Results for 'linguistic points'

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  1.  9
    From a Linguistic Point of View: Russell on Words.Keith Green - 1998 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 18 (2).
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  2.  57
    Conditionals from a Linguistic Point of View: Two Case Studies.Katrin Schulz - 2015 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 44 (6):805-816.
    IntroductionThe meaning of conditional sentences bears an intrinsic relation to a number of central philosophical problems, like the nature of reasoning, the possibility of knowledge, and the status of laws of nature. This has incited philosophers to spend a lot of time working on conditionals and to fill countless bookshelves with inspiring and sophisticated theories on their meaning. However, the overall question of how to approach the meaning of conditionals is still open. There are many different theories on the market, (...)
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  3. Jakob von UexkuÈ ll's theory of sign and meaning from a philosophical, semiotic, and linguistic point of view.Tuomo Jaè Msaè - 2001 - Semiotica 134 (1/4):481-551.
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  4. “Universals of colour” from a linguistic point of view.Anna Wierzbicka - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):724-725.
    Saunders and van Brakel's observation that “linguistic evidence provides no grounds for the universality of basic color categories” also applies to the concept of “colour” itself. The language of “seeing” is rooted in human experience, and its basic frame of reference is provided by the universal rhythm of “light” days and “dark” nights and by the fundamental and visually salient features of human environment: the sky, the sun, vegetation, fire, the sea, the naked earth.
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  5.  25
    Jakob von Uexkülls theory of sign and meaning from a philosophical, semiotic, and linguistic point of view.Tuomo JämsÄ - 2001 - Semiotica 2001 (134):481-551.
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  6.  13
    Turning points in the philosophy of language and linguistics.Piotr Stalmaszczyk (ed.) - 2011 - Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.
    The papers in this collection discuss broadly understood cognitive turns in the philosophy of language, inspired by the Chomskyan revolution in linguistics, Langacker's and Lakoff's Cognitive Linguistics, but also phenomenology, Relevance Theory and Classical Indian Philosophy. The individual texts investigate, from different angles, the relations between philosophy of language and linguistics, and contribute to the development of theoretical frameworks for studying language. Most of the contributions were presented at the first International Conference on Philosophy of Language and Linguistics, PhiLang2009 (University (...)
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  7.  59
    Linguistics from an evolutionary point of view.James Hurford - 2012 - In Ruth M. Kempson, Tim Fernando & Nicholas Asher (eds.), Philosophy of Linguistics. North Holland. pp. 477.
  8.  45
    The status of linguistic facts: Rethinking the relation between cognition, social institution and utterance from a functional point of view.Peter Harder - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (1):52–76.
    In spite of contemporary theoretical disagreement on the nature of language, there is a widespread informal agreement about what linguistic facts are. This article argues that a functional approach to language can provide the foundation for an explicit account of what the informal consensus implies. The account bridges the ‘internalist’ and the ‘externalist’ views of language by understanding mental constructs such as those involved in human languages as aspects of a dynamic social equilibrium. As in evolutionary biology, processes of (...)
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  9.  40
    Linguistic Evidence and Substantive Epistemic Contextualism.Ron Wilburn - 2021 - Logos and Episteme 12 (1):53-76.
    Epistemic contextualism is the thesis that the standards that must be met by a knowledge claimant vary with contexts of utterance. Thus construed, EC may concern only knowledge claims, or else the knowledge relation itself. Herein, my concern is with “Substantive EC.” Let’s call the claim that the sorts of linguistic evidence commonly cited in support of Semantic EC also imply or support Substantive EC the “Implication Thesis”. IP is a view about which some epistemologists have equivocated. Keith DeRose (...)
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  10. Linguistic Geometry and its Applications.W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy, K. Ilanthenral & Florentin Smarandache - 2022 - Miami, FL, USA: Global Knowledge.
    The notion of linguistic geometry is defined in this book. It is pertinent to keep in the record that linguistic geometry differs from classical geometry. Many basic or fundamental concepts and notions of classical geometry are not true or extendable in the case of linguistic geometry. Hence, for simple illustration, facts like two distinct points in classical geometry always define a line passing through them; this is generally not true in linguistic geometry. Suppose we have (...)
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  11.  2
    Commentary: Gustave Guillaume Between Linguistics and Philosophy of Language: A New Point of View.Louis Begioni - 2015 - In Flavia Santoianni (ed.), The Concept of Time in Early Twentieth-Century Philosophy: A Philosophical Thematic Atlas. Cham: Springer Verlag.
  12. Is ‘recognition’ in the sense of intrinsic motivational altruism necessary for pre-linguistic communicative pointing?Heikki Ikäheimo - 2010 - In Wayne Christensen (ed.), ASCS09 : Proceedings of the 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science.
    The concept of recognition (Anerkennung in German) has been in the center of intensive interest and debate for some time in social and political philosophy, as well as in Hegel-scholarship. The first part of the article clarifies conceptually what recognition in the relevant sense arguably is. The second part explores one possible route for arguing that the „recognitive attitudes‟ of respect and love have a necessary role in the coming about of the psychological capacities distinctive of persons. More exactly, it (...)
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  13.  16
    Is 'recognition' in the sense of intrinsic motivational altruism necessary for pre-linguistic communicative pointing?Heikki Ikaheimo - unknown
    The concept of recognition has been in the center of intensive interest and debate for some time in social and political philosophy, as well as in Hegel-scholarship. The first part of the article clarifies conceptually what recognition in the relevant sense arguably is. The second part explores one possible route for arguing that the 'recognitive attitudes' of respect and love have a necessary role in the coming about of the psychological capacities distinctive of persons. More exactly, it explores the possibility (...)
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  14. The linguistic basis for propositions.Peter van Elswyk - 2022 - In Chris Tillman & Adam Murray (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Propositions. Routledge. pp. 57-78.
    Propositions are traditionally regarded as performing vital roles in theories of natural language, logic, and cognition. This chapter offers an opinionated survey of recent literature to assess whether they are still needed to perform three linguistic roles: be the meaning of a declarative sentence in a context, be what is designated by certain linguistic expressions, and be the content of illocutionary acts. After considering many of the relevant choice-points, I suggest that there remains a linguistic basis (...)
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  15. Linguistic Discrimination in Science: Can English Disfluency Help Debias Scientific Research?Uwe Peters - 2023 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 36 (1):61-79.
    The English language now dominates scientific communications. Yet, many scientists have English as their second language. Their English proficiency may therefore often be more limited than that of a ‘native speaker’, and their scientific contributions (e.g. manuscripts) in English may frequently contain linguistic features that disrupt the fluency of a reader’s, or listener’s information processing even when the contributions are understandable. Scientific gatekeepers (e.g. journal reviewers) sometimes cite these features to justify negative decisions on manuscripts. Such justifications may rest (...)
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  16.  48
    Linguistic representation.Jay F. Rosenberg - 1974 - Boston: D. Reidel Pub. Co..
    This book is nominally about linguistic representation. But, since it is we who do the representing, it is also about us. And, since it is the universe which we represent, it is also about the universe. In the end, then, this book is about everything, which, since it is a philosophy book, is as it should be. I recognize that it is nowadays unfashionable to write books about every thing. Philosophers of language, it will be said, ought to stick (...)
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  17.  28
    The Linguistic Turn, Social Construction and the Impartial Spectator: why Do these Ideas Matter to Managerial Thinking?Patricia Werhane - 2018 - Philosophy of Management 17 (3):265-278.
    One’s philosophical points of view, which form the bases for assumptions that we bring to management theory and practice matter, and matter deeply, to management thinking and corporate behavior. In this paper I outline three related threads of philosophical conversations and explain how they are important in management theory and practice: the “linguistic turn” in philosophy, deriving from the later writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein, a social constructionist perspective: a set of theories at least implicitly derived from the (...) turn in philosophy, and the notion of the impartial spectator. I then use these three theories to analyze the idea of the corporation, corporate cultures and corporate mission statements, stakeholder theories and their differences, and the limitations of the popular notion of “corporate social responsibility.” I conclude that how one frames these management ideas makes a difference, a difference in theory and in practice. (shrink)
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  18.  91
    Linguistic Turns in Modern Philosophy.Michael Losonsky - 2006 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book traces the linguistic turns in the history of modern philosophy and the development of the philosophy of language from Locke to Wittgenstein. It examines the contributions of canonical figures such as Leibniz, Mill, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Austin, Quine, and Davidson, as well as those of Condillac, Humboldt, Chomsky, and Derrida. Michael Losonsky argues that the philosophy of language begins with Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding. He shows how the history of the philosophy of language in the modern (...)
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  19. The origin and theories of linguistic philosophy: a Marxist point of view.Suman Gupta - 1983 - New Delhi: Intellectual Pub. House.
     
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  20. Verification in Structural Theory: A Linguist's Point of View.Harvey Rosenbaum - 1982 - In Ino Rossi (ed.), The Logic of Culture: Advances in Structural Theory and Methods. J.F. Bergin Publishers. pp. 88.
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  21.  7
    Linguistics and philosophy: the controversial interface.Rom Harré & Roy Harris (eds.) - 1993 - New York: Pergamon Press.
    As hopes that generative linguistics might solve philosophical problems about the mind give way to disillusionment, old problems concerning the relationship between linguistics and philosophy survive unresolved. This collection surveys the historical engagement between the two, and opens up avenues for further reflection. In Part 1 two contrasting views are presented of the interface nowadays called 'philosophy of linguistics '. Part 2 gives a detailed historical survey of the engagement of analytic philosophy with linguistic problems during the present century, (...)
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  22.  8
    A Linguistic approach to economy discourse from the monetary policy report gender.Liliana Vásquez-Rocca - 2019 - Alpha (Osorno) 48:195-211.
    Resumen: El discurso de la economía ha transitado por una tensión entre pertenecer a una Ciencia Social y presentar rasgos prototípicos de una Ciencia Básica. Ahora bien, evidenciar esta hibridez desafía a los investigadores del lenguaje, sobre todo si estos textos son parte de la formación de un economista. Particularmente, el Informe de Política Monetaria no ha sido estudiado desde el punto de vista lingüístico, por lo que se busca observar, en un corpus de 45 textos, si el género IPOM (...)
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  23.  10
    From trace to topical field: Toward a linguistic definition of point of view.Zsuzsa Simonffy - 2015 - Semiotica 2015 (203):79-108.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2015 Heft: 203 Seiten: 79-108.
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  24.  28
    Is Linguistic Relativity a Kind of Relativism?Filippo Batisti - 2019 - Paradigmi. Rivista di Critica Filosofica 2019 (3):415-428.
    This paper aims to shed light on the terminological and conceptual area around linguistic relativity (nowadays a mostly empirically conceived problem), namely the relations with relativism as a philosophical position. Throughout history and up to now there has been a degree of confusion in handling the terms ‘linguistic relativity’, ‘linguistic relativism’, ‘linguistic determinism’ and the like, all in a more or less conscious fashion. Here it is clarified that linguistic relativity, at least as construed by (...)
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  25.  8
    Cultural and Linguistic Prejudices Experienced by African Language Speaking Witnesses and Legal Practitioners at the Hands of Judicial Officers in South African Courtroom Discourse: The Senzo Meyiwa Murder Trial.Zakeera Docrat & Russell H. Kaschula - forthcoming - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-14.
    This article recognizes that linguistic prejudice (with its associated cultural biases) is a reality in any multilingual country, including South Africa. Prejudice is inherently human and the article suggests that it can be both positive and negative. In the case of the Senzo Meyiwa murder trial the article suggests that the linguistic prejudice experienced by witnesses and legal practitioners was largely negative. Even though the South African Constitution suggests an empowering multilingual environment where there are now twelve official (...)
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  26. Escalating Linguistic Violence: From Microaggressions to Hate Speech.Emma McClure - 2019 - In Jeanine Weekes Schroer & Lauren Freeman (eds.), Microaggressions and Philosophy. New York: Taylor & Francis. pp. 121-145.
    At first glance, hate speech and microaggressions seem to have little overlap beyond being communicated verbally or in written form. Hate speech seems clearly macro-aggressive: an intentional, obviously harmful act lacking the ambiguity (and plausible deniability) of microaggressions. If we look back at historical discussions of hate speech, however, many of these assumed differences turn out to be points of similarity. The harmfulness of hate speech only became widely acknowledged after a concerted effort by critical race theorists, feminists, and (...)
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  27.  52
    Linguistic Knowledge of Reality: A Metaphysical Impossibility?J. Nescolarde-Selva, J. L. Usó-Doménech & M. J. Sabán - 2015 - Foundations of Science 20 (1):27-58.
    Reality contains information that becomes significances in the mind of the observer. Language is the human instrument to understand reality. But is it possible to attain this reality? Is there an absolute reality, as certain philosophical schools tell us? The reality that we perceive, is it just a fragmented reality of which we are part? The work that the authors present is an attempt to address this question from an epistemological, linguistic and logical-mathematical point of view.
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  28.  23
    Linguistics and Aphasia: Psycholinguistic and Pragmatic Aspects of Intervention.Ruth Lesser & Lesley Milroy - 1993 - Routledge.
    _Linguistics and Aphasia_ is a major study of recent developments in applying psycholinguistics and pragmatics to the study of acquired language disorders and their remediation. Psycholinguistic analyses of aphasia interpret disorders in terms of damaged modules and processes within what was once a normal language system. These analyses have progressed to the point that they now routinely provide a model-based rationalefor planning patient therapy. Through a series of case studies, the authors show how the psycholinguistic analysis of aphasia can be (...)
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  29.  4
    Linguistic Regularity, Grammar and Autonomy.Michael Luntley - 2015 - In Wittgenstein. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 88–124.
    Wittgenstein has a role for pointing out with grammar. Pointing is available as a potential resource in justifying and explaining grammar, the regular use of words. This chapter explores some of the foundational issues that frame the idea that pointing can play this role. It concentrates on the role of pointing in justifying the use of words and provides the beginnings of an account of how Wittgenstein's discussion in the opening sections of Philosophical Investigations can be integrated with on‐going philosophical (...)
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  30.  19
    Linguistic nature of reality in Richard Rorty.Isa Mousazadeh, Muhammad Asghari & Mohammadreza Abdollahnejat - 2021 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 23 (4):103-120.
    In this article, our aim is to examine the place of “reality” in Richard Rorty’s thought in view of the important and key discussion of language in the philosophy of this thinker. In other words, we know that with the occurrence of the “linguistic turn” in the middle of the twentieth century, the relationship between language and reality has become one of the central debates of philosophy, especially analytical philosophy, and has become of particular importance. Is it language that (...)
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  31. Linguistic Multidimensional Spaces.W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy, Ilanthenral K. & Florentin Smarandache - 2023
    This book extends the concept of linguistic coordinate geometry using linguistic planes or semi-linguistic planes. In the case of coordinate planes, we are always guaranteed of the distance between any two points in that plane. However, in the case of linguistic and semi-linguistic planes, we can not always determine the linguistic distance between any two points. This is the first limitation of linguistic planes and semi-linguistic planes.
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  32.  16
    Linguistic Norm history.V. A. Litvinov - 2013 - Liberal Arts in Russia 2 (1):94--102.
    The article deals with the problem of norm and normative approach to the diachronic language study. It identifies specificity of the normative approach to linguistic means within various linguistic traditions and determines the main features of the linguistic norm. The author points out that specific norms appear at each stage of language development as the result of correlation of the existing language means.
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  33. Linguistic labor and its division.Jeff Engelhardt - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (7):1855-1871.
    This paper exposes a common mistake concerning the division of linguistic labor. I characterize the mistake as an overgeneralization from natural kind terms; this misleads philosophers about which terms are subject to the division of linguistic labor, what linguistic labor is, how linguistic labor is divided, and how the extensions of non-natural kind terms subject to the division of linguistic labor are determined. I illustrate these points by considering Sally Haslanger’s account of the division (...)
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  34.  8
    Linguistic modelling of scenarios: the means of paradigm change from the systemic view to systems science.Janos Korn - 2013 - Kibworth Beauchamp, Leicestershire: Matador.
    Linguistic Modelling of Scenarios proposes a paradigm change from the 'systemic VIEW' to 'systems SCIENCE', so as to extend the methodology of conventional science of physics into the domains hitherto beyond the reach of this kind of treatment. The book: I. Identifies the problematic issues in current approaches to the 'systemic or structural view' of parts of the world as opposed to the 'quantitative/qualitative views' of conventional science of physics and the arts whereby introducing the 'third culture'. II. Locates (...)
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  35. Linguistic-pragmatic factors in interpreting disjunctions.Ira A. Noveck, Gennaro Chierchia, Florelle Chevaux, Raphaelle Guelminger & Emmanuel Sylvestre - 2002 - Thinking and Reasoning 8 (4):297 – 326.
    The connective or can be treated as an inclusive disjunction or else as an exclusive disjunction. Although researchers are aware of this distinction, few have examined the conditions under which each interpretation should be anticipated. Based on linguistic-pragmatic analyses, we assume that interpretations are initially inclusive before either (a) remaining so, or (b) becoming exclusive by way of an implicature ( but not both ). We point to a class of situations that ought to predispose disjunctions to inclusive interpretations (...)
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  36.  10
    Linguistic norm in post-non-classical studies and the runaway world theory.E. A. Kartushina - 2018 - Liberal Arts in Russia 7 (1):11.
    The article devoted to the study of elaborate correlation between language and ideology, language and culture. The author dwells on the shift in the key concept of social and humanitarian studies from a classical standard and language description to the flexibility in the language use and functioning. It is necessary to point out though that despite some similarities in correlation between language and culture on the one side and language and ideology on the other side, there are some differences in (...)
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  37.  16
    Art and linguistic bodies: a transformative view.Ståle Finke, Thomas Netland & Mattias Solli - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-21.
    This article takes its point of departure from the second (embodied) linguistic turn represented by the enactivist notion of humans as linguistic bodies, using resources from Hans Georg Gadamer in order to propose a view of the relation between art and everyday experience as one of symbolic transformation. Conceiving art as a form of linguistic phenomenon wherein one can engage in original situations of communication, this view rejects both autonomist and direct continuity views of the art-everyday relation. (...)
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  38.  6
    Agir professionnel, point de vue et mobilité empathique.Alain Rabatel - 2016 - Revue Phronesis 5 (3-4):5-15.
    This paper assumes that the realization of a teaching action implies the conceptualisation and the theorization of practice, a positioning that allows to put things into perspective with respect to the professional activity and to learners, as well as a complex linguistic and cognitive positioning towards academic knowledge and institutional injunctions. This hypothesis is confronted with the scriptural positioning that young pre-service teachers adopt for the writing of their professional report, and is viewed through the lens of the point (...)
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  39. Linguistic meanings meet linguistic forms.Raquel Krempel - 2022 - Manuscrito 45 (1):28-42.
    In this paper I critically address some ideas presented in Patrick Duffley’s book Linguistic Meaning Meets Linguistic Form. Duffley adopts the semiological principle that linguistic signs have stable meanings. I argue that this principle leads Duffley to an artificial description of the meaning of the preposition for, in attempting to avoid the charge of polysemy. Another issue is that the principle is not consistently followed throughout the book, such as in Duffley’s analysis of the meaning of start, (...)
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  40.  49
    Theorizing ‘Linguistic’ Hermeneutical Injustice as a Distinctive Kind of ‘Intercultural’ Epistemic Injustice.Alicia García Álvarez & Alicia García Álvarez - 2022 - Nova Science.
    Literature on epistemic injustice has grown tremendously as an increasingly rich and diverse body of work in recent years. From the point of view of intercultural and anticolonial discussions, contemporary contributions have also helped to illuminate how epistemic injustice and other forms of cultural domination might be related to essential processes within the structures of colonial and racial supremacy. -/- This proposal aims to contribute to such relevant and illuminating discussions by focusing on the role that language and culture might (...)
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  41.  32
    Linguistic contextualism and medieval political thought: Quentin Skinner on Marsilius of Padua.Vasileios Syros - 2010 - History of Political Thought 31 (4):691-708.
    This article discusses hitherto unexplored aspects of Quentin Skinner's work on the history of political thought by offering a critical appraisal of the medieval section of Skinner's Foundations of Modern Political Thought. The article investigates and critically assesses Skinner's study of the medieval 'classics' with a specific focus on his interpretation of the fourteenth-century political thinker Marsilius of Padua. In particular, the paper demonstrates that Skinner's analysis of Marsilius' political ideas is at odds with his own methodology. It also contends (...)
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  42.  12
    Linguistic Relativities: Language Diversity and Modern Thought.John Leavitt - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    There are more than six thousand human languages, each one unique. For the last five hundred years, people have argued about how important language differences are. This book traces that history and shows how language differences have generally been treated either as of no importance or as all-important, depending on broader approaches taken to human life and knowledge. It was only in the twentieth century, in the work of Franz Boas and his students, that an attempt was made to engage (...)
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  43.  22
    Pointing and placing: Nominal grounding in Argentine Sign Language.Rocío Martínez & Sherman Wilcox - 2019 - Cognitive Linguistics 30 (1):85-121.
    Grounding refers to expressions that establish a connection between the ground and the content evoked by a nominal or finite clause. In this paper we report on two grammatical implementations of nominal grounding in Argentine Sign Language: pointing and placing. For pointing constructions, we also examine distal-proximal pointing and directive force. We introduce the concept of placing, in which a sign is produced at a specific meaningful location in space. Two types of placing are discussed: Placing-for-Creating, in which a new (...)
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  44.  14
    Generative Linguistics Meets Normative Inferentialism: Part 1.David Pereplyotchik - 2020 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):311-352.
    This is the first installment of a two-part essay. Limitations of space prevented the publication of the full essay in present issue of the Journal. The second installment will appear in the next issue, 2021 (1). My overall goal is to outline a strategy for integrating generative linguistics with a broadly pragmatist approach to meaning and communication. Two immensely useful guides in this venture are Robert Brandom and Paul Pietroski. Squarely in the Chomskyan tradition, Pietroski’s recent book, Conjoining Meanings, offers (...)
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  45.  52
    Linguistics in Philosophy.J. B. R. - 1970 - New Scholasticism 44 (3):469-469.
    During the first half of the present century a number of outstanding philosophers realized that language theory could profitably be viewed as far more than merely a means of studying one among the many human faculties, or merely sharpening the tool we use to philosophize - they realized that there is a sense in which philosophy of language comprises (almost) the whole of philosophy. This was the famous linguistic turn: philosophers came to accept that everything that is is in (...)
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  46.  25
    Cross-Linguistic Variation in the Meaning of Quantifiers: Implications for Pragmatic Enrichment.Penka Stateva, Arthur Stepanov, Viviane Déprez, Ludivine Emma Dupuy & Anne Colette Reboul - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    One of the most experimentally studied scales in the literature on scalar implicatures is the quantifier scale. While the truth of some is entailed by the truth of all, some is felicitous only when all is false. This opens the possibility that some would be felicitous if, e.g., 99% of the objects in the domain of quantification fall under it, a conclusion that clashes with native speakers’ intuitions. In Experiment 1 we report a questionnaire study on the perception of quantifier (...)
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  47. On Being Bound to Linguistic Norms. Reply to Reinikainen and Kaluziński.Matthias Kiesselbach - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 28 (4):1-14.
    The question whether a constitutive linguistic norm can be prescriptive is central to the debate on the normativity of meaning. Recently, the author has attempted to defend an affirmative answer, pointing to how speakers sporadically invoke constitutive linguistic norms in the service of linguistic calibration. Such invocations are clearly prescriptive. However, they are only appropriate if the invoked norms are applicable to the addressed speaker. But that can only be the case if the speaker herself generally accepts (...)
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  48.  41
    Willard van Orman Quine. Foreword, 1980. From a logical point of view, 9 logico-philosophical essays, by Willard Van Orman Quine, second edition, revised, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., and London, 1980, pp. vii–ix. - Willard Van Orman Quine. On what there is. A reprint of XXXIII 149. From a logical point of view, 9 logico-philosophical essays, by Willard Van Orman Quine, second edition, revised, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., and London, 1980, pp. 1–19. - Willard Van Orman Quine. Two dogmas of empiricism. A reprint of XXXIII 149. From a logical point of view, 9 logico-philosophical essays, by Willard Van Orman Quine, second edition, revised, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., and London, 1980, pp. 20–46. - Willard Van Orman Quine. The problem of meaning in linguistics. A reprint of XXXIII 149. From a logical point of view, 9 logico-philosophical essays, by Willard Van Orman Quine, second edition, revised, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., a. [REVIEW]Frederic B. Fitch - 1982 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 47 (1):230-231.
  49. Philosophers' linguistic expertise: A psycholinguistic approach to the expertise objection against experimental philosophy.Eugen Fischer, Paul E. Engelhardt & Aurélie Herbelot - 2022 - Synthese 200 (1):1-33.
    Philosophers are often credited with particularly well-developed conceptual skills. The ‘expertise objection’ to experimental philosophy builds on this assumption to challenge inferences from findings about laypeople to conclusions about philosophers. We draw on psycholinguistics to develop and assess this objection. We examine whether philosophers are less or differently susceptible than laypersons to cognitive biases that affect how people understand verbal case descriptions and judge the cases described. We examine two possible sources of difference: Philosophers could be better at deploying concepts, (...)
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    Reconsidering linguistic nativism from an interdisciplinary, emergentist perspective.Michael Breyl - 2023 - Evolutionary Linguistic Theory 5 (2):162-193.
    For decades, interdisciplinary research efforts have accumulated insights that diminish the significance of the classic nature versus nurture dichotomy, instead calling for a nuanced, multifactorial approach to ontogeny. Similarly, the role of genes in both phylogeny and ontogeny, once seen as rather deterministic, is now conceptualized as highly dependent on environmental factors, including behavior. Linguistic theories have, in principle, made an effort to incorporate these changing views. However, the central claim of the given paper is that this apparent compliance (...)
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