Results for 'liability'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Rights, Liability, and the Moral Equality of Combatants.Uwe Steinhoff - 2012 - The Journal of Ethics 16 (4):339-366.
    According to the dominant position in the just war tradition from Augustine to Anscombe and beyond, there is no "moral equality of combatants." That is, on the traditional view the combatants participating in a justified war may kill their enemy combatants participating in an unjustified war - but not vice versa (barring certain qualifications). I shall argue here, however, that in the large number of wars (and in practically all modern wars) where the combatants on the justified side violate the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  2. Complicitous Liability in War.Saba Bazargan - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (1):177-195.
    Jeff McMahan has argued against the moral equivalence of combatants (MEC) by developing a liability-based account of killing in warfare. On this account, a combatant is morally liable to be killed only if doing so is an effective means of reducing or eliminating an unjust threat to which that combatant is contributing. Since combatants fighting for a just cause generally do not contribute to unjust threats, they are not morally liable to be killed; thus MEC is mistaken. The problem, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  3. Liability to Defensive Harm.Jonathan Quong - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (1):45-77.
  4.  25
    Partial Liability.Alex Kaiserman - 2017 - Legal Theory 23 (1):1-26.
    In most cases, liability in tort law is all-or-nothing—a defendant is either fully liable or not at all liable for a claimant's loss. By contrast, this paper defends a causal theory of partial liability. I argue that a defendant should be held liable for a claimant's loss only to the degree to which the defendant's wrongdoing contributed to the causing of the loss. I ground this principle in a conception of tort law as a system of corrective justice (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  5. The Liability of Justified Attackers.Uwe Steinhoff - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (4):1016-1030.
    McMahan argues that justification defeats liability to defensive attack (which would undermine the thesis of the "moral equality of combatants"). In response, I argue, first, that McMahan’s attempt to burden the contrary claim with counter-intuitive implications fails; second, that McMahan’s own position implies that the innocent civilians do not have a right of self-defense against justified attackers, which neither coheres with his description of the case (the justified bombers infringe the rights of the civilians) nor with his views about (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  78
    Liability and Just Cause.Thomas Hurka - 2007 - Ethics and International Affairs 21 (2):199-218.
    This paper is a response to Jeff McMahan's "Just Cause for War". It defends a more permissive, and more traditional view of just war liability against McMahan's claims.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  7. The Basis of Moral Liability to Defensive Killing.Jeff McMahan - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):386–405.
    There may be circumstances in which it is morally justifiable intentionally to kill a person who is morally innocent, threatens no one, rationally wishes not to die, and does not consent to be killed. Although the killing would wrong the victim, it might be justified by the necessity of averting some disaster that would otherwise occur. In other instances of permissible killing, however, the justification appeals to more than consequences. It may appeal to the claim that the person to be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  8.  22
    Liability, culpability, and luck.Dana Kay Nelkin - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (11):3523-3541.
    This paper focuses on the role of culpability in determining the degree of liability to defensive harm, and asks whether there are any restrictions on when culpability is relevant to liability. A natural first suggestion is that it is only relevant when combined with an actual threat of harm in the situation in which defensive harm becomes salient as a means of protection. The paper begins by considering the question of whether two people are equally liable to defensive (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. The Liabilities of Mobility: A Selection Pressure for the Transition to Consciousness in Animal Evolution.Bjorn H. Merker - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):89-114.
    The issue of the biological origin of consciousness is linked to that of its function. One source of evidence in this regard is the contrast between the types of information that are and are not included within its compass. Consciousness presents us with a stable arena for our actions—the world—but excludes awareness of the multiple sensory and sensorimotor transformations through which the image of that world is extracted from the confounding influence of self-produced motion of multiple receptor arrays mounted on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  10.  70
    Liability and Risk.David McCarthy - 1996 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 25 (3):238-262.
    Standard theories of liability say that X is liable to Y only if Y was harmed, only if X caused Y harm, and (usually) only if X was at fault. This article offers a series of criticisms of each of these claims, and use them to construct an alternative theory of liability in which the nature of X's having imposed a risk of harm on Y is central to the question of when X is liable to Y, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  11.  28
    Civilian Liability.Helen Frowe - 2019 - Ethics 129 (4):625-650.
    Adil Ahmad Haque argues that civilians who contribute to unjust lethal threats in war, but who do not directly participate in the war, are not liable to defensive killing. His argument rests on two central claims: first, that the extent of a person’s liability to defensive harm in virtue of contributing to an unjust threat is limited to the cost that she is initially required to bear in order to avoid contributing, and, second, that civilians need not bear lethal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. Liability to International Prosecution: The Nature of Universal Jurisdiction.Anthony Reeves - 2017 - European Journal of International Law 28 (4):1047-1067.
    The paper considers the proper method for theorizing about criminal jurisdiction. It challenges a received understanding of how to substantiate the right to punish, and articulates an alternative account of how that theoretical task is properly conducted. The received view says that a special relationship is the ground of a tribunal’s authority to prosecute and, hence, that a normative theory of that authority is faced with identifying a distinctive relation. The alternative account locates prosecutorial standing on an institution’s capacity to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Strict Liability and the Presumption of Innocence: An Exposé of Functionalist Assumptions.Paul Roberts - 2005 - In Andrew Simester (ed.), Appraising Strict Liability. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  14. Moral Liability to Defensive Killing and Symmetrical Self-Defense.David R. Mapel - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (2):198-217.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  15.  78
    Civil Liability and the 50%+ Standard of Proof.Martin Smith - 2021 - International Journal of Evidence and Proof 25 (3):183-199.
    The standard of proof applied in civil trials is the preponderance of evidence, often said to be met when a proposition is shown to be more than 50% likely to be true. A number of theorists have argued that this 50%+ standard is too weak – there are circumstances in which a court should find that the defendant is not liable, even though the evidence presented makes it more than 50% likely that the plaintiff’s claim is true. In this paper, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  11
    Liability and Risk.David Mccarhty - 1996 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 25 (3):238-262.
  17. Individual Liability in War: A Response to Fabre, Leveringhaus and Tadros.Jeff Mcmahan - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (2):278-299.
    This article is a response to commentaries on my book, Killing in War, by Cécile Fabre, Alex Leveringhaus and Victor Tadros. It discusses the implications of the approach I have defended for the morality of war for such issues as internecine killing in war, humanitarian intervention and the bases of individual liability to attack in war.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18. Defensive Liability Without Culpability.Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2016 - In Christian Coons & Michael Weber (eds.), The Ethics of Self- Defense. Oxford University Press.
    A minimally responsible threatener is someone who bears some responsibility for imposing an objectively wrongful threat, but whose responsibility does not rise to the level of culpability. Minimally responsible threateners include those who knowingly commit a wrongful harm under duress, those who are epistemically justified but mistaken in their belief that a morally risky activity will not cause a wrongful harm, and those who commit a harm while suffering from a cognitive impairment which makes it prohibitively difficult to recognize and (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  24
    Liability for Robots: Sidestepping the Gaps.Bartek Chomanski - 2021 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (4):1013-1032.
    In this paper, I outline a proposal for assigning liability for autonomous machines modeled on the doctrine of respondeat superior. I argue that the machines’ users’ or designers’ liability should be determined by the manner in which the machines are created, which, in turn, should be responsive to considerations of the machines’ welfare interests. This approach has the twin virtues of promoting socially beneficial design of machines, and of taking their potential moral patiency seriously. I then argue for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Epistemological Liabilities of the Clinical Appraisal of Psychoanalytic Theory.Adolf Grunbaum - 1980 - Noûs 14 (3):307-385.
  21. Criminal Liability for Omissions - An Inventory of Issues.Larry Alexander - 2002 - In Stephen Shute & Andrew Simester (eds.), Criminal Law Theory: Doctrines of the General Part. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22.  44
    Power, Liability, and the Free-Will Defence: Reply to Mawson.Wes Morriston - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (1):71-80.
    Tim Mawson argues that the ability to choose what one knows to be morally wrong is a power for some persons in some circumstances, but that it would be a mere liability for God. The lynchpin of Mawson 's argument is his claim that a power is an ability that it is good to have. In this rejoinder, I challenge this claim of Mawson 's, arguing that choosing a course of action is always an exercise of power, whether or (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23. Strict Liability, Legal Presumptions, and the Presumption of Innocence.R. A. Duff - 2005 - In Andrew Simester (ed.), Appraising Strict Liability. Oxford University Press. pp. 125-49.
  24.  33
    Law, Liability and Expert Systems.Dr Joseph A. Cannataci - 1989 - AI and Society 3 (3):169-183.
    This paper examines some of the possible legal implications of the production, marketing and use of expert systems. The relevance of a legally useful definition of expert systems, comprising systems designed for use both by laymen and professionals, is related to the distinctions inherent in the legal doctrine underlying provision of goods and provision of services. The liability of the sellers and users of, and contributors to, expert systems are examined in terms of professional malpractice as well as product (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  58
    Responsibility, Liability, and Lethal Autonomous Robots.Heather M. Roff - 2013 - In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge. pp. 352.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  26.  39
    Proportionality, Liability, and Defensive Harm.Jonathan Quong - 2015 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 43 (2):144-173.
  27.  10
    Defensive Liability: A Matter of Rights Enforcement, not Distributive Justice.Susanne Burri - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-15.
    The Moral Responsibility Account of Liability to Defensive Harm states that an agent becomes liable to defensive harm if, and only if, she engages in a foreseeably risk-imposing activity that subsequently threatens objectively unjustified harm. Advocates of the account contend that liability to defensive harm is best understood as an aspect of distributive justice. Individuals who are liable to some harm are not wronged if the harm is imposed on them, and liability to defensive harm thus helps (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  11
    Liability in the Law of Tort of Research Ethics Committees and Their Members.J. V. McHale - 2005 - Research Ethics 1 (2):53-59.
    The current rise in malpractice litigation has led to concern in the research community as to the prospect of litigation against researchers. Clearly as the responsibility for the day-to-day conduct of the research falls upon the researchers they will be potentially liable should there be negligence in the conduct of the research project itself. But to what extent can the research ethics committee and its members be held liable should harm result to the research subject? How far does the prospect (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29.  71
    Causal Contributions and Liability.Victor Tadros - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):402-431.
    This article explores the extent to which the magnitude of harm that a person is liable to suffer to avert a threat depends on the magnitude of her causal contribution to the threat. Several different versions of this view are considered. The conclusions are mostly skeptical—facts that may determine how large of a causal contribution a person makes to a threat are not morally significant, or not sufficiently significant to make an important difference to liability. However, understanding ways in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30.  14
    Liability for Animals: An Historico-Structural Comparison. [REVIEW]Bernard S. Jackson - 2011 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):259-289.
    This account of civil liability for animals in a range of ancient, mediaeval and modern legal systems (based on a series of studies conducted early in my career: (s.1)) uses semiotic analysis to supplement the insights of conventional legal history, thus balancing diachronic and synchronic approaches. It reinforces the conventional historical sensitivity to anachronism in two respects: (1) (logical) inference of underlying values from concrete rules (rather than attending to literary features of the text) manifests cognitive anachronism, an issue (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Duty and Liability.Victor Tadros - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (2):259-277.
    In his recent book, Killing in War, Jeff McMahan sets out a number of conditions for a person to be liable to attack, provided the attack is used to avert an objectively unjust threat: (1) The threat, if realized, will wrongfully harm another; (2) the person is responsible for creating the threat; (3) killing the person is necessary to avert the threat, and (4) killing the person is a proportionate response to the threat. The present article focuses on McMahan's second (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  32.  70
    Liabilities of Queer Anti-Racist Critique.Stacy Douglas, Suhraiya Jivraj & Sarah Lamble - 2011 - Feminist Legal Studies 19 (2):107-118.
  33. Tort Liability for Belligerent Wrongs.Haim Abraham - forthcoming - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies.
    Most legal systems deny civilians a right to compensation for losses they sustain during belligerent activities. Arguments for recognising such a right are usually divorced, to various degrees, from the moral and legal underpinnings of the notion of inflicting a wrongful loss under either international humanitarian law or domestic tort law. My aim in this article is to advance a novel account of states’ tortious liability for belligerent wrongdoing, drawing on both international humanitarian law and corrective justice approaches to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Between Strict Liability and Blameworthy Quality of Will: Taking Responsibility’.Elinor Mason - 2019 - In David Shoemaker (ed.), Oxford Studies in Agency and Responsibility 6. pp. 241-264.
    This chapter discusses blameworthiness for problematic acts that an agent does inadvertently. Blameworthiness, as opposed to liability, is difficult to make sense of in this sort of case, as there is usually thought to be a tight connection between blameworthiness and something in the agent’s quality of will. This chapter argues that in personal relationships we should sometimes take responsibility for inadvertent actions. Taking on responsibility when we inadvertently fail in our duties to our loved ones assures them that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  8
    Contractual Liability: For Fault or Strict?Simona Selelionytė-Drukteinienė - 2011 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 18 (4):1417-1441.
    The author investigates the necessity of fault as the prerequisite of contractual civil liability. The author makes the conclusion that Lithuanian law, following most of the countries belonging to the civil law tradition and contrary to the common law systems, as well as Vienna convention, UNIDROIT principles, PECL and DCFR, begins with the theory that fault is a requirement for contractual liability. Strict liability in Lithuanian law is the exception of this general rule. Nevertheless, the author argues (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  49
    Limited Liability and its Moral Hazard Implications: The Systemic Inscription of Instability in Contemporary Capitalism. [REVIEW]Marie-Laure Djelic & Joel Bothello - 2013 - Theory and Society 42 (6):589-615.
  37.  21
    Limited Liability and the Public's Health.Lainie Rutkow & Stephen P. Teret - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):599-608.
    Corporations, through their products and behaviors, exert a strong effect on the well-being of populations. Industries including frearms, motor vehicles, tobacco, and alcohol produce and market products negatively impact public health. All of these industries are composed of corporations, which are legal fctions designed to provide limited exposure to liability, through a variety of mechanisms, for their investors and directors. This means that when actions are taken on behalf of a corporate entity, the individuals responsible generally will not face (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Liberty, Liability, and Contractualism.Andrew Williams - 2006 - In Nils Holtug & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), Egalitarianism: New Essays on the Nature and Value of Equality. Clarendon Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. Is the Risk–Liability Theory Compatible with Negligence Law?Toby Handfield & Trevor Pisciotta - 2005 - Legal Theory 11 (4):387-404.
    David McCarthy has recently suggested that our compensation and liability practices may be interpreted as reflecting a fundamental norm to hold people liable for imposing risk of harm on others. Independently, closely related ideas have been criticised by Stephen R. Perry and Arthur Ripstein as incompatible with central features of negligence law. We aim to show that these objections are unsuccessful against McCarthy’s Risk–liability theory, and that such an approach is a promising means both for understanding the moral (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40.  13
    Just Liability and Reciprocity Reasons for Treating Wounded Soldiers.Michael J. Selgelid - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):19 – 21.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41.  25
    Material Liability of Public Servants in Lithuania: Theory and Practice.Violeta Kosmačaitė & Vidmantas Jurgaitis - 2013 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 20 (2):611-625.
    Legal acts of the Republic of Lithuania establish several types of material liability of workers engaged in labour (professional) relations: material liability applied pursuant to the Labour Code of the Republic of Lithuania (hereinafter referred to as the LC) and material liability applied pursuant to the Law on Public Service of the Republic of Lithuania (hereinafter referred to as the LPC). In the present article, theoretical and practical aspects of material liability of Lithuanian public servants for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  26
    Justifying Liability to Third Parties for Negligent Misstatements.Witting Christian - 2000 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 20 (4):615-643.
    The courts have experienced difficulty in justifying the imposition of liability to third parties for negligent misstatements. The justifications ordinarily invoked relate to notions of assumption of responsibility and detrimental reliance. These can be seen, in turn, to rest upon a normative framework of give and take (or «mutuality») between statement makers and third party recipients. This article challenges the cogency of that normative framework and offers an alternative based upon the remedial nature of tort, which has traditionally focused (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  75
    Liability and Responsibility: Essays in Law and Morals.R. G. Frey & Christopher W. Morris (eds.) - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of contemporary essays by a group of well-known philosophers and legal theorists covers various topics in the philosophy of law, focusing on issues concerning liability in contract, tort and criminal law. The book is divided into four sections. The first provides a conceptual overview of the issues at stake in a philosophical discussion of liability and responsibility. The second, third and fourth sections present, in turn, more detailed explorations of the roles of notions of liability (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  20
    Professional Liability (Malpractice) Coverage of Humanist Scholars Functioning as Clinical Medical Ethicists.Donnie J. Self & Joy D. Skeel - 1988 - Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):101-110.
    In contrast to theoretical discussions about potential professional liability of clinical ethicists, this report gives the results of empirical data gathered in a national survey of clinical medical ethicists. The report assesses the types of activities of clinical ethicists, the extent and types of their professional liability coverage, and the influence that concerns about legal liability has on how they function as clinical ethicists. In addition demographic data on age, sex, educational background, etc. are reported. The results (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. Legal Liability and Clinical Ethics Consultations: Practical and Philosophical Considerations.Donnie J. Self & Joy D. Skeel - 1988 - In John F. Monagle & David C. Thomasma (eds.), Medical Ethics: A Guide for Health Professionals. Aspen Publishers. pp. 408--16.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  46.  10
    Disciplinary Liability as a Background for Dismissal of Employees in Lithuania.Tomas Bagdanskis - 2011 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 18 (4):1485-1500.
    This article discusses the problematic aspects relating to the employee dismissal based on application of the disciplinary liability. It contains analysis of two grounds for termination of the employment contract without any previous notice: 1) imposing several disciplinary sanctions upon the employee in the course of twelve months, and 2) the employee has only one breach of labour discipline but a gross one. The article is based on legal acts and judgements of Judicial Assemblies of the Civil Division of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  84
    Necessity, Moral Liability, and Defensive Harm.Joanna Mary Firth & Jonathan Quong - 2012 - Law and Philosophy 31 (6):673-701.
    A person who is liable to defensive harm has forfeited his rights against the imposition of the harm, and so is not wronged if that harm is imposed. A number of philosophers, most notably Jeff McMahan, argue for an instrumental account of liability, whereby a person is liable to defensive harm when he is either morally or culpably responsible for an unjust threat of harm to others, and when the imposition of defensive harm is necessary to avert the threatened (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  48.  8
    Liabilities in Private Law.Peter Jaffey - 2008 - Legal Theory 14 (4):233-255.
    This article elaborates upon and defends the distinction between “primary duty” claims and “primary liability” claims in private law introduced in a previous article. In particular, I discuss the relevance of the distinction to the debates over fault and strict liability and “duty skepticism” and to the relationship between primary and remedial rights. I argue that the tendency to assume that all claims in private law arise from a breach of duty is a source of error and confusion. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  24
    State Liability for the Infringement of the Obligation to Refer for a Preliminary Ruling under the European Convention on Human Rights.Regina Valutytė - 2012 - Jurisprudencija: Mokslo darbu žurnalas 19 (1):7-20.
    The article deals with the question whether a state might be held liable for the infringement of the European Convention on Human Rights if its national court of last instance fails to implement the obligation to make a reference for a preliminary ruling to the Court of Justice of the European Union under the conditions laid down in Article 267 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and developed in the case-law of the Court. Relying on well-established (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Tort Liability Under Uncertainty.Ariel Porat & Alex Stein - 2001 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The book provides a comprehensive and principled account of the uncertainty problem that arises in tort litigation. It presents and critically examines the existing doctrinal solutions of the problem, as evolved in England, the United States, Canada, and Israel, and also offers a number of original solutions, such as imposition of collective liability and liability for evidential damage. Among the issues dealt with by the book are rapidly developing areas of tort law, such as mass torts, liability (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000