Results for 'intellectual disability'

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  1. Profound Intellectual Disability and the Bestowment View of Moral Status.Simo Vehmas & Benjamin Curtis - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):505-516.
    This article engages with debates concerning the moral worth of human beings with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMDs). Some argue that those with such disabilities are morally less valuable than so-called normal human beings, whereas others argue that all human beings have equal moral value and so each group of humans ought to be treated with equal concern. We will argue in favor of a reconciliatory view that takes points from opposing camps in the debates about the moral (...)
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  2.  9
    Why Intellectual Disability Poses a Challenge to the Received View of Capacity and a Potential Response.Abraham Graber & Andy Kreusel - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (1):117-136.
    While copious quantities of ink have been spilled on the topic of autonomy in the context of health care, little has been written about autonomy in relation to intellectual disability. After presenting the received account of capacity, we argue that it cannot account for the moral permissibility of limiting an individual with intellectual disability’s access to diet soda. In cases of preventative medicine and intellectual disability, the philosophical motivation for the received account of capacity (...)
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  3.  1
    Intellectual Disability: Ethics, Dehumanization and a New Moral Community.Heather E. Keith - 2013 - J. Wiley.
    Intellectual Disability: Ethics, Dehumanization, and a New Moral Community presents an interdisciplinary exploration of the roots and evolution of the dehumanization of people with intellectual disabilities. Examines the roots of disability ethics from a psychological, philosophical, and educational perspective Presents a coherent, sustained moral perspective in examining the historical dehumanization of people with diminished cognitive abilities Includes a series of narratives and case descriptions to illustrate arguments Reveals the importance of an interdisciplinary understanding of the social (...)
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  4.  57
    Metaepistemic Injustice and Intellectual Disability: A Pluralist Account of Epistemic Agency.Amandine Catala - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (5):755-776.
    The literature on epistemic injustice currently displays a logocentric or propositional bias that excludes people with intellectual disabilities from the scope of epistemic agency and the demands of epistemic justice. This paper develops an account of epistemic agency and injustice that is inclusive of both people with and people without intellectual disabilities. I begin by specifying the hitherto undertheorized notion of epistemic agency. I develop a broader, pluralist account of epistemic agency, which relies on a conception of knowledge (...)
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  5.  2
    Why Intellectual Disability is Not Mere Difference.James B. Gould - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (3):495-509.
    A key question in disability studies, philosophy, and bioethics concerns the relationship between disability and well-being. The mere difference view, endorsed by Elizabeth Barnes, claims that physical and sensory disabilities by themselves do not make a person worse off overall—any negative impacts on welfare are due to social injustice. This article argues that Barnes’s Value Neutral Model does not extend to intellectual disability. Intellectual disability is intrinsically bad—by itself it makes a person worse off, (...)
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  6.  36
    The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Indiana University Press.
    In a challenge to current thinking about cognitive impairment, this book explores what it means to treat people with intellectual disabilities in an ethical manner.
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  7.  18
    Autism, Intellectual Disability, and a Challenge to Our Understanding of Proxy Consent.Abraham Graber - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):229-236.
    This paper focuses on a hypothetical case that represents an intervention request familiar to those who work with individuals with intellectual disability. Stacy has autism and moderate intellectual disability. Her parents have requested treatment for her hand flapping. Stacy is not competent to make her own treatment decisions; proxy consent is required. There are three primary justifications for proxy consent: the right to an open future, substituted judgment, and the best interest standard. The right to an (...)
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  8.  13
    Intellectual Disability, Brain Damage, and Group-to-Individual Inferences.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 2018 - Balkan Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):5-16.
    In this essay, I home in on the difficulties with group-to-individual inferences in neuroscience and how they impact the legal system. I briefly outline how cognitive shortcutting can distort legal decisions, and then turn my attention to G2i inferences, with a special focus on issues of intellectual disability and brain damage. I argue that judges and juries are not situated to appreciate the nuances in brain data and that they are required to make clinical decisions without clinical training. (...)
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  9. Reconsidering Intellectual Disability: L’Arche, Medical Ethics, and Christian Friendship.[author unknown] - 2015
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  10.  14
    Justice and Intellectual Disability In A Pandemic.Ryan H. Nelson & Leslie P. Francis - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 30 (3):319-338.
    If the COVID-19 crisis has brought any benefits, one is the increased attention paid to persons with disabilities in the contexts of clinical medicine and public health. There has been a great deal of insightful discussion since the outbreak about controversial disability issues the pandemic has brought to light. For a population often overlooked in both academic circles and the public square, mere visibility is a victory. There are at least two important respects in which the discussion remains underdeveloped, (...)
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  11.  24
    Sterilization, Intellectual Disability, and Some Ethical and Methodological Challenges: It Shouldn't Be a Secret.Guðrún V. Stefánsdóttir & Eygló Ebba Hreinsdóttir - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):302-308.
    This article discusses the experience of an Icelandic woman with intellectual disabilities who was sterilized and how she has dealt with it. It also reflects on some ethical and methodological issues that arise during inclusive life history research. The article is based on cooperation between two women, Eygló Ebba Hreinsdóttir, who was labelled with intellectual disabilities when she moved to an institution in Iceland in the 1970s, and the researcher Gu?rún V. Stefánsdóttir. Since 2003 we have worked closely (...)
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  12.  55
    Philosophical Inclusive Design: Intellectual Disability and the Limits of Individual Autonomy in Moral and Political Theory.Laura Davy - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):132-148.
    Drawing on the built environment concept of “inclusive design” and its emphasis on creating accessible environments for all persons regardless of ability, I suggest that a central task for feminist disability theory is to redesign foundational philosophical concepts to present opportunities rather than barriers to inclusion for people with disability. Accounts of autonomy within liberal philosophy stress self-determination and the dignity of all individual persons, but have excluded people with intellectual disability from moral and political theories (...)
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  13.  20
    Intellectual Disability and Mystical Unknowing: Contemporary Insights From Medieval Sources.Erinn Staley - 2012 - Modern Theology 28 (3):385-401.
    Intellectual disabilities make people vulnerable to marginalization in churches and social spaces, but theology has not sufficiently attended to the topic and promoted the flourishing of people who have cognitive impairments. This article responds to theology's inadequate attention to intellectual disability and historical resources for reflection on the topic by reading medieval sources with intellectual disability in mind. I argue that Bonaventure's Itinerarium Mentis in Deum provides a model for imagining intellectually disabled and nondisabled people (...)
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  14. Intellectual Disability, Sensation, and Thinking Through Affect.Anna Hickey-Moody - 2008 - In Anna Hickey-Moody & Peta Malins (eds.), Deleuzian Encounters: Studies in Contemporary Social Issues. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  15.  68
    Philosophers of Intellectual Disability: A Taxonomy.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):552-566.
  16.  16
    Intellectual Disability, Choice, and Relational Ethics.Henry Somers-Hall - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):377-380.
    In ‘Liberal individualism and Deleuzean Relationality,’ Clegg, Murphy, and Almack argue that the ability to choose has become something of a dogma in the management of intellectual disability, and one that sits badly with the heterogeneity of those with intellectual disabilities. They argue for a move away from choice as the primary ethical category to an ethics of relationality, following from the work of Deleuze and Guattari, to offer a more nuanced and stable form of care. In (...)
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  17.  3
    Intellectual Disability, Sexual Assault, and Empowerment.Virginia L. Warren - 2019 - In Wanda Teays (ed.), Analyzing Violence Against Women. Springer. pp. 51-61.
    Girls and women with intellectual disabilities, such as Down syndrome, have a shockingly high rate of rape and sexual assault—12 times the rate of persons without disabilities. The perpetrators are often caretakers, who repeatedly violate them. Empowerment is a better framework than autonomy to address this crisis. A conception of autonomy common in healthcare is individualistic and stresses rationality. It may disempower those deemed not competent to make autonomous decisions. By contrast, empowerment calls for changes that are nuanced, political, (...)
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  18. Moral Worth and Severe Intellectual Disability – A Hybrid View.Benjamin L. Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2013 - In Jerome E. Bickenbach, Franziska Felder & Barbara Schmitz (eds.), Disability and the Good Human Life. Cambridge University Press. pp. 19-49.
    Consider: You can save either a human or a normal adult dog from a burning building (with no risk to yourself and at little cost), but not both. However, the human is a human with a severe intellectually disability (or, as we shall say, a “SID”). -/- Which one should you save? There is disagreement in the literature about which this issue. Two opposing camps exist, which we call “the intrinsic property camp ” and “the special relations camp.” Those (...)
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  19. Intellectual Disabilities Behavior Under the Lens of Embodied Cognition Approaches.J. Walter Tolentino-Castro & Markus Raab - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
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  20.  11
    Reconsidering Intellectual Disability: L’Arche, Medical Ethics, and Christian Friendship. By Jason Reimer Greig. Pp. Viii, 296, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Press, 2015, £23.00. [REVIEW]Luke Penkett - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (4):662-662.
  21.  26
    The Moral Status of Intellectually Disabled Individuals.S. D. Edwards - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (1):29-42.
    The moral status accorded to an individual (or class of individuals) helps to account for the weight of the moral obligations considered due to an individual (or class of individuals). Strong arguments can be given to indicate that the moral status accorded, justly or unjustly, to individuals with intellectual disabilities is less than that accorded to those considered intellectually able. This paper suggests that such a view of the moral status of intellectually disabled individuals derives from individualism. Ontological and (...)
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  22.  9
    Compensation of Intellectual Disability in a Relational Dialogue on Down Syndrome.Fabiola Ribeiro de Souza & Silviane Bonaccorsi Barbato - 2020 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 21 (1):49-68.
    The historical-cultural theory of Intellectual Disability overcompensation/compensation is referenced in several studies, but little empirical evidence is presented to corroborate this thesis. In this work, 13 current studies were analysed about the behavioural profile of people with Down syndrome, a case of neurobiological ID, published in the last 15 years, in order to verify the possibility of dialogue with the theorizing about compensation. Despite contributing to an up to date understanding of DS, the results point to similarities between (...)
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  23. A Moorean Argument for the Full Moral Status of Those with Profound Intellectual Disability.Benjamin Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):41-45.
    This paper is about the moral status of those human beings with profound intellectual disabilities (PIDs). We hold the common sense view that they have equal status to ‘normal’ human beings, and a higher status than any non-human animal. We start with an admission, however: we don’t know how to give a fully satisfying theoretical account of the grounds of moral status that explains this view. And in fact, not only do we not know how to give such an (...)
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  24.  4
    Reconsidering Intellectual Disability: L'Arche, Medical Ethics, and Christian Friendship by Jason Reimer Greig , + 304 Pp. [REVIEW]Michael Buttrey - 2016 - Modern Theology 32 (4):664-666.
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  25.  12
    Stability of Autobiographical Memory in Young People with Intellectual Disabilities.Claudia Morales, Antonio L. Manzanero, Alina Wong, Mar Gómez-Gutiérrez, Ana M. Iglesias, Susana Barón & Miguel Álvarez - 2017 - Anuario de Psicología Jurídica 27 (1):79-84.
    The present study aimed to analyze the stability of the memory of a stressful event over time in young people with mild or moderate intellectual disability. The results show a stability of the memory of what happened an hour and a week after the event in relation to the people involved, the apparatus used, and the parts of the body explored. No interaction effects were found between the stability of memory over time and the level of intellectual (...)
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  26.  14
    Priority Vaccination for Mental Illness, Developmental or Intellectual Disability.Nina Shevzov-Zebrun & Arthur L. Caplan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):510-511.
    Coronavirus vaccines have made their debut. Now, allocation practices have stepped into the spotlight. Following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, states and healthcare institutions initially prioritised healthcare personnel and elderly residents of congregant facilities; other groups at elevated risk for severe complications are now becoming eligible through locally administered programmes. The question remains, however: who else should be prioritised for immunisation? Here, we call attention to individuals institutionalised with severe mental illnesses and/or developmental or intellectual disabilities—a group (...)
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  27.  19
    Democratic Care and Intellectual Disability: More Than Maintenance.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (4):298-313.
    Joan Tronto defines care by three activities: maintaining, continuing, and repairing. These activities give care a maintenance quality, which is problematic given that caring often takes place within contexts of inequality and domination. Empirical research with paid support staff and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) illustrate these problems: care practices tend to reinforce the social exclusion of people with IDD, particularly for people with challenging behavior. Yet, support workers’ care practices can facilitate a better quality of life (...)
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  28. Review of A History of Intelligence and 'Intellectual Disability': The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe by C. F. Goodey. [REVIEW]María G. Navarro - 2013 - Seventeenth-Century News 71 (1 & 2).
    A History of Intelligence and “Intellectual Disability” examines how the concepts of intellectual ability and disability became part of psychology, medicine and biology. Focusing on the period between the Protestant Reform and 1700, this book shows that in many cases it has been accepted without scientific and psychological foundations that intelligence and disability describe natural or trans-historical realities.
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  29.  4
    The Complicated but Plain Relationship of Intellectual Disability and Well-Being.James Gould - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 3 (1):37-51.
    The common belief is that disability is bad for the person who is disabled, that it has a negative effect on well-being. Some disability rights activists and philosophers, however, assert that disability has little or no impact on how well a person’s life goes, that it is neutral with respect to flourishing. In recent articles Stephen Campbell and Joseph Stramondo, while rejecting both views, claim that we cannot make any broad generalizations about the effect of disability (...)
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  30.  1
    Criteria-Based Content Analysis in True and Simulated Victims with Intellectual Disability.Antonio L. Manzanero, M. Teresa Scott, Rocío Vallet, Javier Aróztegui & Ray Bull - 2018 - Anuario de Psicología Jurídica 29 (1):55.
    The aims of the present study were to analyse people’s natural ability to discriminate between true and false statements provided by people with intellectual disability, and the differentiating characteristics of such people’s statements using criteria-based content analysis. Thirty-three people assessed 16 true statements and 13 false statements using their normal abilities. Two other evaluators trained in CBCA evaluated the same statements. The natural evaluators differentiated between true and false statements with somewhat above-chance accuracy, even though error rate was (...)
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  31. Assistive Technology, Telecare and People with Intellectual Disabilities: Ethical Considerations.J. Perry, S. Beyer & S. Holm - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):81-86.
    Increasingly, commissioners and providers of services for people with intellectual disabilities are turning to assistive technology and telecare as a potential solution to the problem of the increased demand for services, brought about by an expanding population of people with intellectual disabilities in the context of relatively static or diminishing resources. While there are numerous potential benefits of assistive technology and telecare, both for service providers and service users, there are also a number of ethical issues. The aim (...)
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  32.  17
    Considering the Boundaries of Intellectual Disability: Using Philosophy of Science to Make Sense of Borderline Cases.Veerle Garrels - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):6-21.
    Who should be diagnosed with intellectual disability and who should not? For borderline cases, the answer to this question may be as difficult to decide on as determining the borderline between being bald or not. While going bald may be upsetting to some, it is also an inevitable and relatively undramatic course of nature. In contrast, getting a diagnosis of intellectual disability is likely to have more far-reaching consequences. This makes the question of where the cutoff (...)
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  33.  46
    Are Persons with Profound Intellectual Disabilities Sacramental Icons of Heavenly Life? Aquinas on Impairment.John Berkman - 2013 - Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (1):83-96.
    Although almost completely ignored, Aquinas’s account of persons with severe intellectual disabilities is key to his understanding of human persons and their salvation. Aquinas extensively addresses questions of human impairment, and for Aquinas physical and mental impairment are not nearly as important as moral or spiritual impairment. Contrary to those who focus on Aquinas’s account of rationality and suppose he thinks that a person must exercise rationality in order to be moral and in the image of God, Aquinas’s view (...)
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  34.  20
    Irresponsible Love: Rethinking Intellectual Disability, Humanity and the Church1.Medi Ann Volpe - 2009 - Modern Theology 25 (3):491-501.
    This review essay considers three recent studies at the intersection of theology and intellectual disability. All three authors work out constructive proposals against a background of literature in which Nancy Eiesland and Stanley Hauerwas are central. Each explores the nature of intellectual disability through interdisciplinary study and draws this work into conversation with classical Christian theology. The essay welcomes these three books, and also suggests ways in which their constructive proposals might be strengthened. In particular, their (...)
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  35.  56
    Is It in the Best Interests of an Intellectually Disabled Infant to Die?D. Wilkinson - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):454-459.
    One of the most contentious ethical issues in the neonatal intensive care unit is the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment from infants who may otherwise survive. In practice, one of the most important factors influencing this decision is the prediction that the infant will be severely intellectually disabled. Most professional guidelines suggest that decisions should be made on the basis of the best interests of the infant. It is, however, not clear how intellectual disability affects those interests. Why should (...)
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  36.  51
    Substitute Decision-Making for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Residential Care: Learning Through Experience.Michael C. Dunn, Isabel C. H. Clare & Anthony J. Holland - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (1):52-64.
    In the UK, current policies and services for people with mental disorders, including those with intellectual disabilities (ID), presume that these men and women can, do, and should, make decisions for themselves. The new Mental Capacity Act (England and Wales) 2005 (MCA) sets this presumption into statute, and codifies how decisions relating to health and welfare should be made for those adults judged unable to make one or more such decisions autonomously. The MCA uses a procedural checklist to guide (...)
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  37.  45
    Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability.Andria Bianchi - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:107-121.
    Respect for autonomy grounds common ethical judgments about why people should be allowed to make decisions for themselves. Under this assumption, it is concerning that a number of feminist conceptions of autonomy present challenges for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper explores some of the most philosophically influential feminist accounts of autonomy and demonstrates how these accounts exclude persons with intellectual disabilities. As a possible solution to these accounts, Laura Davy’s inclusive design approach is presented, which is a (...)
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  38.  1
    The Disabled Contract: Severe Intellectual Disability, Justice and Morality.Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    Social contract theories generally predicate the authority of rules that govern society on the idea that these rules are the product of a contractual agreement struck between members of society. These theories embody values, such as equality, reciprocity and rationality, that are highly prized within our culture. Yet a closer inspection reveals that these features exclude other important values, relations and even persons from the realm of contractual morality and justice, especially people with severe intellectual disabilities. Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry explores (...)
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  39.  16
    Including Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Who Lack Capacity to Consent in Research.Julie Calveley - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (4):558-567.
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 has stipulated that in England and Wales the ethical implications of carrying out research with people who are unable to consent must be considered alongside the ethical implications of excluding them from research altogether. This paper describes the methods that were used to enable people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities, who lacked capacity, to participate in a study that examined their experience of receiving intimate care. The safeguards that were put in place to (...)
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  40.  18
    2 the Limits of the Medical Model: Historical Epidemiology of Intellectual Disability in the United States Jeffrey P. Brosco.Historical Epidemiology Of Intellectual - 2010 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  41.  36
    Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide for People with an Intellectual Disability and/or Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Examination of Nine Relevant Euthanasia Cases in the Netherlands.Irene Tuffrey-Wijne, Leopold Curfs, Ilora Finlay & Sheila Hollins - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):17.
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have been legally possible in the Netherlands since 2001, provided that statutory due care criteria are met, including: voluntary and well-considered request; unbearable suffering without prospect of improvement; informing the patient; lack of a reasonable alternative; independent second physician’s opinion. ‘Unbearable suffering’ must have a medical basis, either somatic or psychiatric, but there is no requirement of limited life expectancy. All EAS cases must be reported and are scrutinised by regional review committees. The purpose of this (...)
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  42.  49
    The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections. [REVIEW]Leslie P. Francis - 2012 - Social Theory and Practice 38 (2):370-376.
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  43.  4
    The Subject of Intellectual Disability: A Reply to Clegg, Murphy, & Almack.Murray K. Simpson - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):373-376.
    As a starting point, Clegg, Murphy, and Almack contend that frameworks of policy fail both to engage with ethical theory and to fit with the complex realities of how services are delivered. Both of these points are well-supported both in their engagement with literature and in the research presented. Their Deleuzoguattarian analysis and Deleuzean ethical alternatives provide fresh and challenging insights. The key question in this rejoinder is whether their critique goes too far, or not far enough. To begin, however, (...)
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  44.  57
    Supported Decision‐Making and Personal Autonomy for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Nandini Devi - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):792-806.
    Making decisions is an important component of everyday living, and issues surrounding autonomy and self-determination are crucial for persons with intellectual disabilities. Article 12 (Equal Recognition before the Law) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities addresses this issue of decision-making for persons with disabilities: the recognition of legal capacity. Legal capacity means recognizing the right to make decisions for oneself. Article 12 is also moving in the direction of supported decision-making, as an alternative to (...)
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  45.  11
    Ethical Management in the Hotel Sector: Creating an Authentic Work Experience for Workers with Intellectual Disabilities.Hannah Meacham, Jillian Cavanagh, Timothy Bartram & Jennifer Laing - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (3):823-835.
    The study examines the employment experience of workers with intellectual disability in the hotel sector in Australia. Through a qualitative case study, we interviewed managers and WWID, and held focus groups with supervisors and colleagues at three hotels. We have used the theoretical framework of corporate social responsibility to investigate HR practices that create an ethical climate which promote authentic work experiences for WWID. The study found that participative work practices provide evidence of how WWID fit in at (...)
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  46.  14
    Negotiating Mutuality and Agency in Care-Giving Relationships with Women with Intellectual Disabilities.Pamela Cushing & Tanya Lewis - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):173-193.
    This article is an ethnographic analysis of the mutuality that is possible in relationships between caregivers and women with intellectual disabilities who live together in L'Arche homes. Creating mutuality through which both parties grow and exercise agency requires that caregivers learn to negotiate delicate power relations connected to the physics of care and to reframe dominant stereotypes of disability. This helps them to support the women with intellectual disabilities to name and achieve their desires.
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  47.  1
    Living in Nowheresville: David Hume’s Equal Power Requirement, Political Entitlements and People with Intellectual Disabilities.James B. Gould - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 1:145-173.
    Political theory contains two views of social care for people with intellectual disabilities. The favor view treats disability services as an undeserved gratuity, while the entitlement view sees them as a deserved right. This paper argues that David Hume is one philosophical source of the favor view; he bases political membership on a threshold level of mental capacity and shuts out anyone who falls below. Hume’s account, which excludes people with intellectual disabilities from justice owing to their (...)
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  48.  24
    Supported Decision-Making and Personal Autonomy for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Nandini Devi - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):792-806.
    Making decisions is an important component of everyday living, and issues surrounding autonomy and self-determination are crucial for persons with intellectual disabilities. Adults with intellectual disabilities are characterized by the limitations in their intellectual functioning and in their adaptive behavior, which compromises three skill types, and this starts before the age of 18. Though persons with intellectual disabilities are characterized by having these limitations, they are thought to face significant decisionmaking challenges due to their disability. (...)
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  49.  5
    Christian Faith, Intellectual Disability, and the Mere Difference / Bad Difference Debate.James B. Gould - 2018 - Philosophy and Theology 30 (2):447-477.
    The mere difference view, endorsed by some philosophers and Christian scholars, claims that disability by itself does not make a person worse off on balance—any negative impacts on overall welfare are due to social injustice. This article defends the bad difference view—some disability is bad not simply because of social arrangements but because of biological deficits that, by themselves, make a person worse off. It argues that the mere difference view contradicts core doctrines of Christian faith. The analysis (...)
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  50.  9
    Culpable Ignorance, Professional Counselling, and Selective Abortion of Intellectual Disability.James B. Gould - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (3):369-381.
    In this paper I argue that selective abortion for disability often involves inadequate counselling on the part of reproductive medicine professionals who advise prospective parents. I claim that prenatal disability clinicians often fail in intellectual duty—they are culpably ignorant about intellectual disability. First, I explain why a standard motivation for selective abortion is flawed. Second, I summarize recent research on parent experience with prenatal professionals. Third, I outline the notions of epistemic excellence and deficiency. Fourth, (...)
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