Results for 'lewis causation'

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  1. Causation as Influence.David Lewis - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):182-197.
  2. Causation.David Lewis - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy 70 (17):556-567.
  3. Philosophical Papers.David K. Lewis - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the second volume of philosophical essays by one of the most innovative and influential philosophers now writing in English. Containing thirteen papers in all, the book includes both new essays and previously published papers, some of them with extensive new postscripts reflecting Lewis's current thinking. The papers in Volume II focus on causation and several other closely related topics, including counterfactual and indicative conditionals, the direction of time, subjective and objective probability, causation, explanation, perception, free (...)
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    Causation as Influence.David Lewis - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):182.
  5. Postscripts to `Causation'.David Lewis - 1986 - In Philosophical Papers Vol. Ii. Oxford University Press.
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  6. Causation. Reprinted with Postscripts In.David Lewis - 1986 - Philosophical Papers 2.
     
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  7. Humean Supervenience Debugged.David Lewis - 1994 - Mind 103 (412):473--490.
    Tn this paper I explore and to an extent defend HS. The main philosophical challenges to HS come from philosophical views that say that nomic concepts-laws, chance, and causation-denote features of the world that fail to supervene on non-nomic features. Lewis rejects these views and has labored mightily to construct HS accounts of nomic concepts. His account of laws is fundamental to his program, since his accounts of the other nomic notions rely on it. Recently, a number of (...)
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  8. Chancy Causation.D. K. Lewis - 1986 - Philosophical Papers 2:175-184.
  9.  4
    Hereditary and Environmental Factors in the Causation of Manic-Depressive Psychoses and Dementia Praecox.A. J. Lewis - 1941 - The Eugenics Review 33 (3):86.
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    Philosophical Papers, Volume I.David K. Lewis - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):42-45.
    This is the second volume of philosophical essays by one of the most innovative and influential philosophers now writing in English. Containing thirteen papers in all, the book includes both new essays and previously published papers, some of them with extensive new postscripts reflecting Lewis's current thinking. The papers in Volume II focus on causation and several other closely related topics, including counterfactual and indicative conditionals, the direction of time, subjective and objective probability, causation, explanation, perception, free (...)
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  11. Philosophical Papers: Volume 2.David Lewis - 1987 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This is the second volume of philosophical essays by one of the most innovative and influential philosophers now writing in English. Containing thirteen papers in all, the book includes both new essays and previously published papers, some of them with extensive new postscripts reflecting Lewis's current thinking. The papers in Volume II focus on causation and several other closely related topics, including counterfactual and indicative conditionals, the direction of time, subjective and objective probability, causation, explanation, perception, free (...)
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  12. Owen Barfield on C.S. Lewis.Owen Barfield, C. S. Lewis & G. B. Tennyson - 1989
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  13. New Work for a Theory of Universals.David Lewis - 1983 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 61 (December):343-377.
  14. Probabilistic Causation and Causal Processes: A Critique of Lewis.Peter Menzies - 1989 - Philosophy of Science 56 (4):642-663.
    This paper examines a promising probabilistic theory of singular causation developed by David Lewis. I argue that Lewis' theory must be made more sophisticated to deal with certain counterexamples involving pre-emption. These counterexamples appear to show that in the usual case singular causation requires an unbroken causal process to link cause with effect. I propose a new probabilistic account of singular causation, within the framework developed by Lewis, which captures this intuition.
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    Lewis on Backward Causation.Ryan Wasserman - 2015 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):141-150.
    David Lewis famously defends a counterfactual theory of causation and a non-causal, similarity-based theory of counterfactuals. Lewis also famously defends the possibility of backward causation. I argue that this combination of views is untenable—given the possibility of backward causation, one ought to reject Lewis's theories of causation and counterfactuals.
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  16. Lewis' Modal Realism and Absence Causation.Joseph A. Baltimore - 2011 - Metaphysica 12 (2):117-124.
    A major criticism of David Lewis’ counterfactual theory of causation is that it allows too many things to count as causes, especially since Lewis allows, in addition to events, absences to be causes as well. Peter Menzies has advanced this concern under the title “the problem of profligate causation.” In this paper, I argue that the problem of profligate causation provides resources for exposing a tension between Lewis’ acceptance of absence causation and his (...)
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  17. Lewis' Causation and Quantum Correlations.Michael Esfeld - unknown
    If we apply Lewis’ theory of causation to the quantum correlations which become manifest in the Bell experiments, this theory tells us that these correlations are a case of causation. However, there are strong physical reasons (and concrete suggestions) not to treat these correlations in terms of a physical interaction. The aim of this paper is to assess this conflict. My conclusion is: one can either divorce Lewiscausation from physical interaction, or one can take (...)
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  18.  35
    Spielman and Lewis on Inductive Immodesty.David Lewis - 1974 - Philosophy of Science 41 (1):84-85.
  19.  12
    Naphtali Lewis: Greek Historical Documents: The Fifth Century B.C. Pp. Xii+125. Toronto: Hakkert, 1971. Paper, $2.25.D. M. Lewis - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (02):283-284.
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  20. Religion, Reason, and the Self: Essays in Honour of Hywel D. Lewis.Hywel David Lewis, Stewart R. Sutherland & T. A. Roberts (eds.) - 1989 - University of Wales Press.
     
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    The Philosophy of C. I. Lewis.Clarence Irving Lewis & Paul Arthur Schilpp (eds.) - 1968 - La Salle, Ill., Open Court.
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  22. Lewis Causation is a Special Case of Spohn Causation.F. Huber - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):207-210.
    This paper shows that causation in the sense of Lewis is a special case of causation in the sense of Spohn.
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    Applying D. K. Lewis’s Counterfactual Theory of Causation to the Philosophy of Historiography.Alexander Maar - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (3):349-369.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 349 - 369 A theory of causation suitable for historiography must accommodate the many types of causal claims historians make. In this paper, I examine the advantages of applying D. K. Lewis’s counterfactual theory of causation to the philosophy of historiography. I contend that Lewis’s possible world semantics offers a superior framework for making sense of historical causation, and that it lays the foundation for historians to look at (...)
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    Against Lewis's New Theory of Causation: A Story with Three Morals.MIchael Strevens - 2003 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):398–412.
    A recent paper by David Lewis, "Causation as Influence", proposes a new theory of causation. I argue against the theory, maintaining that (a) the relation asserted by a claim of the form "C was a cause of E" is distinct from the relation of causal influence, (b) the former relation depends very much, contra Lewis, on the individuation conditions for the event E, and (c) Lewis's account is unsatisfactory as an analysis of either kind of (...)
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  25. Counterexamples to Lewis' ‘Causation as Influence’.I. Kvart - 2001 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79:411-23.
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    Lewis's 'Causation as Influence'.I. Kvart - 2001 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):409 – 421.
    In his ‘Causation as Influence’,1 David Lewis proposed a counterfactual theory of cause which was designed to improve on his previous account.2 Here I offer counter-examples to this new account, involving early preemption and late preemption, and a revised account, which is no longer an influence theory, that handles those counter-examples.
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  27. Rescued From the Rubbish Bin: Lewis on Causation.Ned Hall - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1107-1114.
    Lewis's work on causation was governed by a familiar methodological approach: the aim was to come up with an account of causation that would recover, in as elegant a fashion as possible, all of our firm “pre‐theoretic” intuitions about hypothetical cases. That methodology faces an obvious challenge, in that it is not clear why anyone not interested in the semantics of the English word “cause” should care about its results. Better to take a different approach, one which (...)
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    David Lewis's Awkward Cases of Redundant Causation.Hugh Rice - 1999 - Analysis 59 (263):157–164.
    The main line of Lewis's account of causation is in terms of chains of counterfactual dependence. According to his original account , a causal chain is a sequence of two or more events, with counterfactual dependence at each step; and one event is a cause of another if there is a causal chain from one to the other. But some awkward cases involving redundant causation lead him to introduce the notion of quasi-dependence . Laurie Paul has suggested (...)
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    David Lewis's Awkward Cases of Redundant Causation.H. Rice - 1999 - Analysis 59 (3):157-164.
    The main line of Lewis's account of causation is in terms of chains of counterfactual dependence. According to his original account, a causal chain is a sequence of two or more events, with counterfactual dependence at each step; and one event is a cause of another if there is a causal chain from one to the other. But some awkward cases involving redundant causation lead him to introduce the notion of quasi-dependence. Laurie Paul has suggested a way (...)
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    Metaphysics and Conceptual Analysis: Lewis on Indeterministic Causation.Michael McDermott - 1997 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (3):396 – 403.
    Lewis considers (Postscript B to 'Causation') the objection that what he calls a plain case of probabilistic causation is really a probable case of plain causation. He replies that the objection rests on the false metaphysical assumption that counterfactuals whose consequents are about events (rather than chances) can be true under indeterminism. The present note argues that this is the wrong kind of reply, because metaphysics is never relevant to conceptual analysis.
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  31. Backward Causation and the Stalnaker-Lewis Approach to Counterfactuals.Michael Tooley - 2002 - Analysis 62 (3):191–197.
  32.  36
    Lewis' Counterfactual Analysis of Causation.Cindy D. Stern - 1981 - Synthese 48 (3):333 - 345.
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    Backward Causation and the Stalnaker-Lewis Approach to Counterfactuals.M. Tooley - 2002 - Analysis 62 (3):191-197.
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    Causation and Counterfactuals: Lewis' Treatment Reconsidered.Alexander Rosenberg - 1979 - Dialogue 18 (2):209-219.
  35.  3
    Causation as Influence, David Lewis.Preemptive Prevention - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (3).
  36.  2
    Lewis's Causation: A Fatal Example. A Response to Dorothy Edgington, Helen Beebee and Horacio Abeledo.Eduardo H. Flichman - 2000 - Critica 32 (94):89 - 125.
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  37. D. Lewis on Causation.J. Pal - 1999 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 26 (4):495-502.
     
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  38.  99
    Trumping the Causal Influence Account of Causation.Jim Stone - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 142 (2):153 - 160.
    Here is a simple counterexample to David Lewis’s causal influence account of causation, one that is especially illuminating due to its connection to what Lewis himself writes: it is a variant of his trumping example.
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  39. Freedom, Causation, and the Consequence Argument.Laura W. Ekstrom - 1998 - Synthese 115 (3):333-54.
    The problem of analyzing causation and the problem of incompatibilism versus compatibilism are largely distinct. Yet, this paper will show that there are some theories of causation that a compatibilist should not endorse: namely, counterfactual theories, specifically the one developed by David Lewis and a newer, amended version of his account. Endorsing either of those accounts of causation undercuts the main compatibilist reply to a powerful argument for incompatibilism. Conversely, the argument of this paper has the (...)
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  40. Causation: A User's Guide.L. A. Paul & Ned Hall - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Causation is at once familiar and mysterious. Neither common sense nor extensive philosophical debate has led us to anything like agreement on the correct analysis of the concept of causation, or an account of the metaphysical nature of the causal relation. Causation: A User's Guide cuts a clear path through this confusing but vital landscape. L. A. Paul and Ned Hall guide the reader through the most important philosophical treatments of causation, negotiating the terrain by taking (...)
     
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  41. On the Supposed Temporal Asymmetry of Counterfactual Dependence; Or: It Wouldn't Have Taken a Miracle!Gabriele Contessa - 2006 - Dialectica 60 (4):461–473.
    The thesis that a temporal asymmetry of counterfactual dependence characterizes our world plays a central role in Lewis’s philosophy, as. among other things, it underpins one of Lewis most renowned theses—that causation can be analyzed in terms of counterfactual dependence. To maintain that a temporal asymmetry of counterfactual dependence characterizes our world, Lewis committed himself to two other theses. The first is that the closest possible worlds at which the antecedent of a counterfactual conditional is true (...)
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    Causation, Absences, and the Prince of Wales.Cei Maslen - forthcoming - Synthese:1-12.
    In this paper, I defend a counterfactual approach to causation by absences from some recent criticisms due to Sartorio.
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  43. Problems with Late Preemption.L. A. Paul - 1998 - Analysis 58 (1):48–53.
    In response to counterexamples involving late preemption, David Lewis (1986) revised his original (1973) counterfactual analysis of causation to include the notion of quasi-dependence. Jonardon Ganeri, Paul Noordhof and Murali Ramachandran (1998) argue that their ‘PCA*-analysis’ of causation solves the problem of late preemption and is superior to Lewis’s analysis. I show that neither quasi-dependence nor the PCA*-analysis solves the problem of late preemption.
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    A Principled Approach to Defining Actual Causation.Sander Beckers & Joost Vennekens - 2017 - Synthese:1-28.
    In this paper we present a new proposal for defining actual causation, i.e., the problem of deciding if one event caused another. We do so within the popular counterfactual tradition initiated by Lewis, which is characterised by attributing a fundamental role to counterfactual dependence. Unlike the currently prominent definitions, our approach proceeds from the ground up: we start from basic principles, and construct a definition of causation that satisfies them. We define the concepts of counterfactual dependence and (...)
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  45. Causation and Counterfactuals.L. A. Paul, E. J. Hall & J. Collins (eds.) - 2004
    One philosophical approach to causation sees counterfactual dependence as the key to the explanation of causal facts: for example, events c (the cause) and e (the effect) both occur, but had c not occurred, e would not have occurred either. The counterfactual analysis of causation became a focus of philosophical debate after the 1973 publication of the late David Lewis's groundbreaking paper, "Causation," which argues against the previously accepted "regularity" analysis and in favor of what he (...)
     
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  46. Relativity, Quantum Entanglement, Counterfactuals, and Causation.Luke Fenton-Glynn & Thomas Kroedel - 2015 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66 (1):45-67.
    We investigate whether standard counterfactual analyses of causation imply that the outcomes of space-like separated measurements on entangled particles are causally related. Although it has sometimes been claimed that standard CACs imply such a causal relation, we argue that a careful examination of David Lewis’s influential counterfactual semantics casts doubt on this. We discuss ways in which Lewis’s semantics and standard CACs might be extended to the case of space-like correlations.
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  47. Presentism and Causation Revisited.Sam Baron - 2012 - Philosophical Papers 41 (1):1-21.
    One of the major difficulties facing presentism is the problem of causation. In this paper, I propose a new solution to that problem, one that is compatible with intrinsic, fundamental causal relations. Accommodating relations of this kind is important because (i) according to David Lewis (2004), such relations are needed to account for causation in our world and worlds relevantly similar to our own, (ii) there is no other strategy currently available that successfully reconciles presentism with relations (...)
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  48. A Church-Fitch Proof for the Universality of Causation.Christopher Gregory Weaver - 2013 - Synthese 190 (14):2749-2772.
    In an attempt to improve upon Alexander Pruss’s work (The principle of sufficient reason: A reassessment, pp. 240–248, 2006), I (Weaver, Synthese 184(3):299–317, 2012) have argued that if all purely contingent events could be caused and something like a Lewisian analysis of causation is true (per, Lewis’s, Causation as influence, reprinted in: Collins, Hall and paul. Causation and counterfactuals, 2004), then all purely contingent events have causes. I dubbed the derivation of the universality of causation (...)
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  49. Counterfactual Analyses of Causation: The Problem of Effects and Epiphenomena Revisited.Stephen Barker - 2003 - Noûs 37 (1):133–150.
    I argue that Lewis's counterfactual theory of causation, given his treatment of counterfactuals in terms of world-comparative similarity faces insuperable problems in the form of the problem of effects and the problem of epiphenomena.
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  50. Causation.Ernest Sosa & Michael Tooley (eds.) - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents a selection of the most influential recent discussions of the crucial metaphysical question: What is it for one event to cause another? The subject of causation bears on many topics, such as time, explanation, mental states, the laws of nature, and the philosophy of science. Contributors include J.L Mackie, Michael Scriven, Jaegwon Kim, G.E.M. Anscombe, G.H. von Wright, C.J. Ducasse, Wesley C. Salmon, David Lewis, Paul Horwich, Jonathan Bennett, Ernest Sosa, and Michael Tooley.
     
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