Christian Friendship. By Jason Reimer Greig. Pp. Viii, 296, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Press, 2015, £23.00. [REVIEW]Luke Penkett - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (4):662-662.
  29.  4
    Reconsidering Intellectual Disability: L'Arche, Medical Ethics, and Christian Friendship by Jason Reimer Greig , + 304 Pp. [REVIEW]Michael Buttrey - 2016 - Modern Theology 32 (4):664-666.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Reconsidering Intellectual Disability: L’Arche, Medical Ethics, and Christian Friendship.[author unknown] - 2015
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Intellectual Disabilities Behavior Under the Lens of Embodied Cognition Approaches.J. Walter Tolentino-Castro & Markus Raab - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  17
    The Logic of Deferral: Educational Aims and Intellectual Disability.Ashley Taylor - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (3):265-285.
    The educational aims described by educational philosophers rarely embrace the full range of differences in intellectual ability, adaptive behavior, or communication that children exhibit. Because envisioned educational aims have significant consequences for how educational practices, pedagogy, and curricula are conceptualized, the failure to acknowledge and embrace differences in ability leaves open the question of the extent to which students with intellectual disabilities are subject to the same aims as their “typically-developing” peers. In articulating and defending valued aims of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  22
    Exploring the Ethical Underpinnings of Self-Advocacy Support for Intellectually Disabled Adults.Rohhss Chapman & Liz Tilley - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):257-271.
    Self-advocacy organisations support people in a wide range of political activities, alongside providing key social networks. The emergence of formalised self-advocacy for intellectually disabled people marked an important cultural shift. These groups soon became associated with the pursuit of social change and the attainment of rights. The role of the self-advocacy support worker, working together with self-advocates, has been pivotal. However, studies have shown there has been concern over the relationship between self-advocates and those who advise or support them. Both (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  7
    Compensation of Intellectual Disability in a Relational Dialogue on Down Syndrome.Fabiola Ribeiro de Souza & Silviane Bonaccorsi Barbato - 2020 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 21 (1):49-68.
    The historical-cultural theory of Intellectual Disability overcompensation/compensation is referenced in several studies, but little empirical evidence is presented to corroborate this thesis. In this work, 13 current studies were analysed about the behavioural profile of people with Down syndrome, a case of neurobiological ID, published in the last 15 years, in order to verify the possibility of dialogue with the theorizing about compensation. Despite contributing to an up to date understanding of DS, the results point to similarities between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Understanding Autonomy in Light of Intellectual Disability.Leslie P. Francis - 2009 - In Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.), Disability and Disadvantage. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  36.  14
    Negotiating Mutuality and Agency in Care-Giving Relationships with Women with Intellectual Disabilities.Pamela Cushing & Tanya Lewis - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):173-193.
    This article is an ethnographic analysis of the mutuality that is possible in relationships between caregivers and women with intellectual disabilities who live together in L'Arche homes. Creating mutuality through which both parties grow and exercise agency requires that caregivers learn to negotiate delicate power relations connected to the physics of care and to reframe dominant stereotypes of disability. This helps them to support the women with intellectual disabilities to name and achieve their desires.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  37.  4
    Ethical Considerations in Qualitative Case Study Research Recruiting Participants with Profound Intellectual Disabilities.David Haines - 2017 - Research Ethics 13 (3-4):219-232.
    Drawing on the author’s experience carrying out qualitative research in the field of occupational therapy with people with intellectual disabilities, this article explores ethical issues inherent in ethnographic and case study research, where study designs can evolve over time. Such qualitative methodologies can enable deep understanding of research topics, but detailed description of methods and of the range of potential experiences participants may have is necessary to ensure that they are fully informed and ethics committees satisfied. Thorough consideration is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  75
    Negotiating Mutuality and Agency in Care-Giving Relationships with Women with Intellectual Disabilities.Pamela Cushing & Tanya Lewis - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):173-193.
    : This article is an ethnographic analysis of the mutuality that is possible in relationships between caregivers and women with intellectual disabilities who live together in L'Arche homes. Creating mutuality through which both parties grow and exercise agency requires that caregivers learn to negotiate delicate power relations connected to the physics of care and to reframe dominant stereotypes of disability. This helps them to support the women with intellectual disabilities to name and achieve their desires.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  5
    Demographic and Parental Factors Associated With Developmental Outcomes in Children With Intellectual Disabilities.Rosa Vilaseca, Magda Rivero, Rosa M. Bersabé, María-José Cantero, Esperanza Navarro-Pardo, Clara Valls-Vidal & Fina Ferrer - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  22
    Surrogate Medical Decision Making on Behalf of a Never-Competent, Profoundly Intellectually Disabled Patient Who is Acutely Ill.Arvind Venkat - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):71.
    With the improvements in medical care and resultant increase in life expectancy of the intellectually disabled, it will become more common for healthcare providers to be confronted by ethical dilemmas in the care of this patient population. Many of the dilemmas will focus on what is in the best interest of patients who have never been able to express their wishes with regard to medical and end-of-life care and who should be empowered to exercise surrogate medical decision-making authority on their (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  30
    Autonomy and Professional Responsibility in Care for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities.Herman P. Meininger - 2001 - Nursing Philosophy 2 (3):240–250.
  42.  10
    Considering the Boundaries of Intellectual Disability: Using Philosophy of Science to Make Sense of Borderline Cases.Veerle Garrels - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology:1-17.
    Who should be diagnosed with intellectual disability and who should not? For borderline cases, the answer to this question may be as difficult to decide on as determining the borderline between being bald or not. While going bald may be upsetting to some, it is also an inevitable and relatively undramatic course of nature. In contrast, getting a diagnosis of intellectual disability is likely to have more far-reaching consequences. This makes the question of where the cutoff (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  34
    The Effectiveness of Working Memory Training with Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities – a Meta-Analytic Review.Henrik Danielsson, Valentina Zottarel, Lisa Palmqvist & Silvia Lanfranchi - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  57
    Ethical Challenges in the Treatment of Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities.Sara E. Boyd & Zachary W. Adams - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (6):407-418.
    The effective provision of psychotherapy services to individuals with intellectual disability requires consideration of ethical issues related to clinical competence, access to services, obligations to multiple parties, guardianship, and appropriate assessment practices. This article provides an overview of major ethical considerations with guidance for clarifying and resolving common ethical concerns. Psychologists are encouraged to expand access to psychotherapy services for this population while maintaining awareness of potential modifications, training needs, and boundaries of professional competence. The authors provide recommendations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Review Essay of Racism and Sexual Oppression in Anglo-America: A Genealogy by Ladelle McWhorter and The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections by Licia Carlson. [REVIEW]Shelley Tremain - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):440-445.
  46.  5
    Citizenship of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Within the Frame of Inclusive Research: A Scoping Review of Studies to Inform Future Research.Anna Chalachanová, Inger Marie Lid & Anita Gjermestad - 2021 - Alter - European Journal of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche Sur le Handicap 15 (2):139-152.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  16
    Including Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Who Lack Capacity to Consent in Research.Julie Calveley - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):558-567.
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 has stipulated that in England and Wales the ethical implications of carrying out research with people who are unable to consent must be considered alongside the ethical implications of excluding them from research altogether. This paper describes the methods that were used to enable people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities, who lacked capacity, to participate in a study that examined their experience of receiving intimate care. The safeguards that were put in place to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Disabled Contract: Severe Intellectual Disability, Justice and Morality.Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    Social contract theories generally predicate the authority of rules that govern society on the idea that these rules are the product of a contractual agreement struck between members of society. These theories embody values, such as equality, reciprocity and rationality, that are highly prized within our culture. Yet a closer inspection reveals that these features exclude other important values, relations and even persons from the realm of contractual morality and justice, especially people with severe intellectual disabilities. Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry explores (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  40
    Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability.Andria Bianchi - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:107-121.
    Respect for autonomy grounds common ethical judgments about why people should be allowed to make decisions for themselves. Under this assumption, it is concerning that a number of feminist conceptions of autonomy present challenges for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper explores some of the most philosophically influential feminist accounts of autonomy and demonstrates how these accounts exclude persons with intellectual disabilities. As a possible solution to these accounts, Laura Davy’s inclusive design approach is presented, which is a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  10
    The Experiences of People with Dementia and Intellectual Disabilities with Surveillance Technologies in Residential Care.A. R. Niemeijer, M. F. Depla, B. J. Frederiks & C. M. Hertogh - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (3):307-320.
1 — 50 / 1000