Results for 'life extension'

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  1. Building a Postwork Utopia: Technological Unemployment, Life Extension and the Future of Human Flourishing.John Danaher - 2017 - In Kevin Lagrandeur & James Hughes (eds.), Surviving the Machine Age. Palgrave-MacMillan. pp. 63-82.
    Populations in developed societies are rapidly aging: fertility rates are at all-time lows while life expectancy creeps ever higher. This is triggering a social crisis in which shrinking youth populations are required to pay for the care and retirements of an aging majority. Some people argue that by investing in the right kinds of lifespan extension technology – the kind that extends the healthy and productive phases of life – we can avoid this crisis (thereby securing a (...)
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  2. Life in Overabundance: Agar on Life-Extension and the Fear of Death.Aveek Bhattacharya & Robert Mark Simpson - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):223-236.
    In Humanity’s End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement, Nicholas Agar presents a novel argument against the prospect of radical life-extension. Agar’s argument hinges on the claim that extended lifespans will result in people’s lives being dominated by the fear of death. Here we examine this claim and the surrounding issues in Agar’s discussion. We argue, firstly, that Agar’s view rests on empirically dubious assumptions about human rationality and attitudes to risk, and secondly, that even if those assumptions (...)
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  3.  16
    Life Extension Research: An Analysis of Contemporary Biological Theories and Ethical Issues. [REVIEW]Jennifer Marshall - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):87-96.
    Many opinions and ideas about aging exist. Biological theories have taken hold of the popular and scientific imagination as potential answers to a “cure” for aging. However, it is not clear what exactly is being cured or whether aging could be classified as a disease. Some scientists are convinced that aging will be biologically alterable and that the human lifespan will be vastly extendable. Other investigators believe that aging is an elusive target that may only be “statistically” manipulatable through a (...)
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    Life Extension Research: Health, Illness, and Death.Leigh Turner - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (2):117-129.
    Scientists, bioethicists, and policy makers are currently engaged in a contentious debate about the scientific prospects and morality of efforts to increase human longevity. Some demographers and geneticists suggest that there is little reason to think that it will be possible to significantly extend the human lifespan. Other biodemographers and geneticists argue that there might well be increases in both life expectancy and lifespan. Bioethicists and policy makers are currently addressing many of the ethical, social, and economic issues raised (...)
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  5.  18
    Four Ways Life Extension Will Change Our Relationship with Death.John K. Davis - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (3):165-172.
    Discussions of life extension ethics have focused mainly on whether an extended life would be desirable to have, and on the social consequences of widely available life extension. I want to explore a different range of issues: four ways in which the advent of life extension will change our relationship with death, not only for those who live extended lives, but also for those who cannot or choose not to. Although I believe that, (...)
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  6. The Creative Matrix of the Origins Dynamisms, Forces and the Shaping of Life.Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning & International Congress of Phenomenology/Philosophy and the Sciences Of Life - 2002
  7.  10
    The Tortoise Transformation as a Prospect for Life Extension.Timothy F. Murphy - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):645-649.
    The value of extending the human lifespan remains a key philosophical debate in bioethics. In building a case against the extension of the species-typical human life, Nicolas Agar considers the prospect of transforming human beings near the end of their lives into Galapagos tortoises, which would then live on decades longer. A central question at stake in this transformation is the persistence of human consciousness as a condition of the value of the transformation. Agar entertains the idea that (...)
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  8.  75
    Making the Case for Human Life Extension: Personal Arguments.John Schloendorn - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (4):191–202.
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  9. Immortality, Human Nature, the Value of Life and the Value of Life Extension.Steven Horrobin - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (6):279–292.
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  10. Agency, Life Extension, and the Meaning of Life.Lisa Bortolotti - 2010 - The Monist 93 (1):38-56.
    Contemporary philosophers and bioethicists argue that life extension is bad for the individual. According to the agency objection to life extension, being constrained as an agent adds to the meaningfulness of human life. Life extension removes constraints, and thus it deprives life of meaning. In the paper, I concede that constrained agency contributes to the meaningfulness of human life, but reject the agency objection to life extension in its current (...)
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  11.  18
    The Ethics of Human Life Extension: The Second Argument From Evolution.Chris Gyngell - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (6):696-713.
    One argument that is sometimes made against pursuing radical forms of human life extension is that such interventions will make the species less evolvable, which would be morally undesirable. In this article, I discuss the empirical and evaluative claims of this argument. I argue that radical increases in life expectancy could, in principle, reduce the evolutionary potential of human populations through both biological and cultural mechanisms. I further argue that if life extension did reduce the (...)
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  12.  48
    Moral Pluralism Versus the Total View: Why Singer is Wrong About Radical Life Extension.R. Blackford - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):747-752.
    Peter Singer has argued that we should not proceed with a hypothetical life-extension drug, based on a scenario in which developing the drug would fail to achieve the greatest sum of happiness over time. However, this is the wrong test. If we ask, more simply, which policy would be more benevolent, we reach a different conclusion from Singer’s: even given his (admittedly questionable) scenario, development of the drug should go ahead. Singer’s rigorous utilitarian position pushes him in the (...)
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  13.  17
    Forever Young? Life Extension and the Ageing Mind.Michael Hauskeller - 2011 - Ethical Perspectives 18 (3):385-405.
    This paper argues that the goal the proponents of radical life extension wish to attain is in fact unattainable, and that with regard to this goal, the whole project of conquering ageing and death is therefore likely to fail. What we seek to achieve is not the prolongation of life as such, but rather the prolongation of a healthy and youthful life. Yet even though it may one day be possible to prevent the body from ageing (...)
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  14.  80
    Life-Extension and the Malthusian Objection.John K. Davis - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):27 – 44.
    The worst possible way to resolve this issue is to leave it up to individual choice. There is no known social good coming from the conquest of death (Bailey, 1999). - Daniel Callahan Dramatically extending the human lifespan seems increasingly possible. Many bioethicists object that life-extension will have Malthusian consequences as new Methuselahs accumulate, generation by generation. I argue for a Life-Years Response to the Malthusian Objection. If even a minority of each generation chooses life-extension, (...)
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  15.  83
    Life Extension, Overpopulation and the Right to Life: Against Lethal Ethics.D. E. Cutas - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e7-e7.
    Some of the objections to life-extension stem from a concern with overpopulation. I will show that whether or not the overpopulation threat is realistic, arguments from overpopulation cannot ethically demand halting the quest for, nor access to, life-extension. The reason for this is that we have a right to life, which entitles us not to have meaningful life denied to us against our will and which does not allow discrimination solely on the grounds of (...)
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  16.  40
    Life Extension and Mental Ageing.Christopher Wareham - 2012 - Philosophical Papers 41 (3):455-477.
    Abstract Objections to life extension often focus on its effects for individual well-being. Prominent amongst these concerns is the possibility that life extending technologies will extend lifespan without preventing the ageing of the mind. Writers on the subject express the fear that life extending drugs will keep us physically youthful whilst our minds decay, succumbing to dementia, boredom, and loneliness. Generally these fears remain speculative, in part due to the absence of genuine life extending technologies. (...)
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  17.  14
    Life Extension and Future Generations.Adrian Bunn - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):133-147.
    Future technology may dramatically extend the human lifespan. Peter Singer argues that we should reject life extension because developing it would result in a world with lower total and average happiness. Singer’s argument depends on the claim that we should maximise average happiness per moment. I will argue that developing the life-extending drug would not be impermissible because doing so will maximise average happiness per person. I offer an independent argument for why we should adopt a consequentialist (...)
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  18.  26
    The Prolongevists Speak Up: The Life-Extension Ethics Session at the 10th Annual Congress of the International Association of Biomedical Gerontology.John K. Davis - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):W6-W8.
    Life-extension was the focus for the 10th annual Congress of the International Association of Biomedical Gerontology, held last September at Cambridge University. This scientific convention included a panel of several bioethicists, including Art Caplan, John Harris, and others. The presentations on the ethics of life-extension are reviewed here.
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  19.  23
    Discourse, Upstream Public Engagement and the Governance of Human Life Extension Research.Matthew Cotton - 2009 - Poiesis and Praxis 7 (1-2):135-150.
    Important scientific, ethical and sociological debates are emerging over the trans-humanist goal to achieve therapeutic treatments to ‘cure’ the debilitation of age-related illness and extend the healthy life span of individuals through interventive biogerontological research. The scientific and moral discourses surrounding this contentious scientific field are mapped out, followed by a normative argument favouring ‘strong’ deliberative democratic control of human life extension research. This proposal incorporates insights from constructive and participatory technology assessment, upstream public engagement and back-casting (...)
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  20.  41
    Life Extension, Human Rights, and the Rational Refinement of Repugnance.A. D. N. J. de Grey - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (11):659-663.
    On the ethics of extending human life: healthy people have a right to carry on livingHumanity has long demonstrated a paradoxical ambivalence concerning the extension of a healthy human lifespan. Modest health extension has been universally sought, whereas extreme health extension has been regarded as a snare and delusion—a dream beyond all others at first blush, but actually something we are better off without. The prevailing pace of biotechnological progress is bringing ever closer the day when (...)
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  21.  57
    Life Extension and the Burden of Mortality: Leon Kass Versus John Harris.Andrea Sauchelli - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):336-40.
    Some bioethicists have questioned the desirability of a line of biomedical research aimed at extending the length of our lives over what some think to be its natural limit. In particular, Leon Kass has argued that living longer is not such a great advantage, and that mortality is not a burden after all. In this essay, I evaluate his arguments in favour of such a counterintuitive view by elaborating upon some critical remarks advanced by John Harris. Ultimately, I argue that (...)
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  22.  26
    Death is a Punch in the Jaw: Life-Extension and its Discontents.Felicia Nimue Ackerman - 2009 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
    This article deals both with greatly extended finite life and with immortality and uses the term ‘greatly extended life’ to cover both. Except where indicated, it proceeds from some assumptions adapted from Christine Overall. First, people would know the life expectancy in their society or would know that they were immortal. Second, everyone would have the opportunity to choose greatly extended life. Third, greatly extended life would not be mandatory; people would be able to opt (...)
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  23. Life Extension Versus Replacement.Gustaf Arrhenius - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):211-227.
    It seems to be a widespread opinion that increasing the length of existing happy lives is better than creating new happy lives although the total welfare is the same in both cases, and that it may be better even when the total welfare is lower in the outcome with extended lives. I shall discuss two interesting suggestion that seems to support this idea, or so it has been argued. Firstly, the idea there is a positive level of wellbeing above which (...)
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  24.  12
    Substantial Life Extension and the Fair Distribution of Healthspans.Christopher S. Wareham - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: A Forum for Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine 41 (5):521-539.
    One of the strongest objections to the development and use of substantially life-extending interventions is that they would exacerbate existing unjust disparities of healthy lifespans between rich and poor members of society. In both popular opinion and ethical theory, this consequence is sometimes thought to justify a ban on life-prolonging technologies. However, the practical and ethical drawbacks of banning receive little attention, and the viability of alternative policies is seldom considered. Moreover, where ethicists do propose alternatives, there is (...)
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    Substantial Life Extension and the Fair Distribution of Healthspans.Christopher S. Wareham - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):521-539.
    One of the strongest objections to the development and use of substantially life-extending interventions is that they would exacerbate existing unjust disparities of healthy lifespans between rich and poor members of society. In both popular opinion and ethical theory, this consequence is sometimes thought to justify a ban on life-prolonging technologies. However, the practical and ethical drawbacks of banning receive little attention, and the viability of alternative policies is seldom considered. Moreover, where ethicists do propose alternatives, there is (...)
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  26.  3
    Life Extension and the Burden of Mortality : Leon Kass Versus John Harris.Andrea Sauchelli - unknown
    Some bioethicists have questioned the desirability of a line of biomedical research aimed at extending the length of our lives over what some think to be its natural limit. In particular, Leon Kass has argued that living longer is not such a great advantage, and that mortality is not a burden after all. In this essay, I evaluate his arguments in favour of such a counterintuitive view by elaborating upon some critical remarks advanced by John Harris. Ultimately, I argue that (...)
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  27.  1
    Science Fiction and Human Enhancement: Radical Life-Extension in the Movie ‘In Time’.Johann A. R. Roduit, Tobias Eichinger & Walter Glannon - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (3):287-293.
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  28. Life-Extension and Personal Identity.G. Barazetti & M. Reichlin - 2011 - In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities.
     
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  29.  38
    Life Extension and Creation: A Reply to Silverstein and Boonin.Timothy Hall - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):485-492.
  30.  41
    Evaluating Life Extension From a Narrative Perspective.Adrian Bunn - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):79-80.
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  31. Life Extension : Proponents, Opponents, and the Social Impact of the Defeat of Death.Kevin T. Keith - 2009 - In Michael K. Bartalos (ed.), Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
     
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  32.  16
    The Salience of Language in Probing Public Attitudes About Life Extension.Richard Settersten, Jennifer Fishman, Marcie Lambrix, Michael Flatt & Robert Binstock - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):81-82.
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  33. Life Extension and the Ageing Mind.M. Hauskeller - 2011 - Ethical Perspectives 18 (3):385-405.
     
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  34.  17
    Finding a Context for Discussing Human Life-Extension.D. Gareth Jones & Maja Whitaker - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):77-79.
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  35.  65
    Life Extension Technologies: Economic, Psychological, and Social Considerations.Leigh Turner - 2003 - HEC Forum 15 (3):258-273.
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  36.  23
    Considerable Life Extension and Three Views on the Meaning of Life.Matti Häyry - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):21-29.
    Picture this. You are having your regular medical checkup, when, all of a sudden, the physician turns to you and says: “Oh, did I remember to mention that you can now live forever?” You look at the doctor enquiringly and she goes on: “Well, it’s not actual immortality, you know, but they’ve invented this treatment—I don’t have the full details—that stops aging, getting physically older. It might not be for everyone, but you seem to be a suitable candidate. You could (...)
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  37.  35
    Medical Nanorobotics: Breaking the Trance of Futility in Life Extension Research (A Reply to de Grey).Robert A. Freitas - 2007 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
    Biogerontologist Aubrey de Grey has suggested that one of the reasons we as a society invest so little in research on combating aging is because we are in an intellectual trance. We think the effort will be futile: aging is immutable, so why try? A healthy skepticism can be a good thing but it is a major mistake to bet against the irresistible force of inexorable technological progress. Over the next few decades, nanotechnology will come to play a pivotal role (...)
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  38.  20
    Cryonic Life Extension: Scientific Possibility or Stupid Pipe Dream?D. John Doyle - 2012 - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 3 (1-3):9-28.
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    Some Additional Thoughts on Considerable Life Extension and the Meaning of Life.Matti Häyry - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):68-72.
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  40.  15
    Patient and Family Decisions About Life-Extension and Death.Felicia Nimue Ackerman - 2007 - In Rosamond Rhodes, Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics. Blackwell.
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  41.  10
    Considerable Life Extension and Three Views on the Meaning of Life.Matti H.?? Yry - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):21.
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  42.  12
    Life-Extension in Transhumanist and Christian Perspectives: Consonance and Conflict.Todd Daly - 2005 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 14 (2):57-75.
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  43.  11
    Fear of Misrepresentation Cannot Justify Silence About Foreseeable Life-Extension Biotechnology.Aubrey de Grey - 2003 - Bioessays 25 (1):94-95.
  44.  18
    Life Extension and Creation: A Reply to Silverstein and Boonin. TimothyHall - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):485–492.
  45.  1
    Agency, Life Extension, and the Meaning of Life.Lisa Bortolotti - 2010 - The Monist 93 (1):38-56.
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  46. Life Extension, Replacement, and Comparativism.Gustaf Arrhenius - manuscript
    It has been claimed that increasing the length of existing lives with positive welfare is better than creating new lives with positive welfare although the total sum of well-being is the same in both cases, or less in the outcome with extended lives. I shall discuss an interesting suggestion --- that it makes an outcome worse if people are worse off than they otherwise could have been --- that seem to support this idea. I call this view Comparativism.
     
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  47. Pt. IV. The End of Life. The Definition of Death / Stuart Youngner ; The Aging Society and the Expansion of Senility: Biotechnological and Treatment Goals / Stephen Post ; Death is a Punch in the Jaw: Life-Extension and its Discontents / Felicia Nimue Ackerman ; Precedent Autonomy, Advance Directives, and End-of-Life Care / John K. Davis ; Physician-Assisted Death: The State of the Debate. [REVIEW]Gerald Dworkin - 2007 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
  48. Aging and the Aged: Theories of Aging and Life Extension.G. R. Martin & G. T. Baker - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Bioethics, New York: Macmillan.
     
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  49.  54
    Life Span Extension Research and Public Debate: Societal Considerations.Aubrey D. N. J. de Grey - 2007 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
    The pace of a given strand of scientific research, whether purely curiosity-driven or motivated by a particular technological goal, is strongly influenced by public attitudes towards its value. In the case of research directed to the radical postponement of aging and the consequent extension of healthy and total lifespans, public opinion is entrenched in a "pro-aging trance" - a state of resolute irrationality. This arises from the entirely rational attitude to a grisly, inevitable and relatively far-off fate: putting it (...)
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  50. The Moral Dynamics of Economic Life: An Extension and Critique of Caritas in Veritate.Daniel K. Finn (ed.) - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    Caritas in veritate (Charity in Truth) is the ''social'' encyclical of Pope Benedict XVI, one of many papal encyclicals over the last 120 years that address economic life. This volume, based on discussions at a symposium co-sponsored by the Institute for Advanced Catholic Studies and the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, analyzes the situation of the Church and the theological basis for Benedict's thinking about the person, community, and the globalized economy.
     
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