Results for 'language and tragedy'

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  1. Fatalities: Freedom and the Question of Language in Walter Benjamin's Reading of Tragedy.Simon Sparks - 2000 - In Miguel de Beistegui & Simon Sparks (eds.), Philosophy and Tragedy. Routledge. pp. 194--220.
     
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    Colloquial Language in Tragedy: A Supplement to the Work of P. T. Stevens.Christopher Collard - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (02):350-386.
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  3.  29
    Allan, William. The Andromache and Euripidean Tragedy. Oxford Classical Mono-Graphs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Xii+ 310 Pp. Cloth, $70. Allen, James P. Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Xiv+ 510 Pp. Numer-Ous Ills. 1 Map. Cloth, $74.95; Paper, $29.95. [REVIEW]Seth Benardete & Richard Bodéüs - 2001 - American Journal of Philology 122:151-154.
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    The Gravity of History: Language, Responsibility and Tragedy in the Middle East.Alexander Barder - 2007 - Theory and Event 10 (3).
  5.  21
    Sophocles and the language of tragedy.Luciano A. Sabattini - 2012 - Circe de Clásicos y Modernos 16 (2):192-196.
    La idea de que el cuerpo (σῶμα) es una tumba (σῆμα) donde el alma permanece encerrada cumpliendo un castigo por una antigua culpa es transmitida por Platón, quien la atribuye a los órficos. Filón de Alejandría utilizó en diversos pasajes de su obra esta metáfora de procedencia órfica. Nuestro interés consiste en analizar el sentido que Filón le asigna y el modo en que reelabora el significado que le fue asignado en la tradición órfica y en la interpretación platónica. Intentaremos (...)
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    Sophocles, Sisterhood, and IndividualitySophocles and the Language of Tragedy, by GoldhillSimon. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 296 Pp.Antigone, Interrupted, by HonigBonnie. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, 321 Pp.Private Lives, Public Deaths: Antigone and the Invention of Individuality, by StraussJonathan. New York: Fordham University Press, 2013, 216 Pp. [REVIEW]Melissa Lane - 2015 - Political Theory 43 (1):118-127.
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  7.  21
    The Language of Attic Tragedy Gudmund Björck: Das Alpha impurum und die tragische Kunstsprache. (Acta Societatis Litterarum Humaniorum Regiae Upsaliensis, 39: 1.) Pp. 392. Uppsala: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1950. Paper, 30 kr. [REVIEW]D. M. Jones - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (3-4):154-156.
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    The Language of Attic Tragedy.D. M. Jones - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (3-4):154-.
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  9. The Beginnings of Nietzsche's Theory of Language.CLAUDIA CRAWFORD - 1988 - De Gruyter.
    The Beginnings of Nietzsche's Theory of Language is concerned with the years 1865 through Winter/Spring 1870-71. Four texts of Nietzsche's, "Vom Ursprung der Sprache", "Zur Teleologie", "Zu Schopenhauer", and "Anschauung Notes", are translated into English and interpreted from the perspective of Nietzsche's developing theory of language. An examination of the major influences of Schopenhauer, Kant, Eduard von Hartmann, and Frederick A. Lange are pursued. ;Theory, in this work, does not assume that it is possible to take a position (...)
     
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  10.  22
    Forgiveness and the Limits of Language in The Shrine at Altamira.Brent Little - 2015 - Renascence 67 (3):167-180.
    Jacques Derrida’s description of forgiveness as a kind of “madness” certainly applies to John L’Heureux’s novel, The Shrine at Altamira. In the novel’s climax, forgiveness is manifested between Russell Whitaker and his son John through an incomprehensible tragedy. But although the novel harmonizes with much of Derrida’s thought, it resists a complete coherence. This article will explore the gaps between the novelistic and philosophic discourses on the subject of forgiveness. I argue that while the story painfully portrays an event (...)
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  11. The Phenomenology of Language and the Metaphysicalizing of the Real.Robert D. Stolorow & George E. Atwood - 2017 - Language and Psychoanalysis 6 (1):04-09.
    This essay joins Wilhelm Dilthey’s conception of the metaphysical impulse as a flight from the tragedy of human finitude with Ludwig Wittgenstein’s understanding of how language bewitches intelligence. We contend that there are features of the phenomenology of language that play a constitutive and pervasive role in the formation of metaphysical illusion.
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  12.  28
    Lunar Voices: Of Tragedy, Poetry, Fiction, and Thought.David Farrell Krell - 1995 - University of Chicago Press.
    David Farrell Krell reflects on nine writers and philosophers, including Heidegger, Derrida, Blanchot, and Holderlin, in a personal exploration of the meaning of sensual love, language, tragedy, and death. The moon provides a unifying image that guides Krell's development of a new poetics in which literature and philosophy become one. Krell pursues important philosophical motifs such as time, rhythm, and desire, through texts by Nietzsche, Trakl, Empedocles, Kafka, and Garcia Marquez. He surveys instances in which poets or novelists (...)
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  13. On the Common Origin of Music and Philosophy: Plato, Nietzsche, and Benjamin.Leonardo V. Distaso - 2009 - Topoi 28 (2):137-142.
    The essay shows the common ground between music and philosophy from the origin of Western philosophy to the crisis of metaphysical thinking, in particular with Nietzsche and Benjamin. At the beginning, the relationship between philosophy and music is marked by the hegemony of the word on the sound. This is the nature of the Platonic idea of music. With Nietzsche and Benjamin this hegemony is denied and a new vision of the relationship becomes possible. The sound is the origin both (...)
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  14. The Ironic Tragedy of Human Rights.Charles Blattberg - 2009 - In Patriotic Elaborations. Montreal, QC, Canada and Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen's University Press.
    With the 1948 UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the idea of human rights came into its own on the world stage. More than anything, the Declaration was a response to the Holocaust, to both its perpetrators and the failure of the rest of the world adequately to come to the aid of its victims. Since that year, however, we have seen many more cases of mass murder. Think of China, Bali, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Guatemala, the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and now (...)
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  15.  24
    Language in the Philosophy of Aristotle. [REVIEW]S. R. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):138-138.
    The author explores Aristotle’s theory of signification by contrasting it to Plato’s theory of language, which is interpreted, rather uncritically, as a theory of "natural" signification. She discusses Aristotle’s position on the meaning of sentences and sentential parts, and his theory of reference. She then considers Aristotle’s concept of philosophical language as the language of demonstration, in contrast to the saying of myths, and compares apodeixis to rhetoric and poetry. "Clarity" is required in philosophical discourse, and is (...)
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  16.  10
    Body Language in Augustine’s Confessiones and De Doctrina Christiana.Anne-Isabelle Bouton-Touboulic - 2018 - Augustinian Studies 49 (1):1-23.
    This article examines the role of bodily expressions within Augustine’s theory of signs and language. Philosophical reflection, rhetorical practice, and his own homiletical experience all led Augustine to consider the role played by the body in communicative acts. The invesitgation is sharpened via careful analysis of the rhetorical category of actio and close readings of particular passages that are relevant for Augustine’s understanding of the process of learning language in general and of learning the catechism in particular. The (...)
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  17. Between Physiology and Semiology: Language and Materiality in the Writings of Nietzsche.Wayne Klein - 1993 - Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    This dissertation examines the questions of interpretation raised by the naturalist vocabulary employed by Nietzsche in the writings of his last creative years, 1885-88. In particular, the concepts of life, physiology and nature which are central to these texts are elucidated in relation to the theory of language and rhetoric that Nietzsche developed in the early 1870's. The first chapter details the problems posed by this naturalistic vocabulary: in particular whether it justifies the interpretation of Nietzsche as a contradictory (...)
     
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  18.  59
    Fate in Greek Tragedy.Richard E. Doyle - 1972 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 47 (1):90-100.
    However much Greek tragedy was concerned with fate, it was more deeply concerned with the ways of men, the failures and achievements of human freedom.
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  19.  11
    O estatuto da linguagem no pensamento do jovem Nietzsche: Reflexões sobre a fisiologia dos fenômenos estéticos.André Luis Muniz Garcia - 2011 - Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 16 (2):10-5216.
    O objetivo do presente artigo, pensado preliminarmente como parte integrante de um estudo mais amplo e sistemático sobre o processo de formação do pensamento do jovem Nietzsche, é discutir o estatuto da linguagem em suas considerações sobre estética, notadamente naquela apresentada nos fragmentos, apontamentos e escritos póstumos preparatórios d’ O Nascimento da Tragédia . Como se poderá notar, o viés de investigação proposto, respaldado em importantes estudos de literatura secundária, primou por uma esmerada, porém não exaustiva, reconstituição do trinômio: linguagem (...)
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  20. The Tragedy of the American Dream in Death of a Salesman.Alfred R. Ferguson - 1978 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 53 (1):83-98.
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  21.  80
    An American Tragedy" and "In Cold Blood.John J. McAleer - 1972 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 47 (4):569-586.
    Capote, apparently having mistaken craft for art, has reported on an event. Dreiser, in transcending time, has reported on the truth of human nature.
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    Triumph and Tragedy of Christendom.Gerald G. Walsh - 1945 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 20 (2):201-207.
  23.  36
    America’s Tragedy.Joseph P. Donnelly - 1936 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 10 (4):683-685.
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    The Possibility of a Christian Tragedy.Laurence Michel - 1956 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 31 (3):403-428.
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    English Domestic or Homiletic Tragedy, 1575 To 1642.Richard H. Perkinson - 1945 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 20 (3):550-551.
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    Moral and Social Values From Ancient Greek Tragedy.Georgia Xanthaki-Karamanou - 2015 - Dialogue and Universalism 25 (1):20-29.
    The paper deals globally with the history of human and social values from Homer and Hesiod to the end of the fifth century. Special emphasis is given on the moral and social concepts expressed in some fundamental texts of the three major tragic poets. The paper is particularly focused on the significant discrimination between the competitive values, such as wealth and noble origin, and the cooperative ones, expressed in the concepts of justice, wisdom, temperance, modesty, and nobility of character, as (...)
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    Beyond the “Tragedy of Culture”.Göran Sonesson - 2017 - American Journal of Semiotics 33 (3):141-180.
    Spelling out the more or less implicit phenomenology found in Peirce’s categories and in the “Basisphänomene” suggested by the late Cassirer, this paper attempts to extend Cassirer’s own suggestion for the grounding of the human, or, as we prefer to say, semiotic, sciences, by means of an elucidation of the components of the basic situation of communication, revised on the basis of the Prague school approach to semiotics. In the first part of the paper, we consider Cassirer’s proposal for a (...)
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    Chesterton on the Idea of Christian Tragedy.Joseph Schwartz - 2001 - Renascence 53 (3):227-238.
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    Porter's Noon Wine: A Stifled Tragedy.J. Gates Smith - 1965 - Renascence 17 (3):157-162.
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  30. The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy.Stanley Cavell - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
    This reissue of an American philosophical classic includes a new preface by Cavell, in which he discusses the work's reception and influence. The work fosters a fascinating relationship between philosophy and literature both by augmenting his philosophical discussions with examples from literature and by applying philosophical theories to literary texts. Cavell also succeeds in drawing some very important parallels between the British analytic tradition and the continental tradition, by comparing skepticism as understood in Descartes, Hume, and Kant with philosophy of (...)
  31. The - Generation Will One Day Understand: The English Language : 'I Am' but 'I Do' Speak English!Rituparna Ray Chaudhuri - 2015
    [ https://plus.google.com/108060242686103906748/posts/cwvdB6mK3J6 ]"As Literature germinates within me, my words are-“Literature is something, that I need to be acclaimed for, I need to know more...it’s my life that has given me birth, my way of thoughts that I am visualizing in the perspective of all dimensions, my frailties, my faults...my every comprehensive discussion even after my death, my spiritualism, my haunting towards the ecology of the cosmic world, and the way that I have brought up at my elbows to enhance myself (...)
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    On Hegel: The Sway of the Negative.Karin de Boer - 2010 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Hegel is most famous for his view that conflicts between contrary positions are necessarily resolved. Whereas this optimism, inherent in modernity as such, has been challenged from Kierkegaard onward, many critics have misconstrued Hegel's own intentions. Focusing on the Science of Logic, this transformative reading of Hegel on the one hand exposes the immense force of Hegel's conception of tragedy, logic, nature, history, time, language, spirit, politics, and philosophy itself. Drawing out the implications of Hegel's insight into tragic (...)
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  33.  25
    The Tragedy of the Object: Democracy of Vision and the Terrorism of Things in Bazin's Cinematic Realism.John Mullarkey - 2012 - Angelaki 17 (4):39-59.
    The ongoing duel between realist and anti-realist tendencies in film theory usually positions the ideas of André Bazin unambiguously on the realist side. Whatever else we expect to find in his writing – and the current resurgence is finding more and more – we should find this: realism, cinematic realism. But what type of realism? Is it ontological, and, if so, is it based on a claim for the primacy of photography's “analogical” relation to the world, even to the point (...)
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  34.  25
    Danto, History, and the Tragedy of Human Existence.F. R. Ankersmit - 2003 - History and Theory 42 (3):291–304.
    Philosophy of history is the Cinderella of contemporary philosophy. Philosophers rarely believe that the issues dealt with by philosophers of history are matters of any great theoretical interest or urgency. In their view philosophy of history rarely goes beyond the question of how results that have already been achieved elsewhere can or should be applied to the domain of historical writing. Moreover, contemporary philosophers of history have done desperately little to dispel the low opinion that their colleagues have of them. (...)
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  35.  8
    Discourses of Tragedy: A Comparative Corpus-Based Study of Newspaper Reportage of the Berkeley Balcony Collapse and Carrickmines Fire.Fergal Quinn & Elaine Vaughan - 2019 - Critical Discourse Studies 16 (3):330-346.
    ABSTRACTHierarchies of information –inclusion, omission and presentation of society and its citizenry – is a critical aspect of news presentation. This paper looks at newspaper reportage of two tragic events in 2015: a balcony collapse in Berkeley, USA, in which six Irish students died; and a fire at a halting site in Carrickmines, Ireland, which claimed the lives of four adults and six children who were members of the Irish Traveller community. This latter group are an officially recognised indigenous ethnic (...)
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  36.  49
    Aristotle and the Best Kind of Tragedy.Arthur W. H. Adkins - 1966 - Classical Quarterly 16 (01):78-.
    The literary criticism of the Greeks and Romans furnishes some of the most baffling documents which have come down to us from antiquity. Nor could it be otherwise. Few elements of language can be at once so ephemeral and so elusive as the overtones of words used in aesthetic contexts; even in our own language it is only with a conscious effort that the appropriate overtones of words used by quite recent critics can be recalled. Such recall must (...)
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  37.  11
    Nietzsche and the Promise of Philosophy.Wayne Klein - 1997 - State University of New York Press.
    Examines the role of language in Nietzsche's thought, including the relationship between style and subjectivity, the semiological underpinnings of his theory of tragedy, his naturalism, and his theory of language and rhetoric.
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  38.  26
    Teatralidad en la Biblia y la Biblia en el teatro. Eslabones olvidados.Julio Trebolle Barrera - 2013 - 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 18:219-238.
    The texts of the Bible treasure a high amount of theatrical potential. Thus, the book of Job constituted the basis of the Theatrum Mundi . Nevertheless, the Jewish and Christian conception of the world and history, despite its tragedies and Passions, is far removed from Greek tragedy. The figure of Job constitutes a contrast to the tragic in King Lear . An exorcistic formula from the Bible appears in Hamlet, Macbeth, and in plays of the Faustian theme –El mágico (...)
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    A Note on Titles, Abbreviations, and Language in the Text.Mitchell Cohen - 1994 - In The Wager of Lucien Goldmann: Tragedy, Dialectics, and a Hidden God. Princeton University Press.
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  40.  1
    Aristotle and the Best Kind of Tragedy.Arthur W. H. Adkins - 1966 - Classical Quarterly 16 (1):78-102.
    The literary criticism of the Greeks and Romans furnishes some of the most baffling documents which have come down to us from antiquity. Nor could it be otherwise. Few elements of language can be at once so ephemeral and so elusive as the overtones of words used in aesthetic contexts; even in our own language it is only with a conscious effort that the appropriate overtones of words used by quite recent critics can be recalled. Such recall must (...)
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  41. Mind, Language, and Reality.Hilary Putnam - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Hilary Putnam has been one of the most influential and sharply original of recent American philosophers in a whole range of fields. His most important published work is collected here, together with several new and substantial studies, in two volumes. The first deals with the philosophy of mathematics and of science and the nature of philosophical and scientific enquiry; the second deals with the philosophy of language and mind. Volume one is now issued in a new edition, including (...)
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  42. Frege: Philosophy of Language.Michael Dummett - 1973 - London: Duckworth.
    This highly acclaimed book is a major contribution to the philosophy of language as well as a systematic interpretation of Frege, indisputably the father of ...
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  43.  57
    Ethical Pitfalls for Natural Language Processing in Psychology.Mark Alfano, Emily Sullivan & Amir Ebrahimi Fard - forthcoming - In Morteza Dehghani & Ryan Boyd (eds.), The Atlas of Language Analysis in Psychology. Guilford Press.
    Knowledge is power. Knowledge about human psychology is increasingly being produced using natural language processing (NLP) and related techniques. The power that accompanies and harnesses this knowledge should be subject to ethical controls and oversight. In this chapter, we address the ethical pitfalls that are likely to be encountered in the context of such research. These pitfalls occur at various stages of the NLP pipeline, including data acquisition, enrichment, analysis, storage, and sharing. We also address secondary uses of the (...)
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  44. Natural Language and Natural Selection.Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-27.
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any intermediate (...)
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  45. New Horizons in the Study of Language and Mind.Noam Chomsky - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an outstanding contribution to the philosophical study of language and mind, by one of the most influential thinkers of our time. In a series of penetrating essays, Chomsky cuts through the confusion and prejudice which has infected the study of language and mind, bringing new solutions to traditional philosophical puzzles and fresh perspectives on issues of general interest, ranging from the mind-body problem to the unification of science. Using a range of imaginative and deceptively simple (...)
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  46. Spreading the Word: Groundings in the Philosophy of Language.Simon Blackburn - 1984 - Clarendon Press.
    Provides a comprehensive introduction to the major philosophical theories attempting to explain the workings of language.
  47.  31
    Levels of Ontology and Natural Language: The Case of the Ontology of Parts and Wholes.Friederike Moltmann - forthcoming - In James Miller (ed.), The Language of Ontology. Oxford University Press.
    It is common in contemporary metaphysics to distinguish two levels of ontology: the ontology of ordinary objects and the ontology of fundamental reality. This papers argues that natural language reflects not only the ontology of ordinary objects, but also a language-driven ontology, which is involved in the mass-count distinction and part-structure-sensitive semantic selection, as well as perhaps the light ontology of pleonastic entities. The paper recasts my older theory of situated part structures without situations, making use of a (...)
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  48. What We Know When We Know a Language.Barry C. Smith - 2006 - In Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press. pp. 941.
    EVERY speaker of a language knows a bewildering variety of linguistic facts, and will come to know many more. It is knowledge that connects sound and meaning. Questions about the nature of this knowledge cannot be separated from fundamental questions about the nature of language. The conception of language we should adopt depends on the part it plays in explaining our knowledge of language. This chapter explores options in accounting for language, and our knowledge of (...)
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  49. Common Sense and Ordinary Language: Wittgenstein and Austin.Krista Lawlor - forthcoming - In Rik Peels & René Van Woudenberg (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Common Sense Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    What role does ‘ordinary language philosophy’ play in the defense of common sense beliefs? J.L. Austin and Ludwig Wittgenstein each give central place to ordinary language in their responses to skeptical challenges to common sense beliefs. But Austin and Wittgenstein do not always respond to such challenges in the same way, and their working methods are different. In this paper, I compare Austin’s and Wittgenstein’s metaphilosophical positions, and show that they share many metaphilosophical commitments. I then examine Austin (...)
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  50. The Seas of Language.Michael Dummett - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael Dummett is a leading contemporary philosopher whose work on the logic and metaphysics of language has had a lasting influence on how these subjects are conceived and discussed. This volume contains some of the most provocative and widely discussed essays published in the last fifteen years, together with a number of unpublished or inaccessible writings. Essays included are: "What is a Theory of Meaning?," "What do I Know When I Know a Language?," "What Does the Appeal to (...)
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