Results for 'markets'

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  1.  68
    What Could Be Wrong with a Mortgage? Private Debt Markets From a Perspective of Structural Injustice.Lisa Herzog - 2017 - Journal of Political Philosophy 25 (4):411-434.
    In many Western capitalist economies, private indebtedness is pervasive, but it has received little attention from political philosophers. Economic theory emphasizes the liberating potential of debt contracts, but its picture is based on assumptions that do not always hold, especially when there is a background of structural injustice. Private debt contracts are likely to miss their liberating potential if there is deception or lack of information, if there is insufficient access to (regular forms of) credit, or if credit is overly (...)
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  2.  9
    Buyer Beware: A Critique of Leading Virtue Ethics Defences of Markets.Roberto Fumagalli - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Over the last few decades, there have been intense debates concerning the effects of markets on the morality of individuals’ behaviour. On the one hand, several authors argue that markets’ ongoing expansion tends to undermine individuals’ intentions for mutual benefit and virtuous character traits and actions. On the other hand, leading economists and philosophers characterize markets as a domain of intentional cooperation for mutual benefit that promotes many of the character traits and actions that traditional virtue ethics (...)
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  3. Exit Left: Markets and Mobility in Republican Thought.Robert S. Taylor - 2017 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary republicanism is characterized by three main ideas: free persons, who are not subject to the arbitrary power of others; free states, which try to protect their citizens from such power without exercising it themselves; and vigilant citizenship, as a means to limit states to their protective role. This book advances an economic model of such republicanism that is ideologically centre-left. It demands an exit-oriented state interventionism, one that would require an activist government to enhance competition and resource exit from (...)
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  4.  52
    Markets with Some Limits.Mark Wells - 2017 - Journal of Value Inquiry 51 (4):611-618.
    In several works, Jason Brennan and Peter Martin Jaworski defend the following thesis: If it is permissible to have, use, or exchange something for free, then it is permissible to have, use, or exchange that thing for money. In this paper, I argue that No Limits is false. Moreover, the reasons why it is false reflect many of the complaints made against markets. The paper will proceed as follows: In §1, I summarize Brennan and Jaworski’s position to clarify exactly (...)
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  5.  85
    Impure Semiotic Objections to Markets.David G. Dick - 2018 - Public Affairs Quarterly 32 (3):227-246.
    Semiotic objections to markets urge us not to place a good on the market because of the message that doing so would send. Brennan and Jaworski reject them on the grounds that either the contingent semiotics of a market can be changed or the weakness of semiotic reasons allows them to be ignored. The scope of their argument neglects the impure semiotic objections that claim that the message a market sends causes, constitutes, or involves a nonsemiotic wrong. These are (...)
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  6. Republicanism and Markets.Robert S. Taylor - 2019 - In Yiftah Elazar & Geneviève Rousselière (eds.), Republicanism and the Future of Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 207-223.
    The republican tradition has long been ambivalent about markets and commercial society more generally: from the contrasting positions of Rousseau and Smith in the eighteenth century to recent neorepublican debates about capitalism, republicans have staked out diverse positions on fundamental issues of political economy. Rather than offering a systematic historical survey of these discussions, this chapter will instead focus on the leading neo-republican theory—that of Philip Pettit—and consider its implications for market society. As I will argue, Pettit’s theory is (...)
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  7. On the Wisdom of Algorithmic Markets: Governance by Algorithmic Price.Pip Thornton & John Danaher - manuscript
    Leading digital platform providers such as Google and Uber construct marketplaces in which algorithms set prices. The efficiency-maximising free market credentials of this approach are touted by the companies involved and by legislators, policy makers and marketers. They have also taken root in the public imagination. In this article we challenge this understanding of algorithmically constructed marketplaces. We do so by returning to Hayek’s (1945) classic defence of the price mechanism, and by arguing that algorithmically-mediated price mechanisms do not, and (...)
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  8. Review of Michael Sandel's What Money Can't Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012, 256 Pp. [REVIEW]Thomas R. Wells - 2014 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 7 (1):138-149.
    Michael Sandel’s latest book is not a scholarly work but is clearly intended as a work of public philosophy—a contribution to public rather than academic discourse. The book makes two moves. The first, which takes up most of it, is to demonstrate by means of a great many examples, mostly culled from newspaper stories, that markets and money corrupt—degrade—the goods they are used to allocate. The second follows from the first as Sandel’s proposed solution: we as a society should (...)
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  9. 'Information as a Condition of Justice in Financial Markets: The Regulation of Credit-Rating Agencies.Boudewijn De Bruin - 2017 - In Lisa Maria Herzog (ed.), Just Financial Markets? Finance in a Just Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 250-270.
    This chapter argues for deregulation of the credit-rating market. Credit-rating agencies are supposed to contribute to the informational needs of investors trading bonds. They provide ratings of debt issued by corporations and governments, as well as of structured debt instruments (e.g. mortgage-backed securities). As many academics, regulators, and commentators have pointed out, the ratings of structured instruments turned out to be highly inaccurate, and, as a result, they have argued for tighter regulation of the industry. This chapter shows, however, that (...)
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  10.  35
    From Value to Values: Sustainable Consumption at Farmers Markets[REVIEW]Alison Hope Alkon - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (4):487-498.
    Advocates of environmental sustainability and social justice increasingly pursue their goals through the promotion of so-called “green” products such as locally grown organic produce. While many scholars support this strategy, others criticize it harshly, arguing that environmental degradation and social injustice are inherent results of capitalism and that positive social change must be achieved through collective action. This study draws upon 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork at two farmers markets located in demographically different parts of the San Francisco Bay (...)
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  11.  81
    Does Corporate Social Responsibility Matter in Asian Emerging Markets?Yan Leung Cheung, Weiqiang Tan, Hee-Joon Ahn & Zheng Zhang - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):401-413.
    This study addresses the question whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) matters in Asian Emerging Markets. Based on CSR scores compiled by Credit Lyonnais Securities (Asia), we assess the CSR performance of major Asian firms over a period of 3 years, from 2001 to 2004. The results show that there is a positive and significant relation between CSR and market valuation among Asian firms. We further find that CSR is positively related to the market valuation of the subsequent year. More (...)
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  12.  26
    Scaling Up Alternative Food Networks: Farmers' Markets and the Role of Clustering in Western Canada. [REVIEW]Mary A. Beckie, Emily Huddart Kennedy & Hannah Wittman - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):333-345.
    Farmers’ markets, often structured as non-profit or cooperative organizations, play a prominent role in emerging alternative food networks of western Canada. The contribution of these social economy organizations to network development may relate, in part, to the process of regional clustering. In this study we explore the nature and significance of farmers’ market clustering in the western Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Alberta, focusing on the possible connection between clustering and a “scaling up” of alternative food networks. Survey (...)
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  13.  28
    CSR Performance in Emerging Markets Evidence From Mexico.Alan Muller & Ans Kolk - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):325 - 337.
    Although interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in emerging markets has increased in recent years, most research still focuses on developed countries. The scant literature on the topic, which traditionally suggested that CSR was relatively underdeveloped in emerging markets, has recently explored the context specificity, suggesting that it is different and reflects the specific social and political background. This would particularly apply to local companies, not so much to foreign subsidiaries of multinationals active in emerging markets. Thus (...)
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  14.  60
    Corporate Governance and Institutional Transparency in Emerging Markets.Carla Cjm Millar, Tarek I. EldomIaty, Chong Ju Choi & Brian Hilton - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):163-174.
    This paper posits that differences in corporate governance structure partly result from differences in institutional arrangements linked to business systems. We developed a new international triad of business systems: the Anglo-American, the Communitarian and the Emerging system, building on the frameworks of Choi et al. (British Academy of Management (Kynoch Birmingham) 1996, Management International Review 39, 257–279, 1999). A common factor determining the success of a corporate governance structure is the extent to which it is transparent to market forces. Such (...)
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  15.  66
    Barbaric, Unseen, and Unknown Orders: Innovative Research on Street and Farmers' Markets.Alexander V. Stehn - 2019 - The Pluralist 14 (1):47.
    Professor Morales’ Coss Dialogue Lecture demonstrates the utility of pragmatism for his work as a social scientist across three projects: 1) field research studying the acephalous and heterogenous social order of Chicago’s Maxwell Street Market; 2) nascent research how unseen religious orders animate the lives of im/migrants and their contributions to food systems; and 3) large-scale longitudinal research on farmers markets using the Metrics + Indicators for Impact (MIFI) toolkit. The first two sections of my paper applaud and build (...)
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  16.  45
    Morals, Markets and Sustainable Investments: A Qualitative Study of 'Champions'. [REVIEW]Alan Lewis & Carmen Juravle - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (3):483 - 494.
    Sustainable investment (SI), which integrates social, environmental and ethical issues, has grown from a niche market of individual ethical investors to embrace institutional investors (e.g. pension funds) resulting in £764 billion in assets under management in the UK alone [Eurosif, 2008 : ‘European SRI Study 2008’ (Eurosif, Paris)]. Explaining this growth is complex, involving shifts in personal and collective values, reactions to corporate scandals, scientific and media pronouncements about climate change, Government initiatives, responses from financial markets and the influence (...)
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  17.  5
    Liberty, Nondomination, Markets.Paul Sagar - 2019 - Review of Politics 81 (3):409-434.
    Over the past two decades, Philip Pettit has consistently argued for an understanding of “republican” liberty in terms of nondomination. Yet in his major published studies, he has almost nothing to say about markets, nor about the economy more generally. I contend that this is a seriously problematic omission, insofar as markets represent a major problem for republican views of freedom. In short: if freedom requires the absence of the mere possibility of arbitrary interference (as Pettit maintains), then (...)
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  18.  19
    Individuals, Institutions, and Markets.C. Mantzavinos - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Individuals, Institutions, and Markets offers a theory of how the institutional framework of a society emerges and how markets within institutions work. The book shows that both social institutions, defined as the rules of the game, and exchange processes can be analyzed along a common theoretical structure. Mantzavinos' proposal is that a problem solving model of individual behavior inspired by the cognitive sciences provides such a unifying theoretical structure. Integrating the latest scholarship in economics, sociology, political science, law, (...)
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  19.  36
    Moral Markets and Moral Managers Revisited.Jeffery D. Smith - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (2):129-141.
    In the wake of recent corporate scandals, this paper examines the claim made by John Boatright that business ethics, as it is currently conceived, “rests on a mistake.” Ethics in business should not be achieved through managerial vision, discretion or responsibility; rather, ethics should shape the design of institutions that regulate business from the outside. What ethicists should advocate for, according to Boatright, are moral markets not moral managers. I explore the empirical and normative dimensions of his claim with (...)
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  20.  26
    Different Markets for Different Folks: Exploring the Challenges of Mainstreaming Responsible Investment Practices. [REVIEW]Kenneth Amaeshi - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (S1):41 - 56.
    The link between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and financial performance has continued to generate mixed and inconclusive results. Most studies in this area seem to assume that corporate social and financial performance share the same underpinning logic. Drawing from a qualitative analysis of practitioners' accounts of the challenges of mainstreaming the market for responsible investments, as part of the broader CSR agenda, this article re-examines this taken-for-granted assumption in the extant literature, and reaches the conclusion that CSR, as a complex (...)
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  21.  16
    Organizations as Human Communities and Internal Markets: Searching for Duality.Miguel Pina E. Cunha, Arménio Rego & Antonino Vaccaro - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (4):441-455.
    Business firms have been explained as internal markets or as communities. To be sustainable, however, they need to reconcile these two constituting elements that have mainly been touted as opposite and part of a dualistic relationship. We suggest that organizations may, in alternative, view market and community as part of a duality, interdependent and mutually constituting processes that may not only contradict each other but also enable one another. The implications of a duality view for business ethics, which articulates (...)
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  22.  48
    Do Credible Firms Perform Better in Emerging Markets? Evidence From China.Ran Zhang & Zabihollah Rezaee - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):221-237.
    Prior research suggests that corporate credibility is associated with firm financial performance in developed countries. This article examines whether corporate credibility is related to firm performance using Economic Observer's rating of corporate credibility in China, the largest emerging market in the world. Based on a four-stage valuation model, we find that more reputable and credible firms outperform those with low ratings by almost 20% in 3-year stock returns and have better 3-year net profit margins, return on equity, and sales growth. (...)
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  23.  2
    Markets as Mere Means.Rutger Claassen - 2017 - British Journal of Political Science 47 (2):263-281.
    There has been a remarkable shift in the relation between market and state responsibilities for public services like health care and education. While these services continue to be financed publicly, they are now often provided through the market. The main argument for this new institutional division of labor is economic: while (public) ends stay the same, (private) means are more efficient. Markets function as ‘mere means’ under the continued responsibility of the state. This paper investigates and rejects currently existing (...)
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  24.  16
    Effective Vote Markets and the Tyranny of Wealth.Alfred Archer, Bart Engelen & Viktor Ivanković - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (1):39-54.
    What limits should there be on the areas of life that are governed by market forces? For many years, no one seriously defended the buying and selling votes for political elections. In recent years, however, this situation has changed, with a number of authors defending the permissibility of vote markets. One popular objection to such markets is that they would lead to a tyranny of wealth, where the poor are politically dominated by the rich. In a recent paper, (...)
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  25.  34
    Of Fair Markets and Distributive Justice.Mukesh Sud & Craig V. VanSandt - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):131-142.
    The authors argue that a free market paradigm facilitates wealth creation but does little to distribute that wealth in a just manner. In order to achieve the social goal of distributive justice, the concept of a fair market is introduced and explored. The authors then examine three drivers that can help improve the lives of all people, especially the poor: civil society, its institutions, and business. After exploring the roles these drivers might play in developing fair markets, we describe (...)
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  26.  27
    Expressing Values in Agricultural Markets: An Economic Policy Perspective. [REVIEW]David S. Conner - 2004 - Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):27-35.
    Many mechanisms now exist forconsumers to express progressive values inpurchasing decisions. Although demand for suchgoods has grown, these goods remain the purviewof small niche markets. Focusing on the marketfor agricultural goods (and the choice betweenthe paradigms of industrialized versussustainable agriculture), this paper discussesthree major reasons (market failures, entrybarriers, and biased policies) why it isdifficult for consumers to express their valuesfor a more sustainable system in this way, andwhy policy change is needed to create a fairerplaying field. The current policy, (...)
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  27.  25
    The Varieties and Dynamics of Moral Repugnance: Prediction Markets and Betting on Matters of Life and Death.Dan Weijers & Vadim Keyser - 2016 - Humanities and Technology Review 35:91-129.
    In this paper, prediction markets that encourage traders to bet on matters of life and death are used to explore the varieties and dynamics of moral repugnance. We define moral repugnance as morally charged feelings of revulsion that correspond (correctly, incorrectly, and indeterminately) to moral reasons and contexts. Rich variations of moral repugnance and their dynamic qualities are presented by investigating the contextual frames in which they arise. These contextual frames constitute interacting conditions composed of information about states of (...)
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  28.  24
    Experiences and Perspectives of Farmers From Upstate New York Farmers' Markets.Matthew R. Griffin & Edward A. Frongillo - 2003 - Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):189-203.
    Despite the growing popularityof farmers' markets (FMs) across the UnitedStates, the experiences and perspectives offarmers who sell at markets have received verylittle research attention. This study describesthe views of 18 farmers from Upstate New Yorkon the importance of FMs as part of theirlifestyle and livelihood, the challenges theyface selling at markets, and their conceptionsof ideal FMs. Through in-depth, semi-structuredinterviews, farmers expressed economic andsocial motivations for selling at FMs; socialbenefits from interacting with customers; andthe challenges they faced as (...)
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  29.  36
    A Moral Analysis of Effective Prediction Markets on Terrorism.Dan Weijers - 2014 - International Journal of Technoethics 5 (1):28-43.
    Predicting terrorist attacks with prediction markets has been accused of being immoral. While some of these concerns are about the likely effectiveness of prediction markets on terrorism (PMsoT), this paper discusses the three main reasons why even effective prediction markets on terrorism might be considered immoral. We argue that these three reasons establish only that PMsoT cause offense and/or fleeting mild harm, and that, even taken together, they do not constitute serious harm. The moral issues considered are (...)
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  30.  54
    Organ Markets and Disrespectful Demands.Simon Rippon - 2017 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):119-136.
    There is a libertarian argument for live donor organ markets, according to which live donor organ markets would be permitted if we simply refrained from imposing any substantive and controversial moral assumptions on people who reasonably disagree about morality and justice. I argue that, to the contrary, this endorsement of live donor organ markets depends upon the libertarians’ adoption of a substantive and deeply controversial conception of strong, extensive property rights. This is shown by the fact that (...)
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  31.  29
    Farmers' Markets in Prague: A New Challenge Within the Urban Shoppingscape.Jana Spilková, Lenka Fendrychová & Marie Syrovátková - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (2):179-191.
    Farmers’ markets are a relatively recent phenomenon in Prague, Czechia. The first of them was opened in the autumn of 2009, but the real boom started in the spring/summer of 2010. The survey introduced in this paper is concerned with the study of alternative food networks and farmers’ markets. It offers the results of methodological triangulation based on: (1) the data obtained via the questionnaire survey, (2) market organizers’ reflections on the customer structure, motivation for shopping at farmers’ (...)
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  32.  18
    Markets and Misogyny: Educational Research on Educational Choice.Sally Power - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (2):175-188.
    This paper has arisen from a concern that much recent policy-related research on markets displays misogynistic tendencies. In both the media and academic accounts it would appear as though the blame for social and educational inequalities can now be laid at the door of women - particularly middle-class mothers. Through examining competing perspectives on how we might understand this attribution of blame, this paper argues that their guilt is best explained not through changes in behaviour but through the conjuncture (...)
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  33.  77
    An Evolutionary Analysis of Buyer Insurance and Seller Reputation in Online Markets.Werner Güth, Friederike Mengel & Axel Ockenfels - 2007 - Theory and Decision 63 (3):265-282.
    Applying an evolutionary framework, we investigate how a reputation mechanism and a buyer insurance (as used on Internet market platforms such as eBay) interact to promote trustworthiness and trust in markets with moral hazard problems. Our analysis suggests that the costs involved in giving reliable feedback determine the gains from trade that can be obtained in equilibrium. Buyer insurance, on the other hand, can affect the trading dynamics and equilibrium selection. We find that, under reasonable conditions, buyer insurance crowds (...)
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  34.  27
    Equitable Selection in Bilateral Matching Markets.Antonio Romero-Medina - 2005 - Theory and Decision 58 (3):305-324.
    This paper presents a procedure to select equitable stable allocations in two-sided matching markets without side payments. The Equitable set is computed using the Equitable algorithm. The algorithm limits the set of options available for each agent throughout the procedure. The stable matchings selected are generally not extreme, form a lattice and satisfy the condition of being “Ralwsian” in each partition of the market. The Equitable algorithm can also be used to select a particular matching from the Equitable Set (...)
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  35.  4
    Agent-Democratic Markets.Carl David Mildenberger - 2019 - Kriterion - Journal of Philosophy (AO):AO.
    This essay examines a new way to exercise democratic control over the market. Instead of a democratic government interfering with a market’s outcomes (e.g. via taxes or minimum wages), we may also “democratize” the market by requiring that all relevant group agents who participate in that market (notably: firms) be democratically governed. This is what I call an agent-democratic market. The purpose of this essay is to argue for the claim that agent-democratic markets are a normatively viable way to (...)
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  36.  31
    Making Markets in Long-Term Care: Or How a Market Can Work by Being Invisible.Kor Grit & Teun Zuiderent-Jerak - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (3):242-259.
    Many Western countries have introduced market principles in healthcare. The newly introduced financial instrument of “care-intensity packages” in the Dutch long-term care sector fit this development since they have some characteristics of a market device. However, policy makers and care providers positioned these instruments as explicitly not belonging to the general trend of marketisation in healthcare. Using a qualitative case study approach, we study the work that the two providers have done to fit these instruments to their organisations and how (...)
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  37.  52
    Do No Harm: A Defense of Markets in Healthcare. [REVIEW]William Kline - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (3):241-251.
    This paper argues that the rules that constitute a market protect autonomy and increase welfare in healthcare. Markets do the former through protecting rights to self-ownership and a cluster of rights that protect its exercise. Markets protect welfare by organizing and protecting trades. In contrast, prohibition destroys legitimate markets, giving rise to so-called black markets that harm both the autonomy and well-being of agents. For example, a fee-for-service medical system is a highly developed and specialized market. (...)
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  38.  11
    Schooling Quasi-Markets: Reconciling Economic and Sociological Analyses.Nick Adnett & Peter Davies - 1999 - British Journal of Educational Studies 47 (3):221 - 234.
    We provide an economic assessment of the operation of schooling quasi-markets, re-interpreting the findings of the mainly sociologically-based empirical research. We find that economic analysis is complementary to that of sociology, providing further explanations for the failure of greater competition to increase the diversity of provision and challenge traditional school hierarchies.
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  39.  32
    Inequality and Markets in Bodily Services.Jessica Flanigan - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (1):144-150.
    I argue that asymmetries in taste and talent can explain markets in bodily services, just as they explain other kinds of work. While inequality is a powerful explanation for participation in bodily-service markets, such markets are not unique in their reliance on inequality. Finally, I address another kind of inequality that deserves our attention -- the advantage of the providers of bodily services over those who require them. While those who suffer from infertility or face the terror (...)
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  40.  5
    Marx Versus Markets.Stanley Moore - 1993 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Marx versus Markets points out that Marx defines communist economies--even in their lower stage of development--as classless economies without markets.
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  41.  32
    Epistemic Closure’s Clash with Technology in New Markets.Dennis R. Cooley - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):181-199.
    Many people, such as Adam Smith, Milton Friedman, Irving Fisher, and William Sharpe, assume that free markets full of rational people automatically lead to ethical actions and outcomes. After all, at its equilibrium point, a perfectly competitive free market maximizes utility, respects autonomy, and fulfills justice’s dictates. Unfortunately, in some technology markets, there are a significant number of people who have undergone epistemic closure. Epistemic closure entails that all reliable evidence that would challenge deeply held beliefs is dismissed (...)
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  42.  5
    Prediction Markets as an Alternative to One More Spy.Dan Weijers - 2016 - In Jai Galliott & Warren Reed (eds.), Ethics and the Future of Spying: Technology, Intelligence Collection and National Security. Routledge. pp. 80-92.
    Real-world policy decisions involve trade-offs. Sometimes the trade-offs involve both the efficacy and morality of potential policies. In this chapter, the morality and likely efficacy of hiring one more spy to help anti-terrorist intelligence gathering efforts is compared to the morality and likely efficacy of implementing a prediction market on terrorism. Prediction markets on terrorism allow registered traders to buy and sell shares in predictions about terrorism-related real-world events. The comparison at the heart of this chapter is based on (...)
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  43. Habermas and Markets.Timo Jütten - 2013 - Constellations 20 (4):587-603.
    In this paper I examine Habermas’ conception of the market in The Theory of Communicative Action (TCA). Habermas’ characterization of the market as norm-free has been controversial and I discuss three objections to it: the claims that it (1) conflates of action types, types of action coordination and spheres of action, (2) cannot account for the normative structure of the social organization of labour, and (3) that it makes impossible to make moral judgments about behaviour in the market. I conclude (...)
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  44.  17
    Rethinking Moral Agency in Markets: A Book Discussion on Behavioral Economics.Christina McRorie - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (1):195-226.
    Recent work in behavioral economics and psychology provides valuable resources for religious ethicists. This book discussion examines contributions by Cass Sunstein, Daniel Kahneman, George Akerlof and Rachel Kranton, Uri Gneezy and John A. List, and Douglas Hough. This literature raises important questions about ethical decision-making, moral agency and responsibility, and the ethics of life in global capitalism. It also opens up promising areas for interdisciplinary dialogue between economics and religious studies. This book discussion concludes that religious ethicists have much to (...)
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  45.  83
    The Narrow Application of Rawls in Business Ethics: A Political Conception of Both Stakeholder Theory and the Morality of Markets.Marc A. Cohen - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):563-579.
    This paper argues that Rawls’ principles of justice provide a normative foundation for stakeholder theory. The principles articulate (at an abstract level) citizens’ rights; these rights create interests across all aspects of society, including in the space of economic activity; and therefore, stakeholders – as citizens – have legitimate interests in the space of economic activity. This approach to stakeholder theory suggests a political interpretation of Boatright’s Moral Market approach, one that emphasizes the rights/place of citizens. And this approach to (...)
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  46.  87
    Fairness in Financial Markets: The Case of High Frequency Trading. [REVIEW]James J. Angel & Douglas McCabe - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):585-595.
    Recent concern over “high frequency trading” (HFT) has called into question the fairness of the practice. What does it mean for a financial market to be “fair”? We first examine how high frequency trading is actually used. High frequency traders often implement traditional beneficial strategies such as market making and arbitrage, although computers can also be used for manipulative strategies as well. We then examine different notions of fairness. Procedural fairness can be viewed from the perspective of equal opportunity, in (...)
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  47. Markets and Economic Theory.Jonny Anomaly & Geoffrey Brennan - 2013 - In Byron Kaldis (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Sage Publications.
  48.  48
    Derivatives and Capitalist Markets: The Speculative Heart of Capital.Tony Norfield - 2012 - Historical Materialism 20 (1):103-132.
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  49. Tiger Stripes and Embodied Systems: Hegel on Markets and Models.David Kolb - 2018 - In Michael J. Thompson (ed.), Hegel's Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Politics. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 286-300.
    From Hegel's philosophy of nature, this essay develops a critique of economic models and market society, based on Hegel's notion of what it takes for a formally described system to be embodied and real.
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    Web‐Based Experiments for the Study of Collective Social Dynamics in Cultural Markets.Matthew J. Salganik & Duncan J. Watts - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):439-468.
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